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* Posts by ibmalone

307 posts • joined 6 Jul 2017

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GitHub.com freezes up as techies race to fix dead data storage gear

ibmalone
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Re: The Microsoft Curse?

You should move to gitlab. They never screw up.

One nice thing about gitlab is that, if you don't trust all this cloud malarky, you can host your own instance.

Which you are then free to lose in the datacentre meltdown of your choice, but at least it will be your datacentre meltdown.

(At least it's git, you can still branch and merge locally, right? And pull & push from colleagues.)

That's the theory, but without a master repo things can get a bit hard to manage if you are pushing and pulling between multiple clones. I think this is a big reason for the success of GitHub and GitLab: the workflows you can build around having a master repository to manage the branches and merging. However, yes, just keep making commits and push once things are working again. If the master repo is utterly lost then spin up a new one and push one of your local clones to it (however you'll have lost all issue and merge request history, and will need to set up any c.i. again).

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Brace yourself, Britain: Health minister shares 'vision' for NHS 'tech revolution'

ibmalone
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Re: SNOM CT

I got the impression at a conference a while back that Spine is (or was) regarded as the place where a person's interaction with the NHS gets recorded, https://psnc.org.uk/contract-it/pharmacy-it/spine-nhs-it/ there's some desire to integrate that with mental and social care I think.

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ibmalone
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Re: EPIC

"I moved all my healthcare data to a single vendor and now I feel Epic!"

(Sorry, the trust we work with is moving to Epic and have been wanting to make that joke for weeks...)

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ibmalone
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Hancock once coded an app criticised for flouting data privacy regs

This being a technology website, maybe worth pointing out he didn't write it himself, he bought an off-the-shelf app. Unless there's a second Matt Hancock...

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Chinese biz baron wants to shove his artificial moon where the sun doesn't shine – literally

ibmalone
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Joke

Re: Eight times brighter than the Moon?

Here's a picture of the Earth and Moon taken together which gives a better idea of it's colour and relative brightness.

Yes, but that's the dark side of the moon!

(Astonishing to think that genuinely is the dark side of the moon, only seen directly by 27 people to date. The Chinese should become the first people to actually land something there this year.)

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ibmalone
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Re: Drag

a) the mirror is large enough to reflect enough sunlight to light an entire city;

b) the energy density of the sun that lights it up in the day is 'n'

c) you want to reflect 'n * m' energy for night-time visibility, where 'm' represents the fraction of daylight brightness you want at night

d) the surface area of your mirror must be 'city area' x 'n' x 'm', with extra factors added in for reflectivity and atmospheric losses.

Right idea, but "n" doesn't appear in the final equation. If it's transferring all incident sunlight then the incident power density simply cancels. Atmospheric loses are partly factored in already too, the sun's light has to come through it, angle obviously varies, but it does this during the day, leaving city area * m as the important bit. The fact sensitivity is approximately logarithmic should help a lot though, 1/100th the light power wont run a solar farm, but incident solar irradiation is usually taken at roughly 1kW/m2, yet a 20W LED bulb can light a reasonable sized room. On the negative side, area is of course square with dimension, so 1/100th the incident power requires 1/10th the diameter of the area you're trying to illuminate.

Still sceptical, it has a pipe-dream feel to it, but not physically impossible.

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It's the real Heart Bleed: Medtronic locks out vulnerable pacemaker programmer kit

ibmalone
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Re: Humanity is doomed

More to the point why would anyone in their right mind allow an internet connection for anything as vital as a pace maker?

The pacemakers aren't connected to the internet. The thing that is used to read and program them does, for updates. It's meant to do this over a VPN, the company have found an issue with the way that's done and disabled it.

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Powerful forces, bodily fluids – it's all in a day's work

ibmalone
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Re: Monitor

Clearly the above commentators have never had the fun* of having their 'known good' hardware killed by whatever was causing the original problem.

Which was actually the case here, to some degree. Though the thing to have done would be to plug the 'known good' monitor back into the setup where it had been good, rather than continue killing (or at least incapacitating) monitors.

More monitor fun. Logged into another workstation in our room a while back to help troubleshoot something about the network (a case of "I'm Spartacus!" it turned out). We got to the bottom of it, but while doing this I noticed the colours looked a bit washed out, somehow paler and not quite right. Loaded up Gimp or something, and found out green (I think it was green) was displaying as white. My desktop is mainly blue and sandy yellow, login screen is blue and red, so it wasn't obvious from a distance. Broken monitor, video card, weird driver bug? Infrequently used machine and not particularly my problem, but I asked the person who did use it. They hadn't really noticed anything, but did agree it looked a bit funny. Made a mental note to try at least replacing the DVI cable, though didn't see how it could be that, surely you'd have a channel missing.

A few days later: had a free moment and remembered about this, so got hold of a new cable, tried plugging it in, met resistance. Pulled the machine around to have a look and saw the plastic around one of the holes in the socket had been distorted, blocking the adjacent hole. Took a look at the plug on the old cable, one of the small DVI pins was bent into contact with another. Prised it into a roughly normal position, fiddled about a bit and got it back in. RWB back to RGB. The computer had been moved a couple of months before and whoever did it had somehow managed to fail to put a DVI plug in correctly, not noticed the force they presumably needed to apply to get it to that state and then not noticed that somehow they'd left green behind after the move.

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On the first day of Christmas my true love gave me tea... pigs-in-blankets-flavoured tea

ibmalone
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Re: Sprouts

Celery rightfully claims that crown !

Even people that supposedly like it dip it in salt to make it semi edible.

Celery is the only thing on my food / I will gag if I smell it list.

Whatever your stance on raw celery (I'll happily eat it, but don't seek it out), cooked it plays an important role in lots of mince based things, bolognese, shepherd's pie etc.

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It's a cert: Hundreds of big sites still unprepared for starring role in that Chrome 70's show

ibmalone
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(The homeovet people are probably trying to make the warnings go away by diluting the certificate.)

You've misunderstood how homeopathy "works": they'll be diluting a MITM attack...

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Google now minus Google Plus: Social mini-network faces axe in data leak bug drama

ibmalone
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Re: Whoops.

Lots of planets have a north. (After Christopher Eccleston I suppose it was in the interests of balance.)

I'm trying to guess whether the downvoter was from Lancashire (like Eccleston) or from Yorkshire...

Edit: suddenly it all becomes clear: the downvote is from Eccleston!

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ibmalone
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Re: Whoops.

"they have to get over a woman being the new Dr.Who."

But will they ever get over her being from Yorkshire?

https://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/arts-entertainment/nobody-told-us-shed-be-from-fking-yorkshire-say-outraged-doctor-who-fans-20181008178117

Lots of planets have a north. (After Christopher Eccleston I suppose it was in the interests of balance.)

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ibmalone
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Re: First nail in the G+ coffin...

Was Google's absolute insistence that you had to have it, if you had an Android phone, Gmail, or YouTube. Look at when Apple put U2 on everyone's phone. Nobody likes being forced.

My ability to comment on youtube videos ("oh no!" I hear you cry...) is broken by my refusal to relinquish a pre-google username that nevertheless got linked to a google plus account.

Did find one use for google+, which was keeping in touch with people from an online course for continuing learning. (Which G+ seemed a more appropriate place for than the alternatives.)

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Remember that lost memory stick from Heathrow Airport? The terrorist's wet dream? So does the ICO

ibmalone
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Re: a national newspaper, which recorded the data

I might be wrong, but it seems some storage devices will accept firmware updates and presumably you need to avoid those.

No, device makers need to get their act together and enforce encrypted and/or signed firmware images. You need to be able to update the firmware when flaws are found, right ?

In general, yes, if the thing could conceivably need firmware updates. For a flash drive? It's one use case where immutable may be better. There's not much you can do to attack it directly when plugged in, except possibly re-program it to attack the next computer it's plugged into. (You've got direct access to the storage anyway, so data destruction is not something you need to exploit a bug in the firmware for, and if there's a serious enough bug to cause data loss then you scrap it and get on with life.)

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ibmalone
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Re: a national newspaper, which recorded the data

Use a dedicated sanitizer device such as https://www.circl.lu/projects/CIRCLean/

That's a nice answer, probably does do the job (at least, it's hard to believe an arbitrary good USB flash drive could be compromised to propagate the attack further), and looks like it's from people who know what they're doing. However when there are things like this in the mix https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/11/07/linux_usb_security_bugs/ it's hard to say that you can't attack the device, even with allowed device classes locked down (to avoid all the peripheral spoofing types of attack), especially the sanitiser is a standard computer. Once you've got control of the sanitiser you can't guarantee what's been written to the 'clean' device is safe. I might be wrong, but it seems some storage devices will accept firmware updates and presumably you need to avoid those.

An attacker who'd gained control of the sanitiser could also attempt to include filesystem handling attacks and compromised files on the output device, but those you can at least handle by analysing from a VM and wiping it afterwards. Attacks on the interface itself seem (to me) harder to deal with, since the attacker potentially has the host OS and therefore the ability to get to the BIOS and other hardware. I suppose I was hoping for some protocol level device that could buffer and sanitise the connection. Admittedly a USB firmware worm that will propagate over a Pi seems like quite a sophisticated hypothetical attack,

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ibmalone
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Happened in 2017, so fell under the old laws. That does mean the cap would have been £500k, but I suppose approach to determining the fine would have also had to be in line with the previous practice, rather than working it out as if it had happened after and then applying the cap.

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ibmalone
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Re: a national newspaper, which recorded the data

And I don't like the idea of viewing it first at a library. Do library PCs have open, functional USB ports? Was the finder worried that there might be malware on it? (And did a qualified security bod sanitise the library PC afterwards?)

Probably the second safest option (after not connecting it to anything) from the finder's point of view. Library computer USBs will allow connecting storage devices because one of their purposes is to let people get data off or on (e.g. for emailing), they're there to give the general public access to IT.

Interesting question though, what is the properly paranoid approach, assuming you need to read an untrusted USB device? If you're willing to believe it may have some way of compromising the machine, or at least the USB interface, then maybe it's use once and dispose of all hardware (or at least, replace all EEPROM and BIOS as well as wipe disc)?

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Convenient switch hides an inconvenient truth

ibmalone
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Re: stairs and hallways lights...

Disclaimer: I am not a qualified 'sparks' and may be out of date with current regulations but - Shirley some mistake?

The two switches are two-way and have two possible paths for the 'switched live' between them. If both switches agree on the path then the switched live is connected to the load and the light is on. If the switches disagree on the path then the light is off.

That is the way I was taught (not a spark either, but did used to help my dad, also it actually gets covered at GCSE physics!), the other way (use the two two-throw switches to separately switch polarity to either side of the lamp) will also work, but the method you describe is more generalisable and has the advantage you know which wires will be live and which neutral.

A flat I used to live in had an entrance and stairway light that didn't work. First floor flat, so entrance hall and stairway then first floor landing. Double switch in entrance hall, neither did anything, single switch at top of stairs, worked first floor landing (crossover with another switch on the first floor). The landlord was not the type to be proactive about this type of thing, and I took the view that as a tenant I shouldn't be messing with the wiring. Situation remained like this for a couple of years until my parents happened to visit and my dad was quite up for having a look. I dissuaded him, but he'd put a bee under my bonnet, so after he left I took off the downstairs switch, it simply hadn't been wired in, live was sitting unconnected. There were extra wires, but these were connected to the system for the landing switching and not easy to trace, can't remember the exact setup, but couldn't be used to cross-over switch the entrance light.

It seemed the most likely explanation was: the entrance hall and stair light should have been controllable from entrance hall and landing, landing light would have been fine to switch only from the landing switches. Whoever put things in only realised this after switches were in and things were plastered, at that point the arrangement couldn't be changed without starting to pull out wires and change the way the landing lights worked, and so they just didn't finish connecting the thing up. I connected the entrance light, but if you wanted to turn it off at night you still had to do it before climbing the stairs...

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UK ruling party's conference app editable by world+dog, blabs members' digits

ibmalone
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(b)does not have consent to the act from any such person.""

By that definition, using the Internet is illegal, unless you request permission from each and every site you wish to visit ...

Well, don't look at me, I didn't write the law (and it is a direct quote). However, connect a computer up to the internet, make it openly accessible, and authorisation for public use is implied (it's clear from your actions that this is what you intended), so no, you don't need to request permission individually, see arguments about deep linking, which don't get people prosecuted under CMA. Accessing a website is no more unauthorised access than taking a free newspaper from a stand is theft. On the other hand, break into a delivery van carrying those same 'free newspapers' to take them and it is theft (or possibly robbery, depending on circumstances).

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ibmalone
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Good thing the Northern Ireland border isn't the UK's problem. The UK won't be putting up border checkpoints as we don't care about goods from Ireland coming into the UK. And if Ireland puts up checkpoints then they will be in violation of the Good Friday agreement. The Northern Ireland border issue is entirely the EU's to solve.

I'm sure this "stop hitting yourself" logic seems perfectly reasonable down the pub, but one of the reasons were are told we are leaving the EU (oddly I don't remember reasons being recorded on the ballot, so for 'reason' read 'fever-dreams of the monocle-fanciers at the ERG that they are claiming legitimacy for') is to "take back control of our borders". The border of the UK and Ireland is a border with the EU single market. 'We' (again, the Etonian 18th century re-enactment society) don't want to be in the single market, so "taking back control" means creating checks on that border, in a situation we (sadly without quotes) created. The EU is not a party to the Good Friday Agreement, Ireland and the United Kingdom are. Leaving the EU with no deal and knowingly creating a situation in which both we (WTO rules remember) and Ireland would have to introduce border checkpoints could only be construed as Ireland breaking the deal in the most twisted logic.

Of course, we could leave the EU and remain in the EEA, completely in line with the Big Opinion Poll. The alternatives: persuade Ireland to jump off the cliff with us (to fix our blunder, good luck with that) or start the break up of the United Kingdom. Interesting that a coalition of Conservatives and Irish Unionists would be the ones kicking it off, but a quick look at the current secretary of state for Northern Ireland should tell you all you need to know about how much the modern conservative party cares.

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ibmalone
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Too late to fix link, and doubt anyone here really needs help, but for completeness: http://usir.salford.ac.uk/15815/7/MacEwan_Crim_LR.pdf commentary on CMA and recent amendments.

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ibmalone
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It depends of the finer technicalities, for example:

Connecting to an unsecured wifi network and using it for internet access is OK.

This is because your device asked the AP for permission and the AP responded giving permission. So as you asked for permission and got it you are in the clear. Open wifi networks still have authentication, it's just that the routers policy is to grant access to anyone who asks for it.

Figuring out that an SQL server is listening on an open port and sending SQL queries to it is NOT OK.

Because there was no authentication process at all, so you didn't have permission and it is therefore a crime.

I'd better put on my 'not a lawyer' hat first, but I think this misses something, because it would make any social engineering attack exempt. The word the CMA repeatedly uses is "unauthorised", "authorised" appears a couple of times. Interpreting a computer's automatic response as granting authorisation is probably wrong, interpretation notes in 17.8 : "An act done in relation to a computer is unauthorised if the person doing the act (or causing it to be done)—

(a)is not himself a person who has responsibility for the computer and is entitled to determine whether the act may be done; and

(b)does not have consent to the act from any such person.""

Authorisation comes from a person, we might use the same words for processes a computer carries out, but they're not the same. An open wifi is authorised to connect to because its owner has chosen to make it open. If it's been left open by accident there might be an argument for that being unauthorised access. And this is where I'm really not a lawyer, how much is thinking you had been authorised a reasonable defence? And implausibly claiming you thought you were authorised when you weren't, such as stealing a neighbour's wifi may not go down well. However prosecutions under CMA are rare, so I don't really see the police getting involved in that one (inconvenience a company on the FTSE and the story might be different).

Ihttp://usir.salford.ac.uk/15815/7/MacEwan_Crim_LR.pdf makes interesting reading (and serves as a reminder that lawyers aren't always in agreement about interpretation, see for example the section on DPP v Bignell)

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Why are sat-nav walking directions always so hopeless?

ibmalone
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Re: Tea with milk

Hard/soft water seems to make a difference to taste and to colour. Tea acts as an indicator and it's difficult to judge its strength in hard water areas.

I was spoiled for several years in London by having an ion exchange softener on the mains. Still needed a Brita filter to make decent tea, and you're really meant to have an additional exchanger on the drinking water, so the extra Na probably didn't do my blood pressure any good.

No longer have that, so have now developed a two step filter involving two filter jugs, one Brita, one BWT. (Some testing indicates Brita-Brita would work, but arrived at this stage by getting the BWT, deciding it was an improvement over the Brita, if not perfect, and then realising I now had two filters.)

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ibmalone
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Re: Tea with milk

Just for the record, tea is grown in the British Isles; just £39.50 for 11 grams (which can make up to 20 cups if you do it right) <https://tregothnan.co.uk/product/single-estate-loose-11g/>. They also sell their tea blended with more common imported leaves at more ordinary prices.

While I suppose I was thinking of the stuff you can buy in a supermarket, had you asked me whether tea was grown commercially in the UK I would have said no. (Well, I might have smelt a rat and said yes.)

So I stand corrected! Corrected and, frankly, baffled...

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ibmalone
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Re: Tea with milk Good tea-related rant

If so, the people operating it are going to have been Irish, which happens to be the nation in Europe that drinks the most tea.

This statement made me curious about where we stand in the world (if the UK nations were considered separately I suspect NI would give the south a run for its money). I now know Ireland comes second only to Turkey. Turkey. Not China. Not India. Turkey. https://www.statista.com/statistics/507950/global-per-capita-tea-consumption-by-country/

Turkey.

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ibmalone
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Re: Tea with milk

You can get both sorts in Ireland due to dominance of UK wholesale and retail. I guess after March the choice will be Lipton's from Poland, Barry's and maybe Lyon's

Bewley's too. Punjana (Thompson's) is Northern Irish (making it obviously superior), it'll probably be possible to smuggle past the magical Brexit fairies. Of course, none of it is actually grown on either island (or in Poland for that matter).

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Oracle pours a mug o' Java 11 for its addicts, tips pot of Binary Code License down the sink

ibmalone
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(This is per C99, ISO 9899-1999; see appropriate sections of chapter 7. C90 required that NULL be defined as either 0 or 0 cast to void*.)

It takes very little time to consult the standard, assuming you have a copy. If you don't, why are you pontificating on what is standard C?

Fair enough, I got it wrong. A decade since I've written C with a copy of the standard beside me. Pontificating though? It was a brief aside attempting to understand why someone might have downvoted an unobjectionable post. For that at midnight I'm not going to go hunting for draft versions of the standard (official ones being fairly expensive) to check.

Implementing a correct, conforming asprintf is not trivial. va-restarting is required (since you can't determine the length of the allocated area and do the formatting without at least two calls to vsnprintf)

Bingo, but non-trivial in an "I might have to take an afternoon once to get it right and write a test for it" way, rather than "it's going to take three months". There are liberally licensed implementations out there to use or refer to if needed, and one of the brilliant things about functions is that you only need to write them once. If you want pontificating, if the standards committee hadn't been so resistant to string allocating functions then string overflows would be a lot less common (and maybe more memory leaks...).

snprintf itself requires a conforming C99 implementation, and some C implementations (hello, Microsoft!) have only recently provided one that actually follows the standard

Of course C99 will be celebrating its 20th birthday in a year or two (depending when you count from).

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ibmalone
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WTF?

Re: Would someone please explain how the desktop JRE licensing will now work?

But we do download a lot of PDFs from government websites and many of them require the JRE to view them.

What a world we live in :(

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ibmalone
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It'll do the job when combined with the previous increment loop, not sure if the downvote is for avoiding strdup (POSIX extension, not standard C) or someone took exception to using NULL (nonstandard macro in C) rather than 0. It does assume nul terminated strings, but this is the C-string world, so if that's wrong you're dead already. Not a big fan of returning a ternary expression containing a function call, but each to their own...

For extra code golf points, the return line after malloc:

return res ? strcpy(res,str) : res;

as null/non-null pointers evaluate as false/true.

For GNU or BSD programmers (and keeping terseness, but don't be afraid of verbosely testing return vlaues!), all the code to allocate and copy str:

char *res;

return asprintf(&res, "%s",str) == -1 ? 0 : res ;

As mentioned, strdup will do this particular job, but asprintf is so handy for other stuff to help make C string handling safe that it's worth the (minimal) effort of providing your own implementation for other platforms.

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Swedish ISP spanked for sexist 'distracted boyfriend' advert for developer jobs

ibmalone
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Re: Negative towards who?

If they swapped the guy for another girl, would there still be outrage? It'd still be objectifying women, so the complaints should still roll in...

If they were feeling vaguely creative they could have run a series of the different possible permutations (what if it's a guy in the red top?), which would have been funnier and might have avoided trouble too.

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ibmalone
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Damn, am I completely out of touch? I've just seen the image for the first time here on El Reg. Does that make my reaction to it more spontaneous than anyone else's?

It sounds like you've been spending more time outside than is healthy. This picture has been done to death over the last couple of years. Mildly funny (the joke being the guy in the picture is shortly going to have neither lady), but I hope the ad agency gave them a discount for refurbished material.

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Click your heels, um, mouse thrice and you've quickly got Ubuntu on Hyper-V in Win 10 Pro

ibmalone
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Re: any chance I wonder...

Already done.

I believe they call that “ESX”

Heck, even VMPlayer is pretty good if you just want it for desktop. (I'm sure KVM will run a windows host, but VMWare handle installing the guest drivers for you.)

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Man cuffed for testing fruit with bum cheek pre-purchase

ibmalone
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I'm reminded of a joke about a monkey and a pool ball.

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Git it girl! Academy tries to tempt women into coding with free course

ibmalone
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Re: Schools need to step up to the plate

These are not the eighties anymore. Find a club outside of school, do an online course, buy a computer/OS combination that you can tinker with, read a few books.

On the other hand, schools are there to teach people, and a formal education can ensure people have a solid foundation in their understanding, which self taught doesn't always guarantee. That's not to say good programmers can't be self taught, my understand of the story is Roberta Williams teaching herself to programme was a big part of how Sierra Entertainment was started. The kids who are really interested in something will pursue it, but the rest of them need to be taught some skills too.

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ibmalone
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Don't teach women to code

Teach them to programme instead.

(I sort of agree with the AC who suggests it may not be the best long term career plan for either sex, but the rudiments of logical thought are sort of useful, however they're taught.)

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Russia: The hole in the ISS Soyuz lifeboat – was it the crew wot dunnit?

ibmalone
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Re: Zero G

Okay people, ask yourself the question: when I'm using a drill, does it rip my wrist off? Because that's where the force is going to be greatest (see Archimedes). If you don't feel it's actually in danger of spinning you round if you don't brace your stance for it then it's not going to be that much more difficult in space. You have a pretty big moment of inertia about point about shoulder level compared to a drill bit (spinning up freely) and the torque from friction is proportional to its (small) diameter.

If you're dealing with some monster two-handed masonry thing then yes, you have to make more effort, but again, if your arms can provide the counter-force where the leverage is shortest, your legs and the rest of your body can certainly provide it at a longer distance.

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ibmalone
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Re: Russian tech workers are NOT paid very much

If that's true, that's a very, very serious failure of management. Literally everyone ever born makes mistakes. You want to encourage people to admit and correct them rather than hide them, especially in mission-critical situations.

However, it would be a relatively accurate description of, say, the USSR under Stalin. (Or, for balance, plenty of other times and places, see Challenger for example, not exactly a blatant denial of mistakes---Feynman eventually got it---so much as an institutional unwillingness to admit that anything could be wrong, but somewhere on the same scale.)

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Docker fave Alpine Linux suffers bug miscreants can exploit to poison containers

ibmalone
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Rotten code in a container can only get more rotten

Surströmming (technically not rotten...)

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A basement of broken kit, zero budget – now get the team running

ibmalone
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I know the answer is probably the PHB but if there was no tech support, who was spending the IT budget?

If an alternative is needed: previous year with no budget spent means budget cut to zero?

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Guess who just bought Maplin? Dragons' Den celebrity biz guy Peter Jones

ibmalone
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Had Maplin not been around, it could have been a very different story, Yes, I could have gone up Tottenham Court Road, but I didn't have the time, and I may not have been able to afford a PSU up there, on top of my train fare.

The glory days of Tottenham Court Road are behind it too (if they ever happened, think I missed them). And despite their "enthusiastic approach to pricing" (quite like that phrase), maplin at least had the prices on the shelf, going to the typical TCR shop you usually have to ask them for what you're after, probably great for those with deep pockets who like haggling, but less so if you're wanting to shop around. Yoyotech was nice, but departed for Basingstoke some time ago.

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2-bit punks' weak 40-bit crypto didn't help Tesla keyless fobs one bit

ibmalone
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Re: Problem-solution dichotomy

If it's pouring with rain, the last thing you want to do is put your shoppping down on the wet floor etc.

Well, if it's the floor chances are you're inside and it's dry! (Sorry, the frequency of the floor/ground confusion has been bugging me recently. Think it might be linked to people spending more time inside...)

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make all relocate... Linux kernel dev summit shifts to Scotland – to fit Torvald's holiday plans

ibmalone
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these people keep following him around and forcing him to talk kernels

They must be nuts.

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Excuse me, but your website's source code appears to be showing

ibmalone
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Is there even a real solution? I just always had (and still have) multiple copies of whatever repository I'm working with.

Well, if you have those on the same local disc then you're doing what the original commenter was claiming only became possible recently.

If you mean having uncommitted work on different branches within the same repository, then you can do git stash, https://git-scm.com/book/en/v1/Git-Tools-Stashing though I've always found having a different copy for working on the other branch to be easier, mainly I worry if I start down that road I'll accumulate stashes and eventually forget which branch they're for. Is the any source control tool that really lets you do this without multiple copies?).

If you keep all your changes committed, then there's nothing to stop you just checking out whichever branch you want to switch to. (And using a branch+merge workflow you can feel free to commit small changes and have them rolled up later.)

More downvotes please.

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ibmalone
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A. git is not an installation or deployment tool. If you replaced the article with any other version control and copying straight to deployment you'd find similar issues (with the exception that git's distributed model means .git directory contains the history, meaning unwisely checked in keys can also be included).

B. git branches have been supported since pretty much the beginning. For a number of projects I've got: multiple checkouts to work on specific features/branches (and whether these are on the same disc or not makes no difference), checkouts (which I don't tend to keep) to work on local merges.

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Spies still super upset they can't get at your encrypted comms data

ibmalone
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Re: governments can always legislate

"The laws of Australia prevail in Australia, I can assure you of that. The laws of mathematics are very commendable, but the only law that applies in Australia is the law of Australia."

It's an interesting distinction between the laws of physics (as misremembered) and the laws of mathematics (what he actually said). If he'd said the laws of physics, people might have spotted the problem more easily (the gravity example for one), but the laws of mathematics... who cares about those? All that boring triangles and x+1=2 stuff nobody ever needs right?

Except, the laws of physics are just models based on empirical evidence and those of mathematics are the hardest form of logic devised by man and are in a sense more fundamental.

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ibmalone
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Re: They will change the target in legislation

Exactly I agree completley, but this is a dog that just won't leave a bone alone.

Sorry, I should have known better than to think anyone here was advocating that state of affairs. Yes, looks like we are all deeply screwed. The irony is, in the long term, I don't think it's really in the interests of the people who do want it anyway.

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ibmalone
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Re: They will change the target in legislation

So I fully expect that in some way or other the end to end element will be targetted in legislation so that traffic will have to go via an intermediary step or even that a licence will be required to provide encrypted services conditional on the licencee having the ability to decrypt any content.

This is just a back door by another name. That intermediary step has to be trusted and secure. Normal citizens may trust it (and maybe you trust the current government, but good luck with the government you get next year or in the next twenty years, all the way from the top to your local town councillor, because eventually they'll all want access), criminals wont and will find alternatives. And it's only going to be secure as the lowest bidder to be the intermediary. How about TalkTalk storing all your banking details unencrypted? On a system they bought from Huawei? Or would it be held by 'the authorities', who can be relied on to contract it out?

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Intel rips up microcode security fix license that banned benchmarking

ibmalone
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"FPU shared between two 'cores' (AMD) or 'virtual cores'" Eypc fixed that

Interesting to know, I hadn't looked at post-Bulldozer. It seems Zen (EPYC's architecture) is more Intel like with SMT, that'd make it more directly comparable in terms of quoted #cores:#threads (and I'll therefore place my bets that I will have to ignore 'threads' numbers for them too).

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ibmalone
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It depends a bit. A while since I was able to benchmark the loads I run on AMD, but my understanding is clustered multithreading on AMD cpus means if you're doing heavy floating point you can be in a similar situation to Intel hyperthreading, where one FPU shared between two 'cores' (AMD) or 'virtual cores' (Intel HT). The result is for heavy FPU work you'll probably find find you can't take advantage of HT anyway, while for more traditional server loads you could, I'd speculate on AMD bulldozer you might find you effectively have half the nominal cores for numeric work. Of course this doesn't change any hit on speculative execution from the spectre etc. fixes.

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London's Gatwick Airport flies back to the future as screens fail

ibmalone
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Come on people.

LONDON SOUTHEND.

Since when?!

If nothing else, it's quite a fun airport. You can pretend it's your own private terminal.

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