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* Posts by Wayland

337 posts • joined 19 Feb 2016

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Watt the heck is this? A 32-core 3.3GHz Arm server CPU shipping? Yes, says Ampere

Wayland
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Re: Drivers ?

I thank that's a fair assumption. If it's aimed at the server market then having network ports is the top requirement. If they use any of the existing network chips then the drivers are already written.

I think if you're not sure what you will use this server for then there is some concern that there is something it might not do. If the only way you can do the job is by running Windows Server then you've bought the wrong hardware. Same would go for running Windows VMs. However if it can be done on Linux then this can do it.

I suspect the only thing stopping people choosing these is lack of experience with non-x86 CPUs. Anyone who has used a Raspberry PI as a server will be quite confident to use this to scale up the project.

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You'll never guess what you can do once you steal a laptop, reflash the BIOS, and reboot it

Wayland
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Re: Again.. How many people turn their machine off?

"The other being a nastygram from the BSA that was quite costly."

The British Shakesphere Association are real bastards.

Birmingham Small Arms.

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Wayland
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Re: Again,

Motherboards have been getting smarter over the years. In the past all they could really do was look for something to boot from. Now they have the capabilities to connect to the Internet with no drives connected.

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Activists rattle tin to take UK's pr0n block to court

Wayland
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Re: What could possibly go wrong,..

"It's almost like they tried to find the worst possible way to implement this."

As a conspiracy theorist I know that's obviously what they are doing.

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Voyager 1 left the planet 41 years ago – and SpaceX hopes to land on Earth this Saturday

Wayland
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Re: Calling home

Incredible? yes, not credible? yes.

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Wayland
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Re: My oldest application still running and in use

I wrote may accounts package in MS Access in 1990 which I still use. My brother and I wrote a production control system in MS Access in 1991 which is still in use.

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Wayland
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Re: ITAR

Yeah like trying to find out how the air conditioning system on the space station works. Why would they keep that secret?

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Wayland
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Re: Rewritten for "new incantations"

What are you, a software wizard? ;-)

That has to be a twist.

But his supple wrist seems to have problems with the keyboard.

I don't know

but he sure plays a mean Windows 2000 Pinball.

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Wayland
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Re: Land where?

They need to land the car on a road this time.

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Wayland
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Re: Telstar

{

[

Telstar. It's great to find that name still in use, but now my head's filled with warbly electric organ music.]

Argh! Now my head is filled with warbly electric organ music!

M

}

Mine too

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Ever wanted to strangle Microsoft? Now Outlook, Skype 'throttle' users amid storm cloud drama

Wayland
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Re: It's Texas, Silly!

I think it's well known that long copper phone lines pick up electricity. It's possible the line protection was not up to the job but there is not really any excuse to get this wrong, phone lines have been in use 100 years in the 1990's.

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Wayland
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Re: Strangling?

I was working in a corporation in the 1990's and they switched from Lotus Notes which the users were very good at creating business apps to MS Outlook and Exchange which could not seem to do much with themselves.

I was puzzled at the time why they did this and I am convinced it was just some sort of corporate conspiracy to get rid of Lotus from the computer industry.

Same sort of thing happened with Flash. Web developers loved it and users enjoyed the fancy animations but no we have to get rid of it, along with wolf whistling and proper light bulbs.

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Wayland
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Re: Skype?

Year = Format("YYYY", Now())

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AI sucks at stopping online trolls spewing toxic comments

Wayland
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However not that many people are mature and well-adjusted.

So should we construct the rules to work best for the people who are least well adjusted?

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London's Gatwick Airport flies back to the future as screens fail

Wayland
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Of course it doubles the cable cost. Just because some of the fibres are dark does not mean you get to use them for free.

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EU wants one phone plug to rule them all. But we've got a better idea.

Wayland
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Re: Be much more interested in...Power-Outlet-Sockets being universal

What's needed is a 220vac USB standard.

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The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

Wayland
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Re: switched from analogue to digital computers 70 years ago

I did some work on a huge machine that converted movie film into video. It was a complex digital and analogue computer. The machine was decades old but still in use because the job could not be handled digitally in 1998 (according to the machine's owner).

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'Plane Hacker' Roberts: I put a network sniffer on my truck to see what it was sharing. Holy crap!

Wayland
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Re: So... who pays for the 3G/4G data connection?

" If you don't then holding title to the vehicle is not worth the paper it is written on."

You don't hold the title to the vehicle. The 'log book' document specifically says THIS IS NOT PROOF OF OWNERSHIP. The DVLA own your vehicle, you are simply the keeper and the driver. Driving is illegal which is why the DVLA have to sell you a licence.

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Relive your misspent, 8-bit youth on the BBC's reopened Micro archive

Wayland
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Re: I had a BBC B, Then Master 128, then Archimedes

CEEFAX was amazing because it produced readable text on a TV screen. All home computers could have benefited from a CEEFAX chip.

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Wayland
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Re: Only the straight-A students had access to the schools computer (singular)

"We had a teletype connected to the local Tech College's ICL via a 150/300baud acoustic modem (in stylish wooden flip-top box with velvet lining) "

Someone figured out how to loop the punched tape back in so it would punch every hole. We used it to create confetti. This was thrown from the first floor window on to people.

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Wayland
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Re: Rasperry Pi fail

PI is a success. If you want the minimal stuff then adreno.

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Wayland
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Re: 3 ring binders

6809 was a beautiful 8 bit CPU with 16 bit features. I liked making program counter relative code which could run anywhere in memoy.

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Wayland
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Re: Made do with a C64, really wanted a BBC micro

Made do with a Dragon 32 which was £200 rather than £400 for a BBC B.

Motorola 6809 Assembly was excellent compared to 6502.

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Wayland
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... damning a stream (???!!!)

That would cause buffering.

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What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

Wayland
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Re: C and C-style C++

Software became unreliable when the malloc() function was implemented. If you can write in C and use static memory allocation then it's possible to properly test a program.

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Wayland
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Re: C and C-style C++

C is excellent. C++ is insanity. It sounds like the insanity is metastasising.

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Docker seeks Golden State burnish for cloud container expansion

Wayland
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What's the point of Docker?

In the days of MS DOS you could lift an application and it's data off the hard drive simply by copying it's directory. This is because everything was written to run in a physical container, the floppy disk.

With the advent of installers like Wise and Install Shield applications get buried deep into the computer and are no longer portable.

Docker sort of brings us back to the days of the floppy disk based application without those limitations.

The problem is figuring out if the effort of moving your system to Docker is actually worth the benefits. Some things are actually quite hard to even get working let alone containerise. If you do manage to containerise a tricky application then plenty of people will be pleased with how easy you have made it to use. However the effort may have been better spent on just sorting out the app so it's easier to set up in the first place.

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Microsoft will ‘lose developers for a generation’ if it stuffs up GitHub, says future CEO

Wayland
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Skype was excellent for years

Then Microsoft bought it and it slowly changed into crap.

Microsoft can't even keep their own products excellent. MS Access 1.0 was ground breaking. Access 2.0 was very solid and mature. From then on it went down hill until it became unusable.

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Russia appears to be 'live testing' cyber attacks – Former UK spy boss Robert Hannigan

Wayland
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You can't get fired for blaming it on the Russians

I don't know what happened or even if anything happened but Putin is behind it.

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WannaCry reverse-engineer Marcus Hutchins hit with fresh charges

Wayland
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I expect this was something some corrupt people in the FBI were supporting. Having some kid from the UK mess it up probably annoyed them.

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Wayland
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Re: FBI is broken

I think the FBI got rid of a lot of their top liars. Other FBI liars are being prosecuted. Trump is quietly and slowly draining the swamp but it's a big messy job.

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Oddly enough, when a Tesla accelerates at a barrier, someone dies: Autopilot report lands

Wayland
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Re: When will people learn

"An alert driver combined with an autonomous vehicle is far safer than an autonomous vehicle by itself."

But there's the rub, how can a driver remain alert if he's not doing anything most of the time?

In order for computers and humans to drive cars together then the human must be involved all the time whilst the computer assists to make the job easier and more precise.

For instance power steering makes steering easier and more precise so the car is driven better with less effort. The 'autopilot' should be a co-pilot.

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Wayland
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Re: Everything makes mistakes

Computer driven cars are in the minority. The crashes are ones that people would not have. A human driver would have no problem with leaving the 101 for the 85 yet should not have allowed the car to attempt this. So it was human error to have allowed the car to do this.

All car crashes should be regarded as human error. Any time a Tesla crashes on autopilot it's the error of the driver who allowed autopilot to be in control. Alternatively someone hacked the car and murdered the driver.

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Wayland
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And in a final effort to pin the blame for the crash on Huang

Was Huang the driver or simply riding in the car?

The 101 is a very scruffy old road with a lot of fast moving traffic through Silicon Valley. You need your wits about you and should not be expecting a computer to drive you. Definitely can't expect your car to follow another car off the 101 onto the 85.

What concerns me is whether the cruise control failed to release the car to the driver.

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US websites block netizens in Europe: Why are they ghosting EU? It's not you, it's GDPR

Wayland
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Re: Overreach

I like the idea that GDPR is protecting us and it's amusing how the spammers have reacted. However the attempt to over reach outside EU jurisdiction is chilling. What if that actually happens? It's already happened on a temporary basis with some websites.

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Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

Wayland
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

I think anyone who has set up Scalextric tracks will have some ideas for jumps and banked corners.

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Wayland
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Go Team RED

AMD and Ferrari.

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Microsoft Office 365 and Azure Active Directory go TITSUP*

Wayland
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Re: FIVE NINES!!!!!

There was a time when Microsoft were advertising their service was FIVE NINES. That lasted a month and then never seen them claim that again.

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Wayland
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Re: Outlook.com email was screwed up on Sunday night/Monday for me

You could easily build a ClearOS server and keep your emails at home. Just use Hotmail for porn... actually no, you can't do that any more. Just don't use Hotmail.

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Wayland
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Re: What a great advert for ...

WINE, Crossover Office are experts in this area.

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Wayland
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On the Plus side

maybe they will upgrade to business service?

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O2 wolfs down entire 4G spectrum as pals fiddle with their shiny 5G band

Wayland
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Re: My mom + BT competitor offering real/pure/full fibre solution "door to door".

"We need to stop looking at Italy for corruption, and look a bit closer to home and remove all those links inside the regulator Ofcom back to BT."

Yes BT are corrupt and protect their own business at the expense of their customers needs.

When running a WISP in 2003 we applied to EEDA (East of England Development Agency) via their Broadband NOW campaign to get our service funded for various villages. The rule was EEDA would only fund areas of "market failure" which translated means areas BT were not going to install ADSL. The amazing thing was that when ever anyone proposed an area to EEDA then BT would suddenly put this area on their list for ADSL rollout meaning no funding for us.

The result was to stifle competition at the expense of the customers. Nice one BT.

Frankly this 5G stuff is BS. It does nothing that can't be done with existing WiFi a lot better. All that's needed is an improved public WiFi protocol added to home routers for mobiles to use. The Internet use can be separated from the home owners Internet use.

BT have sort of got this with their FON network but it needs to be more transparent to the mobile phones to use and public.

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Wayland
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Re: As always...

"And rural locations are generally short of street lights anyway."

And long of trees.

Wonder why they are chopping down trees in Sheffield?

Trees are taller than street lights so in order to make GHz signals work you either have to raise the antennas or lower the trees.

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Wayland
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Re: As always...

"You mean 100Mbps surely?"

In villages surrounding Ongar Essex they have bugger all ADSL but 40Mbps WISP and 1Gbps fibre to the homes buried a few inches in the ditches and under hedges. The one I tested only did 150mbps and the support man on the phone was disappointed since they normally get at least 700mbps there.

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Elon Musk invents bus stop, waits for applause, internet LOLs

Wayland
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Re: RE: Crossrail

"Now here you are almost certainly wrong. The computers cost nothing compared to the engines."

Totally missing the point.

It's not the cost of the computers it's that 3GHz computers can allow the rocket to land.

If that's the case then how did they land on the moon?

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DVLA denies driving licence processing site is a security 'car crash'

Wayland
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Re: SO MY FATHER WAS ABLE TO DO THIS ONLINE WITHOUT A CHECK

Obviously your father feels his driving is up to standard. If my son was like you I'd ignore him.

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World's biggest DDoS attack record broken after just five days

Wayland
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Re: ISPs could mitigate this - car MOT

David, if you read handleoclast's post properly you will notice the real thrust is not for an MOT but for defensive driving.

Devices should be built with security on as standard. Users should be responsible to ensure their device is secure.

BUT you should have some firewalls and suchlike to protect yourself from irresponsible Internet users.

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10 PRINT "ZX81 at 37" 20 GOTO 10

Wayland
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The Dragon 32 was good for programming. The BASIC was fine and with an Assembler and text editor the 6809 was much nicer than Z80 or 6502. The only problem was no sound chip and poor video chip. If it had a couple of chips out of the BBC B it would have beaten it. Half the price at £200.

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Sysadmin left finger on power button for an hour to avert SAP outage

Wayland
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Re: Typed 'Reboot' where ... ?

Cynic_999 "accidentally hits the accelerator instead of the brake"

It's not the same at all because the driver is using all the controls constantly with no problem. To catastrophically make three errors all at one and persist with those errors until people are run over is nothing like being a bit late on the brake peddle.

There is a video where a man is chased into a layby onto the pavement by a bus which smashes through the front of a shop. The man managed to escape but the driver claimed he hit the wrong peddle.

From what I can remember about driving (have not driven since yesterday) you don't hit the peddles with your feet you gradually press them to cause the amount of acceleration or deceleration you need. You begin doing this in plenty of time and you can press the peddles harder if you need more effect.

In a rack of servers it's an easy mistake to be looking at the wrong server, hence the little button that lights up so you can figure out which one you want to work on.

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Ex-Google recruiter: I was fired for opposing hiring caps on white, Asian male nerds

Wayland
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Re: time to get the frilly frock...

Dolly Parton in 9 to 5.

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