nav search
Data Center Software Security Transformation DevOps Business Personal Tech Science Emergent Tech Bootnotes BOFH

* Posts by Wayland

246 posts • joined 19 Feb 2016

Page:

OVH data centres go TITSUP: Power supply blunders blamed

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: "trying to restart generators"

"Once we did a full test: A suitably authorised person went in to a DC, locked the doors on the gate behind him, and announced to the DC supervisor: "There has been a fire. You are dead. Everyone in the DC is dead. All tapes, documents and procedures are gone. The phones are dead.""

Sounds like Dr Strangelove.

0
0

Logitech: We're gonna brick your Harmony Link gizmos next year

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Difference in terminology

One of the challenges of allowing Internet access to the device in your home over the Internet is getting past your router.

Traditionally us techies would open a port and subscribe to DynDNS allowing direct access.

However when selling consumer devices it's very hard to get people to set up these things on all the different types of router out there.

The solution is for the device to log itself into a 'Cloud' service where the consumer can simply accesses it via a website and a username.

ASUS go part of the way to solving this problem with their routers because they provide their own dynamic DNS service providing you go in and set it up. Even with IPv6 I suspect this problem will always be solved by 'The Cloud'.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Difference in terminology

Doug,

Well obviously if all it does is store settings in 'The Cloud' then theoretically it can store settings anywhere. But the whole point was to find a reason why it needs 'The Cloud' and now they are having 2nd thoughts on their commitment.

What they ought to do before switching it off is update the firmware to allow it to save settings locally. Perhaps allow you to set a different 'Cloud'.

1
0

Malware hidden in vid app is so nasty, victims should wipe their Macs

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Wow

There are tools that can get deep into a hard drive. It's likely you could do a hard drive firmware or boot track infection on a whole swath of Apples fitted with the same drive. It's right that RAID drives have something written to them which survives formatting. X-Box drives are also modified in some way as are drives from TV recorders.

I'm not saying the virus did these things but with root access a person could do this therefore a virus could.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Wow

Well it could set up a boot loader of some kind which then boots the main drive once infected. Many PCs these days can access the Internet from the BIOS.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: A complete wipe?

You'd need to wipe the drive from orbit (to use a Globe Earth analogy).

You'd need to boot from a clean drive and run nothing from the suspect drive until you'd run anti-virus. You would really want to replace every executable with a clean one and hope that you can clean out any viruses in the data files.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Are crooks hacking private build systems, or cloud ones?

Like car jacking increased when it became harder to steal one without the key.

I suspect now they have made them easier to steal that car jacking will decline.

0
0

Windows Fall Creators Update is here: What do you want first – bad news or good news?

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Start menu

Cultural change. Darkness is upon us. A few years ago I noticed Robocop was a dark metal rather than the silver of the first movie. You have bright colours for a birthday party, white for a wedding and black for death.

Are Microsoft moving with the times or shaping the times?

2
0

Release the KRACKen patches: The good, the bad, and the ugly on this WPA2 Wi-Fi drama

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Has to be within range

Sitting with a laptop and antenna looks suspicious. Holding a phone looks normal.

1
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Reducing WiFi power?

Some of the newer 802.11 protocols do 'beam shaping' (Ruckus). This allows them to listen and talk in the direction of who they want to talk to. The difference in connection and width is amazing. In the case of a Ruckus Access Point even good old 802.11g is miles better. You can actually reduce the need for boosters and repeaters simply by having the right signal.

5
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Has to be within range

Murder does not happen to the vast majority of people but it's still serious. It will happen where there is a good reason to do it.

3
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Has to be within range

Easy to hook into some WiFi from 2 miles away.

2
0

IT admins hate this one trick: 'Having something look like it’s on storage, when it is not'

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Great article - thanks

Peter2 that's a good point. When you say "can't you just restore from backup" you are talking about the sysadmin (your role) not the user. Yes I would expect you can just dump everything to another storage. It would take a while. The problem would be if you wanted to do so because something broke and you were fed up with your current system and supplier. Your new supplier may well not have the tech to help.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Both are good but different

From reading this I prefer Komprise since they don't mess with your storage system except with the old unused files are moved to the capacity storage leaving a link behind. I expect if you don't want a file moved you can tag it so it stays on primary storage. I expect you could easily add this to an existing live computer system to free up some space.

Infinite-IO sounds like a much more sophisticated system with greater benefits and greater risks. All storage is behind their system so would be much more disruptive to set up on an existing computer system. If building a new one from scratch then it would be a pretty good thing. But as Krishna indicates if you lose a bit of it you can't just read the files off the drive, you need that propitiatory system running to get access to your data.

2
0

Dell makes $1bn bet that IoT at the edge can kill cloud computing takeover

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Deer analogy

It worries me that they would even consider sending the request for a decision to the cloud. It's unlikely that deep in the Black Forest you would have a reliable Internet signal anyway.

Obviously you would decide locally.

The worst thing about self driving vehicles is in order for them to work the humans will have to stop driving on the same roads.

If people want to make automated transport then create a flying drone network at a particular dedicated height. Let those people use that space for their automated stuff.

2
0

Concerns raised about privacy, GDPR as Lords peer over Data Protection Bill

Wayland
Bronze badge

Confusing and unworkable

So you have the right to be forgotten and an actual prison sentence if you forget someone who did not want to be forgotten.

It goes against data backups if you have to delete people from backups.

No wonder these people who read bills for a living are confused. What chance do we have?

I read a bill recently but apparently it means nothing since it's trumped by another bill. I suppose that's why you go to court, to see which bill wins.

12
3

Outage at EE wrecks voice calls across the UK

Wayland
Bronze badge

Kevin Bacon

is probably the worst thing about EE.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Everything Everywhere?

"Nothing Anywhere today." No that's not fair.

More like SS, Somethings Someplaces.

0
0

Russia to block access to cryptocurrency exchanges' websites – report

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Is there a pattern here?

Also you say China wants to destroy Cryptocurrencies but you really mean the Chinese banking system. The Chinese themselves are very keen on it. They have invested loads in mining and exchanges and new coins, they are bonkers about crypto. The Chinese Gov is not going to throw that away but they have to keep the banks from complaining. They just want to get a good grip on crypto. I think the Chinese Gov are working on some approved coins. If they can get their folks to support it then it will be a fantastic coin.

1
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Is there a pattern here?

People who had their money in MtGox did not have their money in BitCoin. They had it in an account in MtGox that would have paid BitCoin into their proper wallet had they drawn it out. In that respect they had their money in a bank that went bust.

If your bank goes bust you will only get £80,000 back. Fine if you only have £80k but if you just sold a house then that's your house money gone. You could put that money in a BitCoin wallet and as long as you keep that a paper wallet in a safe then your money is safe.

1
3
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Is there a pattern here?

Hello Spanners,

The Reg is basically a hate group against crypto-currencies. I thought your comment was on point but it got marked down.

I see someone is on a rant about how guns kill people so they don't want them when clearly people buy more of them when they might get banned.

I also note that BitCoin jumped up to $4850 today which you could say follows my original comment about a ban making it more popular.

It's all very well for people to support currency controls because they think they are a good thing but Russia said they were protecting investors by removing Cryptos. So is it about protecting their own currency or protecting investors.

Quite obviously investors can make up their own mind what is safe as long as they are given the correct info. They do so in every other investment. Clearly it's the banks wanting to protect their power and money. They are on a losing battle with that one.

If people actually want Cryptocurrencies then they could accept them as payment. No need for an exchange. If people actually accept crypto then people holding it and pay people.

If there was no desire for BitCoin then it would not be what it is today. There would be no need to ban it.

1
4
Wayland
Bronze badge

Banning it so it must be popular

We've seen that bad publicity can act as a promoter. The Sandy Hook school shooting showed people why they need guns and sales boomed. Same with cryptocurrencies.

2
9

Microsoft's foray into phones was a bumbling, half-hearted fiasco, and Nadella always knew it

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: What the market wants...

@Ledswinger it depends what you mean by success. If you mean become the market leader in phone operating systems then you could be right.

However success in business does not depend on being number one. The man running the corner shop could be doing fine in spite of Tescos being bigger. Let's list what would make Sailfish a success;

1. A decent alternative to the current offerings

2. Happy users

3. The business making a solid profit and growing

4. Happy investors and workers.

Pretty much in that order because plenty of Open Source projects are not profitable but because the software is good and the users are happy then it's successful.

5
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: What the market wants...

I did not know Sailfish was taking this route. £50 to transform your phone sounds good. They need to get the phone shops on board so that people can pay someone else to do this.

2
1
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Lack of "cool"...

Perhaps Microsoft could have lead the market by making the phone have a voice interface via Cortana. Forget fancy screens, the phone should be worn on your ear and you should not need to touch it.

0
1

Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Perhaps money will talk louder:

Hans, Samsung put a web browser in their telly and now it's broken. Anyone who bought the TV because of that feature has now been let down.

Yeah pretty stupid to buy a TV as anything more than a screen really. You want to watch stuff then get a separate box to drive the screen.

4
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Perhaps money will talk louder:

NHS are on Windows XP so no there is not plenty of money to get the latest.

3
6

Mozilla extends, and ends, Firefox support for Windows XP and Vista

Wayland
Bronze badge

Cobalt Raq

I remember re-installing an old Cobalt Raq server and hooking it to the Internet. It had been hacked and powned within about 20 minutes. So even a Linux OS needs updates or it will be compromised.

4
0

MH370 final report: Aussies still don’t know where it crashed or why

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: planet is surrounded by spy satellites

I suspect the plane flew somewhere that can't exist on a globe planet, so they never looked there.

1
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Electric Monk

Nuked, modern day people have the ability to believe multiple contradictory ideas at the same time, like the Electric Monk of Douglas Adams.

That there is no hiding anything and that you can lose a plane full of people.

The readers of The Register being smarter than most are able to construct complex thought processes allowing them to simultaneously justify multiple contradictory ideas at the same time as rejecting clearly obvious ideas like a conspiracy to hide the plane.

"Oh no, it could not be that bad people took the aircraft and lied about it. That would mean a conspiracy and those things never happen."

1
2

¡Dios mío! Spain blocks DNS to hush Catalonian independence vote sites

Wayland
Bronze badge

Might is Right

Who has the bigger army with the most guns?

Surely Spain can just bomb the region into the stone age? What about gassing them?

1
0

Attention adults working in the real world: Do not upgrade to iOS 11 if you use Outlook, Exchange

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Works fine here

Airplane mode was my first thought. If they broke Airplane mode then what about planes that insist on no WiFi? So that was mis-information. However "Cupertino idiot-tax" is about right. Apple's main market is people who find computers too complicated and want it made simple. For this you pay extra. When I have an idiot customer I encourage them to buy Apple. They ask if it's the best and I say no, it's not and it's overpriced for what it does but it's perfect for you because you stressed how ease of use was the most important thing.

8
10

Downloaded CCleaner lately? Oo, awks... it was stuffed with malware

Wayland
Bronze badge

I was quite impressed by the term 'leveraged' until you pointed out it means 'used'.

2
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Wise Care and Kasperski installed but...

... still CC Cleaner managed to find it's way onto the system after only a day with the customer.

Getting 666 Threats detected please pay £20 and occasional BSD.

Kasperski is usually quite picky who it will let on your system so how come it did not detect the bad guys? It looks like I am going to have to wipe and start again.

0
0

Apple’s facial recognition: Well, it is more secure for the, er, sleeping user

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Biometrics

As a convenient way of locking your phone it's quite good but then so is the fingerprint. However since the technology to read the face is here then so is the technology to simulate the face. Heck you could 3D print a face. It's not super secure.

2
2

The new, new Psion is getting near production. Here's what it looks like

Wayland
Bronze badge

I have a Psion 5 which I'd like to use. Amazing battery life and amazing keyboard. Now if it ran Linux then it would be a pocket laptop.

2
0

Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Benefits

First time for me, I was too young.

1
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Benefits

Len this is Trump hating, Brexit hating, Global Warming believing leftie Register. You can't say Brexit here without getting THumbs down.

1
4
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Really, that Much?

So you're saying that in the past we could use what ever electric we needed and the price was static. That the great modern improvement to this is that the price changes all over the place and is a lot more expensive when we really want it.

No in a modern world energy should not be price rationed. Modern people should be able to afford the nessesaties of modern life.

The fact you are even thinking in these rationing type terms means the brainwashing has worked.

3
3
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Really, that Much?

What's to stop them having a 'computer glitch' causing you to be cut off?

3
0

It's happening! Official retro Thinkpad lappy spotted in the wild

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Screw 16:10

Look at the way people hold their phones when looking at them. They have a choice.

0
1

US watchdog alert: Don't fall victim to crapto crypto-coin cons, people

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: @Wayland

My mum died of the Big C, Chemo. No one ever dies of natural causes in hospital because they try very hard to cure you using potentially deadly treatments.

As for curing cancer how do you know that it's not already been cured in most cases. If it's true that the cures have been suppressed and people just keep going out looking for cures then it's been solved many times over.

No shortage of people claiming to have cured cancer. The usual problem is it has to be cured in the early stages but people usually have to undergo conventional treatment until that's almost killed them. So not much chance of the alternative cure working at that point.

The other problem is that it's illegal to try and cure cancer unless you're approved to do so. I don't know if GcMaf is effective but it has a legendary status as the miracle cure and the establishment come down so hard on it, it's worse than The War On Drugs. Obviously that just increases it's legendary status.

If the treatment was simply offered by the NHS as an alternative to Chemo etc along with warnings that it might not work then it would soon be established if it was a good choice.

So no, I don't think that providing scientists with more computing power will have any impact on curing cancer. Been there, done that, had it illegalized.

0
1
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: The big flaw in Crypto Currencies

OK fair enough. That always happens when you shout Sparticus, loads of people jump up claiming to be Sparticus.

I doubt that if all bank accounts were stolen that the gov could bale people out. Maybe after reducing it from £100k to £85k they think they can? I'm pretty sure the gov would wriggle out of paying me what they owe me even if you are confident they would pay you.

If I lose my BitCoin wallet or someone hacks my computer then that's my own problem. Knowing you have no safety net improves safety. Thinking you have one and expecting it to save you is dangerous.

I agree money is a house of cards.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Pot! Kettle!

It's a slowly deflating bubble.

0
1
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Main use of cryptocurrencies...

Potemkine, theoretically with a government that was mostly not corrupt then it would make sense to pay taxes. However with actual governments the way they are then it's immoral to pay taxes since you're not just funding things you agree with but terrible things you don't even know they are doing.

2
1
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Processing Power

Anon,

The x86 CPU long ceased being powerful enough to mine crypto currencies. I've been mining a NeoScrypt based coin which mines on a CPU or a GPU. A RYZEN 5 has a hash rate of 25KH compared to an AMD RX560 with a hash rate of 220KH. This is pretty much the case across the board a mid range GPU is about 10 times a mid range modern CPU. So the most powerful device in your computer is not the CPU it's the graphics card.

In terms of Ethereum that's a very profitable coin to mine with say a £130 RX560. It kicks out about £1 per day so will take over 4 months to break even. But here's the crucial bit. The coin will probably rise in value from $300 to $1000 during that time so the most profitable mining is when you first start. Plus if it all goes tits up you still have a nice graphics card. The same is not true with BitCoin ASIC mining, those things are just expensive fan heaters now.

There is always this thing of whether is better to invest in the coin itself or the mining. The market forces tend to make this decision a much closer match. It's the popularity of mining which puts the price of the cards very high and makes the coin intrinsically more valuable by way of it being harder to mine. More miners = harder to mine.

Miners do want to be paying for their card with a ROI of a few months but the profit is in the increasing value of the coin.

There was a mining company with thousands of GPUs who decided to stop mining because the cost of mining was the same as the money they were making. However it probably would have been worth them continuing if only for the future value of the coin they were mining. Hindsight is 20/20.

0
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: The big flaw in Crypto Currencies

Sparticus, it's a common theme you writing lots of words but saying very little.

Of course it's a claim that the Crypto can't be cracked. Crypto protects your bank account too. You're not making Fiat sound any better.

It would take more than half the world HASH rate on one currency to crack a wallet. The risk might be that a botnet is created with enough HASH to crack a smaller currency. However a botnet of that size might be better deployed mining the currency. Which incidentally makes it's value increase. Or worse yet all that crypto HASH could be used to crack open your bank account.

One of the uses of OpenCL and GPUs is to break passwords and WiFi keys.

As for gold and diamonds, if you have possession of these then they can be stolen from you. If you don't have possession then you're just back to fiat money. They could be sold to someone else and you would not even know. Provided they were still in the vault they might even let you look at them, just not at the same time they were showing another customer the same gold bars.

You might say none of this is important because your gold will always be honored. Well obviously on a small scale but lets say something happened in the UK that meant masses of wealthy people who thought they owned gold decided to leave. They might find the bank has frozen their money and none of the gold in the vault belonged to them.

We see little glimpses of coming problems when the cash machine networks stop working over the bank holiday. I suspect it's the banks holding on to the cash. The effect on small businesses can be huge. No cash purchases and maybe the card network is broken too. No sale!

We see other types of fraud with the conventional methods of accounting that Crypto like Ethereum may solve. For instance people on pre-pay energy meters think they are paying off part of their bill each time they top up. What they don't know because they have no reason to look at their bill is the company has increased their debt by a couple of thousand pounds.

Why? Factoring. If they can make it look like debtors owe them millions they can get cash from a lender. If anyone does notice then the company just say ooops, computer error then they set that particular account straight. In an ideal world this sort of corruption would be spotted by the big auditing accountancy firms. The trouble is it's probably them who set up the scam. They might get a slap on the wrist with a write up in Private Eye and Knighthoods all round from the Queen.

A blockchain based transaction system would mean an end to such creative shenanigans as every transaction would be set in stone and fully tracable.

0
1
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Processing Power

Cynic_999 such programs exist. Harnessing distributed computing power. The GridCoin hooks the power up to a currency so the currency is proof you spent time crunching the cancer virus or the mental illness cure or whatever the scientists pushed out on the Grid network.

I agree, I'm not sure to what extent such problems get solved with huge computing power

1
0
Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Processing Power

Sparticus, yet again you write a lot of words without actually refuting anything.

" I also don't know why you call them "private central banks" because they're not. They answer to government. "

So perhaps you could tell us the correct term? Companies under the control of the government? Mmmm, Communist? No, Fascist? Yes. Fascist central banks!

Yeah sure the banks play a useful role. Are you refuting anything? No.

Personally I find PayPal the most useful and then Cash. Crypto I have used in conjunction with PayPal and between friends.

The banks have two choices, either get good at crypto or hope it dies. You can bet they are already playing with it.

1
1

Best Korea fingered for hacks against Bitcoin exchanges in South

Wayland
Bronze badge

Re: Next step: drop their routes?

Lil Kim has to show he has got WMD and is prepared to use them. The USA has the same tactic. Getting rid of your WMD and proving it only invites cowardly bullies to set up a no fly zone so they can bomb you from the air. Whilst you have deadly weapons the bullies will keep their distance. This is why everywhere people are politely asked not to be armed. Much easier to bully someone if you have weapons and they don't.

1
0

Page:

The Register - Independent news and views for the tech community. Part of Situation Publishing