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* Posts by CrazyOldCatMan

3395 posts • joined 6 Oct 2015

Greybeard greebos do runner from care home to attend world's largest heavy metal fest Wacken

CrazyOldCatMan
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I think I'll..

.. stick with going to Prog festivals. At least, when the dementia strikes, by the time the song ends you'll have forgotten how it started :-)

(Which leads me on to my complaint about music players - when they say "room for up to 500 songs" they obviously don't have prog in mind. My phone (which has a mix of rock, folk, jazz and prog) has an average song length of 7 minutes..)

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Be your own YouTube: Cloudflare Stream flies out of beta, emits vids

CrazyOldCatMan
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And..

.. if it gets popular, it'll turn into as much of an open sewer at YT.

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Wipro hands $75m to National Grid US after botched SAP upgrade

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: testing?

Or did they just skip that bit?

That's the magic of DevOps baby! No need to do that boring testing stuff, we'll just fix it in the next release!

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: "$75M....after botched SAP upgrade"

Isn't the lack of such lawyerfests a mystery

Presumably SAP (like Oracle) spends an unfeasable amount of money on in-house lawyers to make sure that such things either don't happen or go away quietly..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Why SAP?

the endless focus on "Minimum Viable Product" solutions mean that what gets built has gaps in functionality that have to be addressed by further IT projects

Which (in my experience) will have the lowest priority unless they are fixing something that's costing lots of money..

After all, management wants new Shiny Shiny since that's what gives them brownie points with senior management.

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ZX Spectrum reboot latest: Some Vega+s arrive, Sky pulls plug, Clive drops ball

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Looks excellent!

Where do I sign up!?

Well, you could ask the nice nurse when she comes in with your afternoon medication. Getting her to undo the straitjacket straps might take more work though..

And the brightly-coloured crayons that you are allowed might not be fine enough to tick all the boxes.

:-)

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: What we need

Your generation has varieties of beard oil and North Face vs Superdry

And there was me thinking that beard oil was what you got when you forgot to wash it for a week or two..

(And no - I have no idea what the latter part of your quoted comment is..)

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: What we need

Obviously emacs is better than vi.

At getting the end-user lost in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike. And then getting eaten by a grue.

Whereas vi is a supreme editor, used by support professionals. And me.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: What we need

I also worked on the Acorn Archimedes

Fabulous machine, spoilt only by the lack of commercial games^W software. I sold my Atari ST to get one..

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'Can you just pop in to the office and hit the power button?' 'Not really... the G8 is on'

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Long ago.

except I had one of these (or rather the current model at the time) :-

https://dlidirect.com/products/web-power-switch-7

Yup - before the Apocalypse That Wasn't[1], I had a version of that installed in remote offices that allowed telnet access and controlled power and serial port access (I was herding Solaris boxes at the time and having serial access could be quite important as one of the failure modes would kill all network access but leave the box still running..)

[1] Y2K didn't represent the end of technology as we know it only because we did a lot of work to prevent it..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Just a beer?

Beer is eternal

And they have found lots of beer residues in Egyptian tombs to prove it!

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Grad sends warning to manager: Be nice to our kit and it'll be nice to you

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Need an IT equivalent of mechanical sympathy....

The device, or the relative?

The relative of course - one cares about ones devices..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Elphin safety

because I haven’t found a plausible explanation for an axe in my print room

You need to 'upgrade' to an IBM line printer - those things were so solid that only an axe could disassemble them..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Sometimes violence is the only answer

cowering, simpering, meek little mouse trapped in the corner by a large, hungry, Evil Cat

Objection yer honour! There's no such thing as an evil cat - they are all just misunderstood.

(My cat told me to say that)

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2TB or not 2TB: Microsoft fiddles with OneDrive as competition offers twice the storage

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: So. Kicked in the crotch twice, eigh?

As far as cloud storage is concerned I do not want to be beholden to any company for storing my data

Indeed. Which is why I run Nextcloud on a VM at home.. (mirrored eslewhere as a backup)

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Get drinking! Abstinence just as bad for you as getting bladdered

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Alcohol Free Wine

all references in the Bible to wine actually meant fruit juice

"A land flowing with milk and honey, with corn and new wine" seems to sum up all the approrpriate food groups nicely..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: One little pill?

Maybe we all need to take a resveratol tablet every day

There's pretty good evidence that the synergy effect (of which resveratol is part) is responsible. In the same way as isolating any purifying active chemicals from herbs often doesn't have the same effect as the herb itself.

On the upside, at least with an extraced drug, you generally know what the dosage is - unlike herbs where the active compound amounts can vary widely depending on the growing conditions and age of the plant.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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" a chemical that has been linked to lowering inflammation and preventing blood clots."

... or aspirin?

Fortunately, wine doesn't burn holes in my stomach lining or cause gut pain and bleeding.

Unlike asprin.

(I can tolerate nurofen, but only in combination with something like rabeprazole and taken with milk. Otherwise it's stomach pain and/or bleeding)

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Is correlation causation....?

Finally we have published evidence it is good for us

Indeed. I shot a swift glance at my wife when I saw that article (we've been married long enough that she knew what I meant).

And then I opened a nice bottle of wine and drank some.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Is correlation causation....?

Of course one should order a cask of wine!

Well - I have a nice cask of Amontillado down in the cellar - if you'd like to come down and take a taste.

Ignore all the bricks piled up nearby - I'm doing some... renovations.

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New Zealand school on naughty step after ransomware failure

CrazyOldCatMan
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Application whitelisting is just sensible, isn't it? Who wants any random code that they've not approved to run on their system?

Senior managers who want to run $LATEST_BUZZWOD

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Now that's a dodgy Giza: Eggheads claim Great Pyramid can focus electromagnetic waves

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Woolworths

fetish for laying out some of their sites in a fairly linear manner, sometimes over quite long distances

Usually built along roads. After all, passing trade is a good thing eh?

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: An attitude based on unfounded snobbery

The only materials they had to use back then was stone and later on, copper

And wood. Sandstone is easily split by using copper chisels to make a small hole and then using wooden wedges to make the holes larger. And if your holes are in a nice line (preferrably along the grain) then sandstone is pretty easy to split.

And we know that's how they did it because we know where their quarries were and can see imcomplete or undetatched blocks.

And in Europe, they used deer antler picks to mine flint. It was pretty rubbish (by modern terms) but it did the job and was using something which they had anyway.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Maybe Rob ("Robert") Newman was onto something ?

Maybe they were well paid

Most of them were - they have good evidence of the villages where the contruction workers lived and yes, they were pretty well supplied with food and beer[1].

And the forement and architects were very well paid since they were working on a house that would[2] house the Pharoahs spirit for all eternity and said Pharoah didn't want to stint..

[1] Not really analogous to modern beer but hey, it was mildly alcoholic. safer than the water and had a decent food value too. What's not to like?

[2] In their opinion..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: I went to Egypt and all I got was this ....

lousy brain cancer.

That's what you get for sleeping in a pyramid. All those mysterious Cosmic Rays..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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and of course, spirit vinegar

Heretic! Everybody[1] knows that the One True Condiment is *Malt* vinegar! Away with you to the outer darkness with your non-sacred-spirit-of-Beelzebub-vinegar!

[1] Well, *I* do. Therefore, everybody else must. Because I'm right OK?

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Just because nothing has been found to explain their use

Maybe they just enjoyed the tickling sensation on their tongues?

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: I want to believe..

I have managed to get older versions of Oracle to install on Win10

Out of interest, were there any unusual events afterwards? Two-headed calves, managers with realistic expectations or friendy users?

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Although they both begin with an "A"...

...It's August 1st, not April 1st.

For some, every day is an "All Fools" day..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: "building material with the properties of an ordinary limestone is evenly distributed"

Consider the RF properties of a spherical cow, made of metal...

Do they form part of the BASILISK STARE network?

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: "building material with the properties of an ordinary limestone is evenly distributed"

There's also evidence of a large cavity

But that was done using 'science' and is thus less 'real' than someone reciting the events of a past life[1] to prove that it was made by aliens..

[1] Which, strangely enough, seems to follow pretty exactly the plot of a film that said nutter^W psychic saw 5 years ago..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: And...

...many other people think that homeopathy is real.

Of course it's real! As in "a real waste of time and resources on something that is, at best, a placebo"..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Correlation, causation, and all that

I only realised later it was the effect of the hydrofluoric acid on the glaze

I think I'd be somewhat wary of using a sink that formerly contained (however briefly) hydrofluoric acid..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Correlation, causation, and all that

where soldiers were at least sometimes issued with seven safety razor blades at once

Y'see, this is why I could never have been in the army. At least in the Navy, you were allowed a beard..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Correlation, causation, and all that

that's sort of implicit in the laws of physics

And you canna beat the laws of physics (Jim).

Oh - and there's Klingons on the starboard bow too.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: That's what they want you to think...

Has your wife met my wife? I think they'd get on very well together...

I think it must be a Universal Property of wives[1] since mine also does that. Which is why I'm not allowed to watch pseudo-science stuff with her..

[1] Or maybe the subset of 'wives of people who read El Reg'.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: That's what they want you to think...42

We need far more serious research into this important subject

Remember, it all, in the end, comes down to a really hot cup of tea.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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electromagnetic fields release the excess magic energy

And thus produce octarine..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: It was aliens wot did it

they weren't cut out by aliens with space lasers.

Aha! That's what the aliens[1] *wanted* you to think! It took them *ages* to work out how to make their lasers look like primitive chisel marks!

[1] Were the lasers built into their heads? Were they alien space sharks?

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: It was aliens wot did it

we still have no idea what they were actually built for

Other than burial monuments of course..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: It was aliens wot did it

refuse to thank Uri Geller

To be fair to Mr. Geller though - he was pretty adept at one particular form of magic.. the science and magic of separating fools from their money.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: It was aliens wot did it

Alien Cat

I think at leat 6 of my 7 cats qualify. Why do I always get the odd ones?

(No pointing and laughing you at the back. Yes - you laddie!)

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Microsoft devises new way of making you feel old: Windows NT is 25

CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: IBM's OS/2 foundered on the rocks of Microsoft's Windows.

collaboration between the two companies foundered on the rocks of the success of Microsoft's Windows

Commonly known as "the triumph of marketing over technology".

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: Exceptional HW & incompatibility?

there was an MS OS/2 which included MS LAN Manager

Which was itself a clone of the IBM OS/2 LAN Manager (we used that as our file server back in the old token-ring days).

It worked quite well (for those days) and only fell over twice in about 5 years - once when the aircon broke and the room it was in hit 55C and the second time when I hit the power button by mistake.. (the monitor was on top of the server and had exactly the same power button, just 4 CM away from the server power button. While going out the door, I pushed what I thought was the monitor power button but, before I took my finger off, realised that the texture my other fingers were on wasn't the monitor. I stood there for an age while by colleagues went around the office telling people to save their work. I think they did it as slowly as possible in order to teach me a lesson. We taped over the server power button after that.)

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CrazyOldCatMan
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And of course OS/2 had REXX.

Which started out on their mainframes - I remember using Rexx in VM/CMS back well before OS/2..

And it's now available on Linux.

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: 25 years and the clustering is still not as good as VMS...

I know ZFS is very clever but shadow copy

ZFS isn't available on Windows.. I think you mean NTFS (or possibly VFS)

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: NT4

Were they really prepared to compromise the stability of a server OS to keep the GUI running

After all, why does a server need a GUI? Everything is done via a CLI!

(Unless you use point 'n drool)

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: "OS/2 Warp"

Warp came on a CD too I got it that way - although IIRC it required still five-six floppy to boot before it could read the CD

Two floppies were all that you needed unless you had some *really* exotic hardware..

(My copy of OS/2 Warp came bundled with a SB16 sound card and a CD-Rom drive to hook up to it).

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: " because by the time the hardware became capable enough to support one"

As soon as you have similar needs, the hardware is more or less the same

My last place, we had a number of webservers - two linux boxes (main and failover) and one IIS box. The IIS box cost 4 times more than the linux boxes because of the spec 'required' to run IIS rather than Apache & OpenCMS..

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CrazyOldCatMan
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Re: 16MB?

Makes you wish OS/2 Warp won, doesn't it?

It does indeed - except for one thing - I strongly doubt that IBM would have been any more pleasant to deal with than Microsoft. After all, just look how they treated OS/2 once they finally decided they couldn't be bothered with it - they didn't let anyone else have it for *years*

And even then, they charged so much for it that all the follow-ons (ecomstation et. al.) have been unaffordable.

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