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* Posts by cream wobbly

114 posts • joined 26 May 2015

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Sure, Europe. Here's our Android suite without Search, Chrome apps. Now pay the Google tax

cream wobbly

Re: Or the fourth option...

Funnily enough, I use the googly calendar because my family does. They can see events I create.

I can't see events I create. On my own calendar. On the same app I created them in.

Google Maps is fine for the rare occasions I use it.

Gmail is just where the spam arrives.

Chrome plays spam movies, because the control for not autoplaying videos doesn't work. It's generally crap, but so is the web now, so it's the best tool for the job and the backend is already installed by default anyway.

Everything that's broken has been broken for as long as I've been using Android. It basically reduces my phone to... well, a phone. And a camera. A crap, grainy, non-focusing one that doesn't even come with a lens cap so it gets all smudgy! Can you believe it? A camera. Without a lens cap. And people actually buy this crap for it having a camera!

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cream wobbly

Re: Or the fourth option...

The chances are that those replacements wouldn't get security patches pushed to them and the multitude of "stores" that supported them would be fragmented and not policed for security issues. It's not a good scenario.

Let's all play Fantasy FUD!

The chances are that those replacements would only run on the Commodore Plus/4 and you'd have to run Mastertronic games on them and they didn't even have security in the 80s so it's not a good scenario.

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Oracle? On my server? I must have been hacked! *Penny drops* Oh sh-

cream wobbly

That would've worked

If you go "network stop; network start" over ssh it'll execute the complete command line. The real story is that they typed "network stop" [Enter] "n....oooooooo!"

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Hunt for Planet X finds yet another planetoid, just not the right one

cream wobbly

That's what it means.

Goblin lies about 80 AU from the Sun, making it 80 times more distant than the Earth is from the Sun.

Thank you for restating the very definition of the astronomical unit. Where would we be without you?

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I want to buy a coffee with an app – how hard can it be?

cream wobbly

Not the first time!

One time I made the mistake of attempting to use apps instead of paper for a vacation.

The airline app worked fine the night before our trip, but next afternoon at the checkin counter, it wanted me to change my password. Luckily we had our bags there and the paper versions of the paperless tickets were easily extracted and we got our flights.

The app for a well-known theme park worked fine at the hotel the night before, but next morning when we got to the entrance whaddya know? It wanted me to change my password. Unluckily, the paper versions of the paperless tickets were back at the hotel, and to fetch them the fittest parent (not me) took 25 minutes round trip, also known as "the time it takes for the line at a well-known theme park to grow from a few hundred people to a few thousand" so we missed the first hour or so of the "early bird" stuff.

Next time we went, we just used the paper versions of the paperless tickets. Which are all bigger and use about four times as much paper compared to the old paper tickets that the paperless tickets were supposed to replace.

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2-bit punks' weak 40-bit crypto didn't help Tesla keyless fobs one bit

cream wobbly

Re: Would have been nice to target the right manufacturers El Reg

perhaps Tesla should have checked what they were buying more carefully.

praps, aye. "disruptive" and all that, see above

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cream wobbly

Still relevant..?

"I really feel like doing further research is redundant at this point, since my 2005 papers are apparently still good enough to pwn Tesla," Green noted this week.

Wait, so he noted it this week, but I thought it was patched... I know Musk is a complete but is Green moreso?

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Boffins bash Google Translate for sexism

cream wobbly

This is horrible

"Google Translate typically uses English as a lingua franca to translate between other languages."

Clearly not designed by linguists, who would use etymons and flags for case, number, and gender. Really, the tool should be called "Google Transliterate", because that's all it's doing.

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Lyon for speed, San Francisco for money, Amsterdam for fun: the best cities to be a techie

cream wobbly

Re: Any Reg readers living in Amsterdam right now?

Never have so many known so little about their own country.

I wouldn't say that. It's certainly true that the English are pretty ignorant, and always have been; but Yanks are giving them a run for their ... lack of self awareness. Other nationalities susceptible to similar behaviour include the Iberians, Russians, probably Italians, and very much the Danish. I'll wait for you to make the connection between those nations attitudes to foreigners and their recent history of politics. (Here's a hint: the Germans have climbed down in the last century, so don't feature on the list.)

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Excuse me, but your website's source code appears to be showing

cream wobbly

Re: Not the root problem

Security by obscurity. How well does that work? In war, which is what the Wild, Wild West of the Internet most resembles these days, you must always incorporate "The Enemy" being able to see everything you have and do if you want to win, if not to survive. The same logic applies to every other bit of code and data you are relying on. This is as true about competitors as about hackers/crackers, too.

Sure, just make it easy for them.

Another principle of "war" is knowing who your enemies are. You don't just leave everything open to everyone without having them clear some obstacle.

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Here's a fab idea: Get crypto libs to warn devs when they screw up

cream wobbly

Re: resentment of Clippy

Clearly that's Soviet Russia Clippy. Клипливо?

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Faxploit: Retro hacking of fax machines can spread malware

cream wobbly

Re: Why still a phone line on it??

If fax is "dinosaur" technology, what the math are ballpoint pens? or pencils? Or heck, (electronic versions of) the slates my grandma used to write on at school?

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Motorola strap-on packs a 2,000mAh battery to appease the 5G gods

cream wobbly

Re: Power hungry, low coverage, and heavier.

Now if only they'd make 3G phones last almost a full working day before they run out of battery. That'd be nice.

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ZX Spectrum reboot latest: Some Vega+s arrive, Sky pulls plug, Clive drops ball

cream wobbly

Re: What we need

The C64 also benefited from the SID audio synth-on-a-chip. Unlike "chip music" from other 8-bit micros which typically waggled a DAC around to make PWM noise, the C64 was actually playing music on a viable musical instrument via simple digital registers. The most notable technical thing about it is that once you started playing a note, you didn't have to tie up the CPU to keep on playing it; ... like you did on the Speccy. Another reason why Spectrum games tended not to have in-game music but C64 games did.

Another aside: the SID was used in a couple of real synths; although their makers were always desperate for supply.

The "my CPU is better than your CPU" debate is really irrelevant when your CPU is doing everything and mine is just asking other parts of the architecture to do stuff. The same applies to Firewire vs USB.

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Drink this potion, Linux kernel, and tomorrow you'll wake up with a WireGuard VPN driver

cream wobbly

Re: good lord; is this not a techie site?

"The last time one person could know all science and technology was centuries ago."

Oh go on with you. The article is about something called WireGuard. If you don't know what it is, don't comment about it, or Google it and then comment. The person you're responding to is specifically calling out others on their inability to comprehend bloat, external modules, and precompiled modules; particular the difference between using dkms and not.

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cream wobbly

Is that him?

"The developer of WireGuard..."

Checks image.

I think that's not him. Is that him? He's pretty.

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A fine vintage: Wine has run Microsoft Solitaire on Linux for 25 years

cream wobbly

He has an Operating System now?

Fuck, to think that all these years I've been running that Stallman's GNU shite on my Linux kernel.

Do keep up. It's only been quarter of a century.

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Sysadmin shut down server, it went ‘Clunk!’ but the app kept running

cream wobbly

Re: type 'reboot' in the local console instead of the remote one

I quite often advise other sysadmins to reboot the box instead of clicking about trying to "find root cause", much to their horror. In my eyes, a 30 day uptime is a prime contributor to root cause, and because of failure to patch, an increasing security risk. (Or if it's Windows, 7 days.)

You can do your analysis after you've rebooted. But I know they won't.

If you think that's too harsh, have a word with yourself.

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cream wobbly

Re: @ozbob

' "I call BS, there's not a developer alive who doesn't think he can do a sysadmin's job better." '

' In my opinion that would depend more on the sysadmin than the developer(s). '

Nah, in my experience, it doesn't matter how genius the sysadmin is, developers are always complaining that they could do a better job with their eyes shut...

...which is generally how the buggers code, anyway.

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Creep travels half the world to harass online teen gamer… and gets shot by her mom – cops

cream wobbly

Re: @AC ... The cat is pretty well out of the bag already

In the US, there's a concept called the 'Castle Doctrine'

-----------

Uh, since there are no actual real castles in the US, where do you suppose they got the idea?

I'll wait for you to catch up. You get an extra day off next week to think about it, and there's even a helpful clue in the name of the holiday!

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Potato, potato. Toma6to, I'm going to kill you... How a typo can turn an AI translator against us

cream wobbly

Re: Rubbish in, rubbish out...

"My own impression of Dutch is that it is one third English, one third German, and one third that I cannot make out."

All three are common descendants of Proto-Germanic. English is built on the same structure as Dutch, but has a ton of Scandinavian influence in spelling, and a lorry load of Romance vocabulary and idioms added. Dutch has Gothic and Spanish to thank for its whack pronunciation. German grammar was reformed multiple times so it would be taken seriously like Latin.

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cream wobbly

Re: Hmmm

Same matchsticks ruin sir at cricket thine theirs. Far hymns naughtilywanky.

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cream wobbly

Re: Hmmm

If Google's translation AI had a more linguistically informed parser instead of treating them as strings of letters between whitespace, it wouldn't make such fundamental errors.

The problem will come in about a decade, when they *start* solving that: correct dialectal and idiomatic usage will be simplified to the lowest (American) common (Webster) denominator (slang). By the time they fix it to be more advanced, the damage will be done to the language by pushing our little monkeys to use their cloth mummies instead of going and asking a real teacher.

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So you're doing an IoT project. Cute. Let's start with the basics: Security

cream wobbly

Re: The biggest problem

If someone else connects it, then you don't have to worry about it being yours.

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cream wobbly

Re: Am I the only person...

I hesitate to point out that if it's a brick, then it's *disabled*.

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Software changed the world, then died on the first of the month

cream wobbly

Re: Data format parsing

Yeah, this is a bugbear of mine, too: credit card numbers, dates, and phone numbers without any delimiters. Just let me enter them, and run my input through your implementation's version of "tr -dc [:digit:]".

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cream wobbly

Re: Backend bod: "Either way is fine"

I always use YYYY-MM-DD format on documents, and yet, I recently had to explain to someone that "Since the other date on the cover sheet is March 20th, it should be pretty clear that the one you're confused about is June 2nd, not February 6th."

I was going to say that ISO date format is idiot-proof, but the others on the call were already laughing at him.

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OpenBSD disables Intel’s hyper-threading over CPU data leak fears

cream wobbly

Same applies elsewhere...

"Frankly, I wish the Linux Foundation would take these issues as seriously and disable cruft like this in the consumer OS kernels by default."

Yes, this would be great. However it would annoy their long-term buddy, Intel.

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GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

cream wobbly

CNDVFS it is then!

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The glorious uncertainty: Backup world is having a GDPR moment

cream wobbly

Beware of the Leopard?

Not really feeling it, are you?

In computing jargon, erasure is as simple as unlinking. The data's still there, but there's no direct path to its retrieval. It's the electronic version of 'in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying 'Beware of the Leopard.”'

In legal jargon, erasure has a very definite meaning, closer to the common sense concept of erasure: the data's gone. This type of erasure in computing jargon means scrubbing; whether that's overwriting with zeroes, or "dd </dev/urandom >/that/guy" in a loop fifteen times with an upside-down chicken on your left elbow.

Of course if you scrub something, you should log it...

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Half of all Windows 10 users thought: BSOD it, let's get the latest build

cream wobbly

Re: "reflects perhaps misplaced confidence"

Nah, I wanted the new Notepad that handles Unix line ends. It took a while to install Notepad, but it was worth every penny.

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BOFH: Their bright orange plumage warns other species, 'Back off! I'm dangerous!'

cream wobbly

Re: Fiat 500

"You can guarantee that the owners have not the slightest clue about oils so just pick up 20w50 and go with it (which to paraphrase Robin Williams is "great when you're in a landcrab, but not so great when you've got VVTi") or (and my neighbour actually killed one doing this) top it up to the valve gear."

So, you don't like the Fiat 500 because someone once didn't know how to do an oil change?

Maybe there ought to be warnings. Just saying....

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cream wobbly

Re: One evening about ten year ago...

I knew this would come up in some capacity or other...

"you have to warnings on cups that coffee is hot"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liebeck_v._McDonald%27s_Restaurants#Burn_incident

That Wikipedia article is well-researched. The elderly lady in question took off the lid to add cream and sugar and ended up with third degree burns. She had an eight day stay at the hospital while she underwent skin grafts. She lost nearly 20% of her body weight: 20 lbs.

You might want to adjust your prejudices so you don't sound like a prat in future.

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Google to 'forget me' man: Have you forgotten what you said earlier?

cream wobbly

Worth adding for clarity that the generic name search was the method used to arrive at the list of URLs. But the legal complaint revolves around the URLs on the list; not the search term. The merits or lack thereof for the presence of each URL is what was being debated; and that's where the simplistic methodology came up.

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Fermi famously asked: 'Where is everybody?' Probably dead, says renewed Drake equation

cream wobbly

Re: Not useful

"We have only a sample of one (here) which is statistically meaningless."

Not really. We know roughly when proto-life emerged from spiral molecules, and for roughly how long the conditions conducive to forming those (or similar) molecular spirals were in existence prior to that. We know roughly the astronomical conditions necessary to producing the planetary surface conditions. From there we can deduce some very broad probabilities.

Thing about broad probabilities is when you combine them, they either splounce out to infinities, or they limit themselves. It happens that these are the sort that self-limit.

I mean, it's not like we have anything close to useful that could guide us where to look. Pretty much the best we've got is "I hope that star isn't exploding or collapsing", (but even that makes an unreasonably big assumption that stellar stability is key to life). We don't really know how old their planets are ... yet. We don't know anything at all about their surface conditions. But that's just the probability for evolving life. Life, it can be concluded, given certain pretty common conditions, is pretty much inevitable.

When you start talking about intelligent life though [1], the probabilities start to diverge again. Add in technological intelligent life, and the divergence increases. Add in communicative technological intelligent life, and it's almost as useless trying to make predictions about that as it is to prove the existence of a soul [2].

So it's quite possible that we could eventually make great predictions about where to look for signs of intelligent life [1] but technological and communicative? You're just going to have to keep that screensaver running and brute-force it.

1. Yes I know, not the Whitehouse. Ell Oh Ell.

2. Pronounced "arsehole", natch.

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The Gemini pocket PC is shipping and we've got one. This is what it's like

cream wobbly

Battery life?

The Series 3 got a month from two AAs. The Series 5 got a week from two AAs. How long does a 4Ah battery last with this thing? How long does it take to charge?

"Perhaps they could double the battery capacity to 8000mAh, as was originally envisaged."

Perhaps. And how long would *that* be expected to last? How long to charge?

This is the *only* obstacle to me adding one to my wishlist, and making room in my budget.

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

cream wobbly

Re: Hmmm...

If it helps, Minix, Mach, Hurd, Exec, and Fuchsia (okay, Zircon) won't suffer the 'slowness feature'. Less-than A aitch-ref equals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanenbaum%E2%80%93Torvalds_debate greater-than I'll wait for you to catch up less-than oblique a greater than.

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Millions of moaners vindicated: Man flu is 'a thing', says researcher, and big TVs are cure

cream wobbly

Re: Expect better than this from the reg

"the commentards at El Reg tend to have well-developed critical and analytical skills and take great delight in pulling this sort of research apart"

Nope, most of them up to this point have been "Oh I need a wee dram and to sexually harrass some women". The well-developed critical analytic skills you're talking about are few and far between and exemplified by the post you're railing against. Well done!

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'It's back to the drawing board...' Innocent axions found not guilty of dark matter crimes

cream wobbly

Re: bazillion other laws or observations we still consider correct

By which you mean, these ain't fudges; they were just written as unknowns which became known later.

Dark matter and dark energy are unknowns. Axions might turn out to be the phlogistons of our age, but right now, we don't know. That's kinda what "unknown" means.

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cream wobbly

Re: Phlogiston

Completely agree. It seems like "dark matter" is elusive because it's not there, but that doesn't make it a bad model to explain the universe. The only problem is that people are trying to explain the universe in terms of something for which only its non-existence has been shown. Phlogiston-as-cautionary-tale is very much a valid take, here. Emperor's New Clothes is another. Not that we know they don't exist, just that *so far* we cannot be sure.

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The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

cream wobbly

Re: The Quantum of Firefox

That's a bit of a leap.

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cream wobbly

Re: 30 per cent faster

I use uBlock Origin and Privacy Badger. Extremely useful with pretty much every news site, every blog masquerading as a news site, and all the social media sites; but I have to disable them both for anything work-related.

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80-year-old cyclist killed in prang with Tesla Model S

cream wobbly

Re: The Man Who Fell To Earth: a_yank_lurker

"Yet don't require insurance, an annual worthiness test, a proficiency test, to be visible at night and an understanding that red means STOP and green means GO."

Insurance, roadworthiness and proficiency tests aside, bikes are required to be visible at night in the UK and the US, and cyclists are are required to follow the rules of the road; which include not breaking the push-bike speed limit of 25 mph. (You get a lot of pop-pop bikes being impounded in the US for doing 30.)

Other road users also subject to all the same conditions as cyclists include walkers, runners, skateboarders, rollerbladers, wheelchair users. Are you butthurt about them, too?

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cream wobbly

Re: The Man Who Fell To Earth

"why spend £70,000 on a fast car and then not go fast?"

Sensible people who buy fast cars for 70 grand (and more, and less) take their speed to the track. Croft and Barford circuits aren't that far away. Barely more than a half hour. Maybe the battery would run out before he got there, though? Is that the "mitigating circumstances" you're looking for?

The limit at Shincliffe is 40 mph. The cyclist was heading south (per the local papers -- you can look up the Chronicle and the Northern Echo yourself though.

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Sex harassment scandal scoops up Silicon Valley's Slimy Scoble

cream wobbly

Not clear

"It's not clear why Norton decided to go public with her account now"

Maybe look at the news sometime. There's a bunch of people have had enough of staying silent-demure-victim, and ... the applicability of the phrase to victims isn't lost on me ... *coming out*

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Another day, another cryptocurrency miner lurking in a Google Chrome extension

cream wobbly

Feed it junk

Surely there's some enterprising yoof out there could monkey with the code a bit so it sends back garbage. It wouldn't take as much CPU time either, so it would vastly outweigh the valid data.

I'd use *that* Chrome extension.

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Google slides text message 2FA a little closer to the door

cream wobbly

TXT-based 2FA?

SMS. You're thinking of the file name extension. Different things, deary.

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Calm down, Elon. Deep learning won't make AI generally intelligent

cream wobbly

"and they are called railways"

Almost every logical development of self-driving cars lands on some form of railway.

Every self-driving car making the same observations will choose the same lane of traffic.

Every self-driving car driving in the same lane of traffic will drive along the same two patches of tarmac or concrete. Why not make them metal?

Since everyone seems to be going the same way, scale up from 5 .. 7 passengers per ride to 50 .. 70 passengers per ride.

Sell tickets!

Have platforms!

Sell sandwiches of dubious freshness!

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Ghost in Musk's machines: Software bugs' autonomous joy ride

cream wobbly

Re: Really??

"but autonomous driving will always be responsible for deaths"

Ahem. That case had nothing to do with autonomous driving. Rephrased, then: the driver who engaged cruise control and then took his eyes off the road to enjoy a movie was responsible for his own death.

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Hey, IoT vendors. When a paediatric nurse tells you to fix security, you definitely screwed up

cream wobbly

Re: IoT vendors bad for health care?

"Not connected to the Internet" but connected to a VPN means two things:

1. there's only one more layer of security to get through to attack such devices

2. there's likely zero security on the device itself because the VPN is seen as sufficient

and for a bonus

3. you can scratch the first two letters of IoT

I would tend to believe a former healthcare professional which she speaks in the context of cybersecurity that these devices don't need to be connected.

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