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* Posts by aks

98 posts • joined 16 May 2015

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What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

aks

Re: C and C-style C++

"And high-quality code was produced by the truckload then."

As was low-quality code. I know. I wrote some of it. Just as often, it was the specification rather than the coding that was at fault. Anybody remember Y2K. Plenty of COBOL written in the 1970's was not expected to last that long. Most didn't but some did.

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Apple hauled into US Supreme Court over, no, not ebooks, patents, staff wages, keyboards... but its App Store

aks

I'm waiting for the EU and China to take Apple to court over this.

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Citation needed: Europe claims Kaspersky wares 'confirmed as malicious'

aks

They have offered to show the source code.

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Aussie bloke wins right to sue Google over 'underworld' images

aks

Re: Hold on

But the article says that Google has to pay the costs anyway, so he can presumably hire the most expensive lawers in Australia at no cost to himself. Nice one.

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Russian battery ambitions see a 10x increase in power from smaller, denser nukes

aks

Re: Specific Energy

Petrol is not a complete energy source.

Don't forget the oxygen.

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Who had ICANN suing a German registrar over GDPR and Whois? Congrats, it's happening

aks

Re: Should result in summary judgement...

Gathering data and making it available to others are two different issues.

Making it available to the interested party for them to challenge and correct is sensible. Making it public is not.

I wonder whether the UK government's policy of making the electoral register available is covered by GDPR. Until now, it has been made available to anybody who pays for it, after mandating its collection under threat of severe penalty to the individual if they refuse to supply it.

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aks

Re: probably be replaced by something else

USA arrogance now being replaced by EU arrogance and attempting to export their regulations world-wide.

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Did you even sweat, tho? Plaintiffs told to amend claims in Apple headphones suit

aks

Re: Now we have to worry about fakes names along with fake news

Using the name Judge Robot Cyborg might give the impression that the machines have already taken control. ;)

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aks

Re: Too salty

Ridiculous, or merely mercenary?

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US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

aks

They're working hard on it, especially in the pharmaceutical industry.

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aks

Re: As many have observed

Following the thought provoked by your avatar, why not have a half-life on copyright?

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aks

Re: Copyright extensions need to stop

In most cases, the copyright on music is not held by the musicians but by corporations.

There's also copyright on the tune, the lyrics, the arrangement as well as the original recording and any tweaked version of the recording. This whole thing is a lawyer's wet dream, especially since they're not mandating registration of copyright.

You'll also find that a lot of corporately-produced music no longer specifies the start-date of the copyright.

This is being initiated in the USA but will be enforced worldwide, as the Disney Law was.

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Make masses carry their mobes, suggests wig in not-at-all-creepy speech

aks

Re: Colour me surprised.

Since the double jeopardy rule has been abolished they could simply keep trying until they find an amenable jury.

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Noise from blast of gas destroys Digiplex data depot disk drives

aks

Re: Safe for personnel?

Monsieur Guillotin invented such a device.

"The machine was successful because it was considered a humane form of execution, contrasting with the methods used in pre-revolutionary Ancien Régime."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillotine#Introduction_in_France

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It's April 2018, and we've had to sit on this Windows 10 Spring Creators Update headline for days

aks

Installed successfully yesterday on my Windows 10 Mobile.

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My PC makes ‘negative energy waves’, said user, then demanded fix

aks

Positive waves

Since, as we all agree that mobile phones are the source of negative energy waves, the 3 large antennae on the roof must be emitting lots of positive energy waves and should be encouraged.

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Spring is all about new beginnings, but it could already be lights out for Windows' Fluent Design

aks

Re: re: The Microsoft View of the world

I too prefer the Win7 UI but Win10 can be persuaded to look and feel pretty much like Win7.

As a pure developer, my preference is for a solid colour desktop with no icons except the handful I put there to perform different functions with the same basic program. The couple of hundred programs installed on my Win7 box are easiest reached from the Start button.

In Win10 all my tiles have been removed, starting with the animated Live Tiles.

Flat is good because I've always disliked the 'pretty' icons of WinXP compared to Win2K as I prefer plain and frugal. Same with transparency. Bah humbug!

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Law's changed, now cough up: Uncle Sam serves Microsoft fresh warrant for Irish emails

aks

I assume that the Irish government will still refuse to let the USA have direct access to servers in Ireland.

A search warrant against specific individual individuals or countries causes no problem for the Irish. It's the direct access they object to, allowing the USA to use 'big data' methods.

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Any social media accounts to declare? US wants travelers to tell

aks

Re: Sauce for the goose?.

I remember landing in Bangkok airport just after my daily connecting flight to Singapore had left.

Being there for 24 hours, I had to get a visa. $5 for neighbouring countries, $10 for Europeans and Canadians, $100 for USA citizens. Purely because the USA charged Thai people $100 for a visa.

This is 20 years ago but the concept remained in my head.

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aks

April 1st come early?

Just an idea.

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UK Court of Appeal settles reseller's question: Is software a good?

aks

Goods and Services

If software is not a good and not a service, I assume it must be treated as data (information) and can't be subject to tax. How can software and other copyright objects such as journalistic articles, music and video be legally defined as different to data? I can't see how pure data can be taxed. Then again, the UK doesn't tax books or newspapers but does tax the electronic versions of the same content. The original exemption of books and newspapers was to avoid a 'tax on knowledge' but that doesn't seem to have made it all the way into the 21st century.

We certainly encountered the question of downloadable software back in the 1980's when we uploaded our product to the customer using FTP. They told us that sending them a tape would make it taxable but electronic transfer would not. We did as the customer requested.

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aks

Re: The good, the bad, and the ugly

No software was ever created without bugs, if you include its ability to fail in an unplanned for situation.

The classic example from 52 years ago on IBM mainframes was the IEFBR14 single-instruction program that simply returned to the caller. It should have set a return code showing that it was successful.

That's the story I grew up with but am prepared to believe this is an urban myth after reading the following http://www.miketaylor.org.uk/tech/oreilly/more-iefbr14.html#gsc.tab=0

That said, it does show how it's almost impossible to produce bug-free code for all situations.

On the other hand, I'm quite happy with the change of title from 'good' to 'bad'.

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Bitcoin's blockchain: Potentially a hazardous waste dump of child abuse, malware, etc

aks

Re: Bad Data

Is this a house of cards I see before me?

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aks

"Which is essentially all any currency is ever has been."

Not necessarily. At times, currencies were backed by tangible resources such as gold or silver although they didn't always have the value stamped on the coin.

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aks

Re: help with the basics pls

Sounds like there's a need for tags on transactions, including Quarantine, illegal in France, illegal in China etc. The entries are still there but if you're using software that's aware of this you might be deemed to be legitimate. If you're using software that allows you to open such transactions the handcuffs are waiting for you.

That then pushes the question back to 'who adds the tags?'.

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US govt's final bid to extradite Lauri Love kicked into touch

aks

Scope of the rejection

"Earlier this year the High Court overruled Westminster magistrates' court, which approved Love's extradition, after hearing about conditions in the prisons where Love was likely to be incarcerated, as well as the severe suicide risk that his incarceration posed."

Going purely by the article itself, the reasons why the extradition attempt failed are not specific to hackers.

The standard USA technique of making extreme accusations but permitting 'plea bargaining' to reduce the penalty to something more rational should be another reason to reject extradition.

On the other hand, other countries might reject an extradition attempt by the UK now that double jeopardy is no longer a defence thus allowing multiple trials of the same case until a conviction is obtained.

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Facebook confirms Cambridge Analytica stole its data; it’s a plot, claims former director

aks

Surely this is just the current version of 'focus groups'.

That nice Mr Blair swore by them.

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ESA builds air-breathing engine that works in space

aks

Re: Lack of moving parts

Does the satellite count as a moving part? ;)

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Boffins baffled as AI training leaks secrets to canny thieves

aks

Well, if you will tell all of your secrets to the local gossip!

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Ruskie boffins blasted for using nuke bomb lab's supercomputer to mine crypto-rubles

aks

Re: Putin is losing his touch

> Putin is losing his touch

Who says he's not mining cryptocurrencies? The Chinese are doing it on an industrial scale.

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BBC Telly Tax petition given new Parliament debate date

aks

"Thirty years without TV and I am still getting threatening letters. If I want them to stop I simply have to take the time to give them my data. GIVE them my data. I thought demanding money with menaces was a crime but not if you are part of "the establishment", it seems."

On moving into my rented house and receiving a letter addressed to "The Present Occupier" I simply called them and explained that I don't watch live television or use iPlayer. They sent "The Present Occupier" a letter showing that no licence is required.

I had explained that I had various equipment in the house including screens, DVD players, computers and a smartphone. I have since acquired a Sky box which I use to listen to radio without a subscription. Problem solved.

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Self-driving cars still do not exist even if we think they do

aks

Re: They kinda do and kinda don't

> It can't be 360 degrees otherwise you'd be going back up the road from whence you came.

Going back from whence you came would be 180 degrees.

I don't know the roundabout in question but suspect it's actually 270 degrees (effectively 3 right turns equals one left turn).

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aks

Re: They kinda do and kinda don't

You won't need the court to be involved.

The decision will be made that manual driving has a huge markup on the insurance premium.

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Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

aks

Re: It appears from the article that Mr. Wolmar is a railway enthusiast...

If that arrangement came to pass, the car is a money-earning investment. Many fewer people would own one.

One thing I have never seen mentioned is that the car drops you at the office then autonomously takes itself to the car park. When you need it, you simply summon it and it rolls up to the door. I'd then take over control to fight my way through the traffic, running down anybody who set their foot on the road. You've got to get your kicks somewhere. ;)

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aks

I tend to agree with the diagnosis given in the article.

In cities and towns the trend would be towards gridlock as people knew the vehicle would do anything to avoid hitting them.

What I don't agree with is the idea of engineered 70mph cars. We've seen what happens with trucks engineered to run at 60mph. They then pass each other at 0.5mph. The idea of 20mph limits in towns has already been shown to *increase* the accident rate presumably because pedestrians become less wary.

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aks

Re: It's too Black and White

Surely that's called a taxi (black, mini or uber flavoured) or one of the gang doesn't drink.

Luckily, where I live the nearest pub is 100 yards away and the furthest about a mile (I live on a small island).

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Nokia 8: As pure as the driven Android - it's a classy return

aks

Claiming that there are plenty of security vunerabilities seems to be a contention without evidence.

Windows 10 Mobile is updated frequently (at least monthly).

Having a device that hackers are not interested in sounds good to me.

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Escrow you, Apple! Ireland expects Cupertino to cough up to €13bn

aks

The comments seem to imagine that Apple have agreed to pay. They've put their spare change into an escrow account so that the money is earmarked for payment once all legal processes have completed.

The purpose is clearly so that Apple can bid for business within the EU by saying the money is allocated and real life should go on.

I predict that this will go to international arbitration eventually.

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aks

Re: the remaining 26 are the republic of Ireland.

Wikipedia disagrees with you, as do I. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ireland

The 1937 constitution laid claim to the whole island of Ireland. The Good Friday Agreement was the acceptance by Dublin that the people of the 6 were entitled to choose whether to be separate or to unite with the 26. Since the Agreement, institutions and trade within the 32 have increased markedly and the border had become almost invisible until the Brexit referendum.

Ireland is the name of the island in English. In Scots Gaelic it's Èirinn, In French it's Irlande, in Welsh it's Iwerddon, in Latin it's Hibernia.

Both Beijing and Taiwan agree that Taiwan is a province of China. They simply disagree about who's the legitimate government of the entire country. That's a difference between the status of Taiwan and the status of Northern Ireland.

Calling the 26 counties Éire is simply a shorthand when distinguishing the 26 from the 32. Mostly used by non-republicans in Northern Ireland.

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aks

Re: Tax refund

To out-pedant you, the name of the country is Éire unless you're writing in English.

But do realise that both names refer to all 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The six in the north-east are called Northern Ireland and the remaining 26 are the republic of Ireland. Capitalised Republic is used by the UK but other countries are "persuaded" to use the fiction that the island is one country, in a similar way that Taiwan is a province of China.

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Pokémon GO caused hundreds of deaths, increased crashes

aks

So, is this Pokemon GO "The Carmageddon edition"?

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Parity calamity! Wallet code bug destroys $280m in Ethereum

aks

Software is never finished

http://dilbert.com/strip/2017-10-02

This seems relevant.

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Red (Planet) alert: Future astro-heroes face shocking adventures on Martian moon Phobos

aks

Re: Controlling landers?

You simply control through a network of small communications satellites, not directly from Phobos to the surface. Either that, or you organise your work to suit the time slots available. That's all you'd need in this first generation expedition.

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Dell forgot to renew PC data recovery domain, so a squatter bought it

aks

"Krebs On Security reports that the domain is administered by a third party, which forgot to re-register it in June 2017."

Whether Dell should have outsourced this task seems to be the real issue.

They will certainly have words to say to the third party.

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Roaming charges drop smacks O2 daddy Telefonica in the profits

aks

Re: Correction

To state the obvious, to benefit from no roaming charges you have to be outside your own location.

UK to UK is within your minutes.

France to France, Germany, or UK is within your minutes.

UK to France will cost you bigtime.

My son has Vodafone Red, pay monthly. They charge £1.50 per minute from UK to Ireland but Ireland to UK doesn't cost as it's roaming and within his minutes.

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From Vodafone's website

Calls to Europe from the UK £1.50 a minute (inc. VAT)

Calls to our Rest of World zone from the UK £2.00 a minute (inc. VAT)

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giffgaff charge 2p landline and 5p per minute to phone Ireland.

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Oh, wow, Canada: No more carrier-locked phones for Canucks

aks

Re: Impact will be on expensive phones

why would they want to refuse an unlocked phone?

i doubt if that would be legal.

if the customer is locked into a 12, 18 or 24 month contract, why should the new provider care that you're paying twice. maybe you want a dual-sim phone so you can use a local pay-as-you-go sim when you're over the border. that's what i've been doing for the past 3 years.

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Wowee. Look at this server. Definitely keep critical data in there. Yup

aks

Re: Interesting....

only bad actors and state-operators would be capable of building such "safe" malware that only targetted the intruder. simply releasing common malware into the wild would be very "contra-indicated". can you imagine what the press would make of such behaviour once it got known? it's close to the concept of protecting your house, office or factory with biological booby traps.

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Malware writer offers free trojan to hackers ... with one small drawback

aks

Why on earth are you assuming that this is a super crafty criminal rather than being state-sponsored?

My first assumption is that {pick from the list} is not only using these low-level hackers to spread the toolkit but also building a list of who they are.

Once the toolkit is widespread enough, it will have crept into many dark corners. Why do all the hard work yourself?

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