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* Posts by Lysenko

861 posts • joined 23 Jan 2015

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America restarts dodgy spying program – just as classified surveillance abuse memo emerges

Lysenko
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Re: Good news for Yandex and AliBaba

Are you saying that the place an offence is committed is always limited to the place where the *offender* was physically located, rather than the *victim*?

Yes. Otherwise, a person in Kabul exposed to and injured by your (hypothetical) disparaging comments regarding a prophet of God has a perfect right to demand your extradition and execution. An injury inflicted in one country from the territory of another is an inter-governmental matter that should be dealt with according to the laws of the originating country; that's how the US First Amendment trumps [sic] Afghan blasphemy law.

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Lysenko
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Re: Good news for Yandex and AliBaba

Are you actually serious? The man accused of killing Alexander Litvinenko in London, Lugovoy, actually sits in the Russian parliament.

Reprehensible though that is, it is still a case of the Russian Government (probably) taking action against a Russian Citizen, albeit extra-territorially. I'm not defending that in any way, but it is markedly different to abducting a German citizen in Macedonia and torturing him in Afghanistan.

Anything an elected government does to its own citizens (like lethal injections) has some potential cover of democracy and legality; extra-territorial actions against citizens of foreign countries have none.

When you have an example of the FSB snatching a Frenchman with no connection to Russia off the streets of Lisbon and secretly flying him to a Syrian air force base and torturing him, then you'll have an equivalence to American lawlessness, not before.

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Lysenko
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Re: Good news for Yandex and AliBaba

I prefer democracy too. That means I prefer that someone sitting in Milton Keynes is subject to laws of England & Wales, as enacted by a democratically elected Parliament, and not subject to laws passed by a US Congress (which is an entirely undemocratic body from the perspective of a UK citizen who doesn't get to vote).

That's the position in Russian. If you're sitting in Smolensk and decide to pen-test the Pentagon the only relevant law is that passed by the Duma of the Russian Federation. American law is an irrelevance to Russian Courts because it is a basic pillar of democracy that you have a say (a vote) regarding the laws you are subject to. Pretensions of extra-territorial jurisdiction are fundamentally anti-democratic.

If the Americans can extradite you based on an offence under US law that wasn't committed on US territory then that's identical (in principle) to Tehran or Riyhad claiming universal jurisdiction regarding blasphemy or Thailand extraditing me if I say something uncomplimentary about their King.

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Lysenko
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Good news for Yandex and AliBaba

Obviously, you're still in the NKVD NSA firing line if you're routed over American (or compromised) infrastructure, but at least your data will be 'secure' once it hits the DC. You'll still be a risk of FSB and PLA snooping of course, but last time I checked those organisations weren't firing off extradition requests all over the planet, kidnapping people off Italian streets or asserting that Chinese court orders supercede Irish data protection laws.

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Twitter breaks bad news to 677,775 twits: You were duped by Russia

Lysenko
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Re: @Lysenko

7:3 ... I hate tiny screens ;)

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Lysenko
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Re: @Lysenko

they sure didn't start the fire, but they certainly were shipping fuel by the tanker-full

Limbaugh et. al. Matt. 1:3.

Sort out the "license to lie" and Plutocracy aspects of the 1A and then there'll be time to worry about peripheral details like twitterbots. Easier to just blame the evil foreigners and keep the "Shining Plutocrat Auction on a Hill[sic]" though.

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Lysenko
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It's plain obvious to anyone who keeps their eyes and ears open that social media and the web/internet are being used to try to bend and warp reality for anyone gullible enough to believe it.

It's plain obvious that "Hindenberg" Limbaugh and the rest of the AM Radio liars have been doing this for years, as has Faux News to a large extent. Tricky to pin that on foreigners though, and as this proves, both sides of the political divide prefer to pin everything on foreigners (Firewall the Russians!!, Brick wall the Mexicans!!) and avoid awkward introspection.

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Lysenko
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I would have to agree to some extent. There is a lot of deflection going on, trying to blame Russian maskirovka for entirely home-grown delusions and conspiracy theories about birth certificates, pizza parlours and god knows what else. It's essentially (and ironically) a variant of Dolchstoßlegende, only this time with the intention of unjustly exonerating the "civilians back home".

People believed the rubbish they did because they wanted to; because the confirmation bias was iron-clad and because unmitigated freedom of speech and freedom of association creates an echo chamber capable of creating a singularity of stupidity. It's a pervasive problem. Obama is Kenyan, climate change isn't happening, angels are real, guns reduce murder rates, send Tammy Lou Snakejuggler a cheque check so God will bless your business, POTUS Shield (!?!) ... and they want to worry about/blame Russians!!??

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IBM turns panto villain as The Reg tells readers: 'It's behind you!'

Lysenko
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Re: How long would IBM last if

English is an official language in India with obvious implications for quality of service and therefore medium-term costs. I'm sure the C suite already has plans to shift work to Cambodia or Ulan-Bataar once this becomes a problem (for bonuses) with the Watson initiative papering over the linguistic cracks until a complete shift to chatbot based services becomes tenable. A minor wetware staff will be retained for highly technical work like delivering brown envelopes to C suite peers, minding coats in Michelin starred restaurants and securing Wimbledon centre court tickets (the core competencies of "Enterprise Sales" in other words).

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Take a bow, TalkTalk, Post Office, Vodafone! You win most-whinged-about telcos award

Lysenko
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I didn't consider that they could be outsourcing their support to their own customers.

Radical self-serve (otherwise known as industry SOP) is when you dial the broadband fault reporting line to listen to a recorded message advising you to look at the FAQ pages on the website.

The "radical" bit is the attempted gaslighting (Doctor, I've gone blind!! Here, try reading this helpful booklet) and implicit promotion of competitors: "We're sorry your broadband isn't working, please switch to your mobile internet provider whose service is hopefully more reliable than ours and will enable you to read our brain dead FAQ site. Alternatively, please wait (interminably) for a wetware chatbot who won't even know the difference between an A record and a CNAME."

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Scumbag who tweeted vulnerable adults' details is hauled into court

Lysenko
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Re: Threatened the ICO ?

that there was even a brief window of opportunity for Fred Bloggs who works for the company to have BEEN ABLE to log into something that might have given him more info than was strictly required for his job? Fineable offence, including personal liability of whoever facilitated that.

That all revolves around office systems and centralised data stores and that wasn't the point I was discussing. If a probation officer or social worker (etc.) interviews a client and then decides to type up some notes at home on a personal laptop and save them on a USB stick then there is no liability applicable to corporate IT personnel. The DPA, Computer Misuse Act, ECHR and several other statutes operate in the exact opposite direction - intrusive measures designed to monitor employee actions when they have a reasonable expectation of privacy are likely to be illegal and trying to monitor an employee's own devices in their own home is clearly a criminal act (forget fines: gaol time).

The one thing you can be sure of is that the courts will never extend the definition of "reasonable" to include breaking the law so you have an absolute defence if you establish that the steps necessary to prevent a breach would themselves be illegal.

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Lysenko
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Re: Threatened the ICO ?

Not only her, but YOU as the IT guy can get fined, as well as the company, for not knowing this.

No, you can't. You could be penalised for not having appropriate policies and training or for demonstrable negligence, but any attempt to impose absolute liability runs slap bang into Wednesbury Unreasonableness.

So long as the person in question has been clearly instructed not to record data in an insecure manner you (as the IT guy) have an absolute defence regarding anything that person gets up to on their own premises with their own equipment on their own time unless it can be conclusively be proven you were aware of it or could reasonably be expected to be aware of it without breaching your own obligations regarding employee privacy, particularly in respect of personal equipment and premises.

GDPR won't change that since it is a basic principle of Judicial Review, not a technical point of statutory interpretation. While it is true that Parliamentary Supremacy means that the Judiciary cannot overrule the Legislature when two points of law come into conflict the courts can decide which one they are going to uphold.

Defences in contract and tort are similarly robust since enforcing the data protection policies in all cases would require actions that exceed the legal powers of an employer and any contract or tort fails if it's fulfilment requires an illegal act (e.g. spying on employees).

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Lysenko
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Re: Threatened the ICO ?

The data wouldn't necessarily ever need to be in the office. A situation like this could arise from someone typing up case notes at home from memory. Still a security breach of course, but in the HR rather than IT domain.

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NHS: Thanks for the free work, Linux nerds, now face our trademark cops

Lysenko
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The cards are stacked against open source trying to break into the public sector.

Getting open source through the door isn't a problem in itself, you just need an outfit like I Bribed Management or Crapita heading up the project and organising the requisite lunches at The Ivy etc.

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Who's using 2FA? Sweet FA. Less than 10% of Gmail users enable two-factor authentication

Lysenko
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Re: @AC Not Surprised

If you are disabled and can use a computer, then you can use a phone app to do the 2FA key.

Nonsense. The number of exceptions is vast, even before you bring disabilities into the picture. We have an office with completely stable cabled internet but no cell coverage on anything but O2 (and it isn't reliable) and customers who either can't (underground facility) or won't (compliance) allow external communication that doesn't go through their firewalls (we can log in to our mail server but cell phones stay with security at the gate). 2FA can work with the little calculator gizmos that some banks issue, but anything dependent on cellphones is a non-starter.

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Destroying the city to save the robocar

Lysenko
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Re: Obviously the solution is....

Your points have reminded me that autonomous vehicles might spell doom for towed caravans. Hmmmmm. I'm conflicted here .....

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Google's 'QUIC' TCP alternative slow to excite anyone outside Google

Lysenko
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Re: rjed

Given that IPv6 has only got to 11.6% (source: https://w3techs.com/technologies/details/ce-ipv6/all/all) after a couple of decades as an IETF standard, Google may well regard QUIC progress as quite satisfactory given that it's only been with IETF for three years.

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Wave Tata, Capita: You've lost mega-contract to rival outsourcer

Lysenko
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So essentially, they decided that if they were outsourcing most of the actual work to the subcontinent they might as well outsource the useless parasite "MBA" functions as well? I can't fault their logic.

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Causes of software development woes

Lysenko
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Re: And that's why...

Life is far too short to treat any gobshite boss's demands as wasting their money. It's wasting your time, and you only have a finite amount of it.

I look at it more in terms of being a criminal defence barrister. You're probably going to fail 90% of the time and the client will regularly undermine both you and themselves, but in the end, that's irrelevant. You don't argue the case because you expect to win, you do it because you enjoy the intellectual challenge of the process. If the client blows up the project then they're the one paying the fine, not you.

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ServiceNow unleashes its 'Kingston' release

Lysenko
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Re: Service Now

Well, they named this release after "Hull on Earth" so they can be credited with some (unintentional) oblique honesty.

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Let's Encrypt plugs hole that let miscreants grab HTTPS web certs for strangers' domains

Lysenko
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With an HTTP-01 challenge, the client (cert requester) has to prove it controls HTTP (Port 80) for the domain. With TLS-SNI-01 it only had to prove it could reply from the same IP address as the domain.

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'Mummy, what's felching?' Tot gets smut served by Android app

Lysenko
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It's just as well children don't remember the birth process...

I mean, there's some pretty gruesome and explicit stuff going on there in glorious, technicolour close up. Given the catastrophic effects of such images on young minds (allegedly), any child with a prematurely active visual and memory system would probably never recover!

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Next; tech; meltdown..? Mandatory; semicolons; in; JavaScript; mulled;

Lysenko
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Re: Anyone seen a single line C program ?

Actually, after 20 years of Java threading I'm coming around to the JavaScript everything-is-a-callback idea.

After 20 years of Java threading[1] one appreciates why GoRoutines were invented (or Erlang).

[1] Not that I've ever used Java in anger, but you can lose yourself in semaphore/mutex hell with C++ as well, which what I'm assuming you're referring to. Node/JS is equivalent to tackling flu by mandating mouth breathing and abolishing noses - you can always eat dinner with a callback after all.

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Lysenko
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Re: Anyone seen a single line C program ?

That was common with xBase libraries and it's ubiquitous with JavaScript (uglfiy.js etc) because compressing out whitespace and converting variables to single characters reduces the size of downloads (bogus argument of course since you can just gzip the un-obfuscated source and any browser too retarded to support gzip isn't going to support ES5/CSS3 reliably anyway).

The key to success with JavaScript and it's tooling is realising that when you think:

"I'm missing something. It can't be this retarded. Turbo C/Visual Basic/Delphi was more advanced 20 years ago!?"

... you're wrong. It really is that retarded and the browser programming model really is Win16 redux, complete with message queues, async API callbacks, state machines a-go-go and no threading worth a damn. With ES8/TypeScript and web workers (threads) the JS eco-system might catch up to Delphi 3 on WinNT 4 by 2025 - maybe - but don't count on it.

[*] I've just spent 3 months writing an Angular 4 system so I'm not just ranting from the sidelines.

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Lysenko
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Berlin-based developer Yoshua Wuyts laments

Berlin-based hobbyist, I think you mean. I have never met a developer who only used a single language, except for some embedded guys who do everything in C (and even they know several ASM flavours). If all you know is JS then you're equivalent to a VBA power user writing Word macros, which is a useful skill but doesn't give you a credible perspective for addressing language design issues. Listening to guys like this is how Personal Home Page managed to become and remain the worst language in the world (tm).

And it, feels, well, a little hurtful."

Get used to it, snowflake. You're dealing with computers here. They don't "do" empathy and they don't give an Aardvark's left testicle about your emotional state.

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What do we want? Consensual fun times. How do we get it? Via an app with blockchain...

Lysenko
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Re: What One Desires.....

I want a 100% monogamous sexual relationship, ... Is this possible

.....

You betcha. I have had that exact arrangement for the past 6 years.

If your consent to this sexual relationship is predicated on the "100% monogamy" clause then should your partner have an affair without your knowledge, that renders any subsequent sex with you non-consensual and therefore "rape" under current "zero critical thinking tolerance" criteria.

In fact, it's rape on two grounds (fraud and by proxy) as well as reckless endangerment while owing a duty of care, which is a pretty profitable area of tort. Lawyers in the bedroom - lovely.

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Lysenko
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I've seen some stupid ideas in my time but that's ridiculous and wrong on so many levels it'll probably be a success.

I couldn't agree more, but enough about FaceBook ........

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No wonder Marvin the robot was miserable: AI will make the rich richer – and the poor poorer

Lysenko
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Re: AI is irrelevant

potentially past my aforesaid cliff edge.

Which is when (after some violence) you return to the historically "normal" state of affairs by re-instituting slavery or indentured servitude or workfare or dictatorship of the proletariat or whatever other euphemism you choose for compelling people to do more work than they want to do for less pay than they want to receive.

Until we achieve Culturesque freedom from resource constraints, achieving equality and the aspirations of all it will always be unsustainable because classes and hierarchies are integral to any functioning social system. Taken historically, the current levels of wealth equality in the western world are unprecedented. Rome, for example, had Marcus Licinius Crassus on the one hand (probably the richest man who ever lived) and chattel slavery on the other.

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Lysenko
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Upstairs, Downstairs

That's where humans have an (currently) unassailable advantage. Roombas are impressive in a limited sense, but they are a hopeless joke compared to a wetware cleaner. Same for all the IoT doorbells and thermostats: they're no threat to the capabilities of a proper Footman and Butler. Maybe we'll end up 150 years in the past when a middle-class job like Bank Manager (i.e. Network Sysop) was expected to support half a dozen full-time jobs back home.

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Beer hall putz: Regulator slaps northern pub over Nazi-themed ad

Lysenko
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I think the problem is it was described as a German night, therefore equating Germans with Nazis.

It isn't uncommon (particularly on the wrong side of the pond) to equate Russians with "Commies" without giving everyone the vapours and lots of Vodka branding relies on either Romanov or Soviet stylistic cues.

Couple that with the Holodomor (deadlier than Hitler's effort all by itself) and the other 50-70M wiped out by the Sino-Soviets and I sense a double standard.

Hitler's superlative sin was murdering so many white, western Europeans. His Communist colleagues mostly stuck to murdering easterners and "Asians", so Hitler gets promoted to be the head of the axis of evil rather than number three where he belongs.

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Lysenko
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Replaced Nazi with black or jew in the original article and see if you can figure it out yourself.

Nazis aren't a racial group. Try replacing "Nazi" with "Soviet" or "Maoist" and see if you can figure it out.

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Hold on to your aaSes: Yup, Windows 10 'as a service' is incoming

Lysenko
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Re: Who didn't see this coming?

I don't down vote often, any more, but I think that is very naive and got one.

Naivety doesn't really come into it. You assume that Microsoft either have no interest in retaining their position as the most popular desktop OS or they are terminally incompetent - and I'm not convinced of that. I don't actually care one way or the other since most of my machines run Linux anyway.

Some of the reactions one gets around here lead me to think that a malaria vaccine (should one be created) will be dismissed as an evil innovation if it turns out Bill Gates (Boo!! Hiss!!!) had a hand in funding it.

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Lysenko
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Re: Who didn't see this coming?

I wonder how long it'll be before there's a monthly subscription charge...

Hmmm. Build in and then enhance a Linux subsystem (thus getting an open source competitor into places it otherwise wouldn't be) when your end game is to increase charges?

Sorry, I don't buy it. That's too dumb even for Microsoft. I'm sure there is an end-game, but it's not going to be that.

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SAP customers won't touch the fluffy stuff... so here's another on-prem HR data tool

Lysenko
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A more likely explanation is that the cloud isn't ready for GDPR, nor will it be. In the meantime, can whoever coined the phrase "human capital"

If they were honest and said what they mean (Livestock Tracking) they could probably get around GDPR by claiming it is a Common Agricultural Policy requirement.

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Meltdown, Spectre bug patch slowdown gets real – and what you can do about it

Lysenko
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Or chuck out their current CISC infrastructure and switch over to a RISC-based one? (unlikely).

Given that we know ARM is impacted by these security flaws as well, the CISC/RISC calculation remains unchanged - unless you're suggesting they port the whole of AWS to MIPS.

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Your connection is not Brexit... we mean private: UK Tory party lets security cert expire

Lysenko
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"Your connection is not private."

That's not an error message, it's a Home Office policy announcement.

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Wait! Before you fire up that HP lappy, check the battery

Lysenko
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Now do you get it?

This is the sort of thing "Mugabe" Meg was afraid of over on the other side of HP. Making things is almost as dangerous (to C suite bonuses) as employing people in jurisdictions that have the concept of employment law. Far better to abandon this last century concept of "products" and concentrate on real estate deals with surplus factories, warehouses and offices. In C21 it's all about being a "brand" rather than a "product".

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Windows Store nixed Google Chrome 'app' hours after it went live

Lysenko
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Re: I use Linux

@MacroRodent

but someone now coming from Windows will have no problem finding GUI editors with UI essentially indistiguishable from typical Windows editors

If you're coming from Java riddled monstrosities like Eclipse and (for a lesser value of monstrous) IntelliJ then I'd agree with you, just like OpenOffice on Windows is just as bad as the Linux version. I'm not discussing cross-platform lowest common denominator-ware though.

In any case, I don't need to "come from" Windows. All my dev work is Linux or bare metal already and I have three Linux dev machines and one Windows (VMs complicate hardware interfaces). I don't need to "see the light". I've been using Linux for years (xcfe-Mint, CentOS and Yocto, mostly) and I know exactly what it is capable of.

Today, for example, I was doing web stuff. Linux has no answer to either PhotoShop or Illustrator, even if we set the coding aside. How do I know that? Because I just spent half the day in Gimp and Inkscape. The issue isn't that I'm unaware of Linux tools or unable to use them. It is that I am aware, can use them, do use them - and judge them to be inferior in most cases (PCB CAD being an exception).

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Lysenko
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Re: @Lysenko - I use Linux

If the only editors you know are Vim and Emacs then I strongly doubt you've ever really used Linux.

What did you have in mind? Geany? GEdit? Atom? I already mentioned I use IntelliJ (also the Pycharm and CLion variants) for some things and consider Eclipse to be a bad joke. VSCode? A pale shadow of the real thing (better than Atom though).

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Lysenko
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Re: I use Linux

I write software for Linux and embedded microcontrollers - on Windows. I have three physical Linux machines (not counting servers) and any number of VMs, but 90% of my work is conducted on Windows[1], even though I haven't deployed anything on that platform for half a decade.

This isn't really relevant to the discussion either, but it (hopefully) might enrage a fanboi or two.

[1] Because: Visual Studio ... and yes I know about VSCode and I have a JetBrains subscription I use for Kotlin. Vim or Emacs? I'd rather change career. Eclipse? Hahahaha ...yeah ...right after I start developing in PHP ... or Visual FoxPro.

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Republican tax bill ready to rescue hard-up tech giants, struggling rich

Lysenko
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Re: I don't get it

Dude, are you aware of how many trillions of dollars were added to the US debt during the last admin? I'd guess not, or you wouldn't make such an asinine comment.

Also, when an economy grows the debt shrinks, something that NEVER happened under Obama...

You walked into a lamp post yesterday so you are obliged to do so again today because ... precedent? Tradition? Bone-headed stupidity?

You're so locked into your little dichotomy that you assume that everyone who criticises Republican legislation must be a Democrat and consequently a supporter of the Obama Executive, even though the Executive branch isn't empowered to control taxation and spending (other than vetoing it) which makes Obama (and Trump) essentially irrelevant in this context..

Democrats want to borrow and tax so that the government can spend whereas Republicans want to borrow and cut tax so that the electorate can spend. What if you're a fiscal conservative? What if "borrow" is the consistent feature that concerns you so you want to both cut spending and raise taxes? Too complicated, right? Reasoned analysis be damned. All we need to know is whether Satan Obama would approve and that determines which side we're on.

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Lysenko
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Re: I don't get it

Isn't having 2.2% more income great for EVERYBODY?

Not if you're doing it by taking out loans that the following generation of taxpayers are going to have to pay for. It's quite ironic that (many) Republicans are fixated on the "rights of the unborn" except when it comes to adding over $1T to the deficit tomorrow so they can party like drunken sailors on their golf courses today.

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Facebook flashes ramped-up face-recog tech. Try not to freak out

Lysenko
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"...or reach out to the person who posted the photo if you have concerns about it"

I'm only likely to "reach out" to someone if I intend to grab them by the neck - for example, in the case of people using the expression "reach out" when they mean "contact", "ask", "email" or "speak to".

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Fridge killed my baby? Mag-field radiation from household stuff 'boosts miscarriage risk'

Lysenko
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...and lack of Pirates causes global warming.

This is a human study in California so exposure to high MF/EMF levels may directly correlate with exposure to known carcinogens and other noxious chemical compounds from internal combustion engines and other industrial processes. You can't just wave your hands and declare that "we've controlled for those factors". It isn't possible to control for that just by slapping a dosimeter on volunteers and then plotting exposure against outcome.

To move beyond "Daily Mail Headline" they need to map exposure to all the other environmental factors and then devise some means of excluding any potential effects their effects. As it stands they're essentially asserting that close exposure of the nose to naked flames elevates the risk of lung cancer.

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Top Silicon Valley tech judge hits alt-F4 under cloud of sex-pest claims

Lysenko
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Re: where people are treated fairly and equally

ok you young whippersnappers probably don't know who that guy is...

Just to elaborate (because it was a long time ago), "Henry Kissinger" is/was a satirical caricature, based on a well known National Security Adviser named "Dr Strangelove". As with most caricatures, Kissinger was an exaggerated parody that amplified the reactionary, amoral, untrustworthy and warmongering aspects of Strangelove's character for (very) black comedic effect. Apparently, much as with Ali G and Borat, many prominent people were taken in by Kissinger and mistook him for a genuine foreign policy adviser, causing something of a dilemma for the scriptwriters who had assumed the insanity of their creation would be obvious to everyone.

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Peak smartphone? iPhone X flunks 'supercycle' hopes

Lysenko
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Re: The "Horned One"

When you mentioned horns the first thing that came to mind was the Irish Elk.

One theory regarding the extinction of this creature is that it invested so many resources into showing off with ludicrously expensive status symbols with no added utility that it undermined its ability to compete and survive. Close relatives with more sensibly sized (and priced) status symbols are with us to this day. Darwin is always watching; Fanbois.

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'I knew the company was doomed after managers brawled in a biker bar'

Lysenko
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Re: It's all fun and games until someone's toes freeze solid and shatter,

in the days before H&S and political correctness spoiled everything

I still remember the name of one my chemistry compatriots who refused to believe that the pencil sharpeners were made from blocks of magnesium and decided to prove us wrong with the help of a bunsen burner. It made a terrible mess of the teacher's desk on the level below. After burning its way through the floor ;)

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No hack needed: Anonymisation beaten with a dash of SQL

Lysenko
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Re: How about the use of Cascading Temporal Surrogate Keys?

Screen scrape the data and then store it offline keyed on a hash of the non-key fields. You then have a stable PK for each logical tuple and can track key collisions in a counter field (assuming some denormalization in the source).

The entire concept is flawed. If you have enough attribute data regarding an entity then it will always be possible to resolve the PK in any quasi-normalised dataset because the corollary of a tuple being dependent on "the key, the whole key and nothing but the key" is that the key is dependent on the attributes and for any reasonable dataset, some of those attributes will have high cardinality.

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Lysenko
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I had another idea, put the data online and let the public enter search parameters to find themselves to show them how easy it is to re-identify, then prompt them to write to their MP.

How about putting the complete medical, financial and educational records of all MPs online, after running it through the officially approved anonymisation process. If no-one has managed to reverse that back to individual identities inside maybe 6 months then maybe it's safe to try it out on the general public?

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Oi, force Microsoft to cough up emails on Irish servers to the Feds, US states urge Supremes

Lysenko
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Re: Yeah, but common sense, too...

Not quite. GDPR as it stands also applies to personal data stored in the EU about natural persons residing outside the EU.

Under a plain reading of Recital 14, yes however that is subject to the provisions of Art. 2 S2(a) which provides limitations and Art. 3 S1 which is ambiguous in terms of the interpretation of the word "establishment" due to the second clause of the sentence. This sort of thing will take case law to clarify so, as things stand, one can only be certain that GDPR protects the personal data of persons resident within or citizens of the EU in the context of activities taking place within the jurisdiction of the ECJ (Art. 2).

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