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* Posts by anonymous boring coward

2012 posts • joined 21 Jan 2015

Half of all Windows 10 users thought: BSOD it, let's get the latest build

anonymous boring coward
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Basically Windows is on that bandwagon that games are: Make the utranerdy users salivate with apprehension about every little minor "enhancement". Adrenaline from the anticipation. Sad.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Needs saying!

"So every day more Windows 10 machines have been successfully upgraded to the April 2018 Update than the total number of Linux desktops running in the world."

And every day Android and millions of servers run Linux, not clunky Windows.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Wasted energy

Indeed. And we also have to pay for it with actual money.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: The dark side of rolling releases

" The result would be a better version of the original."

Not entirely true.

Often hardware requirements increased for no apparent reason.

And the XP update system went from fast and slim to exceptionally slow and fat.

And even now in Win 10 it's just as slow and fat.

Windows update is major fail and embarrassment for MS. How can people (companies) keep coping with it?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Rolled out != working users

"Laptop - has the "desktop" issue and is currently a paperweight. I simply don't have time to do anything more to try and fix it"

Insert a USB drive with a linux distro?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: "reflects perhaps misplaced confidence"

Feck me know or later?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: A mess

My stable platform is now an older MacBook Pro. Runs very nicely indeed, and with many useful features that MS has failed to copy properly so far.

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anonymous boring coward
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P.S: I then had to roll it back, but at least that took less than one hour.

P.P.S: Why isn't saying anything at all, so any issues can be identified? Totally useless waiting for hours with absolutely no information. Not even knowing if it is progressing.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Sorry to report no problems on 11-year-old machines

"I will admit the xeon required some coaxing (online upgrade failed so had to use a thumbdrive)"

A new definition of "no problems".

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anonymous boring coward
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Of course it's fast. It's presented as just another update. Only it took 5 hours to install on my gaming PC.

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Internet engineers tear into United Nations' plan to move us all to IPv6

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Mapping plan

"The people who devised IPv6 were NOT engineers - any sensible engineer knows the KISS principle"

I have to agree. Anyone familiar with v4 looking at v6 initially goes, "wtf is this?"

That's not normal with properly engineered stuff building on previous things.

And why is UN involved of all entities?

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Activists hate them! One weird trick Facebook uses to fool people into accepting GDPR terms

anonymous boring coward
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Not a lot to be surprised about there really.

My LG phone gave me a rare update, which was all about privacy invasion.

I declined under threat of not getting any more updates.

But I haven't had a real update for over a year anyway.

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US judge won't budge over Facebook's last-minute bid to 'derail' facial biometrics trial

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Reputational injury

Most FB users are just like smokers: Hooked.

They don't care if it's damaging, or not.

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You've heard that pop will eat itself. Boffins have unveiled a rocket that does the same

anonymous boring coward
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"The engine itself has yet to leave the lab at the Oles Honchar Dnipro National University in Ukraine and currently consists of a 20mm diameter fuel rod fitting into a 50mm combustion chamber."

So only months away from achieving orbit then?

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As Tesla hits speed bump after speed bump, Elon Musk loses his mind in anti-media rant

anonymous boring coward
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Re: Don't forget critics..

"NASA and the Russkis aren't stupid - they could and would have done it years ago if it made economic sense."

No, because they are used to dipping into that bottomless public purse.

You don't think a private company is re-using rockets because it's economically advantageous? What other possible reason could there be?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: People are saying he should stop tweeting and go back to work on the assembly line

"The big auto makers have had over a century of experience at fine tuning manufacturing, production processes and logistics, you don't just replicate that overnight."

Defeatism. Why not? Poach the right people.

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anonymous boring coward
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Looks like they need to do a recall and replace some suspension components with redesigned parts.

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anonymous boring coward
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"More recently have you forgotten the fake chemical weapons attacks in Sryia? Or how about the Sailsbury incident, where the mainstream media were able to tell us who did it, with what within 24 hours? "

I don't subscribe to conspiracy theories just because MSM is lazy.

About BBC though, they are certainly not a balanced observer regarding Brexit. The don't do any thinking at all on the subject, and basically is hushing it down and sweeping all the massive issues under the carpet. Worst kind of government stoogees. Useless.

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anonymous boring coward
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"How's the media supposed to know when government officials are lying to them?"

Because they are moving their mouths?

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anonymous boring coward
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Musk has a point.

Media is mainly moaning, and complaining. Not doing anything much constructive. Sometimes it's a good thing, and sometimes not.

But I think Musk also is overly sensitive and protective of his babies (car especially). An overworked genius, in a hurry to get to Mars before he is too old.

He is not unlike Jobs, who had rather killed off the income bringing Apple II, than having it around representing the past, and put all effort into developing better things. These genii expect people to invest in them getting it right, and not worry about current finances too much.

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About to install the Windows 10 April 2018 Update? You might want to wait a little bit longer

anonymous boring coward
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Re: PC Updated itself last night

To update, rolling back from 1803 did actually work. And didn't even take 5 hours.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: PC Updated itself last night

"But at least you can choose to use one of the popular non bloated distros."

Yes, of course. It's just a bit sad that the most popular distro has become so bloated.

Mint seems a bit better, and is apparently based on Debian, so should provide similar levels of hardware compatibility.

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anonymous boring coward
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25% failure rate, in your case, isn't very impressive by MS. Can you even get to the rollback-option, with that problem? Safe boot?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: PC Updated itself last night

Linux is quite bloated nowadays, in most distros. Sad.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: PC Updated itself last night

I got the 1803 version like that too. Only took about 5 hours to install.

One of my USB devices isn't recognised any longer.

Thanks so much, MS.

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Microsoft gives users options for Office data slurpage – Basic or Full

anonymous boring coward
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Re: At Microsoft, this is what self-delusion looks like:

"“Many of them make money off ads and they have used that as kind of a leverage point,” he said of user data. “At Microsoft, we don’t believe in that.”"

Someone (a big Chairman, no less) at MS said that in 2018? That's quite funny! Can't be very up to speed with what MS is up to.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: GPDR Fines

"Nobody is going to do the thing they should have done 20 years ago and ban their products if they don't pay."

Sure we are.

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anonymous boring coward
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I guess we'll have to thank Google and MS for creating that dystopian world that we see in some cool films. I'm still in two minds about what's worse: psyco replicants or ads that follow you everywhere.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Corporate users?

"This is not something you can lobby your MP about. It's a simple market choice. If you do not like what the software does, go elsewhere."

Obviously, the lobbying bit is about the state trying to get off their MS dependency. And in so doing, making MS change their ways, or go away.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Firewalls?

There used to be a time when writing a document on your own PC wasn't "using the internet".

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London's Met Police: We won't use facial recognition at Notting Hill Carnival

anonymous boring coward
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Re: So they won't be using a

"Without knowing how many "persons of interest" were in the initial sample - which, pretty much by definition, they can't know - we still don't know yet how good the tool is."

If it was any good, you'd probably know it.

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anonymous boring coward
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"Moreover, the group's Freedom of Information responses show that the force has only correctly identified two people using the kit - neither of whom was a criminal."

Was one Cyrano de Bergerac, and the other Joseph Merrick?

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Is your smart device a bit thick? It's about to get a lot worse

anonymous boring coward
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"Hang on, you cry, surely these are examples of spy technology being employed for good reasons with health benefits in mind?"

Someone says this?

You are probably right, and that's a scary thought.

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Mobile app devs have, oh, about 9 hours left to decide whether to stay on Google's ad platform

anonymous boring coward
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Have got loads of email about GDPR asking me to sign up for continued junk email.

Fat chance. Everyone thinks they are the centre of the world, and we just long to hear from them every day. They are "sad to see me go", but I'm not going anywhere, and they are still there.

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Microsoft programming chief to devs: Tell us where Windows hurt you

anonymous boring coward
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Waiting 5 hours for a simple OS update, when a complete reinstall from scratch would take a fraction of that time, hurt quite a lot.

I almost expected MS to get their act together now when they cram updates down peoples throats. But my deepest suspicions about MS's ineptitude (or lack or care?) unfortunately turned out to be true.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: You shouldn't have to ask

"Ms Liuson imagines she can start with a blank slate"

Bit presumptuous? Asking, surely, must be better than having no interest at all? (Which, strangely, seems to describe MS quite well through so many of their years.)

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Oracle demands dev tear down iOS app that has 'JavaScript' in its name

anonymous boring coward
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Oracle wants to have their cake and eat it too.

First they try to commoditise the name, making it popular and used everywhere.

Then they decide that you can't even use the name to refer to a product working with it.

Scummy.

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Microsoft, Google: We've found a fourth data-leaking Meltdown-Spectre CPU hole

anonymous boring coward
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"I think that rather then losing x% performance by disabling speculative execution etc. we should ask ourselves why on earth we allow javascript and similar technologies"

Well, yes, but Google, MS etc don't care about you. They care about what information they can monetise. Running stuff, and letting advertisers run stuff, on your computer, using your electricity and CPU time, is what gives them more money.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Maths

"Mathematics seems to suggest it is impossible to prevent all these types of side channels."

Perhaps, but by limiting the accuracy available to the attacker, I think we should be able to make these sort of attacks unfeasible.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: I'm confused..

This sounds like a well informed explanation and doesn't remind me of waiters running around a restaurant at all! ;-)

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Its *very* depressing really

"It is a standard approach because resetting a system in an unknown state to a consistent starting configuration is a logical and efficient way to start."

It's the standard conditioned approach we use since we have been forced to use fragile systems where various components are allowed to affect each other in unpredictable ways.

It's a sad state of affairs, that I mainly blame "ctrl-alt-del MicroSoft" for.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Its *very* depressing really

"Are you serious? And, by the by, who is this "we"?"

It was a generalisation, of course.

Obviously people have been tricked into running bad stuff on their machines for a very long time. Thanks MS for helping facilitating this.. Why not just run emailed stuff when people click on it? Brilliant!

With "we" I meant your average home PC user, which, by the way, wouldn't even have had email facilities back in the pre-WWW era. (Yes, I know that _some_ would have had that.)

It's a fact that the WWW has opened up the possibilities for trojans and viruses massively.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Its quite depressing really

"No, paranoia is believing things that are not true. Paranoids don't generally worry about real risks."

Well, before you have found the security flaw, you are indeed worrying about things that may or may not be true.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: I'm confused..

"I'd assume most of the hosts of these servers are not going to be idling, so the CPU shouldn't ever do 'idle-time' speculation"

It's not that sort of idle time (on a very macro scale). It's running some instructions while waiting for data for some other instructions: Out-of-order execution. Making your system more busy on a process level scale won't make any difference.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Its quite depressing really

A better word might be that we have to be paranoid.

We used to look at things from above. Privilege etc. Now we need to become paranoid and see what ways people can get to us from all sorts of obscure angles.

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: Its quite depressing really

"Almost as if they are all copying each other......."

CPU design has been openly discussed in fora since day one.

Most performance enhancement methods are very well known, and subject of research at universities etc.

Developers get poached between companies.

All currently used mainstream CPUs follow the same basic design pattern.

Performance improvements are in the details of implementation, more than overall architecture.

Pressure to make the fastest processors would lead to designers doing similar things, perhaps ignoring some obscure and unlikely to be exploited side effects (if they even considered them in the first place).

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HTC U12+: Like a Pixel without the pratfalls, or eye-watering price tag

anonymous boring coward
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Re: "Like a Pixel without the pratfalls"... and presumably without the updates

"No HTC on the Google list, neither are Samsung"

I wonder if Google has a crystal ball? I wouldn't trust that list very much.

Besides, the aim is pretty low. Buy a second hand phone that was out a year before being purchased, has been owned for a year or so, and after you had it for a year, it has no more support. And that's a best case scenario.

And updates being made available no later than 90 days after Google provides them? Well, that's not very impressive either.

Basically, the phone industry is a bit sh*t, isn't it?

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anonymous boring coward
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Re: No Headphone Jack, No Sale

"the lack of a headphone socket (accumulates dirt)"

Oddly enough, since the 1980s, I've never ever had a problem with headphone jacks accumulating dirt.

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Astronaut took camera on spacewalk, but forgot SD memory card

anonymous boring coward
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Re: The man is 53, for god's sake!

Ageism? 53 is no age!

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anonymous boring coward
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If it took me an hour or so to get my walking gear on and get out the door, and the same to get in again, I'd like to think I'd prepare and check my equipment better than that..

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