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* Posts by anothercynic

639 posts • joined 4 Dec 2014

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East Midlands network-sniffer wails: Openreach, fix my outage-ridden line

anothercynic
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@Chris King

AAISP are ace. End of.

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anothercynic
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This is why I pay a premium...

... Before Eclipse... sorry, KCOM, went all 'sorry, but we don't do Consumer even though we do', I had my line through them and to be fair, they were very good with handling Openreach when they developed cable faults (first dodgy connections in the local cabinet and then a cable break).

Now I am with another independent provider who are absolutely brilliant. They suffered a DDoS attack recently and the staff (up to senior management) mucked in. I have complete confidence in them if another glitch happens on my line... :-)

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Outage outrage: TSB app offers users a TITSUP* encore

anothercynic
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Re: Never mind that,

They didn't 'die off'. Lloyds Bank was known as LloydsTSB for nearly 2 decades after they merged with TSB in '95 until they spun TSB off as per EU request after the last financial crunch. "The Savings Bank" (TSB) was always still around. Williams & Glyn on the other hand lived for 15 years in the 70s-80s until RBS rolled it into its main brand and then resurrected it for the same reason Lloyds restored TSB to independence.

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IBM memo to staff: Our CEO Ginni is visiting so please 'act normally!'

anothercynic
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Re: Desks should be clear anyway,...

Hmmm, I wonder how much time they allocate in their day to maintain the clean desk policy? An hour? Two? Three? All day? ;)

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Labour MP pushing to slip 6-hour limit to kill illegal online content into counter-terror bill

anothercynic
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Re: Funny how everyone points at the Tories doing all kinds of shenanigans...

@cynic56, does it really constrain the power of the megacorps? Does it? Legislating for a specific use case is short-sighted (albeit with good intentions). Just remember how much local councils abused RIPA in the name of service delivery despite it being designed *not* to be used for such purposes (funnily enough, RIPA was to deal with terrorism...).

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anothercynic
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Re: Funny how everyone points at the Tories doing all kinds of shenanigans...

Please. "This was New Labor" is the standard bloody excuse that any Labourite of the more lefty persuasion comes up with. Without 'New Labour', Labour would've been consigned to the loony bin for decades already. Thanks to New Labour, Labour *had* its time in the sun for the better part of 17 years. So no. "This was New Labor" doesn't cut it. At. All.

One thing I *do* and *will* agree with you on is one of your closing comments... Yes, yes they are muppet farms. British politics is infested with them. Muppets, that is.

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Firefox hooks up with HaveIBeenPwned for account pwnage probe

anothercynic
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HIBP extension

1Password already uses k-anonymity and it's a good thing.

I would love to see more systems use this, purely to make things safer/better. I trust Troy Hunt more than other people... he's always been upfront and honest about what he does, and Cloudflare's been kind to him since it seems they both are on the same moral compass direction...

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Israel cyber chief's 'pants' analogy for password security deemed, well, 'pants'

anothercynic
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Remind me...

... To never sit on a chair you sat on first. Going commando? Eww.

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GDPR forgive us, it's been one month since you were enforced…

anothercynic
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Re: How difficult is it to disable slurp?

I had so much fun with that one... Disable ad cookies, POP goes Forbes. Lovely.

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anothercynic
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Re: All of which just proves....

What is interesting about several recruiters (especially those who bought a certain CV site that allowed you to set up *one* CV and then let various recruiters who were signed up at it) is that they emailed me several times *begging* me to update my details because of GDPR and that they'd have to delete my data otherwise. Guess what... they're still emailing me to tell me I *must* update my info to allow them to serve my data. Hang on, didn't you say you were going to delete it? Why haven't you?

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National ID cards might not mean much when up against incompetence of the UK Home Office

anothercynic
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@silverfern

This is called a hangover from an Empire.

One reason the UK *never* signed up to the full Schengen agreements was that it would've had to tighten up its entry requirements for any visitors from the Commonwealth. Given that the Commonwealth was (and still is) larger than the EU, it was a no brainer for the powers of the day ("shall we alienate our former colonies or shall we just pull the shutters halfway down to the EU?")...

And of course Ireland has its own special relationship with the bigger island to its east, which meant Ireland is not part of the full Schengen agreement either (otherwise you'd be able to fly to Dublin on your UK driving licence, and then fly from there to Europe without a passport).

Rationalising all of that will be slightly more problematic, but given that the UK has already pulled the shutters down on pretty much all of its Commonwealth partners (look at the 'dark grey' areas here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_the_United_Kingdom), the UK might as well sign up to the full Schengen agreement and get it over and done with.

But... oh. Brexit. That'll change everything in 2019, yes?

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anothercynic
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Re: Main issue I've always had with the ID Card schemes

@Ali Dodd, while I agree with you, the DVLA and the HO (well, the Passport Office) already share data. If you apply for a driving licence (or a replacement), you can, should you choose to, tell the DVLA to get the info from the Passport Office (if you have a passport number) as a secondary ID check, and ditto when you apply for a replacement/renewal of your passport.

THAT kind of integration I don't mind, because that *does* make things easier. Of course it requires careful data rules in place.

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anothercynic
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Re: ID isn't the problem

That seems an odd attitude. Either the government already has that data on you, by being born in the UK. More so if you're on the electoral roll, have a passport, drivers licence, own property etc. Oh, and if you have a bank account or mail delivered to your house or are the chief tenant.

Being on the electoral roll or owning property does not automatically mean you're a citizen, you *do* realise that, yes? Ditto for bank accounts or having mail delivered to your address... All that proves is an address (and someone by said name living there). Driving licences are not proof of citizenship either. The UK requires some countries to exchange their driving licences for a UK licence within two years of arrival (notably Commonwealth countries who have a compatible licence scheme). The EEA licences are valid in the UK under EU regs. Country of birth (as registered on the driving licence) is not an indicator of citizenship either. :-)

This also goes for the rest of the EU... I hate biometrics, but since I was able to read my own passport with a government-reg scanner and see what's on there, I'm a little bit more relaxed about it. The 'biometrics' kept on there are literally just a digital image of your face and the machine-readable data that's on the page in the passport anyway. The only thing it does *not* have that EEA passports *do* (for those signed up to the full Schengen agreement) is fingerprints. Quite frankly I don't see why that would constitute an issue for a passport (an ID card on the other hand... well... *waggles hand*).

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anothercynic
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Re: ID isn't the problem

MonkeyCee, but you know its roots, yes? "IHRE PAPIERE!"

Oh yes... the Nazis have a lot to answer for... But the one indirect effect it's had is that the Netherlands have one of the most pain-in-the-ass Data Protection regulators in the EU (in one sense even more anally retentive than the Germans, ironically). They take citizen privacy *really* seriously because of that.

Most European countries have always had the requirement of registration of foreigners at their local police station (read some historical paperwork around the turn of the 1900s where it was an expected courtesy to make yourself known to the local authorities), and that's also why some (old) hotels still ask for your passport (to hold on to).

Back in the old days when births were registered locally, birth certificates were... well... basic. Once more authoritarian regimes came into being (notably the Fascists in the 20-30's and the Apartheid regime in Africa in the 50's) or wars required this (ask the Japanese-Americans in the US and Canada about their internment during the wars), there was a requirement to register all citizens centrally to enforce the withholding/grant of benefits/rights correctly and strictly.

The UK has a Citizen Card which is a HO- and police-approved ID card that gives you proof of age and photo ID (which is nice if you don't have a driving licence). Of course it's not accepted EEA-wide (because that requires biometrics).

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anothercynic
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@JC_

Presumably my down-voters haven't had experience of dealing with the Home Office under Theresa May.

I commiserate with you, and for this reason you employ a solicitor (preferably one familiar with HO politics/procedure) who can cut through all the bullshit. They're expensive, but OH. MY. GOD, are they worth the money! Let them deal with the drama, the crap of rude/unhelpful HO staff, you just provide what they need to know to do their job.

Had to do that a few times and never regretted it (although it left me somewhat poorer).

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Linux literally loses its Lustre – HPC filesystem ditched in new kernel

anothercynic
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Uh-oh...

... That'll make the HPC people across the road very happy. NOT.

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Indiegogo lawyer asks ZX Spectrum reboot firm: Where's the cash?

anothercynic
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Kickstarter > Indiegogo

I've found so far that all but one of my Kickstarters have delivered. The one outstanding is for a *very* innovative umbrella, but I've pretty much all but written off that 'investment/speculative presale/donation/whatever-you-wanna-call-it-today'. I'll be *very* pleased if it eventually delivers, but I'm not holding my breath.

As for Indiegogo... 100% of my projects there have failed (that's one of one projects), and the response I got from Indiegogo's customer services after questioning whether the project was allowed to hold my 'reward' hostage ('pay an additional £40 or you won't get it') was sufficiently bad to write them off as a credible crowdfunding platform for life.

I know of people who've had the exact inverse experience, so it's a bit of a toss-up really... Crowdfunders are a good thing in general; it's a shame that RCL has seriously screwed this up.

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AI military upstart attacked by Russian malware, Twitter fires up TensorFlow, and more

anothercynic
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Re: "AI..suffers from a lack of diversity. Opening a lab in Ghana will provide more opportunities"

Which Royal family would that be?

Nigeria has several tribes, all of which have a royal family...

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No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

anothercynic
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Re: Yet another Remoaner circle-jerk on El Reg.

Awwwwwwww, widdle Edward didn't like it, now he takes his ball and goes home!

Just like... Oh. Wait.

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anothercynic
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive

If that is what we would've wanted, then that's what we would've negotiated when the Galileo project rules were written. But we didn't. WE were the ones saying "NO non-EU state should have PRS". We insisted on it. Now the EU is applying *exactly* that rule and you don't like it and say "But NATO states should perhaps have it"? Bollocks.

Suck it up, princess.

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anothercynic
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive

Shadmeister, please. Stop playing the "Oh but the EU are being baddies!" card. It is so beneath you. Come up with something better.

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anothercynic
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Ja, Christoph...

... This is what one calls in the English parlance to "want to have the cake and eat it too".

But that's *not* how the Brexit game is played...

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First A380 flown in anger to be broken up for parts

anothercynic
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Perfectly safe. Every part is checked and verified exhaustively. Planes that are written off (after a crash) are often parted out. If the engines are still good (which these are), they're shifted on to another plane (Dr Peters is leasing the RR plants on their bodies back to Airbus/Singapore). Landing gear will be good, as will the usual movable gear like flaps, spoilers, flaperons... the APU will also still be in excellent condition. The interiors will have been gutted by Singapore already, taking what they can (and what's theirs anyway).

This recycling job will be good news for the airliner recyclers, because they get to document and figure out how to recycle an A380 as best as possible.

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anothercynic
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Except...

... They found that even if the A380F had gone ahead, its freight-lifting capability compared to the B747F (-400F, -8F) was still not as economic. Upper passenger deck would've had to be strengthened a lot to deal with more pallets. I may be wrong, but that's what I was told was one of the issues, along with the smaller amount of LD containers that could be loaded. :-/

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anothercynic
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Re: This underlines one more thing

The issue is that the A380 (and B747) weren't economic in the era of the wide bodied long range twin motor.

Incorrect. Singapore Airlines has just taken delivery of new A380 bodies to replace the ones that went off-lease. The reason why MSN003 and their contemporaries are being retired is because they are fat. They are the first of their kind... some things hadn't been ironed out yet. Later bodies were better, the processes had smoothed out, weight was shaved off. Why should someone like SQ fly with jets that are older, more tired, need more TLC when new jets are literally there for use.

And the A380 *is* economic. It is always full between LHR and SIN and FRA and SIN. You cannot for the life of you get reward tickets in business or first. Emirates makes the A380 run pretty full every single flight. It's the 17 hour flights that need smaller jets that can do longer distances. The new SQ flight between SIN and EWR (Newark) will be *all* Premium Economy and Business. There won't be economy on that flight.

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anothercynic
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Re: This underlines one more thing

The A380neo is likely to happen. Emirates is betting on it. But I think Rolls has their hands full sorting out the production issues they're experiencing with the Trent 1000 on the B787-9 that's causing airlines like Virgin Atlantic, Air New Zealand and some others a *lot* of pain right now (hence Virgin Atlantic reviving some of their A340-200 and A340-500's), and I have yet to see Engine Alliance say they're investigating improving the engine package for a 'NEO'. There are some bits in the non-engine hardware that will be improved (like sharklets, more supercritical and laminar flow stuff on the wings...)

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Security execs must prep for post-Brexit cyber challenges – report

anothercynic
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@Anonymous

The 'pillocks in charge of the EU' are doing what they are charged with doing, looking out for the interests of the EU26, *NOT* the UK. The UK is the one who wants to leave. The UK wants the cake and eat it despite being told that it cannot ("But I can. Sure I can. You must let me! But if you don't you're just being mean"). No, the 'pillocks in charge of the EU' are doing exactly what us Remainers (Remoaners in your eyes no doubt) said they would do if the UK chose to do this utterly moronic thing.

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WikiLeaks took 10 days to reject Cambridge Analytica's US emails bid, says Tricksy Nixy

anothercynic
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You should read Carole Cadwalladr's live commentary...

... During this debate. It is truly hilarious.

Nix sneeringly referred to her as 'Carole in the Guardian'. That amused her to no end.

The crowning moment was when she posted:

Nix has now gone full Etonian. Never go full Etonian.

"I THINK we have now concluded, and we are ALL in agreement that Cambridge Analytica undertook no work in Britain."

-- Twitter

Ohhhhhh yes... dissed and dismissed.

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GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

anothercynic
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SCCS

*spasm* *twitch* *twitch* *gag*

You know this means I have to go back to therapy, right? (oh dear God, why! why!)

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anothercynic
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@Waseem Alkurdi

Wouldn't that be FSUD? ;-)

Although I like this very much!

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Uber 'does not exist any more' says Turkish president

anothercynic
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Re: Good. Lyft, Uber & their ilk suck arse.

@Charlie Clark, or by simply having their investors soak up the losses (as Uber and Lyft are at the moment).

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anothercynic
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Re: NYC medallions

Hailo didn't do itself favours by communicating badly with the drivers, but at the same time, the London cabbies are an obstinate bunch anyway. *sigh*

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MH370 search ends – probably – without finding missing 777

anothercynic
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Re: Silver lining

The fact that the industry and ICAO have made this happen is enough proof that this considered a good spend. With longer and more direct flights (like DOH-AKL, LHR-PER, SIN-JFK, MEL-DFW) over vast previously not-particularly-well-tracked oceans, it's a necessity and peace of mind for not only the passengers but the operators as well.

There won't be 'drop-outs' anymore like there tend to be across Africa and the southern parts of the Pacific and Indian Oceans (it's "fun" when the Air New Zealand flight from Buenos Aires to Auckland 'disappears' from tracked space for 8+ hours, or the Qantas Perth to Johannesburg flight)...

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anothercynic
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Re: Silver lining

We will have to see what is deemed realistic in terms of technological options and available budget in the (cut-throat) passenger airline industry to prevent another MH370 mystery. Beyond that we will have to see when MH370's remains will be found. Hopefully before its FDR and CVR black boxes have to be written off completely.

We won't 'have to see'. :-)

We *already* see what is deemed realistic. New Iridium satellites being hoisted aloft are hosting Aireon payloads that will provide very good ADS-B coverage across *all* regions of the planet (not just where most maritime/aviation traffic is) with this coverage being exposed through sites like Flightradar24, Airbus has designed ejectable black boxes that are now (or soon) being fitted to their smaller jets, and airlines are fitting and subscribing to data tracking services from SITAonair, Gogo, and Inmarsat. More is happening that we don't know about until the PR hits the trade news.

However, whether older jets (like the vast numbers of B737/47/57/67/77s, and A300/10/20/30/40s plying the skies today) will be retrofitted is another question... It will be great (and a long-awaited closure) for the families to find the MH370 wreckage. No doubt more will be washed up somewhere at some point...

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SpaceX to pick up the space pace with yet another Falcon 9 launch

anothercynic
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@x 7...

Do you intend to prosecute Boeing (with their expendable Delta), Roscosmos (with their Soyuz rockets) and Arianespace (with Ariane and Vega) too?

If not, do please take a hike. How about you clean up single-use plastics first? And waxed/plasticised paper? And everything else that's single-use? Thank you.

(and you're welcome to downvote this)

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Ex-staffer of UK.gov dept bags payout after boss blabbed medical info to colleagues

anothercynic
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@R69

There is sharing "So and so is currently on leave because of an illness, and when they come back, please be sensitive about any short-notice absences they may need to take because of it" and there is "so and so is currently on leave because of <insert name of illness here> and is suffering of <insert long list of side effects etc>, so when they come back, please be sensitive about any short-notice absences they may need to take because of <insert list of particularly embarrassing side effects>".

I'm sure the latter does not apply, but I *have* seen employers (managers et al) making more of a fuss about things than using common sense.

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Max Schrems is back: Facebook, Google hit with GDPR complaint

anothercynic
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Oh yes...

*sets up popcorn stall* :-)

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Uber robo-ride's deadly crash: Self-driving car had emergency braking switched off by design

anothercynic
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@Martin-73, I'd second this, although with the caveat that the programme director who chose not to include a second person in the car (and hence burdening the driver with the touchscreen entry) should rather be prosecuted than the driver.

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It's hip to be Square: Twitter founder Jack Dorsey's other firm targets White Van Man

anothercynic
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Square vs iZettle...

... Square missed the boat in Europe when they took forever to get themselves sorted out. iZettle saw the Square USP and delivered it to Europe, showed how much better things are with it, and lo and behold, Paypal is swallowing iZettle up.

The whole taking-debit-card-payment thing is growing and something like iZettle definitely helps. One of my preferred local taxi drivers got himself an iZettle and he says it gets used at least once a day, if not more, and as much as another one I know had it, he didn't really advertise it and hence has to deal with cash... lots of it.

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Can't pay Information Commissioner's fine? No problem! Just liquidate your firm

anothercynic
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Re: I'm confused

A "fifth off", a "discount of one fifth", a "discount of 20%"...

Grammar and maths, eh?

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EmDrive? More like BS drive: Physics-defying space engine flunks out

anothercynic
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@Jtom, ummmm... that's not how science is done in *my* field.

Yes, models exist, but the *models* are adjusted to match the data, not vice versa.

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anothercynic
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@cyberdemon

... on balance, my suspicion is, it's bollocks

Give any physicist a challenge and they'll do it just to prove/disprove that challenge. Even if it disproves it as bollocks, that's still valuable data! :-)

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Swiss sausage sizzler 4.0 hits 200 bangers per hour

anothercynic
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Re: No Char

@BebopWeBop, HERETIC!!! :-D

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anothercynic
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Re: 1400 degrees?

@jake, what about the banana hammock? Where does that go?? :-D

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anothercynic
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Re: No Char

What's wrong with Fleischkäse (Leberkäse)? It's great with brauner Butter (beurre noisette) and Kartoffelbrei (mashed potatoes for y'all Englishfolk).

A good Bratwurst is hard to beat, and it beats the crap 'sausages' you get in your average food van at British events... Cumberlands or good quality English sausages of various counties are smashingly good though. :-)

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Kids and the web latest: 'Won't somebody please think of the children!' US Congresscritters plead

anothercynic
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Do Not Track Kids Act?

What? No cutesy backronym? No cutesy acronym? The US Congress disappoints me!

Booooooooo! ;-)

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Finally: Historic Eudora email code goes open source

anothercynic
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I paid for it...

Eudora v3 and then v4 were the best things ever (compared to early versions of Outlook *gag*, Internet Exploder Mail *urghhhh*, Notes *argggghhhh*).

*siiiiigh* The good old days... *dreams on*

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'Facebook takes data from my phone – but I don't have an account!'

anothercynic
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Re: 'Where is it?'

Can you modify its permissions? :-)

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LG chairman Koo Bon-moo dies, aged 73

anothercynic
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Gosh yes...

... Goldstar, huge in Africa along with Technics and... Aiwa! Who still remembers them?

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Bowel down: Laxative brownies brought to colleague's leaving bash

anothercynic
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Re: Dumb move

Why anyone want to eat sugarfree Haribo is beyond me (other than being diabetic)!

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