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* Posts by gnasher729

757 posts • joined 13 Oct 2014

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Watt the heck is this? A 32-core 3.3GHz Arm server CPU shipping? Yes, says Ampere

gnasher729
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Re: 125W for ARM?

"Well there are 32 of them in there. So about 3.9W each."

I heard there is an iPhone XI prototype with this chip. Empties the battery in 16.9 seconds. Explodes your charger after 1 min 15 seconds.

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gnasher729
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Re: Drivers?

How difficult is it to compiler for ARM?

Every iOS developer knows it's trivial. There's the iOS simulator on your Mac running x86 code (32 bit or 64 bit, depending on the emulated device), and there's the real devices running ARM code (32 bit or 64 bit, depending on the emulated device). There are no problems with endianness, and you can even use SIMD code if you use the compiler functionality and not x86 or ARM specific extensions.

So unless your application has lots of x86 assembler code, there's no problem at all.

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Revealed: The billionaire baron who’ll ride Elon’s thrusting erection to the Moon and back

gnasher729
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Prediction

"The billionaire baron who’ll ride Elon’s thrusting erection to the Moon and back". That's a prediction, not a statement of fact. Only a fact _if_ the rocket can take off with this guy inside without exploding, and _if_ it makes it all the way to the moon. and _if_ it makes it back to earth. That's three very big IFs.

Some things of interest like "passenger still alive" should also be mentioned.

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UK.gov isn't ready for no-deal Brexit – and 'secrecy' means businesses won't be either

gnasher729
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Re: Hmm

"then nothing would have happened, because the Remain would have been the biggest response."

Which in hindsight would have been the best choice, because right now we have the choice between a total disaster (whatever deal we get, and with almost two years wasted it won't be a good one), and an even worse disaster (no deal at all).

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gnasher729
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Re: Hmm

Actually, nobody voted for "leave". Or for "remain".

Most people voted for "whatever is best for the country", or "whatever is best for me", plus far too many "whatever shows the politicians that I hate them all". Sure, there was huge disagreement what is best, but the huge majority voted for whatever is best.

I suppose the ones putting their cross behind "leave" didn't expect the utter incompetence that this was handled with. Starting with a David Davis who was utterly, utterly incompetent and lazy. Who didn't have the slightest clue how the EU work. Starting with wanting to negotiate individual trade deals with Germany, France etc. and being too stupid to know that this CANNOT happen as long as these countries are in the EU. Totally unprepared. And then to try to save his job, when he figured out he couldn't deliver anything, he started these nonsense talks about "no deal" brexit. "Hey guys, I totally fucked up, but don't worry, we will be fine".

Then comes Raab. For about a week who looked as if he was seriously negotiating, then he starts the same rubbish about leaving with no deal. Not paying the bill. What does he think will happen? I think that the French would decide that without payment, they cannot pay more than one French customs officer, so the amount of goods going between UK and France will be practically zero.

With a competent government, this could all have worked out fine. Alas...

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One Ring to pwn them all: IoT doorbell can reveal your Wi-Fi key

gnasher729
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If your network uses WEP 2, which it most likely does, then the encryption of any WiFi connection can be cracked by anyone connected to the network. So a crook with your WiFi password can connect to your network, and then crack your own connection, and listen to everything your computer or your phone does.

Most important are unencrypted emails, insecure websites still using http, and possibly WiFi connected printers.

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Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

gnasher729
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If anyone from your old company reads this, they know who you are. What you did was major criminal damage to their systems. You shouldn't be surprised if they asked someone to do major criminal damage to your knee caps. Obviously not know, may one or two years from now so there is no visible connection.

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gnasher729
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Re: One move and we shoot

"We're moving your job/team role(s) to India. Who want's to emigrate?"

I had a colleague once who had done that. On his UK salary.

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Probably for the best: Apple makes sure eSIMs won't nuke the operators

gnasher729
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Re: eSIM sucks

"Try (factory-)unlocking a network-locked iPhone. eBay is filled with iPhones that won't unlock."

I think you are confusing two things - iPhones locked to a network, and iPhones locked with a passcode.

If you use a passcode for your phone and it gets locked, you need the passcode to unlock it. If you are the rightful owner and forgot the passcode (your own fault), or you are a thief with a stolen phone, or you are the unfortunate heir of a deceased person with an iPhone and don't know the passcode, then there is just no f***ing way to unlock that phone. You can't do it, Apple can't do it. There are plenty of such phones on eBay, and they are worthless except to be used for parts. Most of them I expect to be stolen.

If your phone is locked to a network, the network operator can unlock it. Many don't like to do it, and try to make it impossible for you to unlock. The easiest way around is to buy a phone from Apple directly, they are all unlocked and as far as I know, the network operator you pick can't lock them.

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gnasher729
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"I’d give it a year or two before the physical SIM slot joins the headphone socket in the history books."

But the dual SIMs will stay, even if they become to eSims. The benefit for Apple: Lots of people want two phone numbers. Today, they might buy a $750 iPhone and a $250 Android phone. In the future, they would buy one iPhone, and since they save $250 they might go for the $1,000 iPhone. So the dual SIM will make Apple more money. (Plus the buyers who paid $750 for two Android phones and might switch to a single iPhone).

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gnasher729
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Re: eSIMs make so much sense

"The phone could intelligently choose the best SIM out of my collection for the location I'm in. I could "pin" the main SIM for incoming calls, but set data and outgoing calls through my roaming SIM. I could buy SIMs and have them sent to my phone. Phone networks could even allow me to connect and purchase a SIM when I roam their network for the first time. SIMs could have properties like expiring after 30 days or after the credit is used up etc."

That's not how it works. A SIM is associated with a phone number. Two SIMs, two phone numbers. Many people will use that to have a private phone and a works phone in the same case. If your wife calls your private number, the private phone SIM is used. If your boss calls you on the works number, the works phone SIM is used. And when you call your boss, you want to call him using your works phone number, so again the works phone Sim is used.

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A basement of broken kit, zero budget – now get the team running

gnasher729
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Re: HMSO

When I was young I was told once “work is a scarce resource that should be sparingly use. “

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You know all those movies you bought from Apple? Um, well, think different: You didn't

gnasher729
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"it seems to me that Apple made a legal misrepresentation. but i'm not a lawyer. just a nobody who cant make sense of the stupidity of copyright law and how it distinctly smells like an attempt to 'legally' deny my (what i thought were inaliable) rights to freedom to do whatever the f*ck i want to whatever the f*ck i own."

Only because the facts are being badly misrepresented.

You buy the movie. Which gives you the right to download it, and keep it and play it forever. As a convenience, you can download the movie again, as long as Apple sells it. But that's just a convenience. You purchased the version that you downloaded. It's yours. Look after it. Don't throw it away as this guy did.

(Now personally I think renting is much more cost effective, because I rarely watch the same movie four times, but that's a different matter).

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gnasher729
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Re: Where do you put those hard drives?

"Apple machines can't even use USB drives? If that's the case, combined with all the other limitations you cite, then it's pretty clear that Apple machines are so flawed that they shouldn't be considered fit for purpose."

If that was the case, then yes. But DABS sells a nice 8 TB USB-C drive for £186. If you have a new iMac, you buy four USB-C hubs, 28 of these drives, plug it all in, and you about 200 Terabyte of disk space available. Maybe that's a bit exaggerated, mine has 9 TB connected.

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gnasher729
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Re: music

So you had no backup?

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gnasher729
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Re: Music...

Just like movies, it only disappears if _you_ delete it. The headline is totally misleading. The guy's movie didn't disappear. Apple didn't delete it. He deleted it himself, and then couldn't download it again.

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gnasher729
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Re: The larger lesson

I just turned WiFi off (and no Ethernet on my MacBook), opened a movie purchased from iTunes a few years ago, and it just played. It cannot vanish at any time. It's there forever unless I throw it away.

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gnasher729
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"So Apple basically told him that he should have downloaded the films to his disk when he had the chance. But does the DRM not prevent this? Only streaming is allowed right? It is a lose-lose for the guy in the case study."

You were always allowed and able to download Apple movies to your disk and keep them there permanently. "Only streaming is allowed right?" Wrong. Every single movie that I purchased this way (and it's not many, most come from DVDs) is downloaded, and backed up twice. As long as my computer and my backups don't break down at the same time, I've got these movies forever.

What the guy missed: The first download gets you the purchased movie. After that, you can download again as a convenience, for example on another device, but only as a convenience and only as long as Apple has the rights. He purchased the movie, downloaded it, _threw it away_ and now he can't get a new copy. Worlds smallest violin plays the worlds saddest song.

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The grand-plus iPhone is the new normal – this is no place for paupers

gnasher729
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Re: Exchange rate

Oh no, another poor downtrodden Brit. They are all out to get you.

The reality is that since Nigel and Boris started their project "self destruct", you got $1.50 for a pound, and now it is $1.25. And the VAT is 20%, which means out of every £999 a whopping £166.50 goes straight to HMRC. And yes, if your iPhone breaks down between one and two years when it's not covered by manufacturer's warranty, the seller in the UK has to fix it, when in the USA you are out of luck. That's close in value to a year of extra warranty,

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gnasher729
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Re: Exchange rate

"I'm more disgusted by the $999 = £999 bullshit."

Say hello to Nigel and Boris. And Raab and Rees-Mogg doing their best to help out. The dollar is down to about 1.25 again. Add in 20% VAT (US sales tax is not displayed in the price), the cost of European consumer protection laws, and that's what you get.

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gnasher729
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Re: SE gone - so am I :-(

"Are they really ? They sold a lot of the original X, which didn’t come cheap either. As long as people buy them, I expect we’ll see more of the same. Maybe the next iteration will be “only 1999 !”."

The original iPhone X is replaced with the iPhone Xs, which as far as I can see is quite similar but with lots of improvements, so you get a better phone with the Xs, for the exact same number.

The big Xs is the same, just bigger. You pay a bit more for the size. You have the choice to buy either tons of storage or a shitload of storage for extra money, but that is your choice. Being able to spend tons on 512 GB doesn't mean the phone has become more expensive.

And the Xr is £750. It's a lot, but Apple replaced the high end of their range. Like Mercedes selling a bunch of new S-class models, and everyone complains about the price, while all the cheaper models stayed the same.

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gnasher729
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Re: Apple ecosystem

"iOS software is just as easy to pirate, but less people do because... " it involves jailbreaking, and you have no idea if your jailbreak is sponsored by the Chinese or by the NSA.

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A boss pinching pennies may have cost his firm many, many pounds

gnasher729
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Re: Sam Vimes Theory of Economic Injustice

My mom always said: "We are poor. We can't afford to buy cheap things".

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Trend Micro tools tossed from Apple's Mac App Store after spewing fans' browser histories

gnasher729
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Re: 1 - 2 - 3 - Not it!

"It's in the EULA that you didn't read."

Actually, if your app is on the app store, it must also follow the rules of Apple's default EULA. And if you were hiding that it was violating the app store rules (which Trend Micro probably did), Apple can refund all the customers and ask Trend Micro back for the money. For the complete 100% of the purchase price, not the 70% that Trend Micro received.

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gnasher729
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"I'm sure Apple made copies of all URL traffic for their own records."

You obviously mean while testing the app, using a device that is owned by Apple, and the application submitted for review by some company, they will make copies of all URL traffic for their own records? Quite possible. More possible that they will do it in the future. Very possible that they will modify their phones they use for testing to not report "Cupertino" as their location, but some random place in the world.

If you mean traffic on my Mac while I use it: Don't be f***ing ridiculous.

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gnasher729
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Re: VW-ing (cheating) the App-Store screening?

"Could Trend Micro have coded the apps to detect when they are being tested by Apple and not do the data slurp?"

Uber turned some anti-privacy features off if they found that your phone was in or near Cupertino, where the reviews are done.

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Vodafone hounds Czech customers for bills after they were brute-forced with Voda-issued PINs

gnasher729
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Re: Geofencing for logins?

At some point, geolocation was relevant to my job. At that time I found out that while most IP addresses in the USA have a quite precise geolocation, about ten percent have a geolocation that basically means "USA". But since each geolocation has precise coordinates, "USA" had coordinates that matched a little farm in Kansas.

They have (usually armed) police there every wee, when for example police in Los Angeles finds a drug dealer's phone with geolocation = USA = little farm in Kansas. (My phone's geolocation was in the middle of the River Thames).

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Apple cops to iPhone 8 production oops, offers to fix borked phones

gnasher729
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Re: Not Europe?

One: No "six year guarantee" in the UK. Six years is when any obligations run out. If your phone breaks after one year 364 days you have lots of time to complain (six years). If your phone breaks after two years and a day, out of luck.

Two: The device should have worked for a reasonable amount of time. If it doesn't, and there is no sign of damage, then it is a production problem. There's your proof.

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gnasher729
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Re: Am I being over cynical?

You seem to think there are companies that build phones that are sometimes faulty, and companies that build phones without any faults. That's not the case.

You have companies that sometimes build faulty phones, offer to fix them, and the register reports. You have companies doing the same, and the register doesn't report. And the same with phones with faults that don't get fixed.

For Samsung phones, you only hear about it if they explode. For Huawei phones, for example, you just don't hear about it.

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Boffins are building an open-source secure enclave on RISC-V

gnasher729
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Re: What we would actually need...

If everything is Open Source, then you don't need to "modify" a processor - just design your RISC V2 that is entirely compatible with RiSC V except for some spying ability, then when someone orders RISC-V chips you supply them unmodified RISC-V2 chips.

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Apple to require privacy policy on all apps

gnasher729
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Re: re: Anything interactive MUST collect data as a matter of course, and usually use that data

"Are you saying that any app that I interact with will collect my data?"

No. What he is saying is that any app that you use interactively, needs to get _some_ data from you. Just today I used the Maps application to get directions from one place to another. The directions come from Apple's server, and took a major traffic jam into consideration (which unfortunately took the life of a bycicle rider). Apple needed my starting location and my destination, otherwise they wouldn't be able to give directions.

The privacy statement is there to tell me what Apple does with my start and end location. Clearly Apple must _receive_ that data, but there is no good reason why they would keep that information. Same for all the other information that other companies receive.

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gnasher729
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Re: 4 Lane Privacy Highway

iAd is dead. Apple has taken technical measures now so that a random app cannot find out what other applications are installed on your device (only if you give Apple a list of those apps, and give them a good reason why you should know if these apps are installed. For example, if you want the user to be able to send emails to your support, then you can check whether the Mail app is installed).

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gnasher729
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Re: 4 Lane Privacy Highway

Well, looking at this, I can't help noticing that Apple is not Google, Apple is not Facebook, and Apple is not Microsoft.

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Ad watchdog: Amazon 'misleading' over Prime next-day delivery ads

gnasher729
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Re: Well!!

80 % means “almost no exceptions “ to you?

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gnasher729
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Re: Snowflakes

And one extra snowy snowflake thinks that poor Amazon needs a knight in shining armour to defend them from the idiots who believed Amazon’s dross about next day delivery.

If they can’t deliver next day due to bad weather, all they need to do is advertise “no next day delivery due to bad weather”. So the bad weather is no excuse.

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Prank 'Give me a raise!' email nearly lands sysadmin with dismissal

gnasher729
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Re: Asking for a what?

"Point of information: in English, the thing you ask for if you want to be paid more is a "rise". I believe this word is difficult for foreigners, who misspell is (sic) "raise"."

Being a pedant doesn't give you much sympathy. Being a pedant and wrong makes you a fool. Congratulations. Being a pedant, wrong, and not being able to string a sentence together without making mistakes ...

A "raise" on its own, no further words attached, is an increase in salary, especially in US English.

A "rise in salary", with the word "rise" attached to another word, is British English for an increase.

So: "I got a raise" and "I got a rise in salary" are both perfectly fine. You would never ask for a "rise", even in British English (well, YOU might). You ask for a "raise" or a "rise in salary".

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Game over for Google: Fortnite snubs Play Store, keeps its 30%, sparks security fears

gnasher729
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"Nothing says they have to use google's in-app purchase mechanism either - amazon don't pay 30% to google when I use their app to buy some tat, neither do just-eat."

An interesting point. I don't know the Play Store rules, but the App Store rules.

Any purchase that ends up in some way on your phone (like ebooks, music, video, magazines etc.) can be purchased as an in-app purchase (30% to Apple) or can be purchased outside (0% to Apple), but you are not allowed to advertise for outside purchases within the app.

Any purchase that ends up outside your phone (like tat from Amazon, or just-eat which ends up in your stomach) CAN NOT be purchased as an in-app purchase. You can do all the purchasing in your app using your own code, you can advertise for it in your app, Apple gets zero percent, but you are not allowed to use Apple's in-app purchase mechanism for it.

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gnasher729
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Re: I can't blame Epic for doing this...

"Because in the EU/EEA, Apple is a minor bit player in terms of numbers and customers. They aren't even close to being a monopoly."

There are other points. One is that you could argue that Apple has some rights to do things with Apple phones, and Google would have the same rights with Google phones, but they try to extend this to Samsung, Huawei, Sony, and plenty other phones. So that is a different situation right there.

The other thing that this is all about consumer rights. So both for Apple and Google, you'd need to argue how a consumer is damaged, not a games manufacturer.

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gnasher729
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Re: If they really want to send a signal

"then Epic should pull Fortnite from iTunes. Otherwise, the only lesson to be learned by Google is that they need to shut down the side load avenue too."

As others said before, but I can repeat it: Apple gets a percentage of the sale price, which is zero, so Apple gets 30% of nothing to host the app on their servers, to review it so there's nothing dogy going on, and to display it in their app store app. (And to Apple having lots of apps making users buy lots of iPhones is more important than getting money from app sales).

Apple also gets a percentage of any in-app sale (30%, 15% for subscriptions). But you don't have to use in-app sales; you can do all sales through your web site. You can also do both at the same time, so if you have a $10 item to sell, you get $7 from every in-app purchase, and $10 from every purchase through your website. The only thing you cannot do is advertise your website sales in the app.

One argument of the company is incorrect: "Development etc. costs 70% of the sale price". No, development costs a fixed amount of money, which you would subtract from whatever money comes in. So the question to decide is not the amount of development cost, it is whether 70% of sales made through Apple is more than 100% made from sales through your website minus cost of running the website, or not. Your development cost doesn't matter for that decision.

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Think tank calls for post-Brexit national ID cards: The kids have phones so what's the difference?

gnasher729
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Re: Just give me one single number

"The main problem I see is not the lack of a physical ID cards, it's the lack of a single number to identify people."

That's easy. Give them all the number ONE. Everyone wants to be number one.

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gnasher729
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Well that problem can be avoided if every British citizen is required to have some stamp on their head, or maybe on their clothing. A start would be a nice shape.

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gnasher729
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Re: FTFY...

There is an extremely high confidence in any UK government to mess it up.

Lately they have been a bit extreme (like David Davies spending two years as the "Brexit" minister and having no clue, no plan, after two years, and trying to convince us that a "hard Brexit", in other words what happens if the Brexit minister totally fucks up, is no big deal).

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gnasher729
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Oh the choice. Aligning with Trump are Antisemitism.

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gnasher729
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Re: ...citing the Windrush scandal as justification.

I think the real problem with the Windrush scandal was that the fine employees at the Home Office were given quota to remove illegal immigrants, and since illegal immigrants are hard to find, they decided it would be much easier to meet their targets by removing legal immigrants who didn't keep all their paperwork in order for the last 40 years.

I wouldn't be surprised if they made a list of all legal immigrants whose landing papers were destroyed, exactly for the purpose of removing them from the country if it seems expedient.

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Apple laughing all the way to the bank – with profits of $5.3m per hour

gnasher729
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Re: Apple: You WILL like our designs.

The same upgrade path is there that was there for many years: You put your computer on eBay, sell it for tons of money (because Macs hold their value much better than PCs) and buy a new one. Which in two years time will be better in any respect.

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Early experiment in mass email ends with mad dash across office to unplug mail gateway

gnasher729
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There's a very simple solution for that: Don't type that kind of shit.

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Core blimey! Apple macOS update lifts boot from MacBook Pro neck

gnasher729
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When Apple stopped selling the 17 inch MBP, the last remaining ones were available in the UK as "refurbished" for about a year. (That's what Apple does if they can't shift old gear. They mark it as "refurbished"). Took a year to sell them all. So apparently there wasn't that much of a market.

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gnasher729
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Re: Poor quality control

"you're holding it the wrong way"

At the time this happened I had a Nokia phone. I read the instruction manual, being curious. And guess what: It had instructions how to hold it. Because holding it wrong meant the reception wasn't anywhere near as good as you would like it to be. I bet lots of phones had similar problems.

"we invent rectangles with rounded corners, no one else may"

Nonsense. A clear demonstration that you don't understand the difference between. utility patents and design patents. Samsung has design patents as well, for a Galaxy kind of design, with Galaxy shaped rectangles with round corners, and they will sue you if you try copying it.

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Hot US deal! IBM wins $83m from Groupon in e-commerce patent spat

gnasher729
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Two question in every patent fight: How good are their patents? And how good are their lawyers? I can't comment on the quality of IBM's patents, but Groupon clearly underestimated their lawyers.

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Spectre/Meltdown fixes in HPC: Want the bad news or the bad news? It's slower, say boffins

gnasher729
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I suppose you could reduce reliance on speculative execution. There are conditional operations (which test a condition but are executed unconditionally), and there are things like the POWER "count" register where loop execution isn't actually speculative - the processor _knows_ that the loop is executed or not. With hyperthreading, you could move execution to the other thread instead of doing speculative memory reads / writes although that might open another side channel.

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