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* Posts by gnasher729

785 posts • joined 13 Oct 2014

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Super Micro chief bean counter: Bloomberg's 'unwarranted hardware hacking article' has slowed our server sales

gnasher729
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Re: I give SuperMicro the benefit of the doubt.

"Not clear they can sue unless they can prove some sort of conspiracy. "

Of course they can sue. It is unlikely they would win a libel suit, since it would be very hard to prove malice. However, if a court ruled "there is not one bit of evidence that Bloomberg's facts are true, but Apple / Amazon etc. cannot prove malice", the companies would be happy with that.

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Court doc typo 'reveals' Julian Assange may have been charged in US

gnasher729
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Re: Well he's a bit of an arse, but...

Not quite what he said would happen. If he is being charged now (and we really don't know that at all), that is many many years later. He could have gone to Sweden, maybe gone to jail for a short time, flown back to Newzealand, all before charges were brought. Now it may be too late.

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iPhone XS: Just another £300 for a better cam- Wait, come back!

gnasher729
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Re: License the OS

Says who? Apple _did_ license MacOS and it did them no good. Nowadays they are making most of the profits in the PC market and a _huge_ part of the profits in the phone market. Licensing MacOS and iOS would be about the stupidest thing they could do.

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Data-nicking UK car repairman jailed six months instead of copping a fine

gnasher729
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The jailtime wasn't due to the severity. He got jail because he wasn't an employee anymore and had no right to access the old employer's computers at all, so he was caught by computer hacking laws. If a regular employee did this (one that had permission to access the data, but obviously not permission to send them to a competitor), it would have only been a data protection violation.

Of course the company can sue him and the receiving company for damages in any case.

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Upset fat iOS gobbles up so much storage? Too bad, so sad, says judge: Apple lawsuit axed

gnasher729
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Re: Yet some manufacturers get it right.

Hidden memory might happen if the manufacturer has different sources. If they buy a million 4GB chips and a million 4.3GB chips, half the customers want to return their devices. They were selling you 4 GB, and you got 4GB, no matter what chip was used.

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gnasher729
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Re: It's marketing lies allowed to become reality.

Actually, nobody expects 1TB to be 1024 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes except some halfwits. The uneducated have no clue. The educated know that 1TB = 1 trillion bytes. Only halfwits confuse TB and TiB.

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Solid state of fear: Euro boffins bust open SSD, Bitlocker encryption (it's really, really dumb)

gnasher729
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Re: The issue is changing the password...

Interesting how you describe quite accurately how encryption on an iPhone works.

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Wow. Apple's only gone and killed off Mac, iPad, iPhone family... figures for units sold to fans

gnasher729
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So what are they going to do when the latest iPhone runs at twice the speed of the latest Samsung phones...

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Mourning Apple's war against sockets? The 2018 Mac mini should be your first port of call

gnasher729
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Re: That £3,859.00 BTO version Andrew is talking about...

... and you could save a few pound by buying the RAM elsewhere.

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Apple breathes new life into MacBook Air with overhauled 2018 model

gnasher729
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Re: Mac mini SSD

"My careful study of Apple's computer division over the past few years has indicated that making stuff people want to buy has been off the table for some time."

My careful study shows they are not selling the stuff _you_ want to buy, but they are selling the stuff _people_ want to buy.

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gnasher729
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Re: Well it will look so stylish...

Two months: Under warranty. 2 years in Europe: Most likely covered by consumer protection laws.

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gnasher729
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Re: Well it will look so stylish...

My 2006 MacBook got retired because I got a faster one, not because it didn't work. My 2010 MacBook works just fine after eight years.

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gnasher729
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Re: I see the $ to £ conversion rate means nothing

"on XE.com the current conversion rate says it should be £941.21"

Oh well. Have you ever heard of VAT? Of the £1,199.00, Apple takes £200,00 straight away and sends them to the nice Mr. Hammond who is going to look after them.

Another major difference is UK customer protection laws, which mean that Apple will have to fix things if they stop working within two years. That doesn't come for free either.

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Apple's launch confirms one thing: It's determined to kill off the laptop for iPads

gnasher729
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Re: Future ARM laptops

There have been rumours for Macs with ARM processor for long time.

I'd say: There _will_ be Macs with Intel processors for a very long time. Current ARM processors are fine compared to a current quad core laptop, but don't come near the high end Macs (18 cores currently).

But if you see that new iPhones and iPads come with half a terabyte or a terabyte of storage, Apple could just let users run MacOS X on an iOS device, possibly as an app. Take an iPhone XR, run the "macOS" app, attach keyboard and monitor.

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China tells Trump to use a Huawei phone to avoid eavesdroppers

gnasher729
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Why would Huawei be safer?

Can someone explain to me why a Huawei phone would be safer than an iPhone?

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Florida man won't be compelled to reveal iPhone passcode, yet

gnasher729
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"Not in the US, maybe, but in the UK, you most certainly can."

I'd like to see a link for that. I assume you actually _read_ what I wrote beyond the first sentence and didn't miss the fine distinction between revealing your password and unlocking a device.

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gnasher729
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There's one thing that should be changed in the article (after checking, obviously): I don't think anyone can be forced to _reveal their password_. They can (or maybe cannot) be forced to _unlock their phone_. Yes, by entering the password, but nobody has the right to see the password they enter. Of course if the phone locks itself after some period of inactivity, they may be forced to unlock it again.

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Apple to dump Intel CPUs from Macs for Arm – yup, the rumor that just won't die is back

gnasher729
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Re: It would be another world changing innovation of Apple

"The only world that changed was the world of the aimless slurping their Starbucks. 99.99999% of 'the world' has little to do with staring and dabbing at a small slab of glass for hours every day."

Wait a second... Are you telling us there are only 700 iPhone users in the world?

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gnasher729
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Re: What else can a move to ARM bring ?

"If Apple did ass extra instructions to an ARM architecture it would fundamentally invalidate every ARM compatible compiler."

Existing compilers would just not use the new instructions. And Apple was always the driving force behind Clang, so you can be sure that any new additions would be supported by Clang - which is what people use to compile MacOS X code. Not that I expect any additions.

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gnasher729
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Re: Worth the RISC

"You'd've thought so, but I've recently contacted the developers of two Mac applications I'm rather fond of (both of them first came out on 68k Macs). They're currently only available in a 32 bit version.

According to the developers, the only way they can convert them to 64 bit is to completely re-write them in Apple's Swift language which they are having to learn. And that's going from Intel to Intel...

On the other hand, I'd guess that if you've got a fully 64 bit application written using Swift and XCode, then Apple will arrange things so that converting an Intel application to ARM will be low-effort, assuming that Macs are switched to ARM CPUs."

Going from 32 bit to 64 bit can produce all kinds of problems, especially if the code was written at a time where nobody that 64 bit might ever exist. As you said, built for 68k Macs initially. That would have been before 1990.

What these developers probably have is _ancient_ code ported to MacOS X using the Carbon framework, which was never ported to 64 bits. That would have happened around 2002 or so when MacOS X was introduced, and stopped being supported about six years ago. There is no requirement to switch to Swift, Objective-C would do just fine. But 32 bit won't run on MacOS 10.15 anyway (that's the next version after the just released one).

Intel 64-bit vs Arm 64-bit using modern frameworks is no problem. The capabilities of both processors are the same, so any code not using Intel assembler code will compile and run identically.

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gnasher729
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Re: Rosetta-a-like is absolutely necessary

"Unless the software developers spend the time to port the x86 application to ARM, there will never, ever be an ARM version."

You know how much effort it will be? Open your project in Xcode, select "x86_64" and "arm64" as the processor architectures, select "Archive" and upload to the App Store.

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gnasher729
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Re: Rosetta-a-like is absolutely necessary

The idea is that you downloaded your old x86 binaries (which won't run on macOS 10.15 anyway) from the App Store, so you just download it again.

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Yes, Americans, you can break anti-piracy DRM if you want to repair some of your kit – US govt

gnasher729
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"It might be worth a lot less if it just plain didn't work coz you didn't fix it. So might be worth a shot. Paperweights are worth less than working phones."

You can always get an "out-of-warranty" repair, which consists of taking your old phone and handing you a new (refurbished) one. If you botch your non-working iPhone to the point where they refuse an "out-of-warranty" repair, then you did indeed cost yourself a lot of money.

(My wife's first iPhone was given to her by a relative, complete with broken screen and speaker not working, we took it to the Apple Store, paid £140 for an "out-of-warranty" repair and she had a new phone. Much cheaper and better than repairing it).

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iPhone 8: Apple has CPU cycles to burn

gnasher729
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Re: What's the point?

240 FPS is for recording slow motion video. You can slow it down by a factor 8 and still play at 30FPS.

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Apple's dark-horse macOS Mojave is out (and it's already pwned)

gnasher729
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Re: Lame name :(

"They ran out of names."

I would have liked Smilodon.

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Working Apple-1 retro fossil auctioned off to mystery bidder for $375,000

gnasher729
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"iPhone XS Max 256GB materials cost $443, phone retails for $1,249"

Maybe if you ask nicely, you can buy a bag full of parts, to be picked up in a factory in China, for $443. Have fun turning it into a working phone.

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Brexit campaigner AggregateIQ challenges UK's first GDPR notice

gnasher729
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"Oh? The ICO is going to take the whole of Canada to task over the action of one company? Really? "

You seem to be under the impression that Canadian courts would somehow be inclined to protect this company. They won't be. They have no reason to be. Canadian courts don't defend scumbags just because they are Canadian.

If there is a UK court that signs off on it, and it can't make this company pay, then they send it to a court in Canada, and that court will make them pay.

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gnasher729
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"Only if the equipment and/or the company personnel are located or operate out of the EU or Britain does GDPR law apply."

That's where you are wrong. If your actions affect EU citizens, that's when the law applies.

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Watt the heck is this? A 32-core 3.3GHz Arm server CPU shipping? Yes, says Ampere

gnasher729
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Re: 125W for ARM?

"Well there are 32 of them in there. So about 3.9W each."

I heard there is an iPhone XI prototype with this chip. Empties the battery in 16.9 seconds. Explodes your charger after 1 min 15 seconds.

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gnasher729
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Re: Drivers?

How difficult is it to compiler for ARM?

Every iOS developer knows it's trivial. There's the iOS simulator on your Mac running x86 code (32 bit or 64 bit, depending on the emulated device), and there's the real devices running ARM code (32 bit or 64 bit, depending on the emulated device). There are no problems with endianness, and you can even use SIMD code if you use the compiler functionality and not x86 or ARM specific extensions.

So unless your application has lots of x86 assembler code, there's no problem at all.

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Revealed: The billionaire baron who’ll ride Elon’s thrusting erection to the Moon and back

gnasher729
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Prediction

"The billionaire baron who’ll ride Elon’s thrusting erection to the Moon and back". That's a prediction, not a statement of fact. Only a fact _if_ the rocket can take off with this guy inside without exploding, and _if_ it makes it all the way to the moon. and _if_ it makes it back to earth. That's three very big IFs.

Some things of interest like "passenger still alive" should also be mentioned.

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UK.gov isn't ready for no-deal Brexit – and 'secrecy' means businesses won't be either

gnasher729
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Re: Hmm

"then nothing would have happened, because the Remain would have been the biggest response."

Which in hindsight would have been the best choice, because right now we have the choice between a total disaster (whatever deal we get, and with almost two years wasted it won't be a good one), and an even worse disaster (no deal at all).

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gnasher729
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Re: Hmm

Actually, nobody voted for "leave". Or for "remain".

Most people voted for "whatever is best for the country", or "whatever is best for me", plus far too many "whatever shows the politicians that I hate them all". Sure, there was huge disagreement what is best, but the huge majority voted for whatever is best.

I suppose the ones putting their cross behind "leave" didn't expect the utter incompetence that this was handled with. Starting with a David Davis who was utterly, utterly incompetent and lazy. Who didn't have the slightest clue how the EU work. Starting with wanting to negotiate individual trade deals with Germany, France etc. and being too stupid to know that this CANNOT happen as long as these countries are in the EU. Totally unprepared. And then to try to save his job, when he figured out he couldn't deliver anything, he started these nonsense talks about "no deal" brexit. "Hey guys, I totally fucked up, but don't worry, we will be fine".

Then comes Raab. For about a week who looked as if he was seriously negotiating, then he starts the same rubbish about leaving with no deal. Not paying the bill. What does he think will happen? I think that the French would decide that without payment, they cannot pay more than one French customs officer, so the amount of goods going between UK and France will be practically zero.

With a competent government, this could all have worked out fine. Alas...

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One Ring to pwn them all: IoT doorbell can reveal your Wi-Fi key

gnasher729
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If your network uses WEP 2, which it most likely does, then the encryption of any WiFi connection can be cracked by anyone connected to the network. So a crook with your WiFi password can connect to your network, and then crack your own connection, and listen to everything your computer or your phone does.

Most important are unencrypted emails, insecure websites still using http, and possibly WiFi connected printers.

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Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

gnasher729
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If anyone from your old company reads this, they know who you are. What you did was major criminal damage to their systems. You shouldn't be surprised if they asked someone to do major criminal damage to your knee caps. Obviously not know, may one or two years from now so there is no visible connection.

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Probably for the best: Apple makes sure eSIMs won't nuke the operators

gnasher729
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Re: eSIM sucks

"Try (factory-)unlocking a network-locked iPhone. eBay is filled with iPhones that won't unlock."

I think you are confusing two things - iPhones locked to a network, and iPhones locked with a passcode.

If you use a passcode for your phone and it gets locked, you need the passcode to unlock it. If you are the rightful owner and forgot the passcode (your own fault), or you are a thief with a stolen phone, or you are the unfortunate heir of a deceased person with an iPhone and don't know the passcode, then there is just no f***ing way to unlock that phone. You can't do it, Apple can't do it. There are plenty of such phones on eBay, and they are worthless except to be used for parts. Most of them I expect to be stolen.

If your phone is locked to a network, the network operator can unlock it. Many don't like to do it, and try to make it impossible for you to unlock. The easiest way around is to buy a phone from Apple directly, they are all unlocked and as far as I know, the network operator you pick can't lock them.

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gnasher729
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"I’d give it a year or two before the physical SIM slot joins the headphone socket in the history books."

But the dual SIMs will stay, even if they become to eSims. The benefit for Apple: Lots of people want two phone numbers. Today, they might buy a $750 iPhone and a $250 Android phone. In the future, they would buy one iPhone, and since they save $250 they might go for the $1,000 iPhone. So the dual SIM will make Apple more money. (Plus the buyers who paid $750 for two Android phones and might switch to a single iPhone).

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gnasher729
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Re: eSIMs make so much sense

"The phone could intelligently choose the best SIM out of my collection for the location I'm in. I could "pin" the main SIM for incoming calls, but set data and outgoing calls through my roaming SIM. I could buy SIMs and have them sent to my phone. Phone networks could even allow me to connect and purchase a SIM when I roam their network for the first time. SIMs could have properties like expiring after 30 days or after the credit is used up etc."

That's not how it works. A SIM is associated with a phone number. Two SIMs, two phone numbers. Many people will use that to have a private phone and a works phone in the same case. If your wife calls your private number, the private phone SIM is used. If your boss calls you on the works number, the works phone SIM is used. And when you call your boss, you want to call him using your works phone number, so again the works phone Sim is used.

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A basement of broken kit, zero budget – now get the team running

gnasher729
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Re: HMSO

When I was young I was told once “work is a scarce resource that should be sparingly use. “

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You know all those movies you bought from Apple? Um, well, think different: You didn't

gnasher729
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"it seems to me that Apple made a legal misrepresentation. but i'm not a lawyer. just a nobody who cant make sense of the stupidity of copyright law and how it distinctly smells like an attempt to 'legally' deny my (what i thought were inaliable) rights to freedom to do whatever the f*ck i want to whatever the f*ck i own."

Only because the facts are being badly misrepresented.

You buy the movie. Which gives you the right to download it, and keep it and play it forever. As a convenience, you can download the movie again, as long as Apple sells it. But that's just a convenience. You purchased the version that you downloaded. It's yours. Look after it. Don't throw it away as this guy did.

(Now personally I think renting is much more cost effective, because I rarely watch the same movie four times, but that's a different matter).

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gnasher729
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Re: Where do you put those hard drives?

"Apple machines can't even use USB drives? If that's the case, combined with all the other limitations you cite, then it's pretty clear that Apple machines are so flawed that they shouldn't be considered fit for purpose."

If that was the case, then yes. But DABS sells a nice 8 TB USB-C drive for £186. If you have a new iMac, you buy four USB-C hubs, 28 of these drives, plug it all in, and you about 200 Terabyte of disk space available. Maybe that's a bit exaggerated, mine has 9 TB connected.

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gnasher729
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Re: music

So you had no backup?

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gnasher729
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Re: Music...

Just like movies, it only disappears if _you_ delete it. The headline is totally misleading. The guy's movie didn't disappear. Apple didn't delete it. He deleted it himself, and then couldn't download it again.

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gnasher729
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Re: The larger lesson

I just turned WiFi off (and no Ethernet on my MacBook), opened a movie purchased from iTunes a few years ago, and it just played. It cannot vanish at any time. It's there forever unless I throw it away.

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gnasher729
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"So Apple basically told him that he should have downloaded the films to his disk when he had the chance. But does the DRM not prevent this? Only streaming is allowed right? It is a lose-lose for the guy in the case study."

You were always allowed and able to download Apple movies to your disk and keep them there permanently. "Only streaming is allowed right?" Wrong. Every single movie that I purchased this way (and it's not many, most come from DVDs) is downloaded, and backed up twice. As long as my computer and my backups don't break down at the same time, I've got these movies forever.

What the guy missed: The first download gets you the purchased movie. After that, you can download again as a convenience, for example on another device, but only as a convenience and only as long as Apple has the rights. He purchased the movie, downloaded it, _threw it away_ and now he can't get a new copy. Worlds smallest violin plays the worlds saddest song.

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The grand-plus iPhone is the new normal – this is no place for paupers

gnasher729
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Re: Exchange rate

Oh no, another poor downtrodden Brit. They are all out to get you.

The reality is that since Nigel and Boris started their project "self destruct", you got $1.50 for a pound, and now it is $1.25. And the VAT is 20%, which means out of every £999 a whopping £166.50 goes straight to HMRC. And yes, if your iPhone breaks down between one and two years when it's not covered by manufacturer's warranty, the seller in the UK has to fix it, when in the USA you are out of luck. That's close in value to a year of extra warranty,

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gnasher729
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Re: Exchange rate

"I'm more disgusted by the $999 = £999 bullshit."

Say hello to Nigel and Boris. And Raab and Rees-Mogg doing their best to help out. The dollar is down to about 1.25 again. Add in 20% VAT (US sales tax is not displayed in the price), the cost of European consumer protection laws, and that's what you get.

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gnasher729
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Re: SE gone - so am I :-(

"Are they really ? They sold a lot of the original X, which didn’t come cheap either. As long as people buy them, I expect we’ll see more of the same. Maybe the next iteration will be “only 1999 !”."

The original iPhone X is replaced with the iPhone Xs, which as far as I can see is quite similar but with lots of improvements, so you get a better phone with the Xs, for the exact same number.

The big Xs is the same, just bigger. You pay a bit more for the size. You have the choice to buy either tons of storage or a shitload of storage for extra money, but that is your choice. Being able to spend tons on 512 GB doesn't mean the phone has become more expensive.

And the Xr is £750. It's a lot, but Apple replaced the high end of their range. Like Mercedes selling a bunch of new S-class models, and everyone complains about the price, while all the cheaper models stayed the same.

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gnasher729
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Re: Apple ecosystem

"iOS software is just as easy to pirate, but less people do because... " it involves jailbreaking, and you have no idea if your jailbreak is sponsored by the Chinese or by the NSA.

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A boss pinching pennies may have cost his firm many, many pounds

gnasher729
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Re: Sam Vimes Theory of Economic Injustice

My mom always said: "We are poor. We can't afford to buy cheap things".

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