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* Posts by Pompous Git

3130 posts • joined 24 Sep 2014

Gamers red hot with fury over Intel Core i7-7700 temperature spikes

Pompous Git
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"so they are saying they know about it but it's expected !!!"
Like the excessive temperatures reached by their first 1 GHz chip?

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Re: "opening a browser or an application or a program"

"I've called them apps since the days of DOS and 8.3 filenames because they went in the apps directory, as opposed to the tools dir, pics dir, docs dir, db dir etc."
Most of my DOS-using colleagues called them programs, or proggies. Application was more a Mac-user term.

My proggies/applications lived in the BIN directory* and naturally my batch files lived in the BELFRY.

* Except for those that insisted on living in the root dir.

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US copyright law shake-up: Days of flinging stuff on the web and waiting for a DMCA may be over

Pompous Git
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Re: Lawyers arguing for money over sound and light waves

"The really telling thing here is that pictures and sound recordings are meaningless, valueless waves."
You sound just like the dude who tried to persuade me that Shakespeare contributed nothing of interest to the world.

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Spend your paper £5 notes NOW: No longer legal tender after today

Pompous Git
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Re: £5 note issued in 1957 had a strong purchasing power

"The average weekly wage was £7.50"
Pretty certain my dad didn't earn anything near that. He was a machine-tool engineer on piece-work.

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Re: Palm Oil

"When will these vegan dreadlock toting flip flop wearing tree huggers think of the trees?"
Or the orangutans!

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Re: I had no idea

"Our money isn't made out of paper. It's a paper/cotton mix."
Paper:
"A substance composed of fibres interlaced into a compact web, made (usually in the form of a thin flexible sheet, most commonly white) from various fibrous materials, as linen and cotton rags, straw, wood, certain grasses, etc., which are macerated into a pulp, dried, and pressed (and subjected to various other processes, as bleaching, colouring, sizing, etc., according to the intended use)..."

IOW your money is (was) definitely made out of paper.

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Today's bonkers bug report: Microsoft Edge can't print numbers

Pompous Git
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Re: Colour me unsurprised

"I don't know how many Publisher users have color-managed workflow, including profiling monitors correctly."
Probably zero, or near as damnit.

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Re: Colour me unsurprised

"Surely true black can be rendered in RGB, with a value of 0,0,0?"
No, it's a sort of muddy dark brown when printed. Black ink/toner is also a lot cheaper than cyan, magenta and yellow.

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Re: "Surely true black can be rendered in RGB, with a value of 0,0,0?"

"Once I would have found Publisher a welcome addition to the Office suite, now it's mostly a useless toy.

...InDesign CC is too expensive for occasional use."

Back in the mid-90s after I finished a group training of MS Publisher, one of the clients, a young girl, burst into tears. When I asked her what the problem was she explained she had been tasked with producing a monthly newsletter and that she now knew she'd never have enough time.

So, we did a cost-benefit analysis of using MS Publisher versus Pagemaker. A Pagemaker licence back then was well north of $AU1,000 and hiring me for a one-on-one training a further ~$AU400. Publisher may have been "free", but time is money. The cost difference looked like being amortised in 3–6 months.

As with most of my Pagemaker clients, the YL brought her first finished work for my perusal and very good it was, too. It helped that we had created a number of templates for the job during her training. The time-saving exceeded our original estimate.

The first book I created with InDesign more than justified the cost of the licence. The time-saving versus a low-end DTP tool can be quite dramatic. The book had over a thousand footnotes, only one of which had the required full stop at the end. Putting those in manually would have been a chore, but the GREP in InDesign made that a trivial task.

Hint: I purchased my first Pagemaker licence second hand for 20% of the RRP. That meant I paid very little more than for a "new" low end product.

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Re: "Surely true black can be rendered in RGB, with a value of 0,0,0?"

"The end result is that MS now have no serious DTP package and 2 laughable ones."
That deserves more than the single upvote I'm giving you...

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Re: And all the students that get stuck with Windows S!

"Is it in the Store?"
Who gives a shit?

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Pompous Git
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Colour me unsurprised

MS Publisher creates PDFs to hand off to the printer. Unfortunately, printers want/demand CMYK colour space, but that's not supported by Publisher; the graphics remain RGB. MS say the printing industry needs to get up to date. By no longer using black ink? FFS!

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits RC2

Pompous Git
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Re: Easy answer.

"The lack of downvotes on your post is probably because it's not a pro-system post, even though you seem to be thinking it is. ;)"
I am neither pro, nor anti systemD. I am however quite entertained by the discussion :-)

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Re: Easy answer.

"You see manure. I see next year's veggies."
No, we both see next year's veggies. For a decade I made 25 cubic metres of compost a year for my market garden. It's just that in the late 19th C there was a vastly greater amount of manure in New York, London, Paris, Sydney etc. Far more than was needed for vegetable production. The piles of manure on vacant blocks in NYC were reported to be up to 20 metres high.

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Re: Easy answer.

"People have been known to die in horse-related accidents."
The death rate from horse accidents in the major cities in the 19th C was considerably higher than that from motor cars today. Possibly because falling off a motor car is considerably rarer than falling off a horse. The only horse I know of that carried humans internally was built in Troy...

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Re: Easy answer.

"If you watch some period drama from the days of the horse look at the nice clean streets and ask yourself if the historical reconstruction was accurate."
What's even more amazing about those period dramas is there's not only no horse manure, there's not a sparrow starver in sight!

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Re: Easy answer.

"News must have been delayed where you were brought up. I'm a good bit older than you and cars had already replaced horses here."
I was brought up in Nuneaton, Warks. Working class so new books were a luxury denied. Most of the books I read were published in the 19th C. Heck, the words of Aristotle I read were written ~2,500 years ago!

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Re: Easy answer.

"And look at the mess they have caused."
Motor cars solved the mess problem.

"The main problem, however, was manure. A horse produces between 7 and 15 kilos of manure daily. In New York in 1900, the population of 100,000 horses produced nearly 1,200 metric tons of horse manure per day, which all had to be swept up and disposed of. In addition, each horse produces nearly a litre of urine per day, which also ended up on the streets.

....

Writing in the Times of London in 1894, one writer estimated that in 50 years every street in London would be buried under nine feet of manure."

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Pompous Git
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Re: Easy answer.

"Yes, really. I took my Percheron & buckboard to the feedstore to purchase chicken feed just this afternoon."
You're a man after my own heart, Jake :-) However, just because some few of us preserve the old ways, doesn't mean that the vast majority give a damn.

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Pompous Git
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Re: Easy answer.

"Motor cars have not replaced horses."
Really?

Late 19th C London Omnibus

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Pompous Git
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Re: Easy answer.

@ i1ya I get around one downvote for every 6 upvotes. Think how boring it would be if we all thunk the same :-)

Frankly, I have no real idea what the fuss is about. When it comes to OSs I view things from the perspective of an end user. Does it run stable and does it run my applications? Implying I'm childish for wanting that seems rather petty. Now the downvotes will come thick and fast [evil grin]

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Pompous Git
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Re: Easy answer.

"Children running the show."
Hmmm... I kinda like Cinnamon Mint. Perhaps developed by very clever children, but then I'm only 66 years young meself ;-)

I seem to recall reading that motor cars would never replace horses.

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Unpaid tech contractor: 'I have to support my family. I have no money for medicines'

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Re: Australian banks don't care if you are a contractor...

"Aussie banks like risk I guess..."
Old saying: "If you owe the bank $100 you have a problem. If you owe the bank $100 million, the bank has a problem."

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Re: hang on

"Reduce your expenses, earn more, or get a job that you can live from."
Wealth consists not in having great possessions, but in having few wants. Epictetus

Works for me...

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S is for Sandbox: The logic behind Microsoft's new lockdown Windows gambit

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Re: "but MS will control which apps are allowed"

"most of the applications I run are not from Microsoft, and that's the reason Windows became so successful"
Précisément...

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Pompous Git
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Re: @big_D -- Windows Store, oh goody!

"when I met my wife, she didn't know how to install software"
When I met my ex-fiancée, neither of us knew how to install software ;-) Today, she still only has the most rudimentary grasp of how to use a PC and she's been using one at work since the days of the Apple IIe. When I try to explain things she interrupts and says: "But I want to do x. I don't want to know about y or z." Frustrating, but I love her anyway :-)

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Re: @Big_D - Windows Store, oh goody!

"WordPerfect weren't just DOS, Windows and OS/2, I had it on the Amiga "
I have Corel Word Perfect for Linux that I was given at a MS bash. It was a PITA to install (no installer) and a PITA to use. It listed every font twice; one was the screen font and one the printer font. And yes, there was a *nix version that you had to compile before installing.

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Pompous Git
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Re: That picture

"on MacOS with Gate Keeper turned on like that, you can just right click an app and select open"
How does clicking on the right hand side of an Apple mouse do that? Every Mac I've used has a single button mouse as per Steve Jobs' decree..

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Pompous Git
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Re: @Big_D - Windows Store, oh goody!

"Borland with Quattro was able to deliver a better Windows spreadsheet than Lotus."
And a better DOS word processor than Word, Wordstar, or Word Perfect with Sprint. So it goes...

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Re: @Big_D - Windows Store, oh goody!

"I don't know about Ashton Tate and WordStar but WordPerfect and especially Lotus were conveniently kicked at the curb by Microsoft anti-competitive actions to make sure they are not here today."
I used to train end-users using Wordstar for Windows, Word Perfect for Windows, Lotus Word Pro and Word for Windows. WfW's competitors were too little, too late.

Wordstar frequently crashed when running the spellchecker or printing. Word Perfect was also unstable and would often refuse to perform a mail merge. Fixing formatting problems with reveal codes was a step too far for many users, especially when you still couldn't fix the problem. In many respects Lotus was a great product, its modeless dialogs were a wonderful time-saver. Unfortunately, if you changed a template, you changed all the documents that used that template, not just the current and subsequent documents. Thus you ended up with a massive proliferation of templates.

Word had its faults, but was streets ahead of the competition. BillG recalled attempting to interest the software houses in developing for Windows and being told it was a nine day wonder and not worth the effort. So BillG hired his own developers who had no choice.

The odd thing here is that MS doesn't seem to know Windows/Office history and seems as determined as Ashton Tate etc to shoot themselves in the foot. So it goes...

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Windows 10 S: Good, bad, and how this could get ugly for PC makers

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Re: Linux

"with a much greater range of software than MS will ever allow"
I really, really wish that were true, but it isn't. I spent a very pleasant 18 months using Cinnamon Mint as my primary OS. It is indeed wonderful. But my main applications are Windows or Mac OS. They won't run on Linux. There are no acceptable Linux substitutes. Until the major software houses get their act together, or the Linux community gets serious about developing professional software, Linux as a desktop OS is doomed to remain a niche. This saddens me greatly...

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Pompous Git
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Re: Offline

"Like a plough pulled by a horse. And about as useful."
You've obviously never used a breast plough , or ploughed with a horse.

Note that in the video the ploughman is working soft soil, not turf. I have a neighbour who has footage of a peasant in The People's Paradise ploughing up grassland with a breast plough in the 1960s. I'm willing to bet that guy would have given his eye teeth to possess a horse and turnwrest plough.

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Re: Linux

"There's no must-have improvement since Office 2000."
Outlook has improved quite a bit, but then I would also argue Word has been unimproved.

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Pompous Git
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Re: The other secret source for the OS is...

"The OED merely documents usage. It doesn't usually point out where that usage is an abomination to native speakers."
George Bernard Shaw was a superb writer IMHO. YMMV of course...

"What was formerly called ‘real property’ is replaced by ordinary personal property and common property administrated by the State."
On Rocks 1934.

Of course Shaw was an Irishman rather than a proper Englishman.

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Pompous Git
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Re: The other secret source for the OS is...

"It's also to administer and not to administrate."
I take it you're not a big fan of the Oxford English Dictionary then...

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Gig economy tech giants are 'free riding' on the welfare state, say MPs

Pompous Git
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Re: Finally someone's noticed?

"housing benefit is basically a transfer of taxpayer money to private landlords"
That depends. Here in Oz Centrelink pay the rent subsidy to the tenants. The tenants use the rent subsidy to purchase drugs and the landlord ends up evicting the tenants after a long battle to be allowed to do so. Yes, this ends up driving up rents, but that's what the government in its wisdom appears to want. That and cheaper drugs.

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Re: There is a way the gig economy can work ...

"we are ALREADY PAYING it, just in the most ridiculous, complex and wasteful way imaginable"
Amen! Oh, and a Awomen too...

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Pompous Git
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Re: Not just the so-called "gig" economy either...

"after all we want a strong and stable world"
And what do we find in the stable? A horse's arse!

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Re: Definitions of employed/self-employed ?

"what's a holiday?"
Retirement! :-)

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Apple fanbois are officially sheeple. Yes, you heard. Deal with it

Pompous Git
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Re: "the grammar is relatively simple"

"What would you consider a language with complicated grammar then?"
Finnish; there are more than 12 declensions, no prepositions, no masculine or feminine, no articles...

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Pompous Git
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Re: Sheeple in the UK

"Is it 52%, 48%, or simply 100%?"
Does anybody give a flock?

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Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft

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Re: Another day

""the last version of Windows ever" is nothing more than the Microsoft way of saying "resistance is futile.""
As usual MS have this wrong. Resistance is not futile. Having tested w8 and w10 and decided that both were a crock of shit, I concluded that w7 was my last windows ever. If they dick the CPUs to stymie that, I will just continue run w7 in a VM on Linux.

Where's the pass the popcorn icon when you need it? [Though I might prefer a Smith's Crisps icon]

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Come celebrate World Hypocrisy Day

Pompous Git
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I miss...

... the annual cheque from Australia's Copyright Council I used to receive. It was a nominal sum* to be sure being contributed by teachers photocopying my work for the use of their students. But no more... Makes me wonder if they teach their students to steal other property too.

* I don't think it ever exceeded more than $100.

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Microsoft promises twice-yearly Windows 10, O365 updates – with just 18 months' support

Pompous Git
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Re: Dear gods...

"We should ask him to upgrade to a proper Office suite, as there's no point using software that generates files that can't be read by other users."
Alternatively you could upgrade everyone to Libre Office. OTOH if you need compatibility with Word and Excel docs from outside the firm...

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Re: Dear gods...

"Of course it's not completely perfect, but I've never kidded myself that Windows was either."
That's worth more than one upvote, so have another...

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Re: Dear gods...

"I understand MS have finally caught up with multiple workspaces.

So on the whole, that's one up to Linux."

Er... I had multiple desktops on NT4, but never found them particularly useful. I had more fun with the Mac OS Theme 'cos that used to annoy the fuck out of the Mackerels :-)

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Guess who's back at Microsoft? Excel, Word creator Charles Simonyi

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Re: Woah!

"Thanks for being interested and involved in the industry."
Thanks for Excel and Word. I'm retired now, but I made a packet training end users back in the 90s.

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eBay threatens to block Australians from using offshore sellers

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Re: The real reason most people here in Oz buy overseas...

"Don't feel picked on 'cause you live in Tassie, mate."
Oh I don't feel in the least picked on. Imagine if you will a terrorist being told he had to go to Tasmania to wreak havoc.

"You really expect me to fly to Australia, catch a boat to Tasmania and then ride in a horse and cart to where you want me to blow things up? FFS..."

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"Ebay haven't insisted on Paypal exclusively for at least a couple of years. I don't think they ever did in Australia."
They did. The rules change was made in 2010. If you are purchasing from a reputable supplier and thus do not need the PayPal warranty you're better off purchasing by bank deposit.

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Re: The real reason most people here in Oz buy overseas...

"Before I get accused of stretching the truth, I am not making this up. This was the actual supply chain for an item. At each stage nark up [I see what you did there!] was about 30%."
It is even worse in Tasmania where an additional 30-40% is added because Bass Strait. Even quite nominal amounts of material cost significantly less when purchased from mainland suppliers.* When I replaced our dead TV last year, I purchased it from the mainland for ~$300 and it was delivered to my door. Purchasing the identical item from JB HiFi in Hobart was $50 more and still needed to be carted an additional 30 odd miles to my home. I didn't bother ascertaining what that would have cost.

* Amusingly Huon pine harvested in the valley where I live is cheaper to purchase from Victoria (hence two trips across Bass Strait) than it is locally.

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