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* Posts by David Roberts

1348 posts • joined 25 Jan 2007

Page:

Oi, you. Equifax. Cough up half a million quid for fumbling 15 million Brits' personal info to hackers

David Roberts
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Can we really be sure they are now secure? (as claimed)

The phrasing just means that they finally applied the patch.

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Fallover Friday: NatWest, RBS and Ulster Bank go TITSUP*

David Roberts
Silver badge
Unhappy

Another nail in the coffin

Since NatWest closed their local branch I've been looking at moving my account.

This is more encouragement.

Test driving the Nationwide to see if they are any good before deciding if I should switch.

As you get older, though banks that you have...errr....loved and lost get to be the majority.

Barclays, Halifax, Santander, all screwed me over to a greater or lesser extent in the past.

Not sure how long to hold a grudge, but I haven't run out of banks yet. Probably best to have funds in at least two banks if you can afford it. I have more than one credit card via different suppliers (and a mix of Visa and Mastercard) so in theory the only choke point is when they are paid off at the end of the month.

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Why waste away in a cubicle when you could be a goddamn infosec neuromancer on £50k*?

David Roberts
Silver badge
Trollface

Re: neurodiverse ?

My (faulty) translation routine immediately came up with "scatterbrained".

Scatterbrained people are usually happy, cheerful, gay, excited, bouncy....

Yes, my glossary was populated before some words were intentionally repurposed. Which leads me to wonder if the average school year classes are neurodiverse, with some bright and some less so? Is Parliament neurodiverse (it is certainly eurodiverse) for similar reasons?

Why this insane urge to use enormously generic terms to fit your own specific area of interest? For example "differently abled" could equally apply to those who can run marathons at a sub 5 minute mile pace and those who can't. Or failed dancers with two (metaphorical) left feet.

And breathe.

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30-up: You know what? Those really weren't the days

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Re: 1988 too early? - OOP

Reminds me of the time when, as an occasional programmer with some C experience, I was first introduced to C++.

"Isn't this just a fancy way of describing reuseable modules of code?" I wondered.

Thankfully all that is behind me now.

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David Roberts
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Windows

Re: 'Twas in the year of '88

WIMP and GEM?

Am I the only one brought up on character terminals and DOS PCs to have been given an early MAC and spent an hour looking for the command prompt, and on being told there wasn't one spending another few hours wondering "but how do you make it do anything useful?"?

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David Roberts
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Thumb Up

Re: "you were seriously stuck up a gum tree"

News server?

news.individual.net from the University of Berlin.

Been using it for years.

The ratio of troll to useful content is not always good (see Twitter).

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New MeX-Files: The curious case of an evacuated US solar lab, the FBI – and bananas conspiracy theories

David Roberts
Silver badge
Trollface

Security incident

(1) Biosecurity - anything from mercury poisoning to a TexMex chilli aftermath.

(2) IT security - anything from crypto currency mining to a virus infection

(3) Physical security - still trying to work out why they accredited the credentials of a Sun reporter

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We're doomed: Defra's having a cow over its Brexit IT preparations

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

With the cynics here

Including Dr. Syntax.

DEFRA couldn't even manage to build an IT system to distribute EU subsidies to farmers and kept incurring fines for incompetence.

Designs were not optimal - for instance assuming that all rural farmers had the same kind of fast Internet access available to the developers.

If your current systems are red flagged, what are the chances of using the same resources to produce a speculative blue sky system against unknown rules? You are more likely to ease off on the current systems because they are unlikely to be fit for purpose post Brexit anyway.

I am pretty sure that DEFRA are not alone here. Standard project management to keep quiet about your problems and hope some other part of the project is going to force a slippage and get blamed. Then agree to align your project with the new longer timescales.

Personally, I suspect that the "hard" in hard Brexit reflects the times most IT systems will find themselves in. Will this be a licence to print money like Y2K? Or just an opportunity to build trade deals with non-EU service suppliers which include free movement in and out of the UK?

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Python joins movement to dump 'offensive' master, slave terms

David Roberts
Silver badge
Trollface

Just reminds me of the great nitty gritty scandal

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/1988776.stm

For this one the SJWs (was that even a term in 2002?) got it wrong.

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Law firm seeking leak victims to launch £500m suit at British Airways

David Roberts
Silver badge
IT Angle

Re: A better way of effecting change

I assume that you, using this site, work in IT?

Therefore I assume that you are prepared to accept similar punishment should one of your mistakes or oversights contribute to a data breach.

80% of your assets including your house and pension pot should concentrate your mind wonderfully.

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UK.gov went ahead with under-planned, under-funded IT upgrade? Sounds about right

David Roberts
Silver badge
Trollface

Know why they were constantly under staffed?

They couldn't get the job applicants vetted.

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Take a pinch of autofill, mix in HTTP, and bake on a Wi-Fi admin page: Quirky way to swipe a victim's router password

David Roberts
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Does this apply to home networks?

Assuming your home network is reasonably secured, then the attacker can't directly get on.

The attacker can boot you off onto their spoof network using deauth.

They then get their web page (with dodgy code) into your browser and flip you back onto your own network.

At this point their dodgy code is inside your secure network and is phishing for your admin credentials, intending to open up external access via remote admin, or to get credentials to join your secure network.

This seems similar to (spear?) phishing. Getting the user to enter credentials into a dodgy web page.

The point at which this seems unlikely is the same as with a phishing attack from an external web site. If you were browsing the Internet and suddenly you got a web page asking you to log onto your router as admin, would you?

Or is this saying that if you have autofill enabled then a hidden web page could perform the login without anything being visible? For the specific example of being flipped onto a spoof network and back is any user interraction required?

Totally confused now. If no user interraction is required then this is far easier to do with an infected web page or advert than through attacking the wireless network from somewhere nearby.

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UK.gov: NHS should be compensated by firms using its data goldmine

David Roberts
Silver badge
Pirate

NHS as one body again?

Sadly, the NHS was never a single entity, but a forced amalgamation of many private health suppliers.

Possibly comparable to nationalising the railways but still having the individual railway companies infighting and settling old grudges.

Which is a depressing thought, as that could be a model for the NHS in the future. Constantly changing commercial franchises with some underlying architecture (IT for example) still provided by the state. Just hope you don't get sick in Southern Region when they are in dispute with the hospital porters.

Icon for your new selfie if this happens.

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David Roberts
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: care.data all over again

You will, of course, note that the conversation has moved on from "We want to sell your data." "Fuck off!"

The conversation is now "We think the NHS is being ripped off when we sell your data. Join us in demanding more money."

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Hundred-million Kiwi Oracle project on hold after Deloitte review

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Ageing and unsupported

I wonder how much it would have cost to train a new team to support the ageing systems?

Then run them for, say, 3 years whilst the new teams collaborated on documenting functions and requirements?

Possibly less than paying someone to replace the systems when apparently nobody had a clear idea of what they were replacing and so couldn't cost the time and effort.

I assume that the old systems are still running anyway, and likely to be doing so for some considerable time yet.

Then again the supplier (not clear if Oracle is just the platform or is also the developer) may have just bid a figure it knew would be acceptable with no idea of the actual cost.

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Black holes can briefly bring dead white dwarf stars back to life

David Roberts
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End of the world as we know it?

Over a very long timescale super massive black holes are consuming everything.

What happens next?

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Spies still super upset they can't get at your encrypted comms data

David Roberts
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Big Brother

Crypto schmypto

So much commentary on encryption when everyone knows that you can't effectively backdoor encryption.

The narrative has moved on.

At some point, to be intelligible, the information has to be in clear. Pre/post encryption. 5 Eyes are mandating that the data has to be accessible in clear to themselves.

There are already major concerns that router encryption chips can be told to divulge clear text. China won't use US routers and vice versa. This just extends reach so that all commercial hardware platforms have to have embedded capability to reveal clear text pre/post encryption.

There is a lot of suspicious stuff embeded deep below the OS on computer mother boards. Mobile SOCs get more complex every iteration so almost anything could be buried in there.

Going on about encryption is just the magician waving one hand in the air to distract whilst the other hand does the real work.

Regardless, someone has to design and manufacture any intrusion system and then employees have to use it. There may be a brief gain early on, but information invariably leaks over time. Down the line we will find out what they really did.

Think about how you can securely encrypt off platform. Not using computing hardware made by someone else. This includes USB devices because they have a SOC in them.

Recommendation; learn to hand encode important messages using One Time Pads, obscure book references, code words, other traditional methods. Give up all naive hope that your everyday online brain farts and cat pictures will ever be secure from official and officious snoopers. Oh, and make sure you include a lot of garbage text in your daily communications to mask the important stuff.

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HTC U12 Life: Notchless, reasonably priced and proper buttons? Oh joy

David Roberts
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FAIL

Eat your own dog food, El Reg

Home page should be an opt in 4 columns wide!

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Can a script kiddie pwn your SD-WAN? Better check the config, friend

David Roberts
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Trollface

Re: Please, sir!

SD-WAN is an updated verdion of the traditional OB-WAN.

Which sometimes is your only hope.

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If you have to simulate a phishing attack on your org, at least try to get something useful from it

David Roberts
Silver badge
Facepalm

Is the real problem...

......that people were just too keen to be the first on Social Media to blame Rusiia and Republicans and other usual suspects?

Perhaps the correct approach should have been to notify in-house security and give them time to investigate rather than go public immediately and warn the attacker that they have been rumbled.

As far as I can tell, there was no clear evidence of the source of the attack so the knee jerk blaming was counter productive. No doubt they are now ganging up on the security testers to try and conceal what idiots they are. A knee jerk reaction based on no firm evidence puts them in the "boy who cried wolf" category and confirms them as a source of fake news.

A meatware email virus, quite common, involves sending out an email such as "Local Police are warning that Iranian spies are operating in your area disguised as window cleaners. Please warn ALL your friends IMMEDIATELY!" which has loads of people flooding email with this bogus information.

People are so keen to demonstrate how they are privy to important information that they don't stop to think that it might be bogus.

The people who cried Wolf are the ones who should be getting the roasting,

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AI image recognition systems can be tricked by copying and pasting random objects

David Roberts
Silver badge
Boffin

Not just AI

The invisible gorilla experiment shows that humans are also easily confused and don't always identify objects in a field of view.

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Linux 4.19 lets you declare your trust in AMD, IBM and Intel

David Roberts
Silver badge

Request to disable the flag?

You have a Yes/No decision at kernel build time. Why would you want to disable it?

Unless this is envisaged as a user switch, and Daddy wants to say "slow and secure is the only option".

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UK getting ready to go it alone on Galileo

David Roberts
Silver badge
WTF?

I say chaps, where are we going?

New formal start of any NATO joint exercise.

This will also, presumably, have already been translated into Turkish.

Given that the public features will be in all phones in a few years, I presume that this spat is all about future manufacturing contracts and not about civilian or military end users. Unless the UK version of the F35 has the satnav taken out? GPS it is, then.

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IBM slaps patent on coffee-delivering drones that can read your MIND

David Roberts
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

This paints an engaging picture

Of someone half way between Starbucks and Costa with an identifiable need for coffee.

Let the Robot Wars commence!

Most heavily armed drone wins the sale. Collateral damage covered under Ts and Cs.

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US Democrats call in Feds: There's something phishy going on with our voter database

David Roberts
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

How do you effectively test security?

(1) Send a memo to all departments nationally well in advance so that they can brief all their staff that there is a test scheduled, when and what the test will be, and how to identify and pass it. Noting that a secret is safe if only two people know it and one of them is dead.

(2) Run the test like a real attacker with no prior warning.

Perhaps a bit like the difference between a scheduled and unscheduled quality audit. Noting of course that in quality audits the aim of both auditors and auditees is to pass the test so the company can pay for the fancy accreditation.

I would be interested to know how many people they caught before they were shut down. It did test their national security team who managed to identify the phishing attempts. So one positive benefit.

Noting also that a variant of option (1) could be to notify everyone that there was going to be a major phishing attempt in the next 3 months and instant dismissal including line management if anyone was caught. Then close the office and go fishing secure in the knowledge of a job well done.

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The Register's 2018 homepage redesign: What's going on now?

David Roberts
Silver badge

Re: Place holder before I check it out.

Well, curate's egg.

First annoyance; the opt in has a link next to it to this comments page so you can come and comment. Once you are in, the opt out has no such link. I opted out again so I could find the comments page. WTF??

Kudos for recognising a high resolution device and giving me the desktop version not the mobile one. Must go and check this out on my phone.

Kudos for the four wide layout which makes the home page more compact on my device and requires less vertical scrolling.

Demerit for what seems to be a pointless "Latest News" heading. As far as I can see this just tells me that the articles at the top of the page (which is in date/time order) are the most recent. Uh, duh?

Top Stories is intrusive but is right at the top so I can ignore it.

Most Read is a pain. It was much better to one side where I could ignore it by resizing the screen. Oh, and what makes something a Top Story if it isn't the most read? Personally I don't care which is most read because I read what interests me. On newspaper sites such as the Guardian (Oops, outed!) where there is a mass of content which never makes the front page then the Most Read at the bottom of the page (BBC does this as well) gives an alternative route to what news is hot at the moment. El Reg, as far as I can tell, has all the news in one place and the last few days can be easily viewed by vertical scrolling.

Summary. I would go with the new format just because the 4 columns suits my device of choice, and ignore the irritating bits which disrupt the generally smooth layout.

Oh, and are you going to tinker with the forum page layout? Currently it matches the old front page style and this suits me just fine.

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David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Place holder before I check it out.

I will come back and reply to this once I have checked out the new layout.

I mainly read El Reg on a Full HD 10" tablet in portrait mode. I resize the visible display to hide all the cruft down the sides so I just get three columns abreast. I find this just the right size to read.

I have adverts blocked because they are just so infuriating (or were last time I checked). A subscription option would be nice with no adverts.

Nobody so far has mentioned the style change between W7 and W8/W10. That did not go well. Then again I think I usually opt for the Classic view in earler Windows versions, and so I must be resistant to change.

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Nvidia shrugs off crypto-mining crash, touts live ray-tracing GPUs, etc

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Prices finally coming down?

Along with SSD/RAM prices?

Or is this just a tease?

1
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'Oh sh..' – the moment an infosec bod realized he was tracking a cop car's movements by its leaky cellular gateway

David Roberts
Silver badge
Unhappy

What about the trucks?

Loads of speculation about the police, but from my reading of the article this tracking technology is also used for tracking commercial vehicles. Much used in fleet logistics (though not necessarily all using these dodgy gateways).

In the UK delivery services such as DPD provide live tracking of the delivery van via a web page. So the delivery vans must be updating the central server.

I imagine security vehicles moving cash and other valuables around (such as collection/delivery for banks and major stores) are tracked to the inch. It would be good to know if the huge amounts of cash in transit (other brands of van are available) are being tracked via insecure gateways. Likewise ambulances and fire engines.

Not all these scenarios will be a significant threat, but if you can track a truck known to carry high value cargo this must create opportunities for criminals.

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Patch Tuesday heats up with pair of exploited zero-days squashed – plus 58 other vulns fixed

David Roberts
Silver badge
Linux

Don't like Windows? Stop bitching, start switching!

Move to another operating system which you don't even have to pay for.

You may note, however, that the alternative software is being continually patched and has not sprung fully formed from the godlike brow of a super-penguin. Some patches may even be to correct hitherto unnoticed security vulnerabilities and coding errors. Some of which have been present for 10 years or more.

On the subject of Windows, how much did you pay for your copy? Almost certainly less than £100. Many will have paid significantly less. How much dedicated manpower do you think this will fund over the perhaps 10 years or more you will be using this system? [Looking at you, XP.]

If, as some seem to be proposing, software suppliers are held accountable by law for any defects in the software then how long do you expect nominally free or low cost software to be available? No revenue stream, serious legal liabilty, you do the cost/benefit analysis. Do you expect a one-off sale to carry expensive legal liability in perpetuity?

TANSTAAFL.

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Can we talk about the little backdoors in data center servers, please?

David Roberts
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Dumb question

If you stick chewing gum in the onboard ethernet port(s) does that mitigate, albeit with the loss of remote management facilities?

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NVMe? Well, quite. Now Intel, too, is pumping out consumer QLC SSDs

David Roberts
Silver badge

Re: My understand is there's not an "SLC write cache"

So to put it another way, beyond 60% full the performance drops off a cliff?

Makes me wonder if you would be better off with a smaller (or more expensive) drive and a proper SLC write cache.

3
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Grad sends warning to manager: Be nice to our kit and it'll be nice to you

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Anthropomorphisation magic

Usually far more simple.

Impatient user keeps clicking and typing and hammering the <Return> key because the response isn't instant. Leave it alone for a minute and it returns to more or less normal.

Regularly seen with W10 systems when they are grinding through an unexpected update.

Best advice is to step away from the machine and go and make a nice relaxing cup of tea (or other beverage of choice). Amazing how often this solves the problem.

Whilst we are on the subject of W10, users coming directly from XP have to be retrained not to shut the machine down immediately they are finished with it. W10 needs to be left on over night now and then to get its' little head all straightened out.

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David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Printers, Ha!!

Bringing back vague memories of printers being set up logically; names like floor 2 room 16.

Then the reorganisation tango would start and the people and associated kit would migrate around the building.

The trick was to send a print job with the name of the printer on it then scout around until you found it. You were then set until the next reshuffle. Rinse and repeat.

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Think tank calls for post-Brexit national ID cards: The kids have phones so what's the difference?

David Roberts
Silver badge
Black Helicopters

Delete a record

So just like a "smart meter" where you can turn the power off remotely.

Just disable the ID card of your victim and deny access to all services. Goes with a cashless society to impose complete control on the population.

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Click this link and you can get The Register banned in China

David Roberts
Silver badge
Linux

Hush, hush, whisper who dares..

Christopher Robin is saying his prayers.

Allegedly this made it very difficult for CR to engage in any act of public worship.

Nearest I could get to a Pooh Bear icon.

1
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Basic bigot bait: Build big black broad bots – non-white, female 'droids get all the abuse

David Roberts
Silver badge
Coat

Black/white

I see that it is time to remind the readership that the bride (of any stated or unstated ethnicity) wears white to denote purity. The groom, however............

Black Friday.

It was a black day.......

Black mark.......(who he?)

Blacken his name..........

Black tie.......(umm...not sure how that crept in..)

On the other hand in the black is better than in the red so that is a positive.

Black economy......

Black market......

Black board....(sorry)

Those from the UK may recognise that the Black Country is not a definition of skin colour (after a bath).

Black Irish? Forgotten the origins of that one.

Out from the ground came a bubbling crude. Black gold. Texas tea. Coat, please. Yes, the black one over there.

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Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Not in IT...

"During and in the aftermath of a merger/takeover, it's my experience that the rationalisation which follows to cut staff and merge departments always seems to result in a number of job adverts for additional HR staff."

I must speak out in support of one HR department at {cough}. They were pretty good anyway, and when a redundancy exercise was looming they discreetly mentioned this to people about to resign. Two reasons at least; it helped them meet their targets for volunteers, and they had also worked out that they were due for the chop once they had "right sized" the work force.

Still, not like the good old days when you had a local Personnel unit who knew you and went that extra mile for you if you made a point of always being nice to them. Getting massive travel and subsistence claims processed swiftly made life a lot easier.

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Some of you really don't want Windows 10's April 2018 update on your rigs

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Linux and software installs and RPi

Firstly let me get my defence in early and say that I am a long term Unix/Linux system administrator, though mainly out of practice now.

I was looking for something that would play Amazon Prime Video (or whatever it is called) on my TV.

Pi was the obvious choice. Some on line searching later I found a site with a description of how to install the software. It started with enabling ssh on the Pi then installing putty on the PC and then went on to describe adding repositories, configuring files, lots of command line stuff.

Yes, I know how to do it all, however do I want to spend the time?

One major weakness of Linux is the installing of software which isn't already in the default repositories. If it is in a repository then there are loads of GUI front ends which make it a simple search, select, click install. If not, a world of hurt awaits the inexpert user.

With Windows there are packaging tools (such as InstallShield) where you download a file to your PC, run it, and it does all the hard stuff for you. Leaving aside security issues (a long and thorny subject) I can't see Linux becoming useable by the average naive user until third party software installs have the same one click approach as Windows software.

Android gets round this by having an App store that everyone is forced to use. An approach attempted unsuccessfully by W10.

3
1

Big bad Bluetooth blunder bug battered – check for security fixes

David Roberts
Silver badge

Not a major BlueTooth user

However the devices I have don't seem to have any mechanism for firmware updates.

One device was shipped with a bug in the firmware and the fix was to ship a replacement.

Which raises the next question. I assume that if one side of the pairing has the bug then it can be exploited?

However the risk of someone snooping on the audio streams going to my speakers doesn't initially fill me with major anxiety.

Assuming again, if I used BT headphones for phone calls then there is potential to snoop. My BT headphones currently in the drawer don't as far as I know have any firmware update mechanism.

So is this a bug that can be exploited by a laptop sitting on a table in a cafe?

2
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What if tech moguls brewed real ale?

David Roberts
Silver badge
WTF?

Non alchoholic

We can win half price entry tickets or submit a code for 50% discount?

Oh, go on then:

No Contest - an absorbing but confusing beverage with no perceived long term benefit?

Toe Stamp - more hoppy than you expected.

ICL - a traditional ale. Can be distinguished from the more powerful and full bodied IBM mainly by a very slight difference in character(set). One for the discerning old time mainframe systems programmers.

3
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Either my name, my password or my soul is invalid – but which?

David Roberts
Silver badge

Re: University

A!a?0@

B!b?1@

etc.

6
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Azure running out of internets in UK South, starts rationing VMs

David Roberts
Silver badge

Selling it faster than they can build it?

Either very good business or very poor planning.

Either way I assume that there are logistical limits on how fast you can provision new kit and accomodation.

2
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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

David Roberts
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: "get" - I'm good

Nice to know that the entire population of NZ are twats by your rules.

1
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Tech support chap given no training or briefing before jobs, which is why he was arrested

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Back in my day - Swiss Army Knife

Back in the day I was never without my SAK. Many noble deeds were wrought with it, including a US engineer using the saw blade to cut down the plastic front of a 5 1/4 drive to fit in a 3 1/2 inch space. That man was a real engineer. Hi, Jerry!

I carried it on planes, including to the USA, without any problems prior to 9/11. Now I can't even carry it around in the UK because it is the backpacker version with the locking blade (essential if you value your fingers) over three and a fuckwit inches long and that would make me a terrist.

Anyone else remember the days of the Boy Scout where a sheath knife was part of the uniform?

Tell that to the kids of today......

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Fresh cup of WTF with lunch? TeamViewer's big in Twitter's domination-as-a-service scene

David Roberts
Silver badge
WTF?

Unpatched XP?

Has anyone tested this recently?

This used to be a thing when XP was current and some Internet connections came with just a modem and not a NAT router but are there still people/systems out there automatically searching for newly connected unpatched XP systems?

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HP Ink's UK profits tumble nearly 85% – of course Brexit to blame

David Roberts
Silver badge

Lying barstewards!

I have a colour HP Laser Printer because the ink doesn't dry up. I retired my ancient inkjet because I am away for long periods from time to time and the ink dries up.

Not long after starting to use it I was told that it was nearly out of blue. I took the "shut up and keep printing" option. Now about 6 months later it is reporting all consumables low but still printing away just fine. A set of new HP full size (not introductory with the printer) toner cartridges cost more than a new laser printer.

I'm just going to keep on printing till it really runs out of something then try 3rd party toner. If I'd paid any attention to HP I'd have spent £100s on new toner by now. Lying barstewards.

4
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Marriage of AI, Google chips will save diabetics from a lot of pricks

David Roberts
Silver badge
FAIL

Most diabetics?

Most diabetics are Type 2 and not on insulin. Most of those do not finger prick at all, but rely on the HbA1c test every 6 months or every year to measure how good or bad their control is. This is encouraged by the surgeries who are often very tight fisted when it comes to paying for test strips.

Not saying this is a good thing, but the author might try doing at least a little superficial research to learn that not all diabetics are walking pin cushions, and that T1 and T2 are very different conditions,

T1 is an autoimmune disease where the body attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells which produce insulin. T2 is mainly centred around insulin resistance where the insulin produced by the pancreas is not used effectively and sometimes the pancreas gives up in disgust after being over worked for many years. I over simplify because it is much more complex than that and there are more than two types of diabetes.

Having said all that, affordable non invasive blood glucose monitoring would be a boon to all diabetics and should greatly help in the control of diabetes (for those that can be bothered). I stress the "affordable" because it has the potential to be a cash cow that just keeps on giving, much like test strips today and the continuous glucose monitoring devices. There is a reason why you can get free test meters; much the same reason that printers are sold for less than the cost of the replacement ink cartridges.

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Drug cops stopped techie's upgrade to question him for hours. About everything

David Roberts
Silver badge
Windows

Re: Made it here first!

Whatever's the matter with May Jane.........

.......and it's lovely rice pudding for dinner again.

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'No questions asked' Windows code cert slingers 'fuel trade' in digitally signed malware

David Roberts
Silver badge
Unhappy

PKI done properly costs money

The majority of the Internet won't use anything unless it is free.

So I doubt there will ever be a globally trustworthy solution.

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