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* Posts by AndrewDu

135 posts • joined 11 Feb 2014

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The last time Earth was this hot hippos lived in Britain (that’s 130,000 years ago)

AndrewDu

Re: Back in the 70's...

Well maybe.

But some of us were actually alive and sentient in the 70's, and I clearly remember the newspaper headlines: they were just like today's, but with the opposite sign.

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Gov must hire 'thousands' of techies to rescue failing projects

AndrewDu

The project's late, so hire more staff!

Time for someone to re-read "The mythical man-month" again, maybe?

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Boffins: There's a ninth planet out there – now we just need to find it

AndrewDu

Discovered using computer models? Uh-oh!

But then I guess these guys are real scientists, not climate "scientists", so perhaps we can trust them.

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Eighteen year old server trumped by functional 486 fleet!

AndrewDu

Re: Windows not running for longer than 49.7 days.

https://xkcd.com/571/

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Boozing is unsafe at ‘any level’, thunders chief UK.gov quack

AndrewDu

Is it possible that the increased death rates amongst teetotallers is because they're all such miserable gits?

Just wondering.

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Volkswagen blames emissions cheating on 'chain of errors'

AndrewDu

Re: These is no such thing as a "Defeat Device"

"conditions which may reasonably be expected to be encountered in normal vehicle operation and use"

Interesting.

Does "normal operation and use" include the artificial environment of a test bed? It's arguable that it does not. So perhaps in fact VW did comply with the letter of this particular regulation.

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Thousands of 'directly hackable' hospital devices exposed online

AndrewDu

Re: That's bloody criminal!

"In the UK it's impossible to get access to anything in a hospital directly over the internet because hospitals don't have a connection directly to the internet"

Well that may be the design, but experience suggests it's not the end result.

Hospital network has trusted connection to GP surgeries (because it's convenient, obviously), and GP surgery has lots of unpatched and unmanaged PC's running who-knows-what and administered by any old temp sent round that week by the admin staff agency (OK, I exaggerate, but only a bit), and naturally there's an unprotected internet connection somewhere, again because it's convenient, and there you are, job done.

Complexity combined with complete absence of technical knowledge somewhere in the mess, and your nice clean design just disappeared down the tubes.

I've been there, I know.

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No £160m for you: BT to receive termination notice from Cornwall before Christmas

AndrewDu

Re: I may be old fashioned but...

They get away with it because they're a monopoly.

(Cue cries of "oh no we're not" from BT fanboyz).

Where else can you go to get a landline installed?

Nowhere.

That's the problem in a nutshell.

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Drivers? Where we’re going, we don’t need drivers…

AndrewDu

Re: Let's just say that...

" Message the central booking computer and a car will be waiting for you within minutes"

Yes folks, another thing that will only be true if you live within the M25 and it's not closing time on Friday or Saturday evening.

Though I suppose to be accurate, several hours - or even the next day - can still be looked on as "minutes" - it's just a matter of arithmetic.

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Let's shut down the internet: Republicans vacate their mind bowels

AndrewDu

"Carly Fiorina, who actually used to be a tech CEO and so should have a pretty good understanding of how technology works"

No, that does not follow.

The words "CEO" and "understand technology" should never appear in the same sentence.

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Who's right on crypto: An American prosecutor or a Lebanese coder?

AndrewDu

Re: Nope, don't care

" It removes the benefits of encryption accruing to criminals without harming the rest of us."

Until the definition of "criminals" is expanded by the elites to include something you didn't expect, and then you're toast.

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TalkTalk offers customer £30.20 'final settlement' after crims nick £3,500

AndrewDu

I'd be interested to know HOW they took money out of his account.

Every anecdote I've heard so far about this is a simple social engineering hack perpetrated by someone claiming to be from TalkTalk and a user then letting them start a Remote session of some sort "to fix a problem".

I share everyone's disdain for the way they've handled this, but really you can't expect them to pay compensation for peoples' naivety and gullibility.

Of course perhaps in this particular case it really was a hack.

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Phone-fondling docs, nurses sling patient info around willy-nilly

AndrewDu

Re: Load of bollocks

Maybe ask the patient?

Because (even if they were alert and in normal health) they would be just the right person to make a judgment on risk and technical security issues such as this?

I think not.

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AndrewDu

Surprise!

Seller of a secure communications product thinks NHS should buy more secure communications products.

Well colour me astonished.

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UK drivers left idling as Tesla rolls out Autopilot in US

AndrewDu

What happens when the software meets a non-American road, ie one that's not straight, has roundabouts, features non-right-angle bends, and may involve pedestrians, hedges, ditches, or even farm animals?

Does it even know there are parts of the world where people drive on the left - you know, backward countries like Japan?

Just say "No".

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Why do driverless car makers have this insatiable need for speed?

AndrewDu

Re: The end of any driving pleasure

A whole train full of cars all charging themselves up while the train is in motion?

So where does the energy come from to do that, then?

Sunbeams extracted from cucumbers, I suppose.

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Self-driving cars? Boring. We want self driving, lizard dodging golf carts

AndrewDu

So to carry out a heist on one of these self-driving cars, all you have to do is get an accomplice to stand still in front of it (and possibly another one behind it), while you mug the occupants at your leisure?

Yeah, that's what I thought all along.

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Visitors no longer welcomed to Scotland's 'Penis Island'

AndrewDu

The point surely is that it's been wrong for nine years and nobody noticed.

Because nobody on Bute speaks Gaelic and nobody ever did.

The whole thing is a complete waste of taxpayers money.

Similarly, some clown has spend 10's of £1000's replacing all the railway station name boards with bilingual ones, throughout Ayrshire - where again, nobody speaks Gaelic and nobody ever did (Rabbie Burns wrote in old Scots, which is dialect of English). I imagine most of the "gaelic place names" they've used had to be invented for the purpose, since none ever existed before.

Again a complete waste of money. Anyone would think there were no actual real problems in Scotland that the SNP idiots should be focussing on, but alas this is not the case...

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Jeep breach: Scared? You should be, it could be you next

AndrewDu

"“The controls needed to drive the car should be completely isolated from any external facing system, so no Bluetooth, no Wi-Fi, no 3G, no attack surface at all,"

Well precisely.

But what even marginally-competent vehicle designer would ever think anything else? Why does it take a consultant?

I imagine the government must be behind this; only with clout of that power would a manufacturer risk their reputation by implementing something so obviously insane. Or should we, like Napoleon, be careful to "never ascribe to conspiracy that which is adequately explained by stupidity"?

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Get ready: 'Critical' Adobe Reader patches coming on Tuesday 12 May

AndrewDu

Foxit is your friend.

Adobe is not.

Also totally fed up with FireFox blocking Flash every other day (actually EVERY day, this week).

When can we dump this crap?

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Giant FLYING SPACE ROCKS could KILL US ALL, warns Brian May

AndrewDu

Oh good grief.

Read the small print - this was (a) a PhD thesis and (b) a computer model.

Back to sleep everyone.

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Microsoft's certification exams: So easy, a child of six could pass them. Literally

AndrewDu

Re: Real terms

"but engineer and doctor are still real terms with real meanings."

Yes, the word "doctor" means someone with a doctorate-level degree (there's a clue in the word!).

Most practicing medics are not doctors, except by courtesy.

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AndrewDu

Re: There's the right answer, and the Microsoft answer

Indeed. I remember being on an MS course where the instructor said something like "if I stand on this side of the backboard and answer your question, that's the real life answer that actually works, but if I stand on that side, that's the answer you must give in the exam.

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AndrewDu

Re: Why Reg, Why?

Oh come, don't you know there's an unwritten rule in the news business that any story even remotely connected with academic achievement must always be illustrated by a picture of a cute female?

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Naked cyclists take a hard line on 'aroused' protest participant

AndrewDu

"Canterbury needs a drastic and radical change to how it controls the perceived need for private motor vehicle use."

Let me fix that for him:

"Everybody else's lives need to be changed and inconvenienced to suit our leisure requirements"

OK now?

Idiots.

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UK rail comms are safer than mobes – for now – say infosec bods

AndrewDu

Suddenly I'm really glad the the Glasgow subway seems to depend on the good old walkie-talkie.

No, really, it does.

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If hypervisor is commodity, why is VMware still on top?

AndrewDu

" because there is a free edition for home labs "

Well of course there used to be a free edition of Hyper-V (the real thing, not the toy one) for home labs...until Microsoft, in the biggest and most accurate shot-in-the-foot of recent years, abolished the Technet subscription. It's almost like they don't want anyone to learn their technologies any more...

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Hated smart meters likely to be 'a costly failure' – MPs

AndrewDu

I have one of these silly things. It tells me nothing except the total units consumed - just like the old mechanical meter did. It does mean I don't need to have the meter read any more, but then they hardly ever turned up to do that anyway, we read it ourselves and entered the number on a web site.

It's supposed to "help me manage my power usage". How? Nobody has told us. It does nothing for us. It probably does stuff for other people, secretly, and I am sure it can be used to cut us off if some celebs or politicians need the power and they wind ain't blowing that day. But that is all, as far as I know.

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£150m, three years... TWO base stations. Gov.uk? You guessed it

AndrewDu

"This apparently took months".

So OpenReach were involved.

Who expected anything else?

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Smart meters in UK homes will only save folks a lousy £26 a year

AndrewDu

Nothing to do with saving electricity, or the planet (!) or anything else with the possible exception of DECC's bacon.

Everything to do with cutting you off remotely when someone more important (pols, celebs) needs the electricity and the wind isn't blowing hard enough (or is blowing too hard). And before long all new appliances will have to have a gizmo fitted which talks to the SmartMeter and tells it what appliance it is and how much juice it's using, so that they can monitor you even better. For your own good, of course.

We had one fitted while my back was turned (better half agreed to it without asking!) and it does nothing for us at all. No displays, no information or data available anywhere I can see.

No doubt it does plenty for the gubbmint though - it's just that we don't know exactly what.

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AndrewDu

Missing the point

Nothing to do with saving electricity, or the planet (!) or anything else with the possible exception of DECC's bacon.

Everything to do with cutting you off remotely when someone more important (pols, celebs) needs the electricity and the wind isn't blowing hard enough (or is blowing too hard). And before long all new appliances will have to have a gizmo fitted which talks to the SmartMeter and tells it what appliance it is and how much juice it's using, so that they can monitor you even better. For your own good, of course.

We had one fitted while my back was turned (better half agreed to it without asking!) and it does nothing for us at all. No displays, no information or data available anywhere I can see.

No doubt it does plenty for the gubbmint though - it's just that we don't know exactly what.

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Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network

AndrewDu

Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

Erm, no. The ISP will have details from its dhcp logs, and indeed if you don't reboot your router much (and who does) likely it will still have the same IP. It's the public IP that will show up for the downloads, regardless what's going on with the private side of your setup. It's you, and you won't be able to deny it. Even though WE all know that *probably* it wasn't.

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AndrewDu

Re: Not wanting to defend plod, but

Hmm.

I think they would just point out that it WAS your IP address, was it not, that was used to download the kiddie porn?

Case closed. The fine's in the post and your name's in the Sunday Papers.

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Lenovo and IBM's System x biz: It'll be just like 2005's PC buyout

AndrewDu

Quality?

"they kept the attributes that were most attractive to their best customers: things like product quality, reliability, durability, and performance,"

Well, maybe they kept performance.

As for the others, we've completely given up buying Lenovo laptops - far too many failures, shoddy construction, iffy support, etc etc.

Getting ready to switch to HP servers now...

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