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* Posts by 2+2=5

903 posts • joined 21 Jan 2014

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German sauna drags punters to court over naked truth

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TITSUP

Teutonic Inability To Sauna Undressed Politely

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Digital air traffic control upgrade puts potential delays on London flights

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Joke

> I feel quite feint

One does as a rule.

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Commonwealth Games brochure declares that England is now in Africa

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Re: The Gold Coast

> Am I the only one to have had an atlas old enough to show a country called the Gold Coast, before it was renamed Ghana?

Obligatory XKCD...

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Not one, but 20,000 black holes hiding in Milky Way's heart

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Re: I've asked before but...

> Therefore: Could these "new" black holes account for at least some of the missing mass required to bind the galaxy together and keep it spinning at current speed?

No. Because the missing mass (dark matter) needed to make galaxies spin the way they do needs to be spread throughout the galaxy, not just be in the centre.

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Do(ug)h! Half-baked security at Panera Bread spills customer data

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> The Register asked Panera Bread for comment but we've not heard back.

They're probably thinking: What the foccacia has it got to do with you?

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Furious gunwoman opens fire at YouTube HQ, three people shot

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> it's not perfect in the UK but shootings are far less common than the US

Shootings might be less common but the murder rate in London is now on a par with New York.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-43610936

There seems to be a segment of society who are unable to resolve or defuse disputes at an early stage but inflame them instead, rapidly resulting in one or both sides resorting to violence. I blame video games [1] - too many 1st person shooters and players not getting enough interaction with real people.

[1] I don't - but I'm thinking of becoming a politician.

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Which? leads decrepit email service behind barn, single shot rings out over valley

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Re: Wait a minute

> Do you mean to tell me that there is someone willing to do helldesk for less than 15k a year ?

I think I could manage an hour a week for 15k a year.

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Europe dumps 300,000 UK-owned .EU domains into the Brexit bin

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Re: But if you want to believe that the vote was stolen

> Either we should be going for the Norway model or there should be a second referendum which actually states leaving the EU & EEA.

The Norway model would be a mistake - they pay far too much. We should aim for the Switzerland model - as they pay *much* less. :-)

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/brexit/2016/07/20/how-much-do-non-eu-countries-give-up-for-access-to-the-single-market-more-than-brexiteers-will-like/

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Re: I'm an European citizen and I hate Brexit and its perpetrators, ...

> lay the blame where it belongs. At the feet of those who voted for brexit. They should never be allowed to forget their part in the economic damage they KNEW would happen. Vile people, every one

When a referendum is held in Switzerland, for example, the authorities go to great lengths to provide a detailed, unbiased, clear document explaining the pros and cons for and against. For a decision as significant as a country leaving the EU, I would expect such a document to run to at least a hundred pages. Not everyone need read the whole thing, and there is no reason why abridged versions couldn't also be provided, but at least there would be no excuse for not being informed.

By contrast, the UK provided effectively nothing: a small pamphlet with a few bland statements. The press, instead of calling-out the politicians on this woeful lack of information, or doing their best to fill the gap themselves, chose to behave like jeering morons.

And you believe that those who voted to leave knew what the consequences would be?

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Microsoft patches patch for Meltdown bug patch: Windows 7, Server 2008 rushed an emergency fix

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Got there in the end

> So gg Microsoft. You got there in the end.

You're assuming this patch finally fixes everything. :-)

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Details of 600,000 foreign visitors to UK go up in smoke thanks to shonky border database

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Re: Guardian has more details.

> It is absolutely pointless to collect anything at the border unless you can ask for it any point at a later date.

Not strictly true. It would show that, for example, a person who'd entered the UK on a time-limited visa hadn't over-stayed. If they were to apply for another visa in the future then approval could be quicker, on the basis that they had established a level of trustworthiness.

This of course assumes that the system might benefit the individual in some small way - which of course is unlikely.

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User fired IT support company for a 'typo' that was actually a real word

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Re: Re McLinux

> Come to think of it, I'm going to change mine to McLinux. Hot Damn!

Hot Damn McLinux - that's a porn star name if ever there was one.

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10Mbps for world+dog, hoots UK.gov, and here is how we're doing it

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Re: nice man Jeremy

So... Try asking someone old enough (who isn't called Jeremy) how efficient the nationalised industries were in the 1970s before they were privatised. And when they've finished laughing they might tell you.

It's easy to have a pop at the nationalised industries of the 70s, but their private cousins were just as bad: Ford Dagenham for example.

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Google to 'forget me' man: Have you forgotten what you said earlier?

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> So those issues you're worrying about are not created by this.

Drat! I was thinking of changing my name to "NT2" in order to obtain anonymity.

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Half the world warned 'Chinese space station will fall on you'

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Typical eBay delivery from China...

> a “highly variable” re-entry window from 29 March to 9 April

seems a pretty normal eBay delivery estimate for stuff from China.

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BBC Telly Tax heavies got pat on the head from snoopers' overseers

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Re: I just wish they'd leave me alone

> I've lost count of how many times over the years I've told them NO. What grounds do they have for thinking the situation has changed?

Send an FOIA request to the BBC asking them how many times you've told them 'no'. :-)

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Unhappy

Some follow-up questions to ask...

So if Capita can authorise themselves to use RIPA powers, which powers are they actually using?

Interception of communications? Do they spy on suspects emails, letters and telephone calls hoping to catch people discussing the events in Eastenders?

Intrusive surveillance? Do they mount cameras peering into peoples homes? Or do they mount cameras inside people's homes hoping to catch them watching televisions? Do they keep statistics on houses watched? E.g. do they only monitor suspect houses with teenage girls resident? Because... pervs?

Covert Human Intelligence Sources? Do they send a bloke down the pub to befriend you and trick you into revealing that you watched telly last night?

So many questions, so many inadequate answers from Capita, the BBC and the regulator.

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EE: Data goes TITSUP* for Brit mobile customers

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Front

> At best, *at best*, you're checking bus schedules

Or train times - since the ToCs have decided to cancel most of their services based on the mere threat of snow.

On the plus side, snow-plough trains will be able to run unhindered because there will be nothing else on the line.

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EU aviation agency publishes new drone framework. Hobbyists won't like it

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Re: Drone makers rush

> Members of BMFA affiliated clubs should be able to continue flying as at present, and presumably to operate small drones on the club fiend if the club allows it.

Is having a 'club fiend' a requirement of the BMFA or does model flying attract that kind of person naturally?

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Helicopter crashes after manoeuvres to 'avoid... DJI Phantom drone'

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Re: More FAKE News: Truth is Manned Helicopter Hit Static Tree and had Rough Landing

> So what's with the drone? The heli pilot should have gone UP, something his aircraft could do better than a drone. The down draft from the helicopter would have likely driven the drone down, increasing the separation.

If the helicopter was so low that it hit a tree then it's entirely possible that the drone came towards them at a higher altitude and was going to pass overhead. The instructor would then be acutely aware that the downdraft would suck the drone into the rotors, which might explain his hasty reaction. There's not enough info in the story as reported to say for sure.

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Apple to devs: Code for the iPhone X or nothing from April onwards

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Re: We develop for Apple and Android

Mmmm.... not convinced our app runs that well on a washing machine. It does require a touch interface and a GPS unit. If we can find a washing machine that has this, we'll try and port it across.

Yes, but imagine how soft that interface would feel with the right conditioner...

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Yes, Assange, we'll still nick you for skipping bail, rules court

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@ Gerhard

Thank-you for such a specific link. It seems very clear. Except that the extradition treaty between the EU and the US makes no provision for refusing an extradition request because of any previous extradition. So I'm not clear why Sweden is making such a definite statement.

Confusingly https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/117679/european-arrest-warrant1.pdf does require that consent - but only for 45 days (article 28).

However Sweden has made a clear statement, so I'll concede that the judge was right to say that Assange wouldn't be further extradited without the agreement of the UK.

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"If he were to hand himself in and serve out a sentence for skipping bail, and was then extradited to Sweden, the UK authorities would have no further control whatsoever: he wouldn't be on UK territory and he is not a UK citizen"

Absolutely wrong. It is a feature of international law called the Doctrine of Speciality, which Sweden have acknowledged: https://www.aklagare.se/en/nyheter--press/media/the-assange-matter/kan-assange-utlamnas-fran-sverige-till-usa/

There is also the fundamental principle of non-refoulement.

Doctrine of Speciality applies only to criminal offences committed in the country the person is being extradited to and named in the extradition request. There is nothing covering the expectation of a subsequent extradition request from a 3rd country.

Also the quote from the Swedish authorities that you link to states:

Every extradition case is to be judged on its own individual merits. For that reason the Swedish government cannot provide a guarantee in advance that Julian Assange would not be subject to further extradition to the USA.

Non-refoulement, assuming you mean if or when Assange eventually gets to Sweden, doesn't apply because it covers the return of refugees/asylum seekers to the country they came from - and Assange won't have come from the US to Sweden.

If you mean from the UK to Sweden then it doesn't apply because Assange is not requesting asylum from the UK (but from Ecuador).

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Re: astroturfing

> You mean the sources that Assange doesn't protect because he's too lazy to properly redact the documents?

It was a journalist from The Guardian who blabbed the password allowing anyone access to the leaked material. Up until then the documents were being properly redacted.

https://wikileaks.org/Guardian-journalist-negligently.html

(Other sources available if you care to Google)

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> You have somehow missed the rest of what she said. The point was also that if he were sent to Sweden and the Americans requested his extradition, the UK would have to agree to it before it could happen.

I agree that she said that but it is patently nonsense. If he were to hand himself in and serve out a sentence for skipping bail, and was then extradited to Sweden, the UK authorities would have no further control whatsoever: he wouldn't be on UK territory and he is not a UK citizen. The idea that the UK would be consulted and asked to approve any subsequent extradition request made to Sweden by the US is nonsense.

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> No, she really doesn't. Her business is Law, not prognostication. What on earth makes you think she reads El Reg in the first place, and values your opinion in the second?

Doesn't what? Or do you mean "hasn't" as in hasn't missed the point?

You are right: her business is Law. And her response to Assange's argument that if he were sent to Sweden he would be subject to the risk of extradition etc was to fob him off with "the US have done nothing so far". That's not a proper response, in law or otherwise.

If the court's view is they don't care about what might happen in the future then she should say so. My complaint is with her sidestepping the question. That's for politicians not judges.

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>> "Dear Emma, you seem to have completely missed the point. The problem is not what the US has done (past tense) but what the US will do (future tense)."

> What may or not happen is not within the remit of the court at this point. A specific request for extradition would be assessed on it's merits (as has happened with Lauri Love), this hearing is to assess whether or not charges should be dropped for an offense that Assange is blatantly guilty of.

That is kind of the point: if she is supposed to be addressing the issue of Assange breaking his bail conditions then she need not mention the US at all. But she didn't: she chose to make a one-sided statement. If she'd made a balanced statement or none at all then I wouldn't have called her on it.

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> "Rather than rendering Mr Assange to the United States, if the US had initiated a request to extradite Mr Assange from Sweden, Sweden would have contacted this court and the judiciary here would have had to consider the request."

- District Judge Emma Arbuthnot

Dear Emma, you seem to have completely missed the point. The problem is not what the US has done (past tense) but what the US will do (future tense). Do you really need me to point that out to you?

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Mobile phone dealer boss faces 12 years in director limbo

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> Why is he not in jail then ?

Presumably because the unpaid bill was only £24k -odd and there is some expectation that he might be able to pay that back at some point in the future - which being in prison wouldn't help with.

The whole things seems odd: starts off saying only a small amount owing but then 'vast' amounts involved in a VAT carousel fraud. So which is it?

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You're decorating it wrong: Apple HomePod gives wood ring of death

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NASA budget shock: Climate studies? GTFO. We're making the Moon great again, says Trump

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Re: Outer Space Treaty?

Maybe it's worth finding iron asteroids, zone purifying them, and injecting air to blow them into a nice big bubble: either live in 'em or let the air out, plug the gap, and send 'em towards earth: get the volume right and they'd float like huge balloons at the altitude of your choice.

Let the air out? In space? So they contain a vacuum? Then send them to the Earth? Care to explain how an iron sphere, containing nothing lighter than air but made of something much heavier than air, could float in the atmosphere?

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UK Home Sec Amber Rudd unveils extremism blocking tool

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Big Brother

That £600k figure...

We're all focused on how cheap it is for what it purports to do, but what we haven't been told is that the £600k is just the development cost. There will be a licensing charge at a extremely generous, "I'm starving me own kids 'ere" rate of just £1 per video uploaded.

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Due to Oracle being Oracle, Eclipse holds poll to rename Java EE (No, it won't be Java McJava Face)

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Re: What about J?

> What about J?

No - J is a long-established language already.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J_(programming_language)

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MPs: Lack of technical skills for Brexit could create 'damaging, unmanageable muddle'

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Re: Clueless on everything

Did you suggest a plan B to the Government? Are you able to say without giving away who you are, etc?

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Beware the looming Google Chrome HTTPS certificate apocalypse!

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Re: Well done Google....

Thanks chronos and katrinab - learnt something new today

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Lenovo literally has a screw loose – so it's recalled flagship Carbon X1 ThinkPads

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Fault analysis undertaken and fix identified

Investigation has identified the problem: the production line ran out of glue so the screw wasn't glued in.

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A Hughes failure: Flat Earther rocketeer can't get it up yet again

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Re: Although...

> Alternatively he could just say that he went half mile up and the Earth is flat as a pancake. Then ask for more money to go even further to confirm this.

And, if by some miracle, he gets high enough to be able to the whole of the earth's disk is in his field of vision without killing himself, he won't be able to discern any vertical curvature and will triumphantly claim that the earth is a flat disk (with features like continents sliding across it). :-)

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Crowdfunding small print binned as Retro Computers Ltd loses court refund action

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Happy

The picture illustrating the story...

A nice touch that a story about Retro Computers Ltd is illustrated with the retro pound coin.

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Just can't catch a break, can ya, Capita? Shares tumble 40% amid yet another profit warning

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> Nowhere near as disastrous.

It depends on where you stand. If you're buying shares and don't currently own any, then it makes almost no difference: you buy roughly twice the number of shares at half the previous price for no net difference.

If you already owned shares then you've just had 42% wiped off their value selling them today versus selling them yesterday. Some of those share owners will be 'fat cat bastards who deserve it' (tm), others will be your and my pension funds.

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Here we go again... UK Prime Minister urges nerds to come up with magic crypto backdoors

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Headmaster

Re: There's no magic encryption tree

I wouldn't use "hairbrained" as I suspect she's pulling this out of her orifice that's lower to the aft it's 'hare-brained' as in 'mad as a March hare'.

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Hawaii governor: I wanted to tell everyone nuke alert was fake – I just forgot my password

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Simple way to avoid accidentally broadcasting the 4 minute warning...

Just add a 5 minute delay so that there is time to cancel if a mistake is made.

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A high-energy neutrino, a powerful cosmic ray, and a gamma ray walk into a bar... Where you from, asks the bartender

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Re: Far better punchlines available

> These neutrinos and gamma rays are effectively the “daughter particles” of the cosmic rays.

"No children allowed in the bar"

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'WHAT THE F*CK IS GOING ON?' Linus Torvalds explodes at Intel spinning Spectre fix as a security feature

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Re: Speculative but maybe workable fix

> can you briefly explain how ... [snip]

No need as there's a much simpler fix: Intel currently offer a range of CPUs at different clock speeds. All they have to do is offer the faster processor models at the lower price of the slower ones to compensate for the loss of performance introduced by the fix they are currently trying so hard not to roll out.

And then they simply need to refund the price difference between fast and slow processor costs to everyone who bought an Intel CPU, or a PC containing an Intel CPU, in the last 10 years or so.

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User had no webcam or mic, complained vid conference didn’t work

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Facepalm

Equipment and training?

> At which point Pete pointed out the PC had no microphone. Or Webcam.

> “Do you think that’s the problem?” the user asked Pete.

Hah, what an idiot. That's almost as stupid as rolling-out video-conferencing software without making sure that users have cameras and microphones.

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Destroying the city to save the robocar

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Re: F**K the Disabled

> Electric vehicles are already the stuff of nightmares for her. Imagine you are standing at a road junction with your eyes tight shut, several cars around you are eletric and running totally silent. Now cross the road...

That is an area where I would expect the vehicle manufacturers to get together to develop a transponder that people can (optionally) carry as a way of signalling to autonomous cars that they are there. I imagine a variety of models or signalling modes: one for blind / deaf people; one for elderly / disabled / slower moving; one for cyclists; one for dogs. The ones for people might have a button on it that can be pressed to signal "I'm going to cross the road now."

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Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

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Would much rather see developments in stopping drivers from exceeding the speed limits or vehicles being able to travel safely in convoy on motorways to reduce duel costs.

Yes. A good second who knows how to properly prime a pistol is becoming ever harder to find these days.

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Re: It appears from the article that Mr. Wolmar is a railway enthusiast...

> One thing I have never seen mentioned is that the car drops you at the office then autonomously takes itself to the car park.

It has been mentioned but is usually quickly discounted as it simply magnifies the rush-hour: you'd never actually get to work because everybody else would be trying to do the same.

Which is a good thing, because if it were possible for everyone to be chauffeured to work in an autonomous car, literally everywhere within an hour or two of London would be clogged by autonomous cars parking up for the day, waiting for the evening return journey to start.

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1 in 5 STEM bros whinge they can't catch a break in tech world they run

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> It makes me depressed - literally, medication-taking, psychiatrist-seeing, body-harming, sleep-losing depressed - to have this non-stop weight of guilt shoveled upon me just because I was born a certain way and have decided to try and make my career in the tech world. I don't need it and I haven't done anything to warrant it.

Like others, I agree with your post and recognise many elements of myself in you. But don't let things depress you - most people have enough shit in other parts of their lives at various times that you don't want to be taking on extra.

Do you hire people? No? Then you're not responsible for the gender imbalance at work.

Do you post social media articles saying that IT jobs are not for girls / only for nerdy men? No? Then you're not responsible for the public's mis-perception of the industry.

Do you treat the women and minorities that you do work with with respect and as equals? Yes? Then you're doing great.

> I am in my position because I was the best applicant at the time

See - you're thinking positively already!! I like to think that I am in my position because I was the cheapest applicant that passed the minimum grade. If anything goes wrong I console myself with the thought that if the company were really worried about it they would have paid more and employed someone better. :-)

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UK.gov puts Suffolk 7-year-old's submarine design into production

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Toy sub

Years ago I worked on an MoD submarine project and one of the ex-submariners on the project told me how he once tried to play a practical joke on his c/o by putting one of these into an envelope with a note saying "latest submarine design", sealed the envelope, stamped it Top Secret and then put it into an internal post envelope addressed to the Head of the Submarine Service in Whitehall. He was expecting his c/o to remove the package from the out tray (as they're always nosey and would never have let something out to such a senior officer without it going up through the chain of command). Needless to say, something happened, it wasn't intercepted and it was indeed delivered.

Fortunately the top bod had a sense of humour and returned it with a note saying something like "Excellent innovation, design approved". But he sent it back via his chain of command. And as the top bod had found it funny, each subordinate down the chain then felt obliged to add a note showing that they too found it funny.

A week or so later he got called into his c/o's office who said he couldn't give him a bollocking because the top bod had approved it, and the notes from those down the chain of command were simultaneously hilarious and cringeworthy as each tried to be more witty than the previous.

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1980s sci-fi movies: The thrill of being not quite terrified on mum's floral sofa

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Re: Sci-Fi is now Sci-reality

> What's the next exciting step?

Flying cars, of course. :-)

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