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* Posts by Cynic_999

1189 posts • joined 15 Aug 2013

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Drone crashes after operator failed to spot extra building site crane

Cynic_999
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Survey

He obviously should have done a quick site survey to see if anything had changed. He could have use a drone.

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Amount of pixels needed to make VR less crap may set your PC on fire

Cynic_999
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Offload to wetware

Our brain is great at adapting to different situations. If you were to wear glasses that inverts the image, or swaps right and left eye, after a while of continuous use your brain adapts and the World looks completely normal again - you stop noticing. We also know that the brain fills in the gaps when there is visual information missing - we do not perceive the big dark spot that is always present due to the optic nerve's entry point. Various optical illusions show that a huge percentage of what we "see" is really created by our brain rather than seen by our eyes.

I should think therefore that anyone using a VR headset regularly will experience the same effect - the brain will adapt and compensate for the shortcomings in the display and the virtual World will appear realistic.

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Hawaiian fake nukes alert caused by fat-fingered fumble of garbage GUI

Cynic_999
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It was of benefit

I suspect that many more people in Hawaii know where their closest bomb shelter is located than was the case before this happened. Not that we apparently need be concerned about what happens in shithole countries, and any ICBM coming from a Muslim country would be turned away at the border anyway ...

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Facebook settles landmark revenge porn case with UK teen for undisclosed sum

Cynic_999
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Should FB be held responsible?

If someone were to attach a physical "revenge porn" photograph to a lamp-post, would the Local Authority be held responsible for hosting the image (even if they took it down as soon as it was reported)? After all, it's the council that owns the lamp-post that hosted the image!

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Ohio coder accused of infecting Macs, PCs with webcam, browser spyware for 13 years

Cynic_999
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Re: "The code was an interesting mix of very old and new coding styles."

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The fact it triggers on searches for pr()n suggests a backup strategy that if discovered it would allow the operator to discourage users who found it from reporting it.

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Nope. It triggered on porn so that he could concentrate on spying on people who were more likely to be having a wank within view of the webcam. Otherwise he'd be looking at 1000's of boring webcams showing empty rooms, people typing and looking at cat videos.

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Up, up and a-weigh! Boeing flies cargo drone with 225kg payload

Cynic_999
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Re: Other uses

"As it has 4 lifting points, it is not suitable for passenger use - the failure of any rotor or engine will send the craft out of control. At least 6 if not 8 separate lifting points are needed to be able to safely land after a failure."

Remind me - how many lifting points does a conventional helicopter have?

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Brazil says it has bagged Royal Navy flagship HMS Ocean for £84m

Cynic_999
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Re: Whats in a name

I suspect the next will be HMS "Sea" followed by HMS "Pond"

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Proposed Brit law to ban b**tards brandishing bots to bulk-buy tickets

Cynic_999
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Anti-capitalism?

I thought it was perfectly acceptable to let the market set the selling price, and that buying something at a low price and re-selling at a high price was how the retail trade and capitalism in general was *supposed* to work? Especially when the item in question is most definitely non-essential.

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One more credit insurer abandons Maplin Electronics

Cynic_999
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Re: Probably for nought but...

I agree - I occasionally shop at Maplins, and have found that there is at least one employee in the store who knows their anode from their cathode, and who is called PDQ if the sales guy doesn't know the answer (and he will admit that he doesn't know).

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Ex-Microsoft intern claimed one of her fellow temps raped her. Her bosses hired him

Cynic_999
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Re: So what did the police say?

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You are not the one who gets to define how bad the crime is. It's the victim that gets to decide.

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OK, I allege that your entire post was meant as an horrific personal attack on me. As I have made the allegation, by your rules action must now be taken against you you. And as I get to decide how bad your crime was, I say that what you did to me in your post was far worse than murder. You will therefore happily submit to a life sentence.

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Brit film board proposed as overlord of online pr0nz age checks

Cynic_999
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If I knew what the problem was, maybe I'd have a solution

So little Johnny (or Jane) sees porn. If they are young, they giggle and get back to something interesting like Minecraft. If older, they get aroused, have a wank, then get back to something interesting like Facebook. Not sure I see at what stage there is any damage caused, unless there is concern that it might interfere with the pro-ISIS indoctrination of our disaffected youth.

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IBM reminds staff not to break customers in pre-Xmas fix-this-now rush

Cynic_999
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Re: IBM

I was in India last year, and where I was the average Indian 12 year old schoolchild was a lot better educated than most U.K. 16 year olds. That included formal English grammar. Not every child goes to school, but the majority of those who do tend to take it very seriously.

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NiceHash diced up by hackers, thousands of Bitcoin pilfered

Cynic_999
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Re: Bitcoin is basically a Ponzi scheme

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The only way investors who already have bitcoins can get their money out, is when new investors put their money into the scheme. That's the definition of a Ponzi scheme.

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No, a Ponzi scheme relies on several people putting in money to pay out one person in the tier above, thus it requires more and more people to participate and can never be sustained. Bitcoin is like an investment in physical goods such as gold or diamonds. If you invest in diamonds, the only way you can get your money out is when a new investor pays money to buy them.

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Cynic_999
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Re: I hate banks, they're organised, legalised crime gangs...

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....but have to admit I don't live in fear of my bank account being stolen and me losing my money.

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But it happens. Google "identity theft".

IMO there is less chance of a crook getting physical access to one of the USB sticks that hold my BTC wallet and then cracking the password than there is of a crook getting hold of enough information to make a fraudulent online debit card transaction from my bank account.

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Cynic_999
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Re: Fake money

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When RBS and Northern Rock went bankrupt, which in theory meant that all their depositors (and shareholders) lost all their money, instead the kind UK government stepped in and spent 25 grand for every person in the UK to ensure the banks stayed open.

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No, what the government did was to take a little bit from everyone in the UK to fund the bailout - a sort of involuntary crowdfunding. Governments can take your money overtly in taxation, but they can also take it covertly by simply printing more money out of nothing, in which case you think you still have the same money as you had before, but in fact it is worth less, with the government effectively pocketing the difference.

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Cynic_999
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They only have value because people (speculators) think that they have value.

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So, completely unlike those bits of coloured paper and plastic you get from an ATM.

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Cynic_999
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Re: Move on, move on, nothing to see here....

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It's not money, it's not an investment, it's not an asset....it's a stupid computer game, and you can't beat the house.

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You could say exactly the same about fiat currency. Except the over-production of cryptocurrency does not depend on the whims of a government.

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Cynic_999
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Re: Mugs game

And how does the energy needed to create BTC compare to the energy needed to create paper notes and coins? Both paper and metal require a LOT of energy to produce, and that's before factoring in the energy needed to print & shape it into notes & coins.

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Cynic_999
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Re: Entire contents of bitcoin wallet pilfered?

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Every crypto-ripoff just makes "owning" some bitcoin that much more edgy.

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Sure, just like every credit card scam makes owning a credit card that much more edgy. Or a PayPal account. Or cash notes. Or ...

You can keep an encrypted BTC wallet offline on a memory stick (plus a few backup copies) and it's pretty difficult to get ripped off. However if you forget your wallet password or get run over by a bus without letting anyone else know the password, the money is effectively lost.

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Meet the woman with a supernatural affinity for stiff lovers

Cynic_999
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A young lady from Pembroke Dock

Was in love with the spirit of God

But it wasn't the Almighty

Who lifted her nighty

'Twas Roger the lodger, the sod!

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Spy-on-your-home Y-Cam cameras removes free cloud storage bit

Cynic_999
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Re: Any IoT kit without a subscription...

Believe it or not, there is plenty of hardware that will work for decades without needing any form of upgrade or servicing.

However, if you really believe what you just wrote, I can offer you some nice CAT5 Ethernet cables at £10 each and £1.50 per month subscription ...

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Unfit to plead before a US court? You may face 'indefinite detention'

Cynic_999
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My thinking is more straightforward

I'd start by deciding whether, if the situation were reversed (American citizen hacking MI5 from his Texas bedroom), the US would be at all likely to agree to extradite that person to the UK to face trial.

I'm pretty certain the answer to that would be "no way". The US even refused to extradite IRA terrorists who had committed murder while in the UK.

I'd then apply the legal principle of sauce, goose & gander.

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What will drive our cars when the combustion engine dies?

Cynic_999
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Re: We won't be driving them, they'll be driving us.

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Good for you, but my vision of utopia doesn't include any bloody commuting. Working remotely is far greener than any method which involves schlepping yourself to whatever hell hole your employer saw fit to rent an office space in.

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How do you manufacture cars, TV sets, toasters, ships remotely? How do you build roads and bridges remotely? How do you build houses remotely?

Would you be happy if you had a serious illness and all the hospital staff were sat at home interfacing with you remotely?

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Crown Prosecution Service is coming for crooks' cryptocurrency

Cynic_999
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Illegal goods are illegal goods, the law does not care who owns them now and they would still confiscate the cryptocurrency.

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Does that mean that if a criminal bought a car from his ill-gotten gains, the police could demand that the car dealer hand over the money that was used to pay for the car? Could they chase around every shop the criminal bought something and demand the return of the money used for the purchases?

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Thou shalt use our drone app, UK.gov to tell quadcopter pilots

Cynic_999
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You need a licence / insurance to drive a road vehicle because the road is a shared space where you can potentially collide with other road users.

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That statement is incorrect. My 6 year old is permitted to ride a bicycle on the road with neither a licence nor insurance. One wobble causing a bus to swerve into a shop ...

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Cynic_999
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Could someone remind me ...

How many people have been killed/injured and how many aircraft have been damaged by drones in the past 5 years? I'm not talking about "drone incidents" where the drone in question may well have been a plastic bag caught in a thermal or a large bird seen out of the corner of a pilot's eye.

Contrast with the number of deaths/injuries/damage caused by unlicensed and unregistered bicycles.

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Cynic_999
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I live almost adjacent to a small airport roughly in line with the end of the runway. I would never, ever, under any circumstances consider flying a drone from my property it's simple common sense.

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The problem with "common sense" is that it's so often wrong. There would be nothing dangerous or wrong with practicing drone racing or similar low-level operations in your house or garden. Or even taking some videos of your property from 50 or 60 feet up. If an aircraft using the airport is flying lower than 100 feet over your property, a drone would be the least of the pilot's problems unless your house is extremely close to the runway threshold.

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Logicalis lands mega air traffic computer deal. Yes, that Logicalis

Cynic_999
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Re: Quite feasible

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This would be unworkable on approach and departure at busy airports/terminal areas.

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Why? Vectoring & scheduling moving objects so that they fit into a pattern is perfectly suited to a computer algorithm - it should be able to perform better than a human controller in that respect.

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Cynic_999
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Quite feasible

Air traffic control is in fact something that lends itself perfectly to some comprehensive computer algorithms. All (IFR) aircraft are flying known (expected) directions, speeds and altitudes, with very, very few aircraft deviating significantly from what is expected. All positions, speeds and altitudes are reported at short intervals to ATC so any such deviations can be very quickly detected and dealt with. All ATC actions are taken in accordance with a fixed set of straightforward rules.

You'd need human oversight to deal with the completely unexpected and the occasional emergency, but 99.99% of operations could easily be controlled by computer - probably more safely than a human approach, area or tower controller in fact, because a computer will not get fixated on one unusual situation and fail to spot another situation developing. Ground operations are far less predictable, and so ground control is probably still best handled by a human.

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Estonia government locks down ID smartcards: Refresh or else

Cynic_999
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Re: Is there any chance

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So what is the big problem [about getting an ID card], perhaps it's all about the two-party system and nothing else.

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There would be no problem for me if the proposals were *only* about having an ID card. But the ID card was being proposed as a mechanism for tracking people 24/7 and as the basis for a unified database containing all your personal details in one place.

As soon as the law states that everyone must carry an ID card at all times, there will be reasons found why more and more services need to routinely see that ID card. So you will need to swipe your ID card to get served at a pub or buy rail ticket or enter a casino - etc. etc. And every swipe sends your location back to Big Brother where it is meticulously logged and kept forever. And you suddenly find your insurance premiums increase, or you are refused health treatment because the computer says your lifestyle is too unhealthy.

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Universal basic income is a great idea, which is also why it won't happen

Cynic_999
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Re: I see no mention of Speenhamland, a form UBI

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A better solution in my view is a Job Guarantee is a better. It puts a floor under wages, gives people a chance to have meaningful employment (whatever that may be), and alleviates the problem of employers not wanting to employ the short/long term unemployed.

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And exactly where do all these "meaningful jobs" come from?

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Cynic_999
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Feeling useless:

From the article:

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“A lot of people derive their meaning from their employment. So if there’s no need for your labour, what’s your meaning? Do you feel useless? That’s a much harder problem to deal with.”

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This supposes that the only way a person can feel useful is if they are working for someone else in return for money. I can assure you that it is perfectly possible to feel extremely useful by doing work that benefits yourself, your family and your friends. Try it, and you'll find that watching the kids playing on the swings etc. that you spent 10 hours making on your own is far more satisfying than watching a box of widgets that you helped 20 other people make for your employer getting loaded onto the delivery lorry. The happy smiles that the kids reward you with are worth far more than the £15 an hour your employer rewards you with.

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Brace yourselves, fanboys. Winter is coming. And the iPhone X can't handle the cold

Cynic_999
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Re: Diversity figures are meaningless without context

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Sometimes you do have to have a little bit of positive discrimination or else the roles become self-fulfilling gender proportional.

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I have yet to see any rational argument that explains *why* having all jobs done by an equally proportionate number of males, females, blacks, whites, eskimos etc. is in principle beneficial.

I have also not seen any huge outcry about the fact that AFAICS there are far more men filling the roles of dustbin collector and street sweeper than there are women.

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Cynic_999
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Re: Read that yesterday, tried it today

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Was 20F when I left the house ...

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That's one heck of a capacitive touch panel. Be careful when it's charged up.

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Give us a bloody PIN: MPs grill BBC bosses over subscriber access

Cynic_999
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Re: Sick and tired of the freeloaders

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I don't drive. Why should I pay for roads that I never use?

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Because you undoubtedly DO use the roads, indirectly. The goods you buy in shops got there via the roads. The bricks and mortar that make up your home got delivered by road.

You also similarly get indirect benefit from schools and NHS regardless of whether you personally use those things.

But if I do not watch BBC TV, then it does not benefit me in any way either directly or indirectly.

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Cynic_999
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Re: News

The BBC has been found guilty several times of falsifying documentaries - IOW lying. I saw this for myself in an African country when money was thrown into some dustbins at the back of a shopping centre so the BBC could film children rummaging to get it, the resulting documentary reported that the poor black children were starving and getting food from the dustbins of the rich whites.

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Cynic_999
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Re: PIN / subscription for broadcast?

Sky and many other companies manage broadcast subscription services. It may have been difficult to achieve when broadcast TV was analogue, but after the digital switch-over it would be trivial to encrypt BBC broadcast channels so that people need to subscribe to get a decryption card.

The BBC could have mandated that all digital receivers include a card slot at the time of the change-over, but they deliberately did not do so to reduce the pressure of being told to go subscription service instead of TV licence. But is does not make it impossible - set-top boxes with provision for decryption cards could be mass-produced to sell for less than half the TV licence fee, and a date for encryption set for, say, 2 years' time.

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Parity calamity! Wallet code bug destroys $280m in Ethereum

Cynic_999
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Re: How many DevOps are we talking about here

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English has a perfectly usable gender pronoun, "it". In fact "they" is the plural of "it".

Seriously, what would be your reaction if you went to see your boss, and when his secretary told him there was someone to see him, he belches out, "Who is they?"

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A better reaction than if my boss had replied, "Ask it to come in."

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Cynic_999
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Re: A tragedy? @ Richard Boyce

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Real currencies are guaranteed by governments.

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Guaranteed to steadily decline in value perhaps. Ask any Venezuelan how much such a guarantee is worth.

Meanwhile the Bitcoin I bought almost 12 months ago has increased in value by 1000% while the "guaranteed" currency in my bank account has diminished in value by about 3% in the same time period.

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Donald, YOU'RE FIRED: Rogue Twitter worker quits, deletes President Trump's account

Cynic_999
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Re: Fake news

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What about a Twitter employee that deletes your account because he doesn't like your position on Star Trek vs. Star Wars?

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Then you would no longer have a Twitter account. Which would probably make you more productive, more sociable and better liked. You could always demand your money back.

What about a Twitter subscriber who is busily coordinating a terrorist attack in real time, but cannot be stopped because the only senior Twitter employees who have the access rights to delete accounts are unavailable for the next few hours?

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Two drones, two crashes in two months: MoD still won't say why

Cynic_999
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Re: "Airflow will *increase* the temperature of the airframe "

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Not in any major sense below Mach 1

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Not major enough to be a design consideration, but it is certainly not insignificant. At normal light aircraft cruising speeds the increase in the airframe temperature due to air friction can be several degrees C - certainly the difference between ice and no ice in many situations. In larger subsonic aircraft, ice can appear when the aircraft reduces speed from, say, 250kts to 150kts even though the outside air temperature has not changed. I have taken off in a light aircraft having de-iced the wings mechanically as best I can, and watched as the remaining ice melts away after a few minutes' flying, despite the fact that I have climbed into colder air.

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Cynic_999
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Re: "temperatures on the day averaged about 9°C."

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(i.e. airflow over its flying surfaces and hence chill)

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Airflow will *increase* the temperature of the airframe (from friction). "Chill factor" applies only to things that are hotter than the air (e.g. warm-blooded animals, soldering irons etc).

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Hells door-bells! Ring pieces paralyzed in horror during Halloween trick-or-treat rush

Cynic_999
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Technology is de-improving

Well over a decade ago I bought a webcam. It streamed directly to the remote viewer without passing through any intermediate server. Which seems to me to be the most sensible way of achieving the objective in any application where you are not expecting more than 1 or 2 people to need to view the output at the same time.

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Cynic_999
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Re: I know it's apocryphal ...

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Pretty much the last thing you want floating around a space station would be a fleck of conductive graphite from a pencil.

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If any systems on the space station could be adversely affected by conductive dust or flecks floating around in the habitable section, then they are extremely badly designed.

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Health quango: Booze 'evidence' not Puritan enough, do us another

Cynic_999
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The government quite clearly got the best evidence than money can buy.

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Advisory body to 'reconsider' ethics of hanging onto 'mugshots'

Cynic_999
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Waste of time

It doesn't matter what some committee, the HRA or even UK law states, the police will still retain forever all the photos, fingerprints and DNA that are taken from everyone who is arrested whether they are ever charged with a crime or not.

How can anyone prove any different? If there is a slip-up that reveals that an innocent person's data had been retained, it will be waved away as an "oversight"

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Tor blimey, guv'nor: Firefox to try on privacy tool's Canvas gloves to leave fewer fingerprints

Cynic_999
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Re: Back to 1994

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This means, web sites will begin to look like they did back in the mid 1990s.

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Which would be a step in the right direction AFAIAC. Few if any long delays while pop-up adverts are fetched, no automatic video, page load times of a few seconds even at 14400Bd, no freezes due to "long running scripts" etc. And generally sleeker and less cluttered pages.

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Submarine builder admits dismembering journalist's body

Cynic_999
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Re: Not very clever

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Remind me not to take a sea voyage with you...

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You'd be a fool to take an ocean voyage on a small boat with *anyone* you didn't know very well.

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USB stick found in West London contained Heathrow security data

Cynic_999
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could be a few years old and the real-world risk very minimal (if any)

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It was said to contain information about secret tunnels/entrances. I shouldn't think those would change much over time.

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Cynic_999
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Re: Malware spreading via USB stick

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I wouldn't have known whether there was sensitive material on a stick like that, because I would not plug it into my PC.

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Just use a live CD to boot into any of the Linux distros and examine the contents of the USB stick on that. You could use any OS that will not auto-run stuff on removable media to list the files, and boot into the live CD only if anything looks interesting.

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