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* Posts by oldcoder

687 posts • joined 17 Nov 2012

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SCO vs. IBM case over who owns Linux comes back to life. Again

oldcoder
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Re: s/SCO/TSG/g

" when IBM added code to AIX that made the code a part of System V and therefore TSG's property and so couldn't be contributed to Linux without TSG's permission."

Except that the code added to Linux didn't come from AIX.

It came from OS/2. JFS v1 was added to AIX; but JFS v2 had a different foundation. The only thing that was the same was the three letters "JFS"

So the claim still fails.

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Trump backs push for bumpkin broadband with presidential orders

oldcoder
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Nothing will happen.

Since it isn't classed as a title 2 service anymore, there is no impetus for service to rural areas.

It was only having the plain old telephone service labeled as title 2 that got phone service into rural US in the first place.

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IBM melts down fixing Meltdown as processes and patches stutter

oldcoder
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Re: Incapacitated By Meltdown

Itty Bitty Machines

was the one I liked.

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And we return to Munich's migration back to Windows - it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

oldcoder
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Re: 10 years to migrate 16000 PCs and they're going to go back to Windows ?

"But that's an Libre Office issue. It's buggy as hell."

No it is a Microsoft issue as they are NOT USING STANDARDS - even the ones they wrote themselves.

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oldcoder
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Re: Its not just the cost either...

So what? Microsoft corporate is still in charge.

And that is what is being pressured.

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oldcoder
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Re: Its not just the cost either...

No, it would be more expensive for MS to be fined in the US.

They could even find the board of directors in jail.

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oldcoder
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and 70,000 Linux systems.

Which is quite a saving in license fees and hardware upgrades...

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oldcoder
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Only in license fees.

You left out the costs for replacing the hardware every three years.

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oldcoder
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Well... Linux is a cost-saving alternative.

Munich itself has proved that. So have the French.

And a lot of others.

This just looks like bribery.

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oldcoder
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That describes the Windows trap quite well.

Proprietary solutions always seem to cost more than they are worth.

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oldcoder
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You mean "that actually works sometimes".

The other times, Windows is just a brick.

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oldcoder
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Re: Update cycle...

Except that with Windows it happens every other month.

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oldcoder
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Re: 10 years to migrate 16000 PCs and they're going to go back to Windows ?

You mean Exchange actually works?

Last time I had anything to do with it, it couldn't even send a reject message when it runs out of disk space...

Instead, the system crashed.

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oldcoder
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Re: 'Most research is sponsored by proprietary software companies, and as such might be biased'

It was also produced by a microsoft sponsored company.

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oldcoder
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Re: Its not just the cost either...

To the US, EU law doesn't matter.

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oldcoder
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Re: Its not just the cost either...

Or until some US court directs Microsoft to copy the data...

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oldcoder
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He has downvotes because until they switch there isn't 100M loss.

BTW, that loss also sounds like the amount they saved by doing the switch to Linux. If that is true, then yes - it would be a loss.

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

oldcoder
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Re: Crap indeed

Nope.

The problem appears to be context switching problems due to pipeline optimization.

The presented solutions will impact microkernels more than monolithic kernels as they have to do more context switching.

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oldcoder
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Re: Crap indeed

Unfortunately, this is below the microcode level.

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oldcoder
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Re: Hmmm...

No, that was just Linux eating MS lunch again - and demonstrating perfectly usable desktops on the Pi and Arduino.

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oldcoder
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Re: Hmmm...

I believe the added overhead in context switching will nail all the microkernels...

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oldcoder
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Re: Hmmm...

No - the hybrid kernel of Windows will have a much LARGER overhead.

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oldcoder
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Re: Hmmm...

Not really. "key parts of the" kernel are interrupt service functions... and they need to be able to address the entire memory.

Real mode sucks.

What is really needed is better architecture.

One set of registers for each interrupt, kernel, supervisor, user

at a MINIMUM. Then add separate cache for each level - though not necessarily all being the same size.

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oldcoder
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Re: Hmmm... @AC

That causes the instructions to stall - filling the pipeline with unusable instructions and no data.

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oldcoder
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Re: Hmmm... @Primus Secundus Tertius

Depending on the CPU, it did have to save registers.

In other cases, the kernels did save registers as it could not determine BEFORE handling the interrupt, which task was going to be next.

The registers that took the longest was the FPU registers.

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oldcoder
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Re: Hmmm...

Only for the parameters.

Once past that, the kernel could use a single page table entry to map to whatever user memory was needed.

For the intel processors.... this bug just about kills any microkernel which was already slow, now becomes 20% slower.

Microsofts hybrid microkernel is going to have fits with this.

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Lauri Love appeal: 'If he's dead, no victim's going to get anything'

oldcoder
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Re: Evidence is portable...

Actually, the crime should have occured in Mexico, in your example.

It isn't a crime (usually) to shoot a gun.

What is a crime is killing someone with that bullet.

And in your example, that happened in Mexico.

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iPhone X Face ID fooled again by 'evil twin' mask

oldcoder
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Even finger prints, fein scans, and eye ball recognition can be hacked.

ANY biometric can be duplicated.

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Microsoft's memory randomization security defense is a little busted in Windows 8, 10

oldcoder
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"at the bottom"?

When it runs Google, Facebook, Amazon? and even runs Azure networking?

99+% of the supercomputers, all the stock markets...

Microsoft wishes it had that "bottom".

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Don't worry about those 40 Linux USB security holes. That's not a typo

oldcoder
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Re: Physical access means you own the system

Same way all the viruses and ransomeware malware do.

Just ask for one. Windows will obligingly give you one.

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oldcoder
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Re: Wasn't that the primadonna maintainer project

Well, Grsecurity really isn't. Protecting path names isn't very secure.

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Who's that cuddling up in the container... *squints* Wow you're getting along well

oldcoder
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Re: Reassurance

And that was the ONLY sentence in the paragraph related to security.

Security related to what?

How is the data secured?

How is the communications secured?

How are the backups secured?

Who can read the backups?

Who owns the keys to the backup?

As long as you are using someone else's computer, YOU ARE NOT SECURE.

It may be cheaper... but you have no control.

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So, tell us again how tech giants are more important than US govt...

oldcoder
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Re: Applying pressure on Twitter

If they WERE to move, they are also smart enough to move first, then announce that they had moved.

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Plants in SPAAAAAAACE are good for you

oldcoder
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Re: RE: I see what you did there

It all depends on the amount of gravity being simulated, and the radius use.

Larger radius, less effect.

Lower gravity, less effect.

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Red (Planet) alert: Future astro-heroes face shocking adventures on Martian moon Phobos

oldcoder
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Re: There are Puns and Punishment

That would make it dpun/dt

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Windows Fall Creators Update is here: What do you want first – bad news or good news?

oldcoder
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Re: Have they fixed the decades old bug in File Explorer ?

Except that it doesn't.

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Google isn't saying Microsoft security sucks but Chrome for Windows has its own antivirus

oldcoder
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Re: I will not have anything from google scanning my personal files. period

Microsoft knows everything about you...

...

As does every virus in creation.

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oldcoder
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Re: If only

Banning Windows would be an improvement for everyone...

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It's 2017... And Windows PCs can be pwned via DNS, webpages, Office docs, fonts – and some TPM keys are fscked too

oldcoder
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Re: Who designed this then?

Not just a font.. but the processing of that font was a kernel function.

Microsoft IS supposed to have moved it out of the kernel... finally, but it may still have privileges...

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oldcoder
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Re: Old vs New Bugs

Testing?

Microsoft laid off the quality control section about 3 years ago.

Not that there was all that much quality to start with.

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oldcoder
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Re: Exploitable flaws in TPM

Over the years... the average is 0.something per year.

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Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold

oldcoder
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Neither java nor flash are tied to "very expensive equipment".

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oldcoder
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Oh it is still "free as in beer".

They are paying for extra support.

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oldcoder
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No.

They use it because it works more reliably, with less overhead, no spying, and providing better security.

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oldcoder
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Re: Bit rich!!!! (but at no cost)

Android is free.

What isn't is the Google services.

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Looking forward to Solaris 11.next this year? Whomp-whomp. Check again in 2018

oldcoder
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Re: Oracle cares about one thing only...

Windows won't save you... as you lose control over your data and operating system.

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Microsoft says it won't fix kernel flaw: It's not a security issue. Suuuure

oldcoder
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Re: So since Microsoft are not concerned about the security of windows,

They already covered the "unfit for purpose" in the warranty.

There is no warranty that it is "fit for any purpose"....

From the EULA:

"The manufacturer or installer, and Microsoft, exclude all implied warranties and conditions, including those of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose., and non-infringement. If your local law does not allow the exclusion of implied warranties, then any implied warranties, guarantees, or conditions last only during the term of the limited warranty and are limited as much as your local law allows. If your local law requires a longer limited warranty term, despite this agreement, then that longer term will apply, but you can recover only the remedies this agreement allows."

So you get nothing more than what you paid for it...

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Secure microkernel in a KVM switch offers spy-grade app virtualization

oldcoder
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Still looks like it would be susceptible to a smart USB device....

Specially when some of the monitors around can be read from the USB ports.

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Big Tech slams Trump on plan to deport kids

oldcoder
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Re: DACA bad. MAGA good.

Not mentioning pardoning racists, and promoting the white supremacists when they murder people.

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oldcoder
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Re: Texas storm recovery

It certainly will be expensive.

More so due to the substandard construction done by companies owned by Trump.

They won't even pay their suppliers for the materials...

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