nav search
Data Center Software Security Transformation DevOps Business Personal Tech Science Emergent Tech Bootnotes BOFH

* Posts by Ledswinger

6197 posts • joined 1 Jun 2012

BT, Sky bury hatchet with deal to sell each other's telly channels

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Manure in bulk

Blue Planet 2 was worth my licence fee.

Photographically one of the most striking, even amazing programmes I've ever seen, albeit with an overdose of repetitive "swing the camera round into the lights" scenes, and overcooked dramatic music. However, if (apart from the New Year's Day special) we've seen the sum total of final content from four years of filming, then it wasn't a very productive exercise. A further negative vibe is that the scientific and educational content was so thin that I was left knowing little more than before the programme began.

If there's a second series waiting in the wings, I'll be pleased - but I doubt that they'll address the essentially lightweight content.

0
0

Brit film board proposed as overlord of online pr0nz age checks

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: May's tin ear

Yet another example of May's political tin ear. She has no idea

FTFY.

0
0

Russia could chop vital undersea web cables, warns Brit military chief

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Cut off the UK?!?!

One route is ALWAYS under the sea - North Sea or Channel. The other route is USUALLY the Channel Tunnel (sometimes an alternative sea route).

If the Russians want to snip the comms lines, they will, Just because some aren't underwater will be no bother, just as there have at times been a range of suspicious "accidents" and explosions on a range of strategic gas pipelines in central and eastern europe.

Even on land and in "home territory", civil infrastructure is VERY difficult to protect from a modestly intelligent adversary. This also applies to electricity, gas, water, even sewers. Our strategic adversaries (as opposed to bearded god-botherers) know this full well. I could nominate the Pareto attack points for UK infrastructure with a few minutes work - our potential adversaries will already have a list, and maybe even sleepers in place to do the work..

3
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: "Can you imagine a scenario where those cables are cut or disrupted?"

Unless you keep your money under the bed and not in a bank and you have an allotment, the severing of these cables would most certainly affect you.

Still wouldn't be the end of my world. If traders on opposite sides of the Atlantic are unable to communicate, the trades don't happen, the assets don't evaporate, the liabilities don't go away, a few option traders get burned. Big hairy deal.

Remember when 9/11 paralysed Western air traffic for the better part of a week? Or the same of an Icelandic volcano that most of us can't pronounce? And yet, despite the VITAL, VITAL IMPORTANCE of all those business class movers and shakers unable to move, no material impact on business at all. It's the same with transatlantic cables - somebody will certainly be inconvenienced, I can't see any properly run bank having any existential risk, and even food trade wouldn't be unduly affected.

19
1
Ledswinger
Silver badge

"Can you imagine a scenario where those cables are cut or disrupted?"

Yes. Problematic access to cat videos, grumble sites, modest inconvenience for the leeches of the city, It wouldn't be the end of my world.

Perhaps as head of the UK's armed services, Sir Stuart should be more concerned with the vast conventional capability gaps in all three services, and the squandersome and repetitive incompetence of the MoD in all matters of procurement?

28
3

Murdoch's Fox empire is set to become a literal Mickey Mouse outfit

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: A very rich mouse

I wonder what Murdoch will do with the money ?

I don't know, but AFAIAA, he won't be taking it to any afterlife. Maybe he spend it all on gold, and have his body cast at the centre of a vast ingot of the stuff?

Then the rest of humanity could bury the ingot under a public convenience.

1
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

I now refuse to pay for it because it's American owned, expensive and shit

And likely to be much more expensive soon, as Disney try and recoup the billions of dollars of "goodwill" they've likely acquired.

Any existing Sky customer celebrating that they soon won't be contributing to the old scrote's coffers might want to brace themselves for two or three years of double digit price rises (as happened when Virginmedia got bought out by Libertyglobal).

1
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: The New Star Trek

What you LIKE Orville? F*** me backwards. In the UK, EVERYBODY hates Orville. You know why?

https://youtu.be/2c8PUVIKgI4?t=11

That's why. I appreciate the US remake lost something of the original, but isn't that always the way?

3
0

Erase 2017 from your brain. Face ID never happened. The Notch is an illusion

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: I'd happily own a phone

No that was almost certainly done with the ambient light sensor rather than a full camera

Certainly was. On some cheap, shitty phones, (eg Samsung Galaxy Ace 3) they took out the light sensor, and had a crappy time based screen lock, that made using such garbage impossible if you had to keep changing between ear and screen use (eg joining a conference call, or even going through your voicemail and managing settings). How I hated that phone. It was of course a corporate choice, by idiots in our IT department who didn't understand the difference between cheap and good value. Although IT desktop and infrastructure had already been outsourced to HPE, causing endless problems for users, and therefore the IT management must have been the ultimate cynics, knowing the price of everything and the value of nothing.

6
0

UK needs a 'digital twin' to keep track of its data assets – report

Ledswinger
Silver badge

It's a pity they didn't get some boundaries into the title.

You'd have thought that as a former journalist, "Lord" Adonis would have been able to sort that out. Or as a former history prof from Oxford, surely he'd be a detail man?

Then again, what the fuck are this man's qualifications to be chair of the National Infrastructure Commission? I want my infrastructure planned, built and managed by engineers, or people with real world construction programme management experience, not lickspittle arts graduates who have dabbled in journalism before riding into the House of Turds on the coat tails of Blair. I suppose at least Adonis has a PhD, and therefore qualifies as a doctor. Sadly that's doctorate is in the British aristocracy of the late 19th century, which I'm sure qualifies him the be in such a substantive role.

6
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Yaaaawwwnnnn

cutting train delays and traffic jams through better planned maintenance and repairs through sensor networks, and increasing competition between telcos

1) Big data, and data sharing won't deliver this.

2) They've been promising similar shit almost since they stopped promising "electricity too cheap to meter".

3) And all of the public sector are on this particular IoT/data/drones crap. Like the clowns at Highways England claiming they'll repair potholes faster, or reduce road delays.

As usual, jam tomorrow promises from people who can't butter bread today.

4
0

Which distant Mars-alikes could we live on? Ask these Red Planet data-sifters

Ledswinger
Silver badge

You're doing it wrong

Mars? And Mars-alikes? I don't want to travel light years across space to live on a cold desert planet. I want an exotic, beautiful nirvana, at one with itself, with sexy, lithe aliens living in bountiful harmony with the whole ecosystem, sustainably harvesting the minimum that they need.

I will try to avoid kicking off a small war as a result of my breeding with the best looking alien.

22
0

No one saw it coming: Rubin's Essential phone considered anything but

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Your point is valid, but to raise a point of pedantry, none of the Essential phones get "unlocked", 'cos they were never locked in the first place.

So your last point is correct, but not a hypothetical - all Essential phones are unlocked, AND it doesn't affect that 0.085%.

26
0

The North remembers: York scraps Uber's licence over data breach

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Oi!

It's in north and you're all the same.

And they all have whippets, vote Labour, wear flat caps (except when on Ilkley Moor), and live exclusively on black pudding and mushy peas.

11
0

Hello, Dixons Carphone? Yep, we're ringing from a 2015 handset. Profits down 60%, eh?

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Are people still blaming Brexit for management stupidity

Are they still selling £30 HDMI cables?

Unfortunately Brexit has seen the happy days of £30 HDMI cables recede into the rose-tinted past. But there's this bargain. Snap it up, limited stocks, selling out fast!

4
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Worst company ever

Fortunately my exchanges with them were by email so it'll be easy to take them to court.

You don't need to.

If it is over £100 and you paid by credit card it is subject to a credit agreement. Al you need to do is phone the customer services for your credit card provider, tell them that under section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act you're holding them "jointly and severally liable" for the absence of phone and you're either not paying that element of your credit card bill, or if you've already paid it, you want them to refund it. With most providers, you'll find that they're initially a bit circumspect, but when they understand what you're saying the are mostly quick and helpful in these situations, partly because they have been trained to understand an S75 claim, probably more because they'll just dock it from the retailer's monthly settlement, and take an additional "administration" charge from them too.

4
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

With the average decent handset now costing £500+

Only for those too timid or lazy to investigate much better value alternatives. A UK official Moto G5, or G5S or G5 plus are all decent phones. Here at Ledswinger Towers, the last two phones have been grey import Xiaomi devices (through a UK importer - higher spec than the UK Motos, and a lower price).

Fair enough if you value a mix of brand, fast charging, waterproofing and wireless charging at £300+, but IMHO most people are simply hooked on their current brand. For years I bought top of the range Samsung, but with the S6 they lost the plot on value for money (and the sealed battery pissed me off at that price). Having been encouraged to delve in the world of low cost Chinese brands (by the cleverest bloke I've ever met) there's no looking back. I don't laugh in their faces, or even comment, but inwardly I smile to myself whenever I see somebody flash out a Sammy S8, a Pixel or just about any iPhone.

4
0

New battery boffinry could 'triple range' of electric vehicles

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: How many battery "breakthroughs" @ DainB

May I leave it to you to figure out why wood which is 4 times as energy dense as TNT does not produce same result when it is releasing all that energy ?

Because wood usually exists as a discrete physical block, and that prevents the fuel from being exposed quickly to the oxidising agent fast enough to cause an explosion. However, that's for a lump of wood. If you have wood dust it most certainly is explosive because the oxidising agent and the fuel can be mixed to the perfect proportions. Operators of wood pellet power stations and sawmills know this, often from costly experience, and there's Youtube videos of real world wood dust explosions (coal, flour, corn dust, even sugar will do the same). Scan to 30 seconds into this:

https://youtu.be/4hS6IGO2tdA?t=38

TNT and most other explosives don't rely on atmospheric oxygen, they contain their own reagents, and so does a battery. Given the sort of explosions a conventional lithium battery can achieve if short circuited, I wouldn't want to be around one with three times the energy density.

5
2
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: "But it is usually a seven year journey @ John Smith 19

So relatively easy to add into batteries.

Easy? You reckon. We have a claim from a respectable source that they've demonstrated something in the lab. What happens before that is "easily added into batteries"? The short list below is a fraction of the tasks needed, only vaguely in order:

* Labs need to verify that there are no new failure modes or performance changes to the battery - eg energy storage at the expense of service life may not be a good trade-off in these days of sealed devices.

* The IP holders need to establish heads of agreement with a battery and/or phone maker as to who will do what, and how rewards will be shared

* Battery makers need to establish that the lab process could be undertaken in a battery plant - if the preparation is too onerous, then it simply may not be possible to make them other than in a lab.

* The battery makers have to work out if it is actually economic to volume manufacture with the additional materials, and additional processing - many good ideas don't make it to the shop simply because nobody will pay the right price.

* Battery makers have to try and source materials of the required quality and quantity (at a low price). If supply chains are constrained now or in future, that feeds back into the economics.

* Battery and phone makers need to establish what price the market will pay - it may be economic at a basic level, but if the market won't pay more, why go to all the effort?

* Battery makers and phone makers need to do tests that will convince their respective insurers that the technology is safe over several years - after the Note 7, they won't be in a hurry to take chances on a much higher energy density battery.

And at every stage there's regulatory compliance, H&S, disposal and recycling. You've got new concerns that if there's three times the energy density, then the consequences of a "not at fault" failure may be far more serious than current technology - if a perforated battery gives off far more noxious fumes or explodes like a small hand grenade, will airlines permit the devices to fly? If you have much higher energy stored, does the new chemistry work and remain effective with fast chargers?

14
4
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Phone Batteries

Logically, yes. The failure mode that this addresses is the same, although other failure modes exist, as Samsung know too well.

But it is usually a seven year journey from lab to retailer, so don't get your hopes up. You'll have an iPhone 16 by the time this technology is out.

16
2

Argy-bargy Argies barge into Starbucks Wi-Fi with alt-coin discharges

Ledswinger
Silver badge

You expect this from crooks, aided by lazy corporates.

But I'm waiting for the first sysadmin to get busted for running coinhive on his corporate computers. Our BOFH could patch it into the standard build image, and run a single thread on clients, but that's risky because somebody somewhere will know enough to spot it. A safer bet would be an on-command implementation for the servers. Few know or care what goes on in the server cupboard or DC. Run when user loads are small, and nobody will even notice.

7
0

Hey, we've toned down the 'destroying society' shtick, Facebook insists

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Just goes to show

You can't polish a Faece

In the case Faecebook, the polishing has already been achieved in the IPO. There's no turd that an investment bank can't polish.

In the world of proper biological turds, I'll wager you could even polish one of them. So long as it isn't too soft, and you're allowed to use a bit of Mr Sheen. If you get a dried log (or fresh, but heavily constipated) all you'd need is a quick squirt of Mr Sheen and a gentle rub with a soft cloth.

0
0

Pickaxe chops cable, KOs UKFast data centre

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: N+1 redundancy

A proper carrier-class data center is going to be fed from more than one mains supply, entering the building in different locations. Those mains supplies will then lead to separate UPS plants, separate PDU's, and finally to each critical piece of IT gear via A/B power supplies in each rack.

Which is probably about N+3.

N+1 simply means the site has one independent backup, in the form of the UPS and gensets. It didn't work, but up until this morning everybody hoped that it did, and that "hope" element is common to most disaster recovery and resilience plans, no matter how many Ns they claim to have.

4
1
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: DR Testing Failure

I'll wager the components of a recovery plan were all documented and tested, including physical test runs of the gensets. I doubt they did a full "turn off the mains power" test, but if they had, they'd have been in the same position (sitting in a dark data centre, thinking "shit!").

The other possibility is that they have turned off the mains in tests, and everything went perfectly. That's a known problem with standby power - it only works most of the time. And on that subset of times when it doesn't work, you usually need it and everybody notices.

A question for the DR professionals: What is the ACTUAL failure rate of a completely successful, fully automatic handover from interrupted mains to on-site generators? My guess is nobody does it often enough to know.

16
0

Signing up for the RAF? Don't bother – you've been Capita'd

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Did the 23 000 strong MoD Procurement Force have anything to do with this?

Is that the biggest single group of useless ba***ds in the whole of the UK Civil Service?

MoD and "Defence Equipment & Support" are clearly world leaders in failure, waste, incompetence, and not taking responsibility (FWINtr). Barely a week goes by without an update on yet another vast MoD screwup. But don't forget that those Civil Service core values of FWINtr are cultural, and actively promoted through the entire sorry organisation, looking at the persistent failures of projects at the Home Office, DoH, DWP, MoJ, DfT, Defra and others. Quite laughable to read the official Mission of the Civil Service: "The mission of the Civil Service is the achievement of an excellent service for Government and the other institutions of State as well as for the public as citizens and users of public services, based on principles of integrity, impartiality, effectiveness, equity and accountability."

An evidence based Mission of the Civil Service would read something like this: The mission of the Civil Service is the achievement of epic waste for Government and the other institutions of State as well as for the public as citizens and users of public services, based on principles of incompetence, insularity, ineffectiveness, denial and unaccountability.

7
0

Leftover Synaptics debugger puts a keylogger on HP laptops

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Can't fix it

Keyboard driver? Surely the Synaptics driver is just for the trackpad? I suppose the bumblers of HP could be bundling it all up (ICBA to look), but if not, then 181 MB is indeed impressive. The entire King James Bible is only 1.4 MB in ePub format.

2
0

IBM to expunge over 500 people in latest redundo round

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Scarper sharply

A lot of people could take partial blame for the events of the second world war, including the British, thanks to the then government's policy of appeasement.

Go one then, if appeasement was the wrong policy, tell us WHEN the British government should have declared war on Germany, on what RATIONAL basis, and on what LEGAL basis?

Also, you may want to present a dynamic of how Europe would have evolved in the 1940-1960s if Hitler had been forcibly removed by foreign powers in the late 1930s, and also a military outline as to how Britain would have won a war that started essentially before an rearmament of the British military had occurred.

Appeasement was just about the only option, and it bought years that were vital to rearm the RAF, RN and to a more modest extent, the Army.

1
4

UK lacks engineering and tech skillz to make government's industrial strategy work – report

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: All the jobs were sent offshore to get it for cheap....

if we want a rounded and rewarding society, we need those medieval historians and sociologists and creative writing graduates.

So long as their valuable work is commercially funded or sponsored, that's fine by me. Oh, and a ban on them becoming politicians. Seems to me that Parliament is dominated by the fruits of our "rounded and rewarding society".

22
0

Japanese quadcopter makes overworked employees clock out

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Cruel and unusual

Playing Auld Lang Syne at helpless employees, merely for staying late to furkle a Powerpoint presentation that nobody will really give a shit about? I've no problem with torture and the death penalty for selected people (MoD Procurement, if you're interested), but that is so cruel, so excessive to the crime that even I cannot support it.

Sadly I have to put up with a family who think that it is acceptable, nay necessary to sing the damned song on New Year's Eve. WTF is wrong with them? Hideous tune, words no fucker understands, and if they understood them they wouldn't mean them. Apparently I'm the Grinch that Stole New Year. And there's another thing, New Year's Fucking Eve....no, don't get me started.

Auld Lang Syne, MoD Procurement, Uber, Michael Gove.....all of them should be cleansed with fire. Lots of it. And I'd give Scotland independence to pay the bastards back for the cursed tune.

10
3

New Capita system has left British Army recruits unable to register online

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: How bloody typical.

Do it American style and vote for the "blithering idiot"?

Don't you think Mrs May's track record of unbelievably poor decisions fully qualifies her as a BI ?

Ignoring the world class stupidity of throwing away a bar working majority for no reason whatsoever in an election that neither she or her party had prepared for, FFS, she's let Smeagol Gove back into the Cabinet. EVERYBODY hates Smeagol. Every Tory, every opposition politician, every schoolteacher, every schoolkid (even if they don't know it). Anybody with an eye for style, or beauty. Anybody that can think. Hell, that bloke who cemented his head in a microwave probably hates Gove.

In fact, why can't we have Gove's head shoved in a microwave, and then fill the cavity with expanding foam (no plastic bag or polythene tube, natch). By the time the fire brigade arrive, the deed would be done.

3
2
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: MoD as always

'I don't think EU.'

The EU have had a Defence & Security Procurement Directive since 2011 (and transposed into national laws in each country), that sets out the rules requiring these contracts to go to tender. So the EU have to take full responsibility for mandating competitive procurement here.

However, UK politicians (of all colours) have for many years believed in the magic efficacy of competitive tendering, and would probably have done this anyway. Until we have both an infallible test to establish that somebody is a shithead, and a mandatory death penalty or permanent exile as the minimum penalty, this sort of thing will continue.

3
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Sigh

don't waste that lovely view on civil servants, get some use out of them instead. Target practice would be best.

I like that idea. Maybe strap them to floats, and then send the Navy to waste them with a Kryten from about eight miles. Given the dismal accuracy of any 4.5 incher, there would be hours of entertainment before they landed a shell near enough to erase the civil servant. Then you float out the next one.

That of course assumes that after the MoD's efforts, the RN could find a crew, a working ship, that the gun was serviceable, and they'd bought shells that would go "bang". Possibly the MoD have messed things up so badly that the only weapons the British military have that work are bayonets. In which case we might need to hand the guilty over to the Russian navy, and tell them that these people are convincing liars, but are in fact Somali pirates, and should be treated the way the Russians like to deal with all pirates.

3
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: How much? How long?

Don't forget the flagpoles for the politicians

They won't get a flagpole. They get a spike.

A really big one thirty feet high, and they get dropped arse first onto it, and get left to rot, like a raisin on a needle.

They're politicians, they'd approve of theatricals like that .

13
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: How much? How long?

When will they learn outsourcing is not the cheaper option.

Only when all the flagpoles around the front entrance of Abbey Wood South are converted to gibbets, and each day a new senior civil servant is treated to the view from the top of each one.

17
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: 1.3B

Has anybody pointed out that is a years wages for over seven thousand infantrymen?

I say old chap, keep it all in perspective. In MoD terms, £1.3bn is only one failed Watchkeeper programme.

Perhaps we should add that to the El Reg units database?

22
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

So no one at Crapita knows how to write

Maybe not, but in this case it seems to me that the contract probably ASSUMED that adequate management information would be provided, or asked for it, but didn't define it. Crapita will (to the best of their meagre abilities) simply have stuck to the letter of the contract and spec. If nobody specifically asked for a recruitment count or other MI, then it won't have been built in.

But in so doing Crapita show what amateurs they are. Were I running Crapita, we'd have seen this omission, built in the code for the most fan-dabby-dozy MI suite cheaply at the time of code design and build (maybe even copy the spec from our own corporate systems), test it, then disable each finite element with a single asterisk. Then when MoD complain that the system doesn't do what they need but didn't ask for, we offer that which is asked for, charge the full variation order rate against an estimated design, code, test schedule, and simply release the code modified without that asterisk. Every item of bell and whistlery would be disabled separately, and only that which was requested and paid would be released, even though the code was already written.

10
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

This is the kind of thing where the base functionality could be handed to the intern for a summer project if you wanted to just about get by or given to a team of proper devs for a month or two and they'd make it work properly.

And don't forget, they had a system that (sort of) worked before. It isn't even as though this is some new form of devilry that nobody understood. My guess as to HOW this fuck-up happened is that MoD previously outsourced their recruitment IT (or the entire process) to HPE or some predecessor ITinosaur, and to make extra shekels, the outsourcer sacked all the relatively expensive people who knew the system and the process as soon as they could under TUPE rules. Operationally HPE manned-down to a shed load of oppressed and over-worked minimum wage slaves, and as they didn't expect to retain the contract longer term, this slash and burn approach didn't matter. Then, when the Moronistry of Defence came to review the contract, yet again they went for the lowest tender, this time it was Crapita who were the most mendacious. Crapita waltzed in, planning to rinse-and-repeat the HPE effort after using the know-how people to build a new system (as you say, shouldn't take long) before sacking them, but this time it was a Mother Hubbard situation: When they got there, the cupboard was bare of people who understood either systems or processes.

34
2

Florida Man… pockets Uber cash to keep quiet about data breach

Ledswinger
Silver badge

But fair play to Khosrowshahi for coming clean.

Hardly. He was brought in specifically to clean out the Augean Stables that are Uber's headquarters, and he will be on a typical US tech CEO megabuck contract. If he doesn't make demonstrable progress the investors who allowed his appointment would have him fired.

What concerns me is that there seem to be no limits to the rankness of Uber, and potentially all we're seeing is the easy to fix stuff, and the things a lot of people already know are wrong. Whilst firing the guilty is desirable, it guarantees nobody guilty will step forward of their own accord. If individuals or small cabals are associated with particular malfeasance, and nobody outside knows, then the dirt remains. Imagine a scenario where a large part of Uber's code actually belonged to somebody else - if that was known only in the heads of a senior manager and a couple of coders, they won't admit now, and the problem just sits there like a UXB. Doesn't even have to be an IP or tech issue - imagine the wrongs that Uber's HR people have connived to, or hushed up, or the sticky dirt the finance people have on their hands.

0
0

Rogue PIs found guilty of illegally snagging personal financial info

Ledswinger
Silver badge

In this case, the blue chip firm would be Van Ameyde Group BV, who claim themselves (LinkedIn) to be "Europe’s leading claims outsourcing organisation. Its client base includes major insurance providers, corporate risk managers and motor fleet managers. Van Ameyde’s service-offering ranges from off-the-shelf to fully customised solutions for all non-life insurance lines. In addition, Van Ameyde offers IT solutions to help its clients improve their claims performance."

Woodgate & Clark Ltd itself is owned 25% by Michael Woodgate, 25% Richard Clark, and 50% by Van Ameyde. The use of a toss-pot front company was (in my guess) a cynical practice to avoid Van Ameyde's name being associated with dodgy practice, and Woodgate & Clark's website makes no mention of Van Ameyde, although it seems they had come to the attention of SOCA. The real, beneficial client I'm not sure we will ever know, but chances are it is a well known name in the UK insurance market, who had concerns about a claim, and passed it to Van Ameyde for them to investigate and possibly settle (W&C offer loss adjusting services, so basically arguing claims down).

15
0

YouTuber cements head inside microwave oven

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Twat

YouTube has a lot to answer for in providing a platform for attention seeking twats

You don't think that this is just the cream of Wolverhampton showing their mettle?

In an odd sort of way, I'm quite pleased, that after years of amusing fuckwittery from Murica and the Antipodes, somebody has struck out with a bold claim on the gold for Blighty in the Stupidity Olympics.

54
0

Elon Musk finally admits Tesla is building its own custom AI chips

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Maybe concentrate on a business line?

Tesla doesn't look too well against BMW i3, quality wise.

In pure assembly quality yes.

In consumer advocacy, both appear very popular with drivers.

In reliability terms, both appear about the same, which is poor according to sources like Consumer Reports.

Given that Europeans generally assemble cars to a much higher standard than Americans, and that Europe is ultra keen in all matters of environmental consciousness, the most logical reasons for building the first Tesla factory in the US would seem to have been access to capital and a business friendly government. There's good logic to that, but it comes with the consequences of shonky assembly.

10
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Overstretch

I'm just pointing quite obvious fact that Tesla Inc.....

A moment ago you were "just pointing out the obvious fact" that "Tesla as a company does not have anything to do with Musk". I think you're essentially arguing out of your arse, albeit your excremental logic is peppered with a few facts.

10
1
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Overstretch

Let me fix it for you

Actually, I've got a family member working with Tesla, I'm well aware that they use external suppliers. In your desperate bid to pick an argument, you've assumed that I was saying that they didn't use any external suppliers, which (if you go back and read it) was not correct. The whole point was the extent to which Tesla and Musk want control over what is done, and if they can't get it commercially, they'll do the job themselves.

And talking of "not being correct", if Tesla as a company "does not have anything to do with Musk", who the fuck is that bloke who glories in the title of Chief Executive Officer of Tesla Inc? You know, South African bloke, he was one of the founders of Tesla Motors, name escapes me. And separate to that, who is the largest beneficial owner of Tesla Inc shares? Including all institutional investors, it still happens to be some billionaire playboy, bloke who made his money with Paypal...maybe you could help me out, what was his name again?

11
4
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Nothing to worry then

What's the track record of Elon Musk ?

An inspirational technologist, able and willing to come up with ideas that other people aren't brave enough to even attempt, and back them through the early stages?

All credit to the man, we need more technologists, we need people to try the stuff that lard-arse corporations are too cowardly to even consider. But I agree with the Tesla 3 ordering AC, Musk has fingers in too many pies. What Saint Steve showed was that there's rarely room for more than one inspirational evangelist in a business, and for Musk, that means he spreads his energies ever more thinly, and has to delegate to lackeys who simply are not clones. So he can and will countermand decisions they make; They won't be multi-millionaires able to risk their own money; And chances are they'll be immensely bright sycophants. Senior people in business are (all too often) poor at trusting others, and very poor at accepting challenge, so if he doesn't absolutely and totally trust them, and they won't challenge him, that's not a recipe for success, is it?

I suspect this lack of trust and unwillingness to be challenged are behind a lot of the diversifications - experts outside the company with more experience and wisdom in particular field say "You'd be a fool to do it that way" or "It cannot be done economically, it at all", and Musk's immediate reaction is "Hell, I can do it, I will do it". That's a great attitude, but slowly and progressively he's taking on the whole world.

22
1
Ledswinger
Silver badge
Trollface

Flaming wreckage, more likely.

1
1
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Overstretch

So not content with building the cars completely from scratch, from huge control and vertical integration of battery manufacture, from buying the companies making the production kit, owning the distribution to the maximum permitted extent, now Tesla want to bake their own silicon?

This is taking vertical integration beyond all reasonable bounds, and the ability to control and manage such a sprawling empire is going to be so thinly spread that it just won't work. Because it involves Twinkle Toes Musk, he will get away with it for a while, investors, competitors, suppliers, nobody wants to say the Emperor has no clothes. But, eventually reality will bite back, and Tesla will find out the hard way why manufacturers of complex products in competitive markets aren't vertically integrated from mine to shop.

9
10

Looking through walls, now easier than ever

Ledswinger
Silver badge

A cage made of sheet metal (eg aluminium foil) would be a better bet.

Mark 85 needs to investigate electrically conductive paint. At £165 a litre, doing the outside of the house might prove expensive, mind you. If he orders now he'll have it in time for Crimble, although I can't see a gift wrap option on Amazon for this.

5
0

Yes, Britain has an urban-rural 4G schism. This is what it looks like

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Is this internal or external signal reception

No, if the article is correct, it's simply the ratio of a sample of users connection time by technology. The problem of indoor versus outdoor is actually becoming a bigger problem with new build properties due to the fact that they are now 90% made from foil covered insulation board.

It would be nice if Ofcom would get off their saggy grey arses and specify and approve a suitable picocell or femtocell that phone users could buy off the shelf and plug in to extend a wireless signal indoors, without needing this to connect via a broadband connection, and without needing network operator permission to do so. Then again, it's Ofcom; nothing will happen, and even that nothing will only happen slowly.

5
0
Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: 77% my shiney bum

Where does it mention 77%?

Maybe you are holding your shiney bum wrong?

4
1

VW's US environment boss gets seven years for Dieselgate scam

Ledswinger
Silver badge

Re: Poor buggers (as in the American people)

One can't help wondering just how "seriously" this would be taken were VW a B2B or, better still, a government supply organisation.

If it were a government organisation, nothing would have been done. If it were a US corp on the receiving end, they'd just agree a "no fault" settlement and a modest payout. But we can all see this has little to do with the minutiae of the actual case, and everything to do with deterring VW and other unwelcome foreign corporations from focusing on growing any business in the US. You can see the same rampant protectionism around the Boeing/Bombardier trade dispute, in some of the fines handed out to non-US banks for alleged money laundering or mis-sold loans, and a whole range of other US public sector actions.

Corporate ownership of Congress and US policy making and implementation now goes so deep that they may as well dis-enfranchise individuals, abandon elections (solving the problem that elections can't be trusted because Russia interferes) and just allow corporations to buy influence directly. Rather than have policy consultations, just have policy auctions, where companies make bids for various clauses, if a threshold is reached, every corporation who bid has to pay up. Every five years, instead of political parties, businesses (or rich families) could bid to become government, based purely on how much they can raise - not so different to now, but without the tedium of having to vote, or listen to months of boring political coverage by the press.

As we can see from the crooked family junta currently in the Whitehouse, seems most of this has already happened, and the persistent influence of certain rich families on the Democrat side is equally damning.

8
0

The Register - Independent news and views for the tech community. Part of Situation Publishing