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* Posts by Voland's right hand

5387 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Facebook sends lowly minions to placate Euro law makers over data-slurp scandal

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Devil

It is indeed a question of competence, but of a different kind. Not the competence in the area of privacy, but competence as in "being able to set policy and issue orders".

In any case, I do not see what their problem is. All they need to do is to find a "Prodotti di Berlusconi" ranking MEP in their ranks to do a quick deal with Facebook so that whoever shows up shows up only for 30 minutes, runs a script and disappears after that. If they have one, even the ZuckerBorg himself will show up as it will be totally prearranged, pre-set and completely safe. By the way "Prodotti Di Berlusconi" are not corrupt. Oh, no, there is nothing like corruption involved. Really. Really, really, really...

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Test Systems Better, IBM tells UK IT meltdown bank TSB

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Re: Kettle

More like singularity, meet blackhole, blackhole meet singularity...

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Atari accuses El Reg of professional trolling and making stuff up. Welp, here's the interview tape for you to decide...

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Pint

Re: Hahashahahahahahaahah!

And this is exactly what I would call professional trolling.

Professionally executed and the subject has tried to start a flame war which ended up with them being flamed into a crisp.

El reg crew deserves a round of pints :)

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EU negotiator: Crucial data adequacy deal will wait until UK hands in homework

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Anyone would think that the PtB aren't concerned

PtB in Europe work under the assumption that this contagion is not going to spread onto NATO.

That assumption is not entirely warranted according to the current NATO secretary general writing in the Guardian.

That is why these are not being discussed and UK's attempts to bring some of them into the discussion under the guise of security collaboration get only shrugs from Brussels. I am not sure that going down the line of dragging NATO into this contagion will be of any benefit to the UK. Just the opposite.

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That'll be a novelty.

Why? David and Co are realists. They have a realistic assumption of how what they do in Brussels will look on the first page of the Sun and that is ALL they care about. It is 100% for the UK PR and 0% for the interests of the country. That's all that actually matters to them.

Compared to them Barnier does not have to deal with that. Nobody in European media follows what is happening in detail any more. It is a rear day when the news make page 5 or 7 of the daily edition of national broadsheets or the last odd-n-sods 2 minutes of filler before Sport and Weather on TV. It does not make it to the tabloids at all any more. That is the reality - it is 100% in the hands of bookkeepers and lawyers working for the commission now and the result will be what they say can be allowed and not what is "politically expedient" and appealing to a particular public audience.

The results when these two approaches meet are all too well predictable. On a very good day, UK will just cave in to every Eu demand at the last minute (as in December). On a bad day - we are looking at a massive clusterf*ck in March.

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Requoting from another thread

I am re-quoting what I said on the other thread where one of the commentards was accusing Mr Barnier of malice. He is simply doing his job - to deliver a VALID deal.

Any deal which allows UK member-like privileges without any of the checks which are applied by the ECHR and ECJ to members will be successfully challenged in court and declared invalid.

So, unless the UK comes up with some mechanics for checks and balances which are palatable to the EU, there will be absolutely no privileged treatment of UK in any area as there cannot be. Even if it is granted by the commission a Schrem will come along and blow a petard under it.

I have said it before, I will say it again. Davis, May and Boris are trying to put the proverbial donkey behind the proverbial cart. The discussion should START with the definition of the final instance for conflict resolution and compliance checking. Once that is figured out the deal and its scope are plain sailing. If it is not figured out there will be no deal to start off with.

So nothing surprising here and nothing will be fixed because the three blind mice and the one under the control of the potted plants are refusing to deal with the most basic reality of how to fix the whole mess.

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OpenBSD disables Intel’s hyper-threading over CPU data leak fears

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Re: Bulldozer?

Not necessarily. Different design.

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I can hear a spectre howling...

I can hear a spectre arising from the grave of Intel's performance advantage over AMD and giggling madly at the benchmarks.

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Shared, not stirred: GCHQ chief says Europe needs British spies

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Re: It does not matter what GCHQ think

Err... Mr Barnier is under orders to deliver a VALID deal.

Any deal which allows UK member-like privileges without any of the checks which are applied by the ECHR and ECJ to members will be successfully challenged in court and declared invalid.

So, unless the UK comes up with some mechanics for checks and balances which are palatable to the EU, there will be absolutely no privileged treatment of UK in any area as there cannot be. Even if it is granted by the commission a Schrem will come along and blow a petard under it.

I have said it before, I will say it again. Davis, May and Boris are trying to put the proverbial donkey behind the proverbial cart. The discussion should START with the definition of the final instance for conflict resolution and compliance checking. Once that is figured out the deal and its scope are plain sailing. If it is not figured out there will be no deal to start off with.

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Visa fingers 'very rare' data centre switch glitch for payment meltdown

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The failover switch didn't have a fence mechanism to power off the primary completely,

What f*** fence mechanism? Routing protocols and L2 failover do not have any of that.

Partial failure, especially on high bandwidth optical interfaces is NOT rare. It has been years since I have dealt with large SP operations, but I have seen tens of those. There is really f*** all you can do in such case except having a well trained ops team which can deduce what is going on from the stats (as you may not see this a normal fault) and go in and KILL the erroneous interface (and later the whole card proceeding to switch or router if need be). It also needs to have the authority to do so. Which is what I suspect is the issue here. The ops team did not have the authority to go in with kill orders and by the time it was authorized it was too late - there was a gigantic backlog.

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National ID cards might not mean much when up against incompetence of the UK Home Office

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No ID would have prevented this

The issue with Windrush was not the ID system as such. Some of the victims held British passports and were flagged as invalid on renewal.

The issue was the decision by the Home office to systematically destruct evidence that a particular part of the population is entitled to British citizenship. It is not just Windrush, the Home office destroyed similar evidence regarding "early arrivals" from Eastern Europe at the same time. I know this first hand from the Home Office - it came up when I was re-applying for junior's passport.

Let's face it - Windrush was a dress rehearsal. A miserably failed dress rehearsal, but a rehearsal for what Mrs May wants to deliver to the ones she considers her electorate.

In any case - no Id system would have stood a chance to prevent it.

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Audi chief exec arrested over Dieselgate car emissions scandal

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so far it's not about the original sin, e.g. developing the defeat device and lying to regulators.

That is not even criminal offense in most jurisdiction. At most it can go under some obscure paragraph of fraud, but even that is not likely as regulatiory circumvention is punished with relatively low punishments.

This is about the handling of the aftermath:

Now this is juicy. Fraud of various shapes and sizes, perverting the course of justice, etc. You are looking at 7 years plus for most of these in most jurisdictions. So it is not surprising that the prosecution will concentrate on these.

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Re: So lets see....

Translation issues.

I read the report earlier today in a few other places and languages. The reason is potential for witness tampering, not destruction of evidence.

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What can you do when the pup of programming becomes the black dog of burnout? Dude, leave

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Re: Working in IT is a magical, mysterious, and wonderful task

You are missing the point.

There are not one, but two oldest professions which exists from before humans had money, trade, etc. They are "sexual services" and the priesthood.

There is money to be made in making chants about things being magical, mysterious and wonderful. People have been doing so since the dawn of time and continue to do it. It motivates the rank and file and gets the village shaman some trinkets from the powers that be which benefit from the results.

So instead of bitching, join the joyful DevOps psalms and chants. If you do not the shaman may report you to the ones paying his salary.

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What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

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Gimp

Re: I am scared of the pressure to add [...] features to address immediate needs and fashions

Correct. Additionally, the prejudices reign supreme.

Example - when you mention Perl you get retches all around. At the moment I am doing a piece of code which needs to deal with some low level packet mangling, database access and a northbound RPC interface in both Python and Perl.

1. Every single library in Perl worked out of the box and all of them were on the system, so no CPAN abuse. PCAP, Epoll, JSON, DBI and most importantly packet manipulation. Straight sailing all the way until it worked.

2. Python. My, oh, my. It takes some guru level hoop jumps to integrate pcap into anything useful with an event loop, half of the packet mangling does not work, DBI is non-existent and there is only a very loosely policed database interface. Most importantly the off-the shelf packet manipulation does not work so you are either facing the choice of reusing scapy which is a dinosaur or you have to write your own.

So the fact that the emperor has no clothes does not prevent the emperor's followers to continue shouting loudly. Fashion and fanboiing all around.

By the way, the system this will be integrating with is written in C++, but there is no way I am writing in this. Not that I cannot, life is too short for it considering that it has an API interface and python bindings.

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Google cloud VMs given same IP addresses ... and down they went

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Re: Sharing economy

Close. Should be Sharing Economy v4.

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Ex-Rolls-Royce engineer nicked on suspicion of giving F-35 info to China

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Re: Stupid... Just stupid...

something Michelin had cracked, but the Soviets had not.

That is multiply apocryphal:

1. Concorde had 10-15% higher take off and landing speed compared to Tu144 because of the canards on the latter. 350 vs 400km/h take off and 270km/h vs 295km/h. I know, this violates the sacred legend that Tu-144 was copied from the Concord, but tough, the specs say different and so does a trivial comparison of pictures of the "face" on take off and landing. Proper analysis of aerodynamics shows more differences, like more advanced positioning of the engines on the Tu-144 to use shock wave reflections - similar to B1, Tu-160, etc. As an overall result, regardless of what the stupid "patriotic legend" says, Tu-144 was significantly better behaved at lower speeds - approach and take off. Not surprising - it is aerodynamically more advanced.

2. The take off and landing speeds of Tu-144 and Concorde are not out of the ordinary for an older generation fixed wing large supersonic aircraft. Sure, nearly all of them were smaller in size, but the speeds were in the same range.

The non-apocryphal bit which USSR had an issue with for the Tu-144 were not the tires. It was the brakes. The biggest tech difference between the Tu-144 and the Concorde was the Tu-144 ridiculous breaking distances. It even had a fully blown military style drogue shute emergency braking system - something the Concorde had no need of.

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Stupid... Just stupid...

We should MAKE them copy it.

It will take them decades and tens of Billions to make it work. If not more.

The best possible economical subversion and these fools spoiled it.

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Unbreakable smart lock devastated to discover screwdrivers exist

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Re: Yeah - but if I am a "common criminal" I'll definitely find another non-indiegogo to pawn

WTF is an "attack dog"?

Real one? Caucasian Shepherd or to a lesser extent a Bulgarian Karakachan. They are originally bred dual purpose - primary as a sheep dog, secondary to defend households including against armed raiders. Anyone who is not identified as a member of the "family" is automatically identified as a target and it literally goes for the kill. There is no messing about, warnings, etc. A pair (male and female) of these is as effective as two 24x7x365 guards armed with submachine guns.

They are considered to be the "most effective perimeter defense" in places where the law is err... a b it .. flexible. I would not use them in a developed country as nobody will give me an insurance for their use as a guard team.

So if the GP is claiming he has an attack dog and it is not one of these, he has an attack toy. Not an attack dog.

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Swiss cops will 'tolerate' World Cup rabble-rousers – for 60 minutes

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Re: Being sensible

Nothing of the kind.

Most Swiss cantons as well as a lot of Austrian towns including Vienna itself operate a "horn only in emergency" policies with on the spot fines up to 500Euros in some places. Yes, you read that right - up to 500 fecking Euros. Additionally, both countries also charge for cop callout with the offender paying the charge. So make that around 540 Eu total or thereabouts.

I had a close miss with one of those when my factory alarm activated in Vienna on the 23rd of December at 4am. It is, as you would expect from a factory alarm, wired to the horn. Now, bonus points on how to try to get the positive terminal of the battery disconnected in a small pitch black hotel courtyard (with the emergency torch refusing to work) before the first espresso.

So what this piece of news means is that they will temporarily suspend its enforcement during the world cup. By the way, any Brits joking about the sense of humour (or lack of) German police have never seen Austrian or Swiss cops. They accept only people with the humour gland amputated at birth into the force there. Additionally, if you think that Britain is one nation under CCTV, you have not seen the traffic police there - they get life feed in their cruiser from all cameras on the stretch of road they patrol. So if you are trying to claim that "no sir, I did not [overtake | violate priority at roundabout | cut-off | tailgate | use horn]", you get the CCTV footage right in your face and your fine usually doubles there and then.

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ICANN pays to push Whois case to European Court of Justice

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Re: What are ICANN smoking?

Smacks of total irrational desperation

No, just normal behaviour of an American company which has been told that it needs to obey a law different from the contractual law in whatever hamlet in USA they reside at the moment.

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Tech firms, come to Blighty! Everything is brill! Brexit schmexit, Galileo schmalileo

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Re: Hmm

We do seem very good at putting ourselves down

Even in that Brits are very far behind Slavic nations. So it is neither unique, nor best in class.

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Re: Hmm

My dad (a professor of mathematics in the area of optimal control and differential equations) used to have a saying: "There is no need to apply artificial intelligence where natural stupidity will suffice".

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Keep your hands on the f*cking wheel! New Tesla update like being taught to drive by your dad

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Re: Auto-crash-pilot

Brake?

It is implicitly relying on the car in front to be driving at safe speed so it is maintaining breaking distance to it as if it will start stopping then. That is quite normal - most human drivers drive this way. You need 75m braking distance for 70mph. Nobody does that. Everyone drives closer and pays attention to what the other vehicle does as well as looking over it to what is AHEAD of it on the road.

1. The LIDAR and other hard instrumentation of the autopilot suite do not see past the car in front.

2. The software on the vis feed is nowhere near to do that level of analysis at present. You literally have to judge what the other driver has piled up in their rear window and make judgements based on partially obscured views and indicators/stop lights of cars way in front of you. We all do it instinctively after driving for a few months. Automated cars - not even there as this test clearly demonstrates.

3. We make additional decisions based on the car in front. I am actually expecting an Audi driver to switch lanes after the first blink of an indicator (still better than a teenager in a pimped up Saxo which will not even bother). I give it extra 10-15m just because the person in front is pretending to be in the cockpit of a Me109. The autopilot in the BBC video did not do that.

By the way, the BBC video is nearly identical to the reconstruction of the recent incident with the crash barrier in California. The sole difference is that it was a cardboard car, not a concrete barrier. The other variables, including an audi switching lanes at the last minute (coming out of a "non-lane") are identical.

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The only way is ethics: UK.gov emphasises moral compass amid deluge of data plans

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El reg - you owe me a keyboard

I am now having to deal with the results of "moral compass" and "uk government" combined in one sentence all over my keyboard. It is full of coffee...

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Microsoft loves Linux so much its R Open install script rm'd /bin/sh

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Typical installer written in a large company

First, I have seen worse.

Second, it is sort-a normal. It took me a while to explain this in more than one large valley company that software installers should not be done in Bangalore because there the "great developers" consider it under their stature to do them and they end up being handed to the least qualified of all interns - the one which usually does not even do software, but does gophering the coffee.

Install, especially a non-embedded one on a multi-purpose system is something that requires qualification on par (if not greater) with developers to do. This is valid even in this day and age when dh_* does half of the work for you. You need your Tier 1 developers on it or even better a sysadmin with a developer background (if you can find one), not the Tier F ones.

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No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

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Re: If not doing something because it was "inconvenient" was the ciriteria for Brexit..

Which begs the question: why bother making such a song and dance about being denied access in the first place?

Because it is the harbinger of things to come. One of the biggest arguments May and Davis are waving about is that if Eu does not give UK what it wants it will suffer from reduced security cooperation.

Well this is the clearest demonstration on where can UK stuff its security cooperation and exactly how this house of cards will unfold from now on.

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Re: Well

There's levers to pull to put pressure on the EU,

And what are those? Curious minds want to know.

What exactly is the lever an economy whose only "unique product" are snake oil financial machinations can apply to the most diverse and presently largest common market?

Shall we threaten them with a lever involving car production? Agriculture? Aviation industry? Chemical industry? Plastics industry? Textiles? Biotech?

Short of threatening to nuke simultaneously Brussels and Strasbourg I do not see exactly what UK can use a lever.

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Re: irony

Boris didn't put this on the Bus....

That one will go down even better. Aviation safety final instance is European court of justice. So I do not quite see how UK can stay in that one with May and her goals in place.

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Citation needed: Europe claims Kaspersky wares 'confirmed as malicious'

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Re: You do not need evidence against Russians

After all, not all Russians fire missiles at civilian airliners.

Correct. However, if it was the government directly it would have been Buk Mk2, from the AA base in Shakty 30km away accompanied by a TELAR, RADAR and a support truck which is the standard setup for an AA company in ex-Soviet block army. It would not be a transported 700km across 3 military zones of command in a state which would result in the crew cleaning latrines for 30 days if they were on active duty. It would not use a missile which is officially scrapped. It would not be wondering alone without its support train and it will not be photographed by 30 people on the motorway.

That does not mean it was the government indirectly. There are LOTS of questions to be answered by Putin and his crew on how Wagner and other Russian "armies for hire" operating in Ukraine, Caucasus, Kongo, Syria and elsewhere around the world got their T72 tanks, heavy artillery, AA and even attack helicopters and drones and how are they used and against whom.

However, we will not get them answered the way we are approaching this. Not now, not ever. Every bit of evidence is interpreted only one way: "Putin cooks children on neurotoxic gas" and "he gives command personally for everyone being murdered by a Russian worldwide".

Well, maybe he does.

However, he is teflonated and there is no way we will get to him via hearsay, Boris style lies or deliberately misinterpreting the evidence as in the MH17 case. I am saying deliberately because even if the Dutch do not know what is the way things are run in a Russian regiment, there are 10-odd ex-Soviet block countries in NATO and they got their comparison missile sample (which is ALSO a Buk Mk1 - something which is supposed to be 100% scrapped) from Georgia which is also ex-USSR. Asking any one of them would have given them an immediate "this missile is past its mandatory disposal date and you need to come up with a feasible explanation" recommendation.

If we asked the right questions there, we could have gotten somewhere by now. But we are not and we will not. We prefer to lie or hearsay. It's easier than asking the right question.

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You do not need evidence against Russians

The current modus operandi is that you do not need evidence against Russians. Hearsay and rumors are good enough. If that is not enough lie a bit. Then lie a lot. This is across the board. I can provide citations, but IMHO it is unnecessary - Boris and Co generate them on a weekly basis (or even higher frequency).

Dunno if whoever came up with it ran it past a person who is familiar with Russian mentality and Russian culture - out of all possible strategies the "uncorroborated hearsay sprinkled with lies" probably ranks as the one they find most alienating and hostile. This is a natural result of having to endure 70 odd years of society where a bit of hearsay took you down the green corridor in the basement of Lubianka towards the wall with a lot of pockmarks on it.

While I personally would like to see Eugene remove the hide of the idiot busybody who wrote that it is "proven" in the complete absence of any public evidence, but I would not hold my breath about it.

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Cardiff chap chucks challenge at chops*-checking cops

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Re: Good Luck

I don't know what the government is using these days to lubricate their arguments

The Boris Johnson/May first principle of designing an argument: There is no need to present an argument where a lie will suffice.

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UK.gov online dating tips: Do get consent, don't make false claims or fake profiles

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Re: Maybe LinkedIn next ?

Well, the US, but as well all know that *is* the entire world.

No, that is not the entire world. The entire world starts somewhere around the junction of Interstate 101 and the 3rd avenue and finishes somewhere around Coyote Creek. Everything beyond that is "Here Be Dragons".

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Intel confirms it’ll release GPUs in 2020

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It was crap. Without the "apart".

Intel loves to pretend it is its first foray into something while in fact, it has tried it before and has f*** it up.

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New York State is trying to ban 'deepfakes' and Hollywood isn't happy

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WHERE IS THE MENTAL BLEACH...

a version of the black swan scene but with trump

Still looking for that bottle of mental bleach in the household cupboard...

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Ain't going to work

I can see this working for Germany and countries which have cut-n-pasted that paragraph from the German constitution such as Russia and Eastern Europe. They establish the honor of the individual as a constitutional right (*).

For good or for bad, there is no constitutional protection for one's honor in USA constitution. There is nothing of the kind in common law either. Your honor is a fair game and is trumped by everything before it in the queue such as the right to free speech in USA constitution.

As a result the lifetime of this law is up to the first court. The first court will terminate it with extreme prejudice on first amendment grounds.

* In the RF constitution it is paragraph 23 - the same one which establishes the right to privacy of correspondence as a constitutional right. I can't be arsed to look for the actual number in others before my 5th intravenous espresso.

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Trump's ZTE deal challenged by Senate

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Re: C'mon, everybody knows that the real theat to nationals security is...

And after meeting Trump North Korea needs a reliable supplier of electronics components. for their "destroyed" missiles, nukes and chemical weapons.

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US tech companies sucked into Russian sanctions row

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Re: Other way round ?

Because hey, Russia produces nothing.

1. I suggest you explain that to let's say Yandex which till this day has a significantly better translation engine than Google.

2. If we continue to make companies whose only fault is that they have been found by a Russian immigrant fold and move ship back to Russia they will start producing something. Courtesy of our assistance. The same way Putin himself was produced courtesy of our assistance to the disintegration of USSR in the Eltsin years. It's called Blowback.

3. Windows, Oracle DB, Google Cloud, Amazon AWS. I will leave the firsts without comment (in fact if you ask a lot of IT professionals this will be a welcome development). Google Cloud and Amazon AWS - that is an interesting one. Alibaba/Tencent are already STEPPING IN - both building datacenters and running fiber along the Silk Road route as we speak.

Let's come back to Windows, Amazon, Google, etc. Putin has been trying to give their own IT industry an extra jolt for nearly a decade now. Windows is actually banned for procurement across most of their government IT to start with and so is Oracle. It has been procured via backdoors of various descriptions till now. I do not think that giving him the tools to finally enforce what he wants is a positive development for the USA/Western European IT industry. I would not cheer here. It may be counter to our interests in the longer run.

And in Russia loosing lots of essential IT services.

Faux news overdose. For every service they lose, there is a Russian or Chinese replacement to step in. That is a market reality. There is no such thing as unique "Califonication Only" IT any more.

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Re: Other way round ?

so if Russia followed suit it could shutdown all their operations in Russia.

Their countersanctions law language would have resulted in that the way its first draft was written. Quite a few people pointed it out so the voted for version leaves the justification, but instead of making it mandatory, gives the choice of target to the president administration (fairly similar to the arbitrary accusation method operated by the USA).

That has been voted through unanimously (opposition, communists, nationalists and Putin cronies) in all readings and is now active. The reason we do not see it deployed is the World Cup - they way Vlad operates is to delay the use of any nuclear options after big international events.

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EU-US Privacy Shield not up to snuff, data tap should be turned off – MEPs

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Re: Facebook and Cambridge Analytica – are both certified under the Privacy Shield.

No transfer, and no servers owned by US companies or their subsidiaries, because the CLOUD Act means that the US sees the data on non-US servers as being held on US servers, if the company owning the servers (or subsidiary) has a presence in the US.

You sound almost as if you were saying this in Russian. Funny, we laughed at them and said that they will "break the internet" for their citizens and "deprive their people of valuable services" when they did EXACTLY THAT two years ago.

I have been saying this for a decade now - it is advisable to follow their legal pipeline and their regs. Because what happens there will be repeated here in 2-3 years time.

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Re: Perhaps it's a silly question. . .

EU Laws bind the United States

They do not. They do, however, bind USA companies operating in Eu. Same as anywhere else in the world. If you want to operate on the local market you have to comply with the local market rules and regulations.

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Trump kept ZTE alive as ‘personal favour’ to Chinese president Xi

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Re: "He's basically offering foreign policy for sale and personal profit"

They have the same attitude at governing.

To be fair Putin has gone to great lengths to keep his family out of the limelight. His daughter or son in law while obviously benefiting from his rule are not employed in any official capacity.

That is not something I would say about the Orange Baboon and his progeny.

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Youth crime falls as kids stay inside to play Grand Theft Auto instead of going out to steal cars

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“Increased opportunities for home entertainment"

More like decreased opportunities to socialize.

Suburbia effect. In my childhood we spent all of our free time hanging out and doing stupid things as a result. It is a natural result. You get 20 bored teenagers together and something stupid WILL arise as a result.

I am looking at my kids - they simply no longer physically hang out with their peers. Virtual contact has replaced a lot of it and the whole idea of hanging out is somewhat foreign. The most they do is congregate for an hour or two after school in one of the parks and that's it (and even that is not popular).

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Facebook and Snap jam Blackberry patent suit

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Re: The "Alice" standard

Does anyone know, if the US Patent Office is applying this standard t

They are. In their version Alice is in Wonderland though.

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UK digital secretary throws cold water over bid for laws on kids' use of social media

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Re: ...or sea change at the Daily Mail ?

Do not jinx it... Or that may be the drop of blood into the empty coffin which will reincarnate THE EDITOR to dispatch the errant scribes with a few professionally placed neck bites.

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US regains supercomputer crown from Chinese, for now

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“Classified” computers are not included in the lists, IIRC.

Oak Ridge and anything there has a security rating.

As far as the "classified" computers they may have indeed a combined compute power in that area, but not on any of the SPEC tasks used to rank Supers. You do not need MPI or any high speed interconnect to crack crypto. You can do it in a bog standard cluster connected together by a bog standard Ethernet at normal datacenter TOR/Leaf speeds.

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Have to use SMB 1.0? Windows 10 April 2018 Update says NO

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Re: Fix it, don't disable it

Why not just patch the vulnerability rather than disabling it?

You can't. It is fecked up by design. That is what v2 fixes amidst other things.

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D-Link is one, I own their DNS-323. I am avoiding D-Link from now onwards.

That's Gemini which is actually nice hardware, but the software originally skirted GPL by not releasing working kernel sources for it. The original software was actually Debian based by the way. There was a ghastly "original kernel grafted onto a generic Debian distro" load for it a while back, but that died due to lack of maintenance.

That has now been fixed, so after a very long hiatus it should work with the latest kernels. I believe 4.17 works out of the box, there are backport patches for openwrt and Debian. As a result there will be firmware for it in the next releases (finally). I am waiting for the next LEDE release to pull mine out of the dusty drawer and put it to use - the hardware in it is actually quite good.

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Dems push Ryan to vote to help save America's net neutrality measures

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Re: Signal switching

When was it decided that the FCC's remit is to send political messages via regulations, rather than Congress doing it with law

Which is exactly the point here. It should be up to the congress to decide and not to FCC.

As far as when - during Bush. The FCC decision on applicability of CALEA and other phone legislation to the Internet. In 2004.

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Chinese tech giant ZTE is back in business – plus or minus $1.4bn and its entire board

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Re: Trumpium War

I'm absolutely not an expert on the matter but... the Jǐnyīwèi might choose to disagree with that.

I will ask the Oprichniki on the subject. They should have an informed opinion.

Jokes aside as the above mentioned experiment and its Chinese equivalent prove any attempts to centralize the power, by using an NKVD like apparatus have historically resulted in MORE power to the traditional structures (+/- some personnel rearrangements and a few missing heads) - the oligarchs in Russia and the mandarin hierarchy in China. So in the endgame it is still business as usual.

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