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* Posts by Voland's right hand

4652 posts • joined 18 Aug 2011

Vatican sets up dedicated exorcism training course

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This is in the Register -- why?

I will ask you that question again after you are done chasing an autonegotiation issue between two switches in two racks which cannot be explained by anything short of the intervention of ectoplasma.

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Gozer's obnoxious mutt, the one gnawing on my car rear left tyre outside, would like to disagree.

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A bit of intel on AMD's embedded EPYC and Ryzen processors

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The ryzen parts look like a fantastic desktop CPU :)

What embedded? Can I have that in a small form desktop or (hackable) thin client instead? Please? Pretty please?

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Perusing pr0nz at work? Here's a protip: Save it in a file marked 'private'

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The wheels of justice turn slowly. Very slowly...

This was 2007. Technology has moved on.

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Brexit to better bumpkin broadband, 4G coverage for farmers – Gove

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Re: I wonder how many times that "money saved from EU contributions" will be re-used.

the UK struggles to compete against cheaper low-cost producers from the Southern Hemisphere and South America"

Price is not the problem. UK not slaughtering the animals to the customer requirement IS the problem. UK lamb is stunned, then factory killed instead of it done properly with a knife while alive.

90% of sheep meet consumption is in Muslim countries - predominantly the middle east. If you want to sell there it has to be killed the HALAL way. By a human. With a knife. While conscious.

1. It is a manual process. There are not enough qualified Eastern European immigrants to do that and there will be even less after BrExit.

2. If UK will start slaughtering this amount of lamb to the customer requirements there will be civil war with the animal protesters at each and every slaughterhouse. Considering their numbers and how militant they are in the UK it is just not worth it.

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Re: @ Charlie Clark

You might think so, but no. Bulgaria is receiving €10bn in EU aid up until 2020

It has been receiving them since times forgotten around the time it joined with minimal effect - have a look at the previous years stats - same website. 2016 is 4%, 2015 is 4%, previous years vary between 2 and 4%.

The >10% a year growth starts with BrExit or to be more exact the formulation of "BrExit means BrExit" and the actual declaration of article 50.

We can make some guesstimates on the size by comparing it to the EU Aid effect by the way. I'd rather not try to make guesses, as they are likely to be very unscientific. However, any way I look at it the numbers are likely to have Bn at the end.

I am too lazy to try to concoct similar queries in Romanian and Polish, but I would expect their national statistics to show similar numbers.

This is off topic - as far as the cheap credit, Bulgaria debt is one of the lowest in Europe - at ~25% of GDP since 2005. UK at 88% can only dream about a debt at this level. So it is not going down the Greek route any time soon. UK is more likely to go before that (especially considering how much money it is bleeding out at the moment).

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Re: @ Charlie Clark

The thing is, a lot of these doctors, nurses, bus drivers and fruit pickers have already left and won't be coming back.

They did not just leave. They took a lot of money with them and the remaining are sending an even bigger amount out in preparation to do the same.

These are the stats for average salary nationally in Bulgaria for last year: Average salary in Bulgaria by month and industry for 2017 in leva

Growth is > 12%. The only explanation is the financial injection from BrExit - all the money which instead of being spent here is now being spent there.

Romania, Poland, etc are all the same and similar numbers. >10, reaching 20-25 in some specific economic areas and regions.

Money DOES NOT grow on trees. The money spent there to induce this growth would have been spent in the UK otherwise. It was lost by the UK economy and gained by the Eastern European economies. The numbers needed for such a spurt across all of Eastern Europe are in the tens of billions and I find it difficult to believe that ANYTHING, even an act of god showering all of the UK with gold nuggets will be able to recoup it. We are definitely not talking about measly 300 million a week here. This is more.

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Re: Sigh

Gove more closely resembles Gollum than Frodo. Or was that your intention?

I suspect so. He said "a quest about a Ring", not to a quest to save the Middle Earth. If he expected the latter, he needs to share what he is smoking. To imagine such an altruistic self-sacrifice from GoveNoccio... Such imagination would take some very cool drugs to fuel and not sharing them is a crime.

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Re: @ Charlie Clark

I’ll laugh when Jobcentres send our homegrown unemployed out to pick mushrooms, clean toilets and do all the other jobs which were done by “foreigners”. Should be a wakeup call for some...

This has been tried. They last somewhere between 6 hours and 2 days.

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Even by MP standards of lies, this is plumbing new depths when it's so easy to prove Gove

Just call him by his real name. GoveNoccio.

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A dog DNA database? You must be barking

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I'm pretty sure for 50,000 pounds a year in damage, it's cheaper to pay off the claims than analyze DNA and store it.

The 50K damage are not the target. The millions (literally) of fines to owners who do not clean up after their mutt are the target here.

It would have been nice if the police was honest for once. They may actually get public support on this one.

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Re: Fuck livestock

if it means we can catch the anti social scrotes that let their blessed dog shit

Concur. Especially NOT over your lawn. Your lawn you can cover with CCTV if need be. Public parks, paths, etc - not so much.

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Europe's Unified Patent Court fate in the balance amid German probing (yes, Brexit is in the mix)

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Re: Fall in patent quality?

the considerable backlog can be dealt with by replacing all the patent examiners with a monkey with two rubber stamps.

Outsourcing it to USPTO will do the trick. It is pretty much equivalent to that idea.

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Given that Battistelli ignores all court judgements against him, seemingly with impunity, what will it matter how the court rules?

This one he cannot ignore. If it goes against him it de-ratifies the convention which is the basis of him being in office.

Additionally, if memory serves me right, one of the other cases is his (so far) successful claim that he is above German law including labour law. This once again goes against German constitution which states that the ultimate law of the land is the German law and no other law can claim supremacy.

Even if the first case somehow (I do not see how) fails, the second will pretty much get him fired outright under German labour code. There and then.

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it is not clear whether the German Constitutional Court is in a position to rule against either the EPO or the UPC.

Sure it is. The primary argument revolves around the article of the German Constitution which states that only a German court's decisions have validity over German subjects. This has been interpreted as "court with German representation". ECJ, ECHR, etc are OK as they all have German representation.

UPC fails that tests - its panels can be convened in a way where a country has no representation. That is pretty much end of story - the convention in its current form is a classic case of some IPR lobbies thinking that they are above all law and can invalidate criminal, civil legal code and even constitutions with impunity.

The "Professional Jobsworth" product of Ecole d'Administration is just an icing on the cake.

By the way, I suspect Germany is not the only country in Europe with a constitution clause like this. I am pretty sure that some digging will turn up at least one or more countries to raise a similar court case.

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Use ad blockers? Mine some Monero to get access to news, says US site

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Re: Ads

click here to make a payment of the hugely crippling sum of 0.231 pence

1. That is per page.

2. Every service which tried to offer this functionality so far has failed. One of the main reasons is that doing this as a service and integrating it into a website is significantly harder than doing ads. Google has made it deceptively easy so micropayments will remain non-starter unless that money flow seizes altogether.

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Re: The only reason that the ads get blocked ...

not interested, girls are much better, to pregnancy testing kits, to nursery school places

The cycle will roll back to the beginning - all of those are "seasonal goods".

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Re: How about

How about yes.

Just not the cryptocurrency of choice for all the fraudsters out there. Anything but Monero.

The choice is:

1. Sacrifice CPU cycles to run some some nasty garbage which distracts from the article and feed marketing scumbags.

2. Sacrifice CPU cycles to run something which does not distract from the article and (if it was a cryptocurrency other than Monero) does not feed people who will sell their parents to the highest bidder.

I think the choice is obvious - provided that the cryptocurrency (or other form of CPU rental) is something whose use is mostly legit and aboveboard (at least as much as normal money).

I would personally prefer 3 - a form of micropayment, but none of those stay afloat for long enough to be something websites are willing to integrate.

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Rock-a-byte, baby: IoT tot-monitoring camera lets miscreants watch 10,000s of kids online

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Re: "The main problems..."

Most of them do not.

However the only of PREVENTING them from going to a cloud service is a firewall.

So the first thing you do when it comes from a shop is to see if it can be configured to operate in a firewalled DMZ using motion or similar software

It it cannot - you send it back to where it came from and thank god for the distance selling regulation.

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The Gemini pocket PC is shipping and we've got one. This is what it's like

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Re: Where Gemini's value really lies

I think I'd need a reasonable linux distro on there, rather than Android, though.

I remember it being marketed as such - you were supposed to have access to the underlying Linux and it was supposed to be nowhere near as crippled like the environment used to run Android.

I believe this is fixable. Recent android kernels have support for lxc so you should be able to spin up a proper distro as a container. This should be goof enough for most stuff.

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London Mayor's chief digi officer: 'Have faith and give us a chance'

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he has no defined objectives that his performance can be measured against

Even worse - he is a PR professional. So in addition to not having any objectives, he has the professional skills to present his "achievements" in the appropriate rosy colours.

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Trying to work out whether this clown was given the title inspired by George Orwell's 1984 (Ministry of Truth)

You are overestimating his capabilities and competence.

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Bad news: 43% of login attempts 'malicious' Good news: Er, umm...

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Re: Email address as username

Concur.

Having a username != officially visible email is a mandatory first line of defence.

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What's wrong with Anthrax Candy?

Anthrax Candy is nice. Especially with Yersinia Pestis icing on top.

I am surprised it is only 43%. I would have expected something in the 90%+.

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Careful with the 'virtual hugs' says new FreeBSD Code of Conduct

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Complicating matters further is that the code is report-driven, so a review team within the FreeBSD team will tackle every report, even if the result is no action.

More paperwork.

Quite funny how EVERYTHING now resembles the old politics discussion board cartoons: https://www.politicsforum.org/flame-warriors/

Though everyone pretending to be an Eagle Scout is not a solution. Neither is putting Royals in writing. They should be Royals just by the fact of being Royals.

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Flight Simulator's DRM fighter nosedives into Chrome's cache

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Re: They'll get away with it...you wouldn't!

They can install what they like, capture they like, apologise and it's all good.

I would not be so sure. Depends who deals with this. If they pissed off a flight sim fan who happens to be a lawyer or work in CPS they may be up to a very unpleasant experience. Unfortunately as with many other things the only exemption to "we, in the UK, have one of the best legal system money can buy" is when you are dealing with members of said system.

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Facebook's big solution to combating election ad fraud: Snail mail

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Re: Election integrity is easy *if* they're willing.

How are ID checks and thumbprints going to prevent fraud in absentee votes?

The Baltic/Nordic/Eastern European way - the votes are submitted online and a signing certificate used to verify you are who you are. You have the option of the certificate being stored by a third party or being stored on your crypto-token/card or the crypto in the ID itself being used. They have been experimenting with this for a while now. I believe only Baltics went as far as running limited trials for voting though. The rest uses it for other stuff - taxes, banking, signing contracts, etc.

Using it is not as mad as it looks. 95% of adults in UK have access to a card reader. Our banks have made us have one so we can use the Internet banking.

The downside is that you have to trust the election commission to record your vote in the tally, but not record how you voted so you can be identified personally at a later date.

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Re: Election integrity is easy *if* they're willing.

vast majority of fraudulent votes.

That is not how you rig an election in the developed world. The cost of rigging it this way is not astronomical, it outright mindboggling. Even doing this in the developing world costs an arm, a leg and a prosthetic. What you can get this way is at most a few fractions of a percent.

It is much easier and cheaper to shift the vote in the direction you want by manipulating the public opinion and to be more exact manipulating the turnout. This is what outfits like Cambridge Analytica and their counterparts on Russian payroll do for a living. They do it well and they do it in a way where there is absolutely no visible violation of the election laws in the country in question.

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Re: Delivering a narrative is not done via advertising

The cost of an O-ring seal

That was what engineering calls single point of failure. An event which changes everything.

So far nobody has managed to prove that any of the advertisements, fake news, disinformation campaigns, etc by either side was a such a change. There is absolutely nothing we can point at and say: "Woaaa... this item changed the world forever".

So estimating the effect on the basis of its proportion to the overall spending is a valid approximation. Until proven otherwise.

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Re: Delivering a narrative is not done via advertising

This presumes implicitly that these Facebook and other social media activities affect whether and how people vote to a significant degree.

They do not. But they do affect turn-out quite significantly. If you manage to (usually) increase or (less often) decrease the turnout in a specific demographic you can achieve the same (or better) results.

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Voland's right hand
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Delivering a narrative is not done via advertising

The primary means and methods of abusing Facebook to influence OTHER country elections are based around viral propagation, not paid newsfeed or adverts.

We are doing it in the Russian election full blast at the moment with our own troll factories trying to make various articles against Putin go viral. They did it to us in the US election and the BrExit referendum. They will be doing it to us in the rather inevitable next UK, CZ (and several others) elections as well as the USA mid-term. We will be doing it in the same countries to fight back. We will be doing it to... They will be doing to... We will be doing it to...

And so on. All these verification checks do f*** all to prevent Facebook being used as a major influencer because any method which will do that for real will cripple our ability to screw them as much as their ability to screw us.

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KFC: Enemy of waistlines, AI, arteries and logistics software

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Re: And the proverbial "thinking man"?

Probably wouldn't want either a self driving car or KFC.

I will take a car which is INTEGRATED with the highway and under highway control any day. Something that has proper algorithms which implement the solution to an optimal control problem. Something which is under the central control of the computer responsible for this particular highway stretch not everyone doing their own thing.

Neural network regurgitated belch? Screw that. I have done numerical methods work in my past lives and I know exactly easy it is to clusterf*** the underlying math. No amount of californicating dope can convince me to the opposite.

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Re: Have I missed something?

Why would autonomous cars (when they arrive in 2080) need to read road signs?

Let me quote you the oldie but goldie from the other side of the wall dating back to the early 1980-es:

Protocol of the weekly meeting of the Police Union.

The Union met today and discussed the following agenda items:

1. Application by Snr Constable Petrov for financial assistance due to temporary hardship.

The Union decided:

1. To approve the application for financial assistance of Snr Constable Petrov

2. To issue Snr Constable Petrov a temporary movable STOP and 30km/h per limit stop signs.

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UK.gov's Brexiteers warned not to push for divergence on data protection laws

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Re: @ Halcin

No, mostly remainers.

Define remainer. For example, I voted remain in the referendum. Similarly, most of Eastern Europe prior to the referendum supported UK remaining in the Eu.

Now, one year after the BrExit declaration most of Eastern Europe has realized that the harder the BrExit the bigger the financial injection they get. Similarly, those of us who CAN invest there have realized that the harder the BrExit the bigger our ROI.

Nothing personal. Just business.

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So, Everyone is advocating we comply with EU regulations, but without the ability to effect what said regulations are?

Advocating - no. Stating the bleeding obvious that this is a "take it or leave it" case - yes. It cannot be negotiated unless one has an economy of the same size (or bigger) than the Eu, a couple of carrier groups and a fleet of nuclear missile submarines. Size matters I am afraid. If you do not have the size your only option is "take it or leave (it)"

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Re: The Law of Unintended Consequences

I thought the traditional covering of the season is the cake which we are somehow having and eating at the same time.

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US docs show Daimler may have done a Dieselgate – German press claims

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Re: "...any visible smoke..."

I looked up the pollution standard for heavy diesel vehicles.

That was a UK specific issue. UK was the only country in Europe which disallowed diesel fumigation (*). In the pre-DPF days fumigating a diesel with small injection of LPG at the air intake manifold was the only way to reduce soot by several orders of magnitude. This technique is now out of fashion for automotive - it is replaced by DPF. It will probably not pass today reqs too - it makes the burn much cleaner resulting in significantly higher NO2 emissions. It is still used for motorboats as well as other places where DPF is not suitable.

Unfortunately, in addition to reducing soot, it also increases power output and reduces diesel fuel consumption. As a result it suffered the fate of anything which could endanger the fuel excise revenue. Sleazy Tony Bliar and Gordon Brownpants did not make compromises on anything like that. Anything which would significantly reduce excise revenue was sabotaged by any means possible. So UK pretended it did not exist while most of Eu large city public transport (f.e all of Milan, most German cities, etc) ran fumigated.

This is the root cause of the ridiculous soot standard for city buses, etc ~15-20 years ago. It was there in order to be able to pretend that fumigation is unnecessary.

(*)Aka white diesel, disel bianco, etc

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it's cleaned itself recently or has been for a good run out on a motorway.

Autobahn - yah, Motorway - nein. Insufficient revs to give the DPF filter a good burn.

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Voland's right hand
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Top tip: if you have a diesel check out the new MOT rules coming 20/4, I think a lot of cars are going to go off-road.

It is only an extra DPF presence/tamper test. Various forms of De-EGRisation as done by most commercial and hire car drivers in London are still not checked for. So the real problem with diesel in urban environments, namely NO2, will continue as before...

By the way - it is 20th of May, not 20th of April.

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("exhaust aftertreatment", according to Google Translate)

That is not catalytic converter, that is urea injection. Catalytic converter cannot be disabled - it is always in-flow for the exhaust.

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Farts away! Plane makes unscheduled stop after man won't stop guffing

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Old may not be the issue.

One of the side effects of eating some food you are intolerant to like Gluten, Cumin, etc is that you get the flatulence from hell. It is hell in both quantity and hellish smell.

So instead of the proverbial old fart, it may be a younger person who has eaten something not agreeable to their metabolism. Not bad enough to get them into hospital and/or use the epipen, but bad enough to cause the well known side effect.

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"Flight diverted due to asshole on board"

End of the day, all that flatulence has to come out of somewhere...

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PM urged to protect data flows post-Brexit ahead of Munich speech

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Re: Project Fear is still alive and well at camp remoan.

Sofia's airport is busy largely because of the chairmanship of the council.

Correct guess. It was Sofia.

It is the chairmanship which brings there 20-odd aircraft a day registered To hedge funds and banks which according to flight radar flew there predominantly to/from London.

It is the chairmanship which magically provided a 2017 25% GROWTH of salaries in the construction sector in 2017 (according to official stats) while most other sectors scored 10-15.

It is the Eu chairmanship which has reduced the TTL of a 3+ new build bedroom apartment on the Sofia housing market from 6 months down to sub-2 weeks.

It is the Eu chairmanship which has suddenly stuck a halapeno pepper up the builders' arses to complete in 2018 the office complex around the Piza tower replica on the main road near the airport - the one which has been sitting in a dilapidated unfinished state since the real estate slump in 2007.

It is all the magic of the chairmanship you know. It magically changes macroeconomic variables by sprinkling them with magical chairman dust.

Sorry, there is no bucket emoticon so cannot help it, please use tissues to wipe out any surplus sarcasm which poured out of the screen onto the keyboard (I apologise in advance for that).

Chairmanship - my a***. Now BrExit and related contingency money flows seem considerably more plausible.

As far as the rest of 27 asking Britain, if Bulgaria(*) is to be used as an example it has given up on that. It is simply working based on hard BrExit in its own selfish interest now. So are all other Eastern European countries because the harder the BrExit outlook the MORE money they get - both from immigrants and from corporates. I do not see anything funny or pathetic here. That is the way the world works and that is something the idiots on the lie-stickered bus had to take into account before claiming anything.

(*)I have some travel elsewhere in Europe coming up, it will be interesting to compare. I would not expect it to be any different though

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No, they have not.

The reality is that nearly anything you can think of regarding mutual recognition of documents, insurance, rights, deeds, whatever which Britain was part pre-Eu with any country in the world has been superseded by Eu agreements. Most of these agreements also have VOIDED any prior agreement and Britain as a part of the Eu has agreed to that at the time.

As a result Britain either has to fall back to prehistoric treaties like the idiocy about the international driving license and the original car insurance "green cards" or in some of the worst cases has nothing to fall back onto as the original treaties have been obsoleted by the other side as no longer needed. This is especially the case as far as UK and Eu countries are concerned. All pre-Eu individual agreements UK had with let's say France and Germany are null and void now.

This is is in all areas and driving licenses are the least of them. It will take a DECADE to churn through all the admin on this and this is an optimistic estimate as UK will have to redo the work Eu has been doing for the last 50 years (so much for it being useless). While signing a deal with the Eu is a big deal for most countries (even USA), signing a deal with a single country is something that is not going to get any priority in the legislative queue.

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Re: The EU would be shooting themselves in the foot

The limitations on travel should prevent it easily.

Just an idea... Visas... Extreme vetting... You know...

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Crims pull another SWIFT-ie, Indian bank stung for nearly US$2m

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There is little choice besides scanners

The system itself has very little data to distinguish between a fraudulent small-to-medium transaction from a compromised bank and a valid one. The recipient bank may have some data (we assume that the source is compromised so it does not have a say). F.e an account opened yesterday which is getting 10m and is transferring out 10m immediately after that is an outright candidate for blocking under money laundry reqs. The transfer system - not so much.

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Mueller bombshell: 13 Russian 'troll factory' staffers charged with allegedly meddling in US presidential election

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Re: Wonderful timing!

It's easy to get a majority when those who would vote for your opponent are excluded from the process.

FFS. Can you stop repeating the Graunidad and other sponsored media sour grapes.

Navalny's support is within the margin of error in the election. He has absolutely ZERO support out in the countryside and outside Moscow and amidst brainwashed immigrants.

Even Ksenia Sobchak which the entire Russia considers to be the b*tch from hell and who proudly carries the highest disapproval rating amidst public personalities (not just politicians) in the whole country polls HIGHER THAN HIM. By the way, despite him being disqualified, he is still being included in most polls so that it is perfectly clear what his chances are. They are NIL.

We, ladies and gentlemen, are betting on the wrong horse. A horse that cannot win even if we shoot all the other other horses in the competition (something we are trying as well ). A horse that will be disqualified for illegal doping one way or another because it is being doped at our multi-million expense daily.

Instead of continuing to moan about that horse not being given a chance to win (because it will not, it is missing a leg or two to start off with) we should rethink exactly what does it take to have a horse that can win and/or what does it take to get our mitts on the prize(s). Provided that horse is not Жирик(*) of course, dunno about the rest of the el reg commentariat, but I do not fancy glowing in the dark.

(*) Zhirinovski

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Re: Wonderful timing!

You forgot to put inverted commas around the word 'election'.

I did not and I meant to. It is an election all right. With hist current public rating Putin does not even need to rig it.

Most western politicians will kill for a public approval rating half of what he has. We have not had anyone commanding this approval rating and winning elections by such margins since the days of Charles de Gaulle. We have forgotten what it looks like too.

This is something which the west fails to understand. Putin can be elected on "merit" and will be elected on "merit" - based on his total of 15+5 years of running the country. It does not matter how much noise our sponsored Navalni muppet makes, he will not be able to get even remotely within the numbers necessary to contest that election. With all the millions poured into him he is still polling within the margin of error of a poll.

Putin needs to make a major miss-step and his approval needs to drop under 50% for him to need to rig the election. As long as he continues to have the rating he has, he will win the elections the same way De Gaulle won his. By 80%+. Without rigging them - he has no need to.

By the way, we really do not want his approval rating to fall too. If it does, it will not be our sponsored clown to contest the seat. It will be Zhirinovski or even worse Zuganov (or whoever inherits their parties from them). Compared to them Putin is the lesser evil. If you do not believe me tune into RTR (not the foreign edition - the internal one) on Thursday night and listen to the politics talk show. Zhirik is a recurring feature there and he usually has a couple of opponents on fairly liberal positions, sometimes even from UK or USA so you can get a good idea of what we (and the liberals in Russia) should expect if Putin is to loose the election.

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Re: Wonderful timing! -Everyone else is under 3%. This includes our preferred rival.

so that in a year's time rather a lot of Americans could be indicted for interfering with the Russian election.

The way Russian law is at present they can be indicted anyway. The governing law is foreign organization financing. While USA law completely disallows it, Russia law allows it provided you declare it above board. You have to openly declare yourself a "foreign agent" and provide full accounting for all of your funding on a quarterly basis. Navalni has failed to do so for obvious reasons.

By the way - I have participated in protests myself 25 years ago in Eastern Europe so I can see the all the signs. His operation is clearly funded. By us. It is not internal funding. You cannot do what he is doing with less than tens of thousands of dollars per day, ramping up to hundreds of thousands for specific "protest" events. That money has to come from somewhere and I am pretty sure that Mueller counterpart in FSB is patiently collecting all the transaction information as we speak. It is not just ex-FBI directors which know the "follow the money" principle.

It will be a nice indictment list with one major difference. USA always screws this one up. It did it in Eastern Europe 25 years ago, I bet they have screwed it again this time. They always have one or more embassy officials involved. Compared to that Russia always deals via disposable intermediaries. Lavrov's department keeps its hands clean and can always do a theatrical shrug after that.

I am preparing a BelAz full of popcorn for when the sh*t encounters the rotating appliance attached to the ceiling. I will be needed to observe and enjoy the show.

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