nav search
Data Center Software Security DevOps Business Personal Tech Science Emergent Tech Bootnotes
BOFH
Lectures

* Posts by Ken Hagan

6109 posts • joined 14 Jun 2007

Nobody expects the social media inquisition! OK, everybody did, UK politicos

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Again?

A relative of mine reports that when she was a girl she was criticised for "always having her nose in a book". Wicked times...

3
0

Guess who else Spectre is haunting? Yes, it's AMD. Four class-action CPU flaw lawsuits filed

Ken Hagan
Gold badge
Joke

Re: In monetary terms

If it can be shown that AMD processors have actually gone slightly *up* in price (being immune to Meltdown), then would a successful plaintiff have to pay AMD?

3
0

Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: "However it is really difficult for them to change"

"And there are *nix applications available for a single instruction set as well."

Such as Android Studio.

(I find that example *particularly* odd. I can imagine that Google wouldn't want to port the emulator portion, but the editors and build tools are surely written in a portable language.)

5
0

We've built a 4G drone tracking system, beams Vodafone

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

What's the point of RPS when GPS is far more accurate and has far better coverage?

2
0

A print button? Mmkay. Let's explore WHY you need me to add that

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: The Naked Truth

"The skills and attributes that are needed to create a good user interface are not the same as for writing code."

There needs to be some overlap, otherwise your fabulous UI doesn't get the right job done. (Same with end-user documentation: If the author is one of those "professional tech authors" who doesn't know how the software works or what the user is trying to do with it, then the result is unlikely to be useful.)

Of course, "overlap" might just mean communication, and the communication might be 2-way. (I've certain known cases where I changed how a program worked in order to make the user manual easier to write.)

3
0

A computer file system shouldn't lose data, right? Tell that to Apple

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Error handling is hard - let's not do it!

"What's wrong with Windows XP (in the context of when it was a current O/S)?"

Ask Microsoft. It was so bad that they canned the Longhorn project and put all hands back on fixing XP. The result was XP Service Pack 2, which in its SP3 variant is probably what you are thinking of when you think of XP as a much-loved OS that everyone refused to give up for ten years.

It is the only time I can recall in Microsoft's history where they went back to an existing release and fixed the bugs in it rather than simply put out a different set of bugs under the banner of a new release.

12
1

Kentucky gov: Violent video games, not guns, to blame for Florida school massacre

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: What a load of Trump...

"There are 300,000,000+ guns in circulation. [...] You can get guns elsewhere in the world (even in the UK) yet they are seldom if ever used to commit these atrocities [...]"

Well on the one hand ...

This guy appears to have walked into a store and walked out a few minutes later with something that you probably couldn't get in the UK or, if you could, would have required the blessing of your local police chief and convincing a psychiatrist that you had a legitimate use for it.

The result is that even in Northern Ireland, which is a special case, only about 100,000 people (out of 1,800,000) own guns (about 380,000 of them). That's about 5%. I'm not sure if accurate figures exist for the US, but apparently (http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/06/04/a-minority-of-americans-own-guns-but-just-how-many-is-unclear/) around a third of the population regularly admit to owning guns (averaging, again, about 3 or 4 each).

So on the other hand ...

That's about 5 or 6 times smaller than the US figure then, but the consequent rate of gun crime is, I think much lower. I would also point to the Swiss experience where the laws are much more like the US (and some cantons actively encourage serving militia to keep guns at home) but the rate of gun crime is much lower. Indeed, it appears that most gun-related deaths in Switzerland are suicides.

On the face of it, then, there does appear to be a cultural difference in the US. (The obvious difference is the reverence in which the Constitution is held and, by extension, its Second Amendment. Anyone trying to tighten gun laws in the US first has to convince everyone that they aren't undermining the bit of the Constitution that keeps America free from tyranny. That shouldn't be particularly hard if you are just trying to keep semi-automatic weapons away from hormone-ridden teenagers, but the question doesn't even arise in most other countries and most of the rest of the world finds the US attitude utterly incredible.)

However, back on the first hand ...

I would expect that it would be relatively safe to give a gun to most adults in any country. However, as you increase gun ownership and relax checks, eventually you start allowing them for a small number of people who are very much less safe. I would expect the relationship between percentage-gun-ownership and amount-of-gun-crime to be so non-linear that it looks almost like a cliff edge.

30
2

If this laptop is so portable, where's the keyboard, huh? HUH?

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"A lot of lazy people only put one space nowadays."

That's because any decent software will use the correct spacing anyway. I learned this from the TeX manual about 30 years ago and it was such a throwaway comment that I assumed it was common knowledge and had been standard practice amongst typesetting packages since time immemorial. Even after I have learned that not all such packages do this, I still only leave one space and if anyone ever complains (and no-one, in 30 years has *ever* complained) I would say it is a bug in the software.

4
2

Hate to ruin your day, but... Boffins cook up fresh Meltdown, Spectre CPU design flaw exploits

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Just kill ALL code in a browser.

"Yeah, that'll stop anyone exploiting cpu flaws."

Umm, yeah, actually it might. You see, none of these flaws are remotely accessible. They all require the attacker to actually run code on the target computer. Traditionally, the way around this annoying limitation is to persuade everyone that it is safe to run arbitrary third-party (untrusted) code in a browser because the browser's sandbox will protect the machine. We now find that this ain't necessarily so. Solution: stop running untrusted code in your browser (or anywhere else).

5
0

UK Home Sec Amber Rudd unveils extremism blocking tool

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: 99.995% is impossible

"A minister wouldn't lie would they?"

No, but they might knowingly avoid learning their brief so that they remained too ill-informed to make a true statement on matters where the truth conflicted with Party Policy.

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: 99.995% is impossible

The figures sound perfectly reasonable to me.

99.995% of the internet is cat videos and only 6% of terrorist beheading feature kittens, so the test dataset was the entire internet and the algorithm is: (drumroll)

return false == IsCatPresent();

(More seriously, given any non-random algorithm that isn't completely one-sided, I can obtain any error rate I want by fixing the test dataset.)

2
0

NASA budget shock: Climate studies? GTFO. We're making the Moon great again, says Trump

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"And consider fusion reactor research in space, where they can afford to take bigger risks... and have a natural vacuum to assist them."

Actually, a fusion reactor in space would face an almost insurmountable problem that Earth-bound reactors solve quite easily: heat disposal.

You see, your common or garden power station generates about twice as much heat as it does electricity and then uses a heat engine at less than 100% efficiency to convert the heat to leccy. The remaining heat then has to be disposed of. On Earth, that usually involves warming up a few buckets of water and chucking it away. In space, you'd need a closed-cycle alternative capable of shedding roughly as much heat as your reactor was delivering in electricity. Since convection and conduction are out (pesky vacuums) that leaves radiation, so we're probably talking about a space station that is "very bright in the near infrared".

I'm not an engineer, but the problem would appear to be Quite Hard.

8
0

Until last week, you could pwn KDE Linux desktop with a USB stick

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: And which bunch ...

His Holiness Steve Jobs, I believe, is the Original Sinner.

However, a more pertinent question is why the sin has been copied by almost everyone despite it being a known-terrible idea.

15
0

You can resurrect any deleted GitHub account name. And this is why we have trust issues

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"If a dependency breaks for whatever reason, such as the developer pulling the repository, then your next pristine build is going to fail, you will spot the problem and then do something about it."

Either you or I have mis-understood the person you were replying to. I took the suggestion to be that you make yourself dependent on your local copy (fork, or whatever) of the third party code. That dependency cannot break. (If the original source disappears, you lose the ability to update your local copy, but since there cannot now be any new fixes being posted to that original source, this isn't actually a problem.)

You seem to be advocating just linking to the remote source and only taking a local copy *after* the remote one goes titsup. Sorry, but to me that sounds like being lazy and having to face the consequences at an inconvenient moment, possibly after everyone who understands exactly what to do has left the company.

4
0

Why aren't you being arbiters of truth? MPs scream at Facebook, YouTube, Twitter

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: making them responsible

I've always been slightly puzzled why they don't do just that.

If I pick up a phone and make some inflammatory statement to a friend, that's a private call. The phone company has no business listening in and Mr Trump has no cause to complain about what I said. If I pick up a billboard and splash the same comment around so that everyone in the area can see it, I'm liable. Social media are *much* more like the second case than the first, so they shouldn't have the same protections as "carriers".

Sure, it would mean the end of these sites, but why should centuries of legal practice be put aside just to facilitate someone's new business model?

5
0

Exoplanets from another galaxy spotted – take that, Kepler fatigue!

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Incoming pendant

Isn't the observable universe going to be limited by the age of the universe? (I know about inflation, but that predates the recombination horizon so it isn't observable.)

1
0

On the NHS tech team? Weep at ugly WannaCry post-mortem, smile as Health dept outlines plan

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Proxy ?

A fine suggestion, and one that I suspect is well within the capabilities of the people behind the NHSbuntu project, significantly easier to sell to NHS managers, and sufficiently easy to support that the handful of people concerned might actually be sufficient.

In fact, perhaps they should create it as a product and start a company to sell it.

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Piss poor written software

"This on equipment that costs 10's if not 100's of thousands of pounds."

This is a contract failure. Any product that includes software running on COTS Windows boxes or networked machines must come with a guaranteed maintenance period and a line in the contract that says it must run on the patched OS (or in a fully patched LAN) as updated in accordance with Microsoft's schedule until the end of the contract, *because it isn't safe not to*.

If vendors try to wriggle out by limiting the term of the contract, let them, and then tell your bean counters that they must amortise the full purchase cost over the reduced contract period, *because it isn't safe to use the equipment beyond then*.

Then sit back and watch as the crap vendors get priced out of the market.

tl;dr:- Oi! NHS! Grow a pair!

6
0

Capita contract probed after thousands of clinical letters stuffed in a drawer somewhere

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: The devil you don't know?

I think it is more likely that we're seeing how journalism works. There are always stories about bad stuff happening, but it your new story is "like the last one, but bigger" it is easier to persuade an editor to run with it. The result is that stories around a particular theme come along in groups, like the proverbial busses.

3
2
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Some Sympathy here

"There's the issue of professionalism and coutresy. "

Yes, if not also the general duty of care that all members of society are obliged to perform towards each other.

4
1

No Windows 10, no Office 2019, says Microsoft

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Office 365 ONLY

"Microsoft pushing everyone towards the cloud."

Well if it comes free with an internet connection that can match my SSD for bandwidth and will run 24/7 for the lifetime of the product, sign me up!

7
1
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Suicidal business plan?

"I saw it written somewhere that Windows now only brings in 10% of Microsoft's revenue"

But without Windows to run their other revenue sources on, their entire product line would dry up. OK, maybe not the entire line, but just how much of Microsoft's revenue stream does not require a copy of Windows to make it usable. Not much, and their competition is fiercest in those segments.

5
1
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Cold Dead Hand

The only reason MS recommend you stick with Office 32-bit is that there are too many third-party gizmos that only exist in 32-bit form. They won't work in the 64-bit version. If you aren't using any of those, it has been OK to use the 64-bit version for at least 10 years. Conversely, if you are then you will be stuck with 32-bit Office in 2019 as well.

On the other hand, *most* people's documents are under 1GB.

3
2
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: MS: Take footgun

If we believe the reports, Munich failed to even keep email up and running. To me, that implies that they had several senior people who were determined that the project should fail and were willing to sabotage it from within. I mean ... email ... FFS !?

24
1

You can't ignore Spectre. Look, it's pressing its nose against your screen

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Does This Affect AMD Epyc CPUs

"I'm sorry, but in the real world, AMD just isn't part of the any discussion about server chips. There's only one player in that market, and they'll be the one everyone buys replacement chips from."

True, but in the real world *now* there is no player at all in that market. Whilst it is reasonable to expect that Intel will come up with a safe CPU on roughly the same timescale as AMD, they do need to deliver on that expectation.

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Jonathan Schwatrz

"The point is that chip engineers left security in the glovebox the day they parked up in the company lot and walked in to design those parts of the pipeline."

That's a tad unfair. At the launch of the Pentium-Pro, to exploit Spectre you would need to have used the RDTSC instruction to get the necessary timing resolution. That instruction, introduced in the Pentium, can be kept away from user-level code precisely because Intel knew that it would assist side-channel attacks. It is probably still possible to keep RDTSC away from user-level code, although I suspect it would make a lot of programs unhappy.

As far as I know, it isn't possible to keep it away from a guest kernel. However, anticipating the security needs of a VM host was perhaps not on everyone's radar at that time. (There were serious academic papers around explaining why the x86 ISA was not virtualisable and VMware only managed it through a heroic exercise in on-the-fly disassembly and re-writing of code.)

1
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Seriously, I'm tired of this Spectre Meltdown bla bla bla ...

"I mean, what's the probability for me to become a target ? "

As I noted in a reply to a comment a few remarks above this one, the probability might be higher than you think, since the attack is easily automated and almost risk-free for the perpetrator. A state-level attacker rolling out a global offensive might easily catch you in the cross-fire simply because it is impractical *not* to attack you.

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Unecessarily alarmist

For a honey-trap, you need to target a particular individual, devote human resources to the task, and risk being found out. The cost-per-attack and the risk are both quite high. With Spectre, the whole thing can be automated and it is undetectable.

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: "It's not quite that simple"

"Having another country capable of it does not really make a difference."

On the contrary, if you are a US company (or a close enough friend), it is unlikely that the NSA will write such a letter with the intention of causing your business to suffer a cataclysmic accident that wipes you off the map. (OK. In practice it might be more sensible to cause you a thousand minor headaches that, over time, make you less competitive than your rivals. But you get the idea.)

Some other countries intelligence agencies might have different priorities.

1
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Dedicated instances

"Probably not better, but hopefully good enough."

Since you are not trying to secure against an attacker who is legitimately already running on the same hardware, you don't *need* to be better. You don't even need to be as good. I think that's the point that your critic was missing.

7
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: No shared CPUs

"For reliability you want your VMs spread across hosts and data centers."

There's no reason why you can't have your dedicated iron spread across several locations. Still, I'm not sure that the article's optimism is well placed. Whilst you may not be sharing iron with other customers, you are sharing it with your VM provider. That provider is still "at risk" from whoever they rent the iron to. Furthermore, as I understand it there is no way to *detect* that you are under attack from Spectre.

Against that, it is probably true that an outfit like VMware can afford to replace all their kit as soon as safe hardware is available and, as valued customers, will be at the front of the delivery queue.

1
0

Intel alerted Chinese cloud giants 'before US govt' about CPU bugs

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: "We certainly would have liked to have been notified"

"the whole supply-chain needs to be informed [...] so they can make a co-ordinated release of patches, when the situation is made public"

If you are going to inform the whole supply chain, that makes it public. You can't keep a secret between (quite probably) several hundred people across several dozen organisations in several countries.

2
1

UK.gov mass data slurping ruled illegal – AGAIN

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"People keep saying they did it for those 3, so maybe we should haul their arses into court."

I foresee quite a long and heated discussion over how many arses "they" actually possess between them. Quite a large number of people died over the course of the first millenium AD trying to settle that one.

12
0

Microsoft works weekends to kill Intel's shoddy Spectre patch

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: The WinTel Cartel...

"Both should be prosecuted for gross negligence ..."

It is demonstrably not gross negligence and I would expect such claims to be tossed out of court on day one.

The technique of speculative execution has been widespread throughout the industry for twenty years. There were a few people in academia asking whether cache lines could be used as a side-channel. I think there was at least one of those 2 or 3 years ago, but since it came to nothing then I think we can conclude that it wasn't *obvious* that the answer was "yes".

For negligence, you need to have a situation where a knowledgeable person would, if aware of the action, think that it was careless or unwise. We had an entire industry full of such people for 20 years, well aware of what was being done, and the most damning criticism that any of them came up with was "This looks like a possible weakness but despite my best efforts I can't actually exploit it.".

Then, finally, six months ago, someone managed, and Intel's response was to start working on a solution whilst trying to keep the problem away from Black Hats to protect customers.

Yeah, *so* negligent ... not.

8
1
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"A rush to patch things without testing properly."

The embargo *held* for six months and only broke 1 week before the plan. Is that a rush?

4
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"No clear documentation for patches for the end user. I'd like to clear on JUST ONE LINK to be told what exactly is an an update/patch"

Oddly enough, Linux seems to be ahead of the game here. Windows PCs appear to have the constraint that they can't update microcode without permission from the BIOS, which requires the involvement of the BIOS vendor, who is reached through the OEM, and ... FFS! (Ordinary punter loses will to live and never does any of these things. Film at eleven.)

Whereas ... it appears to be the case that Linux systems will pick up a microcode update through their normal automatic updates mechanism and feed it to the CPU at the next reboot.

We had the same ridiculous dependencies for the IME bugs. Perhaps one good thing that might come out of this is that heads will be knocked together so that the OS vendor can do it by themselves. Otherwise, this is getting a bit like Android, with "BIOS vendors" playing the obstructive role of "phone vendors" or "carriers".

2
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Same old....

I'm not aware of evidence that the customers demand speed at the expense of security, but I suppose it may be true.

If the marketplace starts to offer chips that are Spectre-proof and chips that aren't, we'll see. As far as I'm aware, the latter aren't yet available. (And yes, ARM fans, I *am* going to restrict my argument to x64 chips because I'm not aware of an easy way to run all my closed-source x64 Windows apps on your ARM chips and I'm not inclined to take a few years off using a computer whilst the entire software industry pulls its finger out and re-writes everything, for free.)

3
0

FYI: Processor bugs are everywhere – just ask Intel and AMD

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Even the 6502

"And even formal verification of the logic doesn't guarantee that you won't have problems like ..."

...like Spectre? Let's not lose sight of the fact that Spectre is not a bug. The chip is doing exactly what its designers intended. It's just that, with hindsight, they wish they'd intended something less susceptible to side-channel attacks.

19
0

User stepped on mouse, complained pedal wasn’t making PC go faster

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: It was funny but she did learn stuff there.

"There aren't that many left alive. The computer age is older than you think."

The computer age for nerds dates from WW2. The computer age for normal people started around about 1990. Most people over 50, of which there are quite a few left, probably had their first serious encounters with a computer in adulthood. Those over 75, and there's a few of those left too, may have decided at the time that this was a young person's thing and they'd give it a miss. Only now, with the government full of spotty teenagers who can't believe anyone could not want to do everything on the web with their smartphone, do that generation realise that this might have been a bad call.

10
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Reminds me of a story

Pensioners ... "playing Pong & its derivatives in the pub about quarter of a century earlier?"

I doubt whether 40-somethings were really into Pong. They probably reckoned that was the machine surrounded by the younger generation and therefore best avoided.

4
0

Ever wondered why tech products fail so frequently? No, me neither

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: original devs

You might be surprised. Testing (or even writing a user guide) can often be enough to make the original dev think about edge cases and sometimes they are the only people who know where the edges are. Or to put it in the language of testing, you need white-box testing as well as black-box testing.

Writing a user manual is another activity that can make the original dev consider their work from a new angle. I know no-one reads them anymore, but that doesn't mean there is no value in writing them.

6
0

Death notice: Moore’s Law. 19 April 1965 – 2 January 2018

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: will they ?

Well "M" is fixed, as I understand it, by the current round of patches and didn't affect all chip designs anyway, so we're really only worrying about S. S, in turn, is only an issue for people running untrusted code at lower privilege levels, so folks like Google running a completely in-house software stack (at least on some of their iron) don't need to worry about it anyway and folks whose only instances of untrusted code are JavaScript in web browsers can dial down their timer resolutions a bit and push the feasibility of the attack into long grass (or possibly even into a different time zone).

On the other hand, if you are selling VM guests, S makes your entire business model recklessly unsafe both for you and your customers, so that's annoying. Either you or your customers will just have to take the performance hit or buy more hardware, or a bit of both.

3
0

GitHub shrugs off drone maker DJI's crypto key DMCA takedown effort

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: shortsighed on Github's end too

"How about a on-by-default/easily-installed/strongly-suggested plugin on plain git?"

Maybe, but that will be defeated by the kind of person who, when setting up a new repo, carefully goes through the configuration and disables everything that they don't personally understand or didn't personally set up, on the grounds that they are too smart to need such bloatware.

It's evolution in action. You make something idiot proof and then sit back whilst Nature evolves a better idiot.

7
0

Microsoft whips out tool so you can measure Windows 10's data-slurping creepiness

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"why is it still a pile of unstable garbage nearly 3 years after it's release?"

Possibly because the info that reaches MS is skewed towards those don't know about it, or who can't switch it off, or who use the box only for testing purposes. That's a population that is skewed away from the IT literate and towards those who believe whatever you write on the tin. Perfect for advertisers, but shit for the official purpose.

3
0

IT 'heroes' saved Maersk from NotPetya with ten-day reinstallation bliz

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: I hope

"They had lots of heroes including the local techie who had the presence of mind to turn off one of the DC's once they realised what was happening - that saved their AD."

Hmm. Yes. I imagine the rebuild might have taken more than 10 days if it had included typing in a new AD from scratch.

10
0

Serverless: Should we be scared? Maybe. Is it a silly name? Possibly

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Serverless is a stupid name

"If I can create an application that can sort what was once disparate data and produce useful and practical information faster than all previous methods, then bring it on!"

Umm ... UNIX command lines, shell scripts, pipes, tools that do just one thing ... and it probably wasn't a new idea then. (Someone else has already mentioned "subroutines", which is another perfectly fair example of the same concept.)

3
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

"Did you know there are people in their twenties who don't know, and will refuse to try, wiring a plug?"

That's hardly surprising, since it has been illegal for ages to actually buy something that required you do that. I dare say there are *lots* of things that are easy but unnecessary.

1
1

'WHAT THE F*CK IS GOING ON?' Linus Torvalds explodes at Intel spinning Spectre fix as a security feature

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: All of this makes me long for...

"68K architecture, which I read somewhere doesn't have this problem. "

68K probably doesn't have this problem because the architecture was commercially dead before out-of-order processors took over. A 68K chip designed for performance last year would have been out of order and would almost certainly have suffered this problem, just like the highest performing cores from ARM, MIPS, SPARC, ...

Intel are getting flack from Linus because they are being dishonest about the fix, not because of the bug.

5
0
Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Why are the patches so late?

"What have they being doing for 6 months?"

One group will have been figuring out how to change the design of the next generation of chips, which you might see in the shops by Christmas, to avoid the problem. A second group will have been figuring out whether the facilities accessible to *existing* microcode are sufficient to allow a patch, at any performance cost. (Based on the flakiness of the patches so far the answer appears to be "possibly not".) A third group, I hope, will have been trying to think of related attacks that get around whatever strategems the first two groups come up with.

Given the nature of the attacks, I think it is very naive for anyone to assume that a complete patch is actually possible. If Intel *have* internal switches to, for example, turn off speculation then that is both fortunate and frankly rather surprising. (What were they for?)

6
0

Facebook grows a conscience, admits it corroded democracy

Ken Hagan
Gold badge

Re: Matthew 27:3-5

"For 'Gospel truth', it lacks rather a lot in backup evidence."

In my experience, things are only ever presented as Gospel truth when there is no actual evidence and belief is purely a matter of faith. FWIW, that's seen as a plus point by the enthusiasts: <cite>Thomas replied, “My Lord and my God!” Jesus said to him, “Because you have seen Me, you have believed; blessed are those who have not seen, and yet have believed.” </cite>. It's just the atheists who insist on actual evidence.

2
1

The Register - Independent news and views for the tech community. Part of Situation Publishing