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* Posts by MOV r0,r0

104 posts • joined 14 May 2011

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RIP Paul Allen: Microsoft cofounder billionaire dies at 65 after facing third bout with cancer

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Joke

Re: Say what you will

Adobe, OTOH...

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Sopra Steria exec on warpath as its UK Government profit crashes ... by millions

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Re: "From my 50,000 feet position"...

But surely he needs to define the key attributes of his emergent themes and mandate guidelines to provide rafts of measures to drive pictures of excellence through a robust organising framework leveraging relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, observability and triability in his best of breed world class solutions going forward?

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Wasted worker wasps wanna know – oi! – who are you looking at?

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Re: Wasps / Apple fall

Had this in the female loo at work, all the other men in the company being too pussy to deal with the situation I went in with a Henry hoover like some sort of Ghostbuster and thunked them down the nozzle (top tip!) after which I duct-taped their entry holes.

Left a note on the hoover and the nest to die off over winter, total pest control bill £0.00

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Creased Lightning: Profits wobble at Virgin Media while fibre project stays sluggish

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Every time my VM download has gone up, my upload has gone down. Another dirty VM secret.

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Sysadmin cracked military PC’s security by reading the manual

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Lock Story 3: Nothing But a Hand-towel

Smart friend, house in her name, partner & father of her three kids decides to re-engineer his personality with cocaine. He's kicked out but returns one day while she's showering and one of the kids lets him it. He drags her into the street, naked except for a small hand-towel, and locks her out of her own house. Phone box 999, mentions she's naked - said she'd never seen so many police cars turn up at once.

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Lock Story 2: Young, Dumb and (not) Full of Chips

Same street, fire engine turns up outside one teatime and their radio came right through the hi-fi (A&R A60). Turns out the young female student occupant (details that seemed important to the fire service) had locked herself out with a fryer going on the hob.

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Lock Story 1: Bank Holiday Locksmith

Elderly neighbour locked herself out, distressed at the cost of a bank holiday locksmith (but not quite distressed enough for the police to break in for her) she mentioned there were keys inside in the lock of the other door.

Out we went with toolbox and a small mirror to make something to hook the keys out through the front door letterbox. Took maybe an hour, Victorian terrace street plenty of people passing and not one single person queried or even jokingly mentioned what we were doing.

I guess it was the toolbox. I'm told a hi-viz and a bucket of water will get you in just about anywhere.

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No more slurping of kids' nationalities, Brit schools told

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Re: Fair enough, but as a matter of balance

nothing special happening in terms of extra teaching

The class teacher would have been required, with few additional resources, to ensure the child picked up English - even at the expense of the achievement of the rest of the class. Fine with one child, but when it's four or five or six...

Sounds like your example pupil did OK but you don't mention outcomes for the rest of her class.

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Re: Killing the patient

We are talking about data that is not needed for a school to teach the child....

So why ask it?

If English is not the first language in their CoB it might be very relevant and not just in their initial years, Autumn terms follow eight weeks where some children don't hear a word of English.

The data provides evidence to request additional resources or explain academic performance that is lower than expected.

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IBM memo to staff: Our CEO Ginni is visiting so please 'act normally!'

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"will not be here due to [...] work travel" LUL

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The strife of Brian: Why doomed Intel boss's ex86 may not be the real reason for his hasty exit

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Re: Multiple Patterning?

Article is right, 'feature size' doesn't mean much, it is what it says: the smallest distinguishable feature, the actual components are a whole lot bigger.

And yield ain't what it used to be since per-transistor cost started going up instead of down, a particular problem for Intel since their profitability depended on spawning smaller versions of their high-end product at cheaper prices.

There's a good thing to come out of this, since software developer's machines stopped getting faster they've optimised for platforms approximating mine - I've not had to upgrade CPU for six years now.

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At last! Apple admits its MacBook Pro butterfly keyboards utterly suck, offers free replacements

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"Apple has determined..." makes it sound like a judgement, almost as if Apple decides whether a thing actually happened or not. iRDF™

Also, "Apple will refund you" - yep, and add it to your subsequent Cupertino Tax bills.

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Sysadmin hailed as hero for deleting data from the wrong disk drive

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Re: Disk Doctor

Looking through those photos, there are so many places to fsck in that house!

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Are you taking the peacock? United Airlines deny flight to 'emotional support' bird

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Flame

Be careful with the phrase 'emotional support bird' - I just got a right telling off!

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Auto auto fleets to dodge British potholes in future

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Re: Meatbag option

Councils are the ones who are supposed to fix pot holes, and yet they don't get any of the road tax.

Correct, in fact nobody has had any of the road tax since 1937

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Pickaxe chops cable, KOs UKFast data centre

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Re: Normal really

I've heard from a digger driver that they don't worry about things like digging through power cables or water mains

I heard that too, from a BT staffer. If you wrote to them weeks in advance they'd send a map saying where not to dig but if you put a JCB bucket right through they'd actually come out on site, same day too!

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Tired of despairing of Trump and Brexit? Why not despair about YouTube stars instead?

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LD50

Google owns the lab and designed the experiment, humanity are the lab rats and content providers supply the little bits of cheese.

The design requires all types of cheese (including poisonous) and the avoidance of certain types is a valid outcome & worthwhile data. The vast majority of content creators make next to no dollar: the money is in the results, not in the supply of little bits of cheese which is why I am very, very suspicious about this article.

The word is that YouTube has been 'de-monetising' for some time consequently the charm offensive they are on right now with their free food pop-up space events is probably necessary and any story, no matter how negative, about mega-earners just plays into their hands.

Google still wants stats of viewer behaviour but there's less ad revenue to share to attract new content.

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Elon Musk finally admits Tesla is building its own custom AI chips

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Re: Musk is crazy

In mine and "for my own safety" I expect to be banned from the same road space as robocars, a space currently for everyone and funded by everyone through general taxation but I won't expect the new robousers to pay tolls and I won't expect compensation for loss of access.

It's not what I want but it's the only way I can see this working: Moore's Law ran out of road and we're in Amdahl country now.

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80-year-old cyclist killed in prang with Tesla Model S

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<q>Did it make a sudden movement - e.g. to avoid a pothole</q>

The "it" JetSetJim refers to had clocked up 80 years therefore simply on Darwinian grounds is likely to have been a careful and conscientious road user.

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BBC Telly Tax petition given new Parliament debate date

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Re: If you have issues with the Telly Tax...

no chance of me ever watching the BBC, its for brain dead people, every program is mundane, if they have anything intelligent on it, its all dumbed down for 11 year olds who watch eastenders to understand it, i have'nt watched nothing on the BBC for 20 years, and it is all deleted off of my freeview channel list

should'nt need to pay for something you care nothing about

Be careful what you wish for: if we ask gov to abolish the Licence Fee they'll just add the sum to income tax.

TV-free for 20+ years here too and neither do I pay, if El Reg mucks this arrangement up I'll be annoyed!

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Re: Sigh

Since PC is cheaper, sells vastly less number of units, where the PC has an open and diverse architecture which can cause more work to ensure the games works on it, then the PC target is already subsidised ?

You overlooked the console title resale value in you calculations Shadmeister.

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Re: Telly Tax Is Value For Money

Are you really all Dad's Army fans?? It's was vaguely amusing 40 years ago when they last made a new episode, but come on!

It's largely about class and hence never gets old.

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Re: the Beeb don't do anything that is or requires a natural monopoly

Labour Party has largely managed to unite behind Corbyn

Nope, he has achieved popularism but he's leading the most divided Labour Party there has ever been.

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Re: RE: Lee D - tax on TVs

There'd need to be system in place whereby you can buy your telly tax-free if you show your pension book.

Old people got all the money!

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Re: the Beeb don't do anything that is or requires a natural monopoly

Agreed. However, the BBC is required by law to be impartial. Commercial stations just have to make a profit and keep their owners happy. That's a pretty big difference and one that I think is worth paying for.

Sky News do a great job and arguably outpaced the Beeb some time ago. MP's expenses, the biggest political scandal of my generation, was broken by The Telegraph. Meanwhile the Beeb quash Jimmy Savile stories while bothering the airspace over Cliff Richard's house and there are certainly many individuals within the BBC who are anything but impartial.

It's not as good as some people think it is, it's certainly not good value (it's just that lots of people pay which get the individual price down) and while it exists it stops something good coming along to replace it.

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Re: If you have issues with the Telly Tax...

I have spent several years ignoring the TVL letters sent to me on a ridiculously frequent basis...

If the frequency starts to bother you, just answer one. I now get just one email every four years which I think simply exists for people to perjure themselves should they get caught out.

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Re: If you have issues with the Telly Tax...

Secondly, the presence of the BBC raises the standards of the other channels. Without it there would be a rush to the bottom with 3 minutes of programming per 30 minutes of adverts.

The 'rush to the bottom' was started by the BBC when it began chasing ratings after ITV launched in the 50's

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It's a real FAQ to ex-EDS staffers: You'll do what with our pensions, DXC?

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I wonder if Fentanyl will still be around in a few years time?

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DHbEhRWXYAEqMKr.jpg

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Kebab and pizza shop owner jailed for hiding £179k from the taxman

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Re: **straining**

the utter hypocrisy of a government stealing/ wasting billions and then spouting this off...

There are rightly big penalties for not paying it but seeming none for wasting it? Funny how it's "tax" on collection, "tax payer's money" at local government level but then suddenly it's "Westminster money" as soon as MPs get involved.

I really don't understand your message downvotes.

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Bill Gates says he'd do CTRL-ALT-DEL with one key if given the chance to go back through time

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Except that MS DOS was dominant long before Windows arrived.

'One on every desk' - every business, schoolhouse, home was his goal. So he broke IBM's stranglehold by commoditizing the hardware and supplied a cheap, dirty little OS for others to sell their applications on.

I suspect he's always been an altruist but that's not mutually exclusive with being a money grabbing filthy rich capitalist animal :)

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UK PC prices have risen 30% in a year since the EU referendum

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Re: Markets are mostly psychology

If the pound falls in value against the value of foreign currencies, it takes more pounds to afford to buy those items from foreign countries, irregardless of trade deals.

A slightly selfish viewpoint as conversely, the things they buy from us get cheaper. As an exporter, a rising gate price can be passed on under such circumstances. Your problem here is that you're not exporting your house!

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Re: Markets are mostly psychology

After all if you open a factory in the UK it's much less usefull when you cannot sell to the EU

If you open a factory in the UK, the entire EU will barely take a tenth of your exported output (and falling). Having an overvalued pound won't help with most of what you do.

As for manufacturing having been 'killed' by some mysterious outside entity, if only Germany had taken more Austin Allegros! They've missed their chance now...

An overvalued currency shafts your balance of trade, and in an effort to compensate sees your assets flogged off abroad and it badly handicaps exporters. OK, cheap imports can disguise your underlying inflation rate but like QE, that's not healthy long-term.

The EU is all about kicking financial cans down the road and the wheels have already come off across southern Europe. Now is a great time to get clear and look to the rest of the world.

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Re: Markets are mostly psychology

Some Brits seem to think they are very special indeed

The 'rebate' is a discount off a retrospectively applied EEC membership fee for all the time UK wasn't a member.

A very special cash-cow indeed.

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Smart meters: 'Dog's breakfast' that'll only save you 'a tenner' – report

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Is this projected saving just based on usage?

It's not about savings - there are practically none! It's about forcing a change of behaviour through differential pricing as there is no longer enough generating capacity to allow further increase in peak demand.

Old and polluting capacity reached end of life with replacement green generating capacity too small and variable to properly replace the base load loss. That variability also distorts the market making it difficult for your energy supplier, who is in essence a big hedging company, by increasing risk. It's an ages old problem that successive governments all saw coming and all chose to kick the can down the road.

Also, Hinkley Point C. Also, legislative commitment to electric vehicles and the massive load they'll present. We have no energy security, that is the sort of thing we used to fight military battles over and I think we're about to find out why.

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El Reg gets schooled on why SSDs will NOT kill off the trusty hard drive

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They'll kill themselves, eventually

The longer HDDs persist the more the capital cost of their research & production is paid off - they'll just keep getting bigger and cheaper. Eventually that approach will fail (for whatever reason) resulting in insufficient profit margin to provide a return on capital invested and that is what will do them in.

The 'will they die' and the 'what will kill them' are best treated as separate questions.

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New iPhone details leak: Yes, Apple is still chasing Samsung

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iPhones are cancer - but don't worry, I have this weird nut diet cure!

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Nearly three-quarters of convicted TV Licence non-payers are women

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Re: Haven't had a TV licence in years

The truth is our delightful political masters know we need to tax the plebs to support this make-work scheme for Oxbridge thirds as if they got into the wider economy they'd cause havoc!

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And the criminal record is for not paying the court fine rather than for not paying the licence fee, a technicality that conveniently allows the BBC to claim it doesn't criminalise people.

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Your social circle is not a representative sample frame. The BBC has close to 19,000 staffers, their median wage was £43k in 2016 (BBC's own figures) and if they are binned their redundancy averages 16 months pay.

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I imagine most enforcement visits happen during the day when women are more likely to be at home. It's been generally known for a long time that women carry the brunt of these prosecutions, hardly news but good to see it brought to public attention again.

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Citation? The BBC's own 2016 accounts: staff salaries increased to £990 million (up from £977 million) with headcount only cut by 54 leaving 18,920 on the payroll - that many people just for two and a half telly channels and some radio, why?

They did save £154 million but mostly from cutting content rather than bureaucracy. Entirely the wrong thing to do.

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Facebook hit two billion users today and SugarCRM reminded us you are Zuck's product

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'Faecesbook' FTFY!

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Tesla death smash probe: Neither driver nor autopilot saw the truck

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Re: They still call it Autopilot?

Indeed - plus the benefit of a bunch of human beings on the ground making sure no other vehicles are in the way

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Bye bye MP3: You sucked the life out of music. But vinyl is just as warped

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Poly-lined inner sleeves keep vinyl pristine but foresight is required, an attribute in great deficit across swathes of humanity.

CD made second hand easy, MP3 made 'stealing' easy. Now music just comes licenced with the video game.

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MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

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Throw Away Comment

'Alth thr r > efnt aud cdcs w/adv feats vailbl tdy, mp3 stll v pop amgst cnsmrs', the Institute said in a compressed statement.

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FAIL

Lays down £5k challenge, posts as AC

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

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Re: Risk Management

Of the >140,000 million NHS yearly budget, only about 40,000 million is available for things like buying drugs, new hospitals, MRI scanners and desktop refreshes. The rest goes on wages. That's a political failure.

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PC survived lightning strike thanks to a good kicking

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Sony laptops, so many acronyms! VAIO, RMA, DOA...

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"But at the time it seemed so bad"

Had a user claim the PC we supplied (but didn't install) was trying to kill them. Apparently the back panel was 'electrocuting' them. Yep, Cat5 to another PC on a different mains phase, back plate of the NIC had the difference on it. Chargeable.

In another case, PFY asked for help when his malware scan went into the *second day* on a very slow customer's box (the PC was slow, not the punter - although we had them too). Was it Intel? Yep. Had it been dropped? Hmm, happened less after the change to rivet fixed coolers but it still happened - they just resorted to dropping from higher up. Always chargeable, AMD even more so.

In another, the boyfriend-that-Mum-didn't-know-about got into the Autoexec.bat of the family W95 machine which subsequently booted with some very rude remarks indeed. Clean-living, God-fearing daughter swore blind she knew nothing so Mum naturally assumed it must have been us, the supplier right? Actually not a free-fix ploy, Mum genuinely believed her darling teenaged daughter couldn't possibly know what a **** was or that it could be ****ed until it **** all over her pert ****.

@ECHO OFF

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Re: "rather than any anatomical reference"

Or, variation on 'belly-up'? In drowned humans or animals, a phase when belly and breast fat has a buoyant tendency to float the corpse upward against the mass of limbs turning it face down. In females there may be less limb mass and more breast fat, hence the somewhat indelicate expression.

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