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* Posts by jake

11216 posts • joined 7 Jun 2007

'90s hacker collective man turned infosec VIP: Internet security hasn't improved in 20 years

jake
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Re: The Whole Liability Thing

I actually rather like cyber as a prefix. It's a handy filter ... people who use it are rarely worth listening to from a technological perspective.

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jake
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Security was never intended.

On Flag Day, January 1, 1983, TehIntraTubes (note: no "Web") switched from NCP to TCP/IP. It wasn't secure. We knew it wasn't secure. And we knew it couldn't be made secure. But that was the entire point ... it was designed to make it easy to share stuff globally, not to block the sharing of that stuff. To this day, it's still not secure, and still can't be made secure. Not without another Flag Day, when we change from TCP/IP to whatever comes next.

The first Flag Day went without a hitch. The next one will probably be be globally traumatic. I'm not looking forward to it.

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jake
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Re: Hollywood Education System

Any? Facebook? Twitter? (etc., I'll stop. You're welcome.)

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jake
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Pint

It's official, Gene.

You're a curmudgeon. Welcome to the ranks. Beer? :-)

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jake
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"We the geeks and nerds ran things, we were like gods. The world and his wife all bought a PC or a Mac and they had no idea what to do with any of this kit. We strode the world like colossi"

Does anybody actually talk like that?

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jake
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Re: bzzt yourself

BIX and Delphi both had some commercial Internet access in ''92. I knew of several BBSes that offered shell accounts with full Internet access (such as it was) in late '84 or early '85 ... I ran one of 'em. It was coloed at the old CO on Bryant Street in Palo Alto, which allowed connection to both the NSFNet and the ARPANet via connection to the fledgling BARRNet. Over all of 6 USR HST modems, at a blistering 9,600. And trust me, I was neither corporate nor academic in that venture. My several dozen subscribers paid just barely enough to keep the lights blinkin.

It wasn't strictly legal, but it wasn't strictly illegal either. The PTB knew what I was doing, and pretty much looked on me as an anomaly that they tolerated with some bemusement. My friends elsewhere with similar setups were seen pretty much the same way. Two of those friends were in Boston. The "brilliant" kids in the loft (I can't bring myself to type skiddie/haxor today, sorry) somehow managed to miss their local resources. Sad, that.

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Badges for Commentards

jake
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Re: Amazing Soon be 6 years.

Have there been any more gold badges issued in that time? Or are they still internal only, plus the first few hand-picked pets? If the later, what is the point of the badge system?

Do we need steenkin' badges?

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post icons

jake
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Re: post icons

Gives one pause to wonder how many other folks who have been around here for a while and have more than a couple dozen working brain cells may have missed it.

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jake
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Re: post icons

Click the Add an icon "button" next to where it says Enter your comment in the POST COMMENT box ... Note that the "button" doesn't exactly look much like a button, but click it anyway. (ElReg likes to camouflage clickable stuff; see "tips and corrections" at the bottom of articles, and "report abuse" on forum posts as other examples.)

ACs can't pick ... they automagically get the Guy Fawkes mask icon.

Beer. It may only be 9AM, but it's Friday :-)

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User spent 20 minutes trying to move mouse cursor, without success

jake
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Re: Sun optical mice, circa 1985

To be fair, in the early '90s most Sun gear at Unis world-wide was still running SunTools or SunView, with a few lucky(?) systems running the new-fangled OpenWindows (and that's if they ran a GUI at all, many systems were CLI only) ... regardless, for the most part these GUIs were all pretty much only used to run Xclock and multiple xterms ... at least until NCSA Mosaic came around, putting a graphical interface on things like email, FTP, NNTP, and Gopher. (Sorry, kiddies, the WWW was seen as a mostly useless toy back in those days. Still is, in some ways, when you think about it.)

Sure, there was plenty of software that made use of a GUI back then, but it was all bespoke, for a particular need, or to run specific hardware, or a student project that was mostly useless. Mosaic played a large part in making general purpose GUI software a thing in the un*x world.

As for IDEs, most folks used vi or EMACS (the later is arguably better suited as an IDE; I still prefer vi). The first true modern IDE for un*x was Softbench in about 1990, but it wasn't really usable until the mid '90s (IMO, of course).

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jake
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Re: Not Millennials!

Bastardizing United States Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart's famous quote: I shall not today attempt further to define the exact age of persons I understand to be embraced within the shorthand description "Millennial", and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know them when I interact with them.

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jake
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Re: Mouse balls.

Give chocolate to a non-friend? For any reason at all???

BURN THE HERETIC!

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jake
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Re: Speaking of which,

In this part of the world, IPA is made from water, malt, hops and yeast. Isopropyl alcohol is called isopropanol.

You can call me anything you like, as long as it's not late for the first round.

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jake
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Re: Keyboard ecosystems

Re: yeast in the air ... Most of my bread is made with wild-caught yeast. So is some of my wine ... and some of my beer is made from re-purposed proven wild-caught wine yeast. Lovely thingies, yeasties.

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jake
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Re: Not Millennials!

$ sdate

Fri Sep 9054 13:43:38 PDT 1993

$

Yep. Looks like it's still September 1993, alas. (Was that really 25 years ago? Geebus.)

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jake
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Re: Keyboard ecosystems

Basic keyboards "for a tenner" die in dishwashers. I have a model M that's been thru' the wash a few times, still works fine.

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jake
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Re: Sun optical mice, circa 1985

Mouse Systems weren't anything to do with Sun, but Sun contracted them to build the critters to Sun's specs.

Yes, the horizontal & vertical lines are different colo(u)rs.

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jake
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Re: Keyboard ecosystems

When I was getting my zymurgy degree at Davis, the instructor had us all take a couple agar plates home to swab anything that caught our eye. The idea was to impress on the youngsters in the class that cleanliness is vital when making drinkable fermentables, and that almost nothing that you deal with day-to-day is actually clean from a clinical point of view.

I won the sweepstakes with a kitchen sponge. I also took second ... with the tea towel. Makes sense, when you think about it. They stay nice and damp, in a nice warm place, with lots of goodies on them.

Beer, because thankfully brewing works in spite of us filthy humans.

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jake
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Re: Sun optical mice, circa 1985

The one connected to my 1988 Sun 3/470 "Pegasus" still works, despite the small dent in one corner of the metal pad.

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jake
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Purchasing tractor parts last week.

The owner was having trouble with his ancient POS system. After a couple minutes of swearing at technical help, and at least one "turn it off and then on again", he hung up the phone and dug under the counter and came up with an old pad of blank invoices. He allowed as to how he would have to hand write it because the computer was broken. Being me, I asked if I could have a look at it. He looked at me funny, because he's only known me as a rancher/farmer, but said OK.

I came around the counter & eyeballed the situation. Turned out the mouse didn't work. At all. Just an immobile mouse pointer in the center of the screen. I showed the guy the tab key and a couple other keyboard shortcuts for future reference, and eyeballed the system. The drivers were loaded, and running. Probably a dead mouse (tractor parts counters are rough on everthing). I just happened to have a spare serial mouse out in the truck (don't you?). Pulled the mini-maglite out of my pocket & dove under the counter to swap 'em out ... only to discover that the original mouse had managed to work itself loose. So I plugged it back in, and all was well with the world.

Well over ten years of daily use, and the computer had to wait until I was in the shop to spit out it's mouse. Now one of the biggest gossips in the county knows I'm a computer guy. Hopefully he'll keep it to himself ...

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Unbreakable smart lock devastated to discover screwdrivers exist

jake
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Re: "My keychain has 2 sizes each ..."

Out of curiosity, can you still openly carry a Leatherman in UK? Because if that's not "going equipped" I don't know what is ... What about coins? I can't tell you how many times I've removed screws with a coin ... Can a child be fingered for picking up steel street sweeper tines? Those things are easily fashioned into lock picks ... The hydraulic jack in my truck can be used to defeat security gates ... and the HighLift is even more useful.

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jake
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Re: the temptation of an open door with something valuable behind it

I hope your valuables are heat proof ... decomposing horse shit can (and often does) get hot enough to combust.

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jake
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Re: tamper-proof screws aren't

You don't even need that much torque. A couple passes with a needle file and they usually back right out like a normal screw.

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jake
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Re: tamper-proof screws aren't

Oh, kewl! A fanboi! It's even making up fan fiction about me. I must have arrived :-)

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jake
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Re: tamper-proof screws aren't

No, Allan. Pentalobe didn't even exist when I bought the kit. Thus "nearly".

(However, did you read as far as the colophon?)

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jake
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Scrambled.

Of course.

(STR, win a beer.)

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jake
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Re: The Bruce Willis film RED

Been there, done that.

https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/3386125

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jake
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Re: tamper-proof screws aren't

I have a small fitted plastic case containing 154 bits that can be used to remove nearly every "tamper proof" screw known to man. It cost me all of $19.95 from Ace Hardware about 20 years ago. They are not the best quality tools on the planet, but they have done the job for me all these years. And wonder of wonders, I haven't lost one yet ...

All you "remote job site" folks out there would do worse than to keep such a kit (and the required 1/4 inch driver) in your traveling gear. I also throw in a complete 1/4 inch ratchet set, just because I can. Has saved me I don't know how many hundreds of hours over the decades.

(Since I last posted this, I've run across a couple new bits that my kit doesn't handle. A dollar or so later, and I'm covered. That's a pretty good price for a once in a couple decades upgrade!)

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jake
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Vodka & orange juice ... unless it's a Phillips Screwdriver.

Then it's vodka and milk of magnesia.

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jake
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Depends on the restaurant.

For example, most truck stops, which are nominally restaurants that offer fuel, sell almost everything ... and I've seen many restaurants attached to hotels that sell eyeglass repair kits, which contain screwdrivers. Just sayin' ...

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jake
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Re: Yeah - but if I am a "common criminal" I'll definitely find another non-indiegogo to pawn

WTF is an "attack dog"?

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Geoboffins baffled as Ceres is crawling with carbon organics

jake
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Re: I blame

Note to my fellow Yanks: "Fly tipping" isn't a small-scale variation on cow tipping, rather it's what we call illegal dumping.

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jake
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Endolithic crustose lichen?

The pattern is somewhat suggestive ... if a hair on the large side.

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US senators get digging to find out the truth about FCC DDoS attack

jake
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Re: What's the difference between...

You don't use the definition to tell if it's a DDoS, you use the system logs. There is a huge difference between a mechanically generated flood and one that's driven by honest traffic. If you were a sysadmin you'd know this.

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jake
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Re: What's the difference between...

Oh, bullshit. The intent of a DDoS is clearly to stifle the ability of the person targeted by the attack to run a service or services.

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jake
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Re: What's the difference between...

A DDoS attack is defined as: An attempt to make an Internet available service unavailable by overwhelming it with traffic from multiple sources.

To answer Zarno's question, the first is caused by a single entity with malicious intent abusing the resources of the system. The second is caused by many individuals using the system as intended.

HTH

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Relax. It's OK, folks, the US government isn't going to try to take back control of the internet

jake
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Hard to say.

When you're looking at that segment of the stupidity scale, it's kind of hard to test for "stupidest". They all kind of pool together in a pit of experimental error.

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jake
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The Internet interprets governments as damage and routes around them. That's how it was designed, right from the beginning.

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jake
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Re: But ...

You heard wrong. The initial thingie that we now call "The Internet" was built by grad students & professors, with zero government oversight. The students & staff at Stanford, Berkeley & UCLA (and later Utah) had DARPA (later ARPA, later still DARPA again) money, yes. But the feds weren't looking over our shoulders. In fact if they HAD been, we probably wouldn't have been allowed to get on with it. They certainly had no control over what we were doing.

The .gov sponsored commercialization was of NSFNet, which came later & was merged into the already existing Internet. We were world-wide long before this happened.

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jake
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But ...

... the US government never had control of The Internet. Can't take back what you never owned in the first place! IANA and ICANN supposedly control(led) things, but it's always been easy to use the system without bothering to go through them.

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ESA builds air-breathing engine that works in space

jake
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Re: Typo

Blaming the victim, MrKrotos?

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Citation needed: Europe claims Kaspersky wares 'confirmed as malicious'

jake
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Re: You do not need evidence against Russians

Not the Turks, the Ottomans. Splitting hairs? Perhaps ... But please note that the land in question was, and still is, called Palestine. By everybody. For these last couple thousand years. Is it any wonder the Palestinians are a trifle pissed off at the homeless squatters on their territory?

California just is, as usual. We have our issues, too ... Nobody's perfect.

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jake
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Re: Microsoft windows spied on your computer directly

No, Win95 did not "report home". At all.

Source: Packet sniffer between my LAN and my BSD-based Internet facing firewall of the era. Windows was running either Trumpet or Hummingbird for TCP/IP, depending on what I was doing. I detected no traffic sent back to Redmond, nefarious or otherwise.

Note that I'm not a fan of Redmond. I'm even less of a fan of bullshit.

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jake
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Re: You do not need evidence against Russians

Actually, it's England's fault for stealing the land from the Palestinians in the first place, and then turning it over to Europe's displaced Jews. Guilt's an ugly thing.

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jake
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Of course, Mr. (no body).

It's purely political. And pointless. Bloody waste of time, even.

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jake
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Redmond does allow access to their source code. See: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sharedsource/default.aspx

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jake
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Re: Thanks El Reg...

I rather suspect it's because they hate you, TonyJ. It couldn't possibly be that the story was in the works several hours before your tip finally filtered in through the email system ...

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jake
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Re: Whatever.

Alister, perhaps I'm hard of reading, but could you please point out where I discounted any research done by anybody, anywhere? I must have missed it.

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jake
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Depends.

Can I use my own compiler? Linker?

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jake
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Probably because ...

... you've been watching old footage on YouTube? (Am I the only one somewhat surprised that someone didn't paste in the rather distinctive Geneva Drive sound on that clip?)

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