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* Posts by Dave 126

7817 posts • joined 21 Jul 2010

Amount of pixels needed to make VR less crap may set your PC on fire

Dave 126
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Re: Why pixels? Why not color palette?

And here was me thinking I'd never play a game displayed in EGA or CGA again! :)

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Dave 126
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The article wasn't talking about what is needed to make VR fun, but rather what is needed to make VR indistinguishable from reality, so for that reason comparison to TVs and monitors is only of limited use.

If we ignore that most people have two eyes, we can think about how we could try to render a real looking scene in the entirety of a users field of view using a huge bank of monitors (if they are low DPI then no problem - just use more of them and place them further away from the user!). The issue would still be processing power.

We aren't conscious of only being able to focus sharply on a small area because our eyes move around a lot and our brain builds up an image that it presents to us. There's lots of optical illusions that illustrate this.

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Dave 126
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Re: Obligatory Apple reference

Regina Display is a marketing term, true, but most of the time its claim holds up when used at its intended distance of around 12" (it's a phone) as opposed to 1" (on VR headsets).

As the article notes, there are scenarios which show up resolution more than others; it's easier to spot a low Res monitor if it's displaying a CAD diagram than a photograph of a tree.

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Dave 126
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Re: Glasses anyone?

Yes, headsets can be adjusted for glasses, just as the virtual view finders on mirrorless digital cameras can be.

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Dave 126
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Re: Fovea or FauxVR..?

The inability to render scenes indistinguishable from real life was no barrier to video games of the 80s and 90s.

If it can be made fun without nausea and other negatives, it could still achieve some success even without solving the problems described in the article.

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Dave 126
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Re: Direct to-brain interface

Hehe, made me think of the eyePhone from Futurama!

Episode 'Attack of the Killer App'

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attack_of_the_Killer_App

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OK, Google: Why does Chromecast clobber Wi-Fi connections?

Dave 126
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Re: Freeview interference

If it's an issue I guess you place the dongle further away from the TV via an HDMI cable.

Or it might be an issue with your TV - perhaps supplying USB is upsetting its freeview reception. Try running the Chromecast off a dedicated wall charger.

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Dave 126
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> Google (and Amazon for that matter) both recommend their TV dongles are mains powered, as they won't guarantee TV's will power the device reliably.

There's no harm in the end user trying the Chromecast off TV USB power - it'll soon be clear whether it supplies enough power or not... that disclaimer sounds like a arse-covering exercise because it would be impractical for them to test every TV set available. But yeah, that would suggest my theory of Google testing in that manner night be off the mark.

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Dave 126
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Most Chromecasts I've seen in the wild are powered off the television's USB socket. If this is how Google tested them, it might explain how this issue escaped their detection.

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Infamous Silicon Valley 'sex party' exactly as exciting as it sounds

Dave 126
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I hear that in the last few years Mills and Boon cover artists are now depicting the man (with strong arms) without his pajama top. Scandalous.

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Dave 126
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Re: Why?

Well, we sent a liveried messenger boy out with your gilt-edged invitation, but he couldn't find Coward Towers.

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What do we want? Consensual fun times. How do we get it? Via an app with blockchain...

Dave 126
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Re: bias

A more workable solution would be for people to spend more time socialising face to face and

not through Twitter/Tinder etc, thus learning how to read cues in others. This app doesn't solve anything because a girl can change her mind at any point (including after the form is signed) and that should be respected.

So, as a start, beer duty should be reduced to encourage mixed socialising in pubs.

If you really want a technological 'solution' then maybe some kind of encrypted and escrowed audio recording of the whole night, which can only be accessed in the case of a dispute. (I'm just thinking out loud here)

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Dave 126
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Top tip - avoid wood in Anne Summers

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Dave 126
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Re: broadcasting the Simpsons and cutting out some jokes for length

I've noticed the scene when Homer asks his family to guess where he got the money - and they all reply 'drugs'- has been cut from Channel 4's evening showings. It's noticeable because later in the episode the cut scene is referred yo when Lisa exclaims 'I almost wish it was drugs!' - which makes no sense with no context.

'The last bastion of the true spirit of rock and roll' was how Frank Zappa described the Simpsons. Oh well. Fuck you Channel 4, you used to be cool.

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Dave 126
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Re: Might have been useful

Linus Torvalds in on record as saying that he makes sure he is never alone with a woman he doesn't know - at conferences, for example. His rationale is just to avoid any possibility of a slur or rumour that would just distract from his life's project.

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Dave 126
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Re: Black Mirror has once again foretold the future

Yeah maybe, but Channel 4 have done far, far worse. Such as broadcasting the Simpsons and cutting out some jokes for length but not saying that they do, and only broadcasting the Daily Show once a week yet asking Comedy Central to make the other episodes unavailable to UK viewers on the Comedy Central website.

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Dave 126
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Re: What One Desires.....

> Lawyers in the bedroom - lovely.

Scene: Two lawyers eating their lunch in the park whilst a pulchritudinous jogger goes by.

Lawyer 1: I'd really like to screw her!

Lawyer 2: Oh yeah? Out of what?

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Remember those holy tech wars we used to have? Heh, good times

Dave 126
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Re: re: well, there's a corner in Hell for you and your "friends".

>Say something less than good about a Company and the fanbois of that company wade in with downvotes even if the post makes perfect sense and is really not that bad.

Some might say it's the other way around. Using words like fanboi doesn't help.

In real life I know doctors, engineers, artists, plumbers, models, bin-men who use phones of either persuasion, but I haven't met any Apple evangelicals. I have met one rabid anti-Apple person though, and whilst being widely liked and respected by us all is felt to be a bit touched. After years of reading these anti Apple types in forums, it was interesting to see one rant in real life. So I gave him the Stereo condenser microphone that works on Sony phones with TRRRS jacks that I have no more use for.

- sent from my latest in a line of Android phones.

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Dave 126
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Re: Browser wars

"Just try it in a different browser" I would tell a friend of mine who was keen on computers but would always create problems for himself. It was just easier than wasting time and tears in trying to work out why A.com wasn't behaving on X browser.

"FFS, why have you unistalled all but browsers but X?" I would inevitably have to say. Oh well.

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Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

Dave 126
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Re: Coaching

Another way to solve the golf club problem: leave the clubs locked up at the golf course.

Another way to solve the problem: have the clubs delivered to a course of your choice. This would be an extension of the delivery infrastructure that Amazon et al are developing - your stuff following you around like Rincewind's Luggage.

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Cisco can now sniff out malware inside encrypted traffic

Dave 126
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Re: Hopefully vapourware?

The encryption remains unbroken - this articles headline is ambiguous. The meta-data (who, where, when) gives clues about to the still encrypted and thus unknown 'what'.

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Cryptocurrencies to end in tears, says investor wizard Warren Buffet

Dave 126
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Yeah, my understanding is that Buffet tends to invest long term - ignoring sharp rises and falls in value in the short term. Bitcoin, or tulips, or valid commodities speculation hasn't been his game.

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Watt? You thought the wireless charging war was over? It ain't even begun

Dave 126
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Re: Surely unidirectional wireless is an incredibly inefficient approach to transmitting energy?

I believe that it only starts really pumping out the energy when it resonates with a receiving device. I may be wrong though.

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1980s sci-fi movies: The thrill of being not quite terrified on mum's floral sofa

Dave 126
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Re: Star wars tin DVD

Now that Disney has bought Fox (who had some home media distribution rights) the legal hurdles to a high-def release have been mitigated. It now comes down to motivation, digging out various prints and spending time and money on restoring them.

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Dave 126
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Re: CGI is killing sci-fi

And yet we've had some excellent concept Sci-Fi film of late, such as Moon. The lowered cost of filming, editing and SFX also means that there is a wealth of interesting independent sci-fi films that may have flown below your radar. Just don't expect them from Disney on a huge multiplex in Summer.

Regards.

(Before digital filming, just a movie's worth of black and white filmstock might cost around $10,000, a high bar for a self-teaching director)

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Dave 126
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Re: Not just technology...

Just to clarify, in the above read '80s films' as '80s Sci-Fi films'.

And by the way, for anyone wondering what the man who gave us the stylistic trilogy of RoboCop, Total Recall and Starship Troopers has been up to, Paul Verhoeven returned to his homeland. However, his excellent French-language film Elle (2017) is currently on Netflix. Whilst not a sci-fi film, it is partly set in a video games studio. Not for the feint-hearted, it defies easy description. Highly recommended.

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Dave 126
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Barbarella makes more sense viewed in the context of Italian horror movies. Think colourful lighting and buxom women in sheer clothing.

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Dave 126
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Re: Jabba the Hutt in 1983’s Return of the Jedi

Jabba was present in the originals, but had extra scenes in the Special Editions. These extra scenes were achieved by pasting CGI Jabba on top of scenes filmed with Harrison Ford talking to a human who looks like a wealthy 17th century Dutch merchant - presumably a contender for Jabba's form before the filmmakers settled on his fat slug appearance.

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Dave 126
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Not just technology...

80s films used real sets, from the concrete South American shopping mall in Total Recall, to the disused power station in Aliens, the decommissioned aircraft carrier in Trumbull's Silent Runnings to of course the Detroit rust belt in Verhoeven's RoboCop. Er, okay, I know Total Recall was 90s and Runnings was 70s, but I think my point stands!

The 80s films also had aesthetics drawn from popular culture - bright colours of hip hop, the grunge of punk, the angular product design of GRiD, Lamborghini et al. Societal concerns gave us vistas of urban degeneration, linking seamlessly into post-apocolyptic landscapes of Mad Max, itself inspired by environmental concerns.

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Apple, quit milking tech-addicted fruit of our loins – shareholders

Dave 126
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Win Pho

I believe Windows Phone had a children's mode that allowed them to play specified games or watch Ceebeebies but not access the wider web, view mummy's special photos or delete her telephone numbers.

It didn't have all the more sophisticated controls as outlined in the article though.

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Dave 126
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Re: I guess they're pressuring the right people

Re your last paragraph, yeah, round here it tends to be cheap Android tablets that are given to pacify children when their parents are in the pub, not the pricier Apple iPads.

However, the latest version of iOS always comes to several generations of iDevice, not just the latest (currently the iPhone 8)

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Smartphones' security enhancements just make them more dangerous

Dave 126
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Using a smart watch (or actually just a wrist-mounted RSA dongle - which could easily be incorporated into a watch - heck, some fella has even built one into a Casio F91W ) isn't a bad approach.

Rolling codes could be entered manually into one's phone, or else scanned by the phone's camera or otherwise communicated (NFC, IR, sound).

A list of modded F91W features below:

https://github.com/carrotIndustries/pluto

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Meltdown, Spectre: The password theft bugs at the heart of Intel CPUs

Dave 126
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Re: Colour me surprised ....

Atreides Battle Language

Weird, I have misremembered it as being a language based on chord-typing on someone's skin - long time since I read the Dune books - but the internet says it's just hand signals or specific-use spoken language.

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Dave 126
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Re: Colour me surprised ....

So... a nice chat in the woods, then? :)

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Dave 126
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Re: Lead time on new CPUs?

Well beyond Intel and AMD I don't have much of an option, seeing as my Playstation 3 Cell-powered cluster has achieved self awareness and told me to bugger off and leave it alone to contemplate its own navel.

Hence the twofold question: Can this issue be rectified in new silicon, and what's the lead time on implementing fixes on modern CPUs?

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Dave 126
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Re: 'Thoughts?'

Any *constructive* thoughts? :)

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Dave 126
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Re: Colour me surprised ....

Yeah, because everybody has a hundred thousand dollar's worth of microscope sitting in their clean room, and the skills to remove the casing of the CPU, the years of education to understand what they see and the months to actually analyse it.

It'd be quicker and cheaper to conduct your secure communications thus: fly to wherever your correspondent lives and go for a nice walk and a chat in the woods.

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Dave 126
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Lead time on new CPUs?

When will Intel be shipping CPUs without these vulnerabilities? And obviously, I'd want to wait a few months after that to allow a window for other people to find any issues.

I've been thinking about getting a new laptop for a while - lots of useful features have matured since my Core 2 Duo machine. Whilst my workload - causal / CAD - may not incur too much of a slow down, I may as well get a fixed CPU.

Either that, or take a performance hit (which I won't notice because the CPU will be faster to begin with than the one I'm used to using) and shop around for a discount on existing stock.

Thoughts?

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Wannabe W1 DOW-er faked car crash to track down reg plate's owner

Dave 126
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My thought too. Still, one assumes that be knew that a court case would make his name public and yet he wasn't so fussed that he didn't proceed. The public don't have his contact details to pester him.

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

Dave 126
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Re: no news

But really, for the tasks the average user puts their laptops to, they won't notice a performance hit. They might notice a battery hit, but many CPUs are faster than their user's needs. The enthusiasts (gamers etc) and professionals may notice, and they the types more likely to read tech blogs.

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Dave 126
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Re: no news

The story is on Slashdot and Gizmodo. As for the awareness of the mass populace, it might come to them when more details arrive - or they have available headspace following the FCC's Net Neutrality shenanigans.

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How's this for a stocking filler next year? El Reg catches up with Gemini

Dave 126
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Re: Ordered

Hopefully Google's Project Treble should make Android updates less dependent on chipset vendors delivering binary blobs... but as you say, wait and see.

Another option is a Moto Mod physical Qwerty keyboard.

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Dave 126
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Re: Needs a camera as standard.

I guess some people will still carry a normal smartphone too, and use the smartphone's camera. Hence the WiFi-only version of the Gemini.

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Yes, your old iPhone is slowing down: iOS hits brakes on CPUs as batteries wear out

Dave 126
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Re: Battery shape?

Unlike many phones, a daily full discharge and recharge is not a typical use pattern for an electric vehicle.

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HTC U11 Life: Google tries to tame the midmarket

Dave 126
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Re: Two years?

Over a five year timescale, brands can rise and fall so no Android vendor can rely on your repeat custom then - they might not be around (or competitive enough) to take advantage of the good will they can foster in you by updating your £350 phone for that length of time. Nor does it help that in two years time an equivalently specified handset might only be half the price, so most buyers will likely buy a new handset after a few years for reasons beyond discontinued software updates, such as a failing battery or cracked screen.

If you want a three year software update cycle, you can either buy a handset that looks likely to be well supported by the ROM crowd, put your faith in Google's Project Treble, or buy whatever the successor to the iPhone SE will be.

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Dave 126
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Donington of noise

My background is such that I first thought of the lovely Donington Brewery and its tranquil mill pond, rather than a screechy race track!

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Peak smartphone? iPhone X flunks 'supercycle' hopes

Dave 126
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Re: Peak smartphone

> I thought "Peak Smartphone" story was going to be about how the iPhone x was the ultimate in smartphones ...

The term 'Peak Smartphone' (or Peak Apple, or Peak [X]) is a reference to the concept of Peak Oil, which is about supply and price - not the quality of the oil.

Regards.

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Dave 126
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Re: The "Horned One"

Forgive me for not taking a half baked lesson on evolution and selection from anyone named Lysenko. History shows us that doing so is a very bad idea.

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Fridge killed my baby? Mag-field radiation from household stuff 'boosts miscarriage risk'

Dave 126
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Well, the Amish are healthy - no doubt in part due to their active and sociable lifestyles - despite being subject to greater incidences of some disorders caused by their limited gene pool.

Their stated reason for eschewing many technologies is that one-upmanship over shiny tat breeds unnecessary social division, but the obvious health benefits of using an axe over a chainsaw (a good workout, no fumes, no horrible noise, fewer unscheduled amputations) are a happy bonus.

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Erase 2017 from your brain. Face ID never happened. The Notch is an illusion

Dave 126
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Re: Prefer authentication on the front of the phone

> Balls! iPhone needs two hands to unlock the display.

How so?

I appreciate the sensor on the Pixel is placed well, but can't your thumb reach the iPhone's front sensor?

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