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* Posts by Loyal Commenter

2821 posts • joined 20 Jul 2010

When's a backdoor not a backdoor? When the Oz government says it isn't

Loyal Commenter
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Re: baud rate

Is that a fully laden tin cup?

A spherical one in a vacuum.

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Re: The Holy Trinity

So you're ultimately left with a dilemma: anarchy or the police state?

s/dilemma/false dichotomy/

There, fixed that for you. The invoice's in the post. The Aussie government may or may not have already read it.

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Australia's Snooper's Charter: Experts react, and it ain't pretty

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"Did they read peoples post back in the day? "

Depends on which 'they' you are talking about. I've been to the museum in East Berlin where they have the equipment the STASI used to do exactly that on display.

You'd be naïve to think that the STASI differed from any other security service in anything other than the scale of their operations.

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Boffins get fish drunk to prove what any bouncer already knows

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Speak for yourself, I'm having a whale of a time.

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Space, the final Trump-tier: America to beam up $8bn for Space Force

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Re: Excellent sub-head!

If we're going for RAH quotes, lets not forget one that may well be apposite to Trump, "Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity".

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Re: Which is worse ...

Although the bottom right one reminds me of No Mans Sky, whose launch was a massive wave of failure due to over-hyping and broken promises....

To be fair to Hello Games, it has now delivered an arguably reasonable game a few years later, after several updates. This is far more than Trump will ever deliver.

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Devon County Council techies: WE KNOW IT WASN'T YOU!

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Headmaster

Re: They need a lesson in grammar too.

The OED disagrees with you.

If anyone were to be considered the official Grammar Nazi, then I believe they'd at least be in the running...

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/trial

verb

1 with object Test (something, especially a new product) to assess its suitability or performance.

‘teachers all over the UK are trialling the materials’

2 no object (of a horse, dog, or other animal) compete in trials.

‘the pup trialled on Saturday’

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Re: More than just spelling.

The Royal Mail has a very fine system for posting cash to another person. Called a Postal Order

With eye-watering fees to match! A nice little money spinner for the now-privatised Post Office when they make 12.5% clear profit on most POs (i.e. anything between £10 and £100), and even more on some (if you wanted to send a 50p order, it costs you £1!).

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BOFH: Is everybody ready for the meeting? Grab a crayon – let's get technical

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I can only assume he is testing the boss for 'loyalty'. If any senior manglement or HR suddenly appear wanting to scrutinise this documentation, then the boss may be due a little 'accident'. If not, then presumably the BoFH knows he doesn't need to go and get some more quicklime and carpet samples.

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Top Euro court: No, you can't steal images from other websites (too bad a school had to be sued to confirm this little fact)

Loyal Commenter
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Holmes

Are you supposed to just not use an image in case there is a copyright?

That's the way it generally works, yes.

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Internet overseer ICANN loses a THIRD time in Whois GDPR legal war

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Re: EU vs ICANN

Is the EU taking any steps to sue ICANN yet, does anyone know?

I'm assuming that if ICANN continues to fail to comply with the GDPR regulations (which are implemented as national laws by the EU member states), then the next step won't be for the EU to sue them. It will be for them to be prosecuted (a criminal prosecution, not a civil case) by a member state in that nation's courts. Presumably, in a country where they have a presence. Where are their European offices?

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Re: Not legally binding...

I guess from the downvotes I've accrued, that not too many people here understand irony.

I shouldn't really have to use the 'joke alert' icon...

On a serious note, what this whole escapade exposes is the difference between the internet as we experience it today, as a trans-national phenomenon, and the original ARPAnet, which was, after all, originally developed by the US military (Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, hence the 'ARPA' part).

There should have been a point, long ago, where the basic addressing system of the internet stopped being under the control of a US-based entity, and instead was governed by an international body formed by an international treaty. This is coming home to roost now that the US attitude towards personal information becomes more apparently different from the attitude held in other parts of the world (US: personal information is a good to be bought and sold; EU: personal information is protected by law as an individual right)

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And they can point to the hodge-podge of IP address allocation as proof. Never would have happened under the ITU's watch.

Well, we can at least assume that an international body wouldn't have allocated a quarter of all IP addresses to a mixture of US government and US businesses, including ones that no longer exist, like DEC.

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Re: Not legally binding...

So what you are saying is that we may end up with a separate EU internet segment, without access to sites in the US, Russia, China, etc.

And this is a bad thing? I for one am not too bothered if we see a day where there are no Russian botnets, ad-spamming US sites that pull in scripts from 15 domains, or access to baidu.

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Rights groups challenge UK cops over refusal to hand over info on IMSI catchers

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It may even be possible to set your phone to not connect to a 2G signal, in which case Plod would be stuffed.

That's probably not the case, as your phone would still be communicating with what it thinks is a cell-tower to negotiate the access speed. This would include the identification information from your phone and SIM, which the tower needs to know in order to decide whether you can use it. If the towers didn't do this, we'd all have domestic cross-network roaming and much better service and coverage. The telcos couldn't allow us to have that!

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'Can you just pop in to the office and hit the power button?' 'Not really... the G8 is on'

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Re: Its going to end badly when

HAL would have no way of even knowing they were there, much less stopping the power-off.

Just make sure HAL can't read lips through window in the airlock door, right?

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Loyal Commenter
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Joke

Re: London Riots

I always thought mayhem happens elsewhere... but seeing our own streets turn into stuff I used to see in unrests elsewhere in the world was... sobering.

If you think those were bad, consider what it'll be like in about 8 months time when the nationwide food riots start...

Joke icon. Or is it?

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OpenAI bots thrash team of Dota 2 semi-pros, set eyes on mega-tourney

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Ah yes, "spreadsheets in space". So glad I escaped from that second job.

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Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

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Re: Obvious outcomes.

When an emergency hits, a lot of skill (and wisdom) lies in the knowing the gap between acting quickly, to prevent further damage, and not acting, to prevent further damage.

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Re: Timing is everything

If shrunk to 3 inches high then my lungs would be unable to absorb the relatively enormous oxygen molecules. As I was now about 1/20 of my height then my metabolism would have to increase greatly to counter the energy lost to atmosphere as my surface area to volume ratio changes. I estimated a couple of seconds before I used up the air in my lungs and passed out and that I would rather make my peace than try to jump out of a blender.

Also worth noting that if you were shrunk to 3 inches (approx 1:24 scale) then your surface area to mass ratio goes up on the same scale (a 1 inch cube has a ratio of 1:6, a 1/2 inch cube has a ratio of 1:12 on the same scale), so either your body would lose heat 24 times faster than you could generate it, or your metabolism would need to go up by the same factor, your resting pulse would be 1440 bpm, and your heart would fail instantly.

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Nah, it won't install: The return of the ad-blocker-blocker

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Re: Not Ads, but chuggers

If you let it come out of the shadows, it becomes harder to force people into it

Sadly, if you talk to any organisation involved with helping victims of modern slavery, with sex work, it is quickly apparent that this is not the case.

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Re: Not Ads, but chuggers

I say "I used to support you, but not any more, since you started spending your money on chuggers"

It's a genuine shame that although I agree with most of what Amnesty do (with exception to their apparent attitude towards liberalising prostitution which is harmful to the millions of women worldwide forced into the sex trade, because "some of them might want to be doing it"), I won't give them a single penny because of their use of chuggers.

I could stop to explain this to them, but I find loudly proclaiming, "NO" before they have had a chance to open their gobs to be just as effective, and less of a theft of my time.

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Early experiment in mass email ends with mad dash across office to unplug mail gateway

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Re: Bah!

I prefer to use Bacon Ipsum. Unless your client happens to be a vegan restaurant, in which case it may not be wise.

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Re: Not to mention

Or indeed therapist finder.

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HPE supercomputer is still crunching numbers in space after 340 days

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Re: What a waste

For performance monitoring, I would have thought you would need to be running something with a constant run time and known output. That rules out both of those suggestions, on both grounds.

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Some Things just aren't meant to be (on Internet of Things networks). But we can work around that

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"Try to remember that many of those 'Lusers' will be the people who actually generate revenue for the company so it can continue to exist

I'd just like to echo the commenter above and add that if someon'e job involves adding unsecured network hardware to a corporate environment without permission, then that person is not a revenue-generating asset (no matter how high their opinion of themselves). They are a liability. Increasing risk exposure in an uncontrolled manner is never revenue-generating, and if you have people like that in your organisation, they need to be shown the door. Or the nearest window. By applying a voltage if necessary.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: No...

It uses radio waves

Them's photons, just big fuzzy ones.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: No...

We are not swamped with beta radiation.

Although that would explain the shitty range of my Virgin Media router. Maybe it would work better in a vacuum, and in the absence of any electrical fields?

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Re: I had to laugh

It seemed pretty clear this article was aimed at businesses not homes.

So, what's the business case for having a load of pointlessly IoT devices on your corporate network? Which devices are actually appropriate in a work environment? Fridges, kettles, lightbulbs, el-cheapo cameras? I think not...

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Fukushima reactors lend exotic nuclear finish to California's wines

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Re: I know the author is based in Left-Pondia...

It could have been worse I supposed, they could have tried to spell phosphorus fosforus...

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Loyal Commenter
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I know the author is based in Left-Pondia...

...where they like to simplify the spellings of things, but the element is called caesium not cesium. Named after the Latin for sky-blue (from its flame colour), caesius, and not the genus of moss, cesius...

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PayPal's pal Venmo spaffs your pals' payments – and yours

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Re: Weasels

Paired with "We are very sorry" / "We deeply regret" etc. (note it's always 'we', not 'I'), before demonstrating complete lack of contrition but doing the same/similar again once everyone has stopped looking in their direction.

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Loyal Commenter
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GDPR

I can't see how they are compliant if any personally identifying information is being made public.

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UK.gov is ready to talk data safeguards with the EU – but still wants it all

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Conflicted

@codejunky

The usual rock-solid arguments, mixed with name-calling I see.

'Eurosceptic' is a marvellous self-given label, isn't it. Sadly, the adherents seem to fail in the ability to employ scepticism (rational weighing of the facts) and eschew it for emotive cries, distortions of the facts, cherry-picking and outright lies. Goebbels himself advocated the far-right presenting itself as something it is not in order to win popular opinion. Presumably this is why the far-right Tory europhobes euphemistically call themselves by the reasonable-sounding monicker of 'European Research Group', when the amount of research into Europe involved is zero.

FWIW, the 'counter-protesters' I previously refereed to as gammons were all the sort of far-right thugs you'd expect to see up in front of the beak for fighting in the town centre on a Friday night. Several with their 'free tommy' T-shirts, blurry neck tattoos, EDL banners, etc. With those on the 'People's March', there was a party atmosphere. The only interaction with the pro-leave lot was when some of them escaped the police cordon kettling them in, and decided to try to walk through the crowd in parliament square throwing abuse at all and sundry. That, and the ones pissed up in the pub between Parliament Square and Vauxhall Bridge similarly shouting abuse at passers-by. Now, I appreciate that these people don't represent everyone who voted leave. They can, however, be considered to represent those who feel strongly enough about it to turn up to protest for the sort of hard brexit you have advocated yourself.

You should maybe reconsider the company you are keeping.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Hmm

Is it the leading member of the EU?

I hate to burst your bubble, but since her own government is in (admittedly lesser than May's) disarray, Merkel isn't considered to be the leading member of the EU. In fact, the last time I checked the leader(s) of the EU were Jean-Claude Juncker and Donald Tusk, and the national president who is considered to be the political figurehead is Emmanuel Macron. Mutti doesn't hold the sway she once did.

It sounds to me more like May sounding out her own ill-formed ideas with the only EU head-of-state who'd give her the time of day any more, because her own government is so fractured she is clasping around in desperation.

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Re: Do the Conservative get GDPR?

Yes, they have a legal duty to provide a subject access request (free of charge), including information about how and when they think they gained your consent to hold your personal information. If they are unable to do so, refer them to the ICO.

You can also withdraw any consent they think they may have at any time and they must delete all data they hold on you unless they have a proper reason for having it (such as a legal requirement), which it sounds like they do not. They must prove to you that they have deleted your data. If they then continue to contact you by email, refer them directly to the ICO, where they can queue up for their fine.

Keep documentary evidence of your interactions, and let us know the result, because it sounds like they are already in breach if you have previously told them not to contact you.

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Re: ?

(#) I won't refer to him by the cutesy name "BoJo" as this just panders to the "likeably bumbling but harmless" image that allowed this malignly self-serving- and still incompetent, but damagingly so- politician to slip under the radar for far too long.

I prefer the accurate and full: extremely privileged New York born Eton boy and Oxford graduate, Bullingdon club member and gutter journalist, Alexander Boris De Pfeffle Johnson.

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Re: Conflicted

"So, the UK wants "out", but it wants to stay in... Glad that is sorted."

Almost. The UK wants out and the politicians want in. The end result likely pleasing nobody.

Keep trying; Arron Banks, Nigel Farage, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, Boris Johnson, Rupert Murdoch, Lord Rothermere, Jacob Rees-Mogg, Slithy Gove, the Barclay bros, Piers Morgan et al all want us out, each for their own pretty obvious self-interested reasons. Several of those people had enough influence to convince a swathe of voters that it was in their interest too (spoiler: it isn't).

Most professional politicians who know enough about what the EU does, how it works, and how it benefits the UK (and yes, how much it costs in return) on balance thought it was a pretty good arrangement.

May was stupid enough to take the poisoned chalice that Cameron left her after making a promise (beyond his authority) to implement the result of an advisory referendum. She is now reaping the rewards: trying to produce the undefined and undeliverable for the 'clear majority' (a third of the registered voters), many of whom have realised that they were hoodwinked and have changed their mind.

Over a hundred thousand people marched through London a few weeks ago to make their feelings felt against brexit. Even at the height of the campaigning, there weren't that many fervent pro-brexit supporters. Oh, and the voice of the brexiteers? A counter-march of a few hundred angry gammons. I'm not sure why they were all angry, but they were. They should "get over it"; they "won".

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Re: DNA?

Beat me to the comment on this one! I was going to suggest that maybe the other governments of the EU aren't quite as fetishistic about collecting innocent people's DNA as the Maybot.

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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

Loyal Commenter
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Apparently, idiots hold their phones like this, because they have seen it done this way on tripe like The Apprentice, not realising that the 'contestants' have been told to do it this way so that the studio mics can pick up both sides of the staged phone conversations.

edit - apologies to the two posters above who beat me to it!

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UK taxman outlines its CHIEF concerns for customs IT systems

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Re: A new golden era of prosperity

Well, they can relax, Unilever is already headquartered in the Netherlands. This of course, raises the prospect of a golden age of marmite-smuggling off the coast of Norfolk.

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Geoboffins spot hundreds of ghost dunes on Mars

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Headmaster

Re: Someone's dangled their modifier!

I'd suggest that since some may be decay products from radioactive elements, then some at least will be smaller now than they were back then.

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Infrastructure wonks: Tear up Britain's copper phone networks by 2025

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Re: foreign aid is domestic aid

its a huge sum of money squandered for very few beneficial outcomes.

Just because you can't see the intangible benefits of foreign aid (including, but not limited to: our countries perceived standing in the world (net positive), stabilisation of third-world economies (which reduce conflict, which costs everyone money, worldwide, except those manufacturing and selling weapons), reduction in migration from such countries due to conflict, etc. etc.), doesn't mean they are not there.

Whilst there may be a portion of such budgets which end up in questionable hands, I would expect it to be a minuscule amount of the total. It might make good headlines in the Daily Mail, but if you believe one word of what is printed there (with the exception of the tiny retractions at the bottom of p34, or published on their website at midnight on a Sunday), you are a gullible fool.

The foreign aid budget (like our EU budget contribution) is such a small amount proportionately, that it doesn't even show up in a pie-chart of government spending, except as a tiny sliver, less than, for example, what the UK government 'wastes' on VAT exemptions. Google it and learn something, rather than parroting bullshit spread to you by someone with vested interests.

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UK privacy watchdog to fine Facebook 18 mins of profit (£500,000) for Cambridge Analytica

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Re: Conclusions?

Facebook will stomach GDPR fines fine too.

It's worth noting that FB have shouldered the maximum possible fine under the existing legislation (£0.5M). GDPR has provision for far greater fines (4% of annual global turnover). FB's global revenue was over $40Bn in 2017, 4% of that is $1.6Bn, or £1.2Bn. A fine of that magnitude would be a much more interesting proposition. Not least because FB may resist paying it, which would presumably be a criminal matter and involve the invocation of international extradition treaties for those in charge. That's when it would be a good time to invest in popcorn.

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Sysadmin cracked military PC’s security by reading the manual

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Re: Only cracking I have done is

The laptops we have at work have a similar exploit I discovered.

They are DELLs locked with a boot password, which prevents access to the BIOS - one password for the user, which we are told, and one admin password, which we aren't told.

When installing a RAM upgrade, and booting, you are presented with a helpful, "The installed RAM amount has changed" message, and helpfully allowed straight into the BIOS. I didn't change the passwords, but I could have...

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Hurry up and make a deal on post-Brexit data flows, would you? Think of UK business – MPs

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Re: @ Loyal Commenter

I'd just like to point out, that links to newspaper articles (especially the likes of the Daily Express, or the Telegraph), and links to pro-brexit propaganda sites are not in the class of things generally considered to be verifiable sources. Try again.

Now, if those articles have references to verifiable studies (preferably peer-reviewed, or review papers representing the opinions of a majority of experts in the field), and you are able to provide those, then all is good. I posit that you are not able to do so, and that such things do not, in fact, exist. Your opinions are exactly that - opinions, and as such, unfounded.

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Loyal Commenter
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My understanding is that, whilst still in the EU, the ICO is a recognised EU body governing the implementation of GDPR. As such, it can play reasonably fast-and-loose with the rules until it gets reigned in for some transgression or other.

Outside the EU, the ICO is not an EU body, so for an adequacy agreement, it needs to be a whole lot more transparent in its workings, to the satisfaction of the ECJ.

I may be a little hazy on the details, but I think that's the gist of it.

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Loyal Commenter
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A fitting metaphor, given that the people in charge of Brexit are behaving like they're a sandwich short of a picnic.

A better analogy, in my mind, is the bunch of spivs who have convinced everyone that a swarm of killer bees are coming and that they should run away and abandon their picnics in the sun to hide away in a cellar eating gruel, whilst they snaffle up all the sandwiches and pork pies for themselves.

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Re: @ Loyal Commenter

The EU have said they wont negotiate.

Unless you can come up with a verifiable source for that, which confirms the statement, in context, I'm calling bullshit on that, and pretty much everything you have posted here today.

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Re: @ Loyal Commenter

Would this be the experts who predicted 2 of the last 0 recessions

No, it's the vast majority of business leaders1, scientists2, and economists3 in this country who are becoming increasingly worried about the government's harebrained schemes to screw them over for the sake of political expediency. Not to mention experienced and sane elder statesmen4 Many of whom are a great deal more knowledgeable and intelligent than you or I.

1e.g. the CBI's letter against brexit, signed by 1280 of them.

2Such as Mike Galsworthy, and Scientists for EU. I don't see any large groups of scientists gathering together in favour of brexit. Probably because understanding science requires a working brain.

3for example, this. Where are the Nobel Laureates saying that brexit is a good thing? The leavers have that one discredited guy whose name I forget, but I'm sure you have previously quoted.

4Such as Lord Adonis. Although I appreciate that anyone to the left of Thatcher is probably considered to be an extremist in your eyes.

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