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* Posts by Loyal Commenter

2914 posts • joined 20 Jul 2010

London flatmate (Julian Assange) sues landlord (government of Ecuador) in human rights spat

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Lets Get Real

Perhaps the allegations were fabricated, but then is that not the case in many rape claims?

No.

Next time, actually bother to find out whether the thing you are typing is true or not before hitting that 'post' button.

The evidence suggests that the vast majority of rape/serious sexual assault claims by women against men are true. To claim otherwise is basically blaming the victims. The thing is, human beings (en masse) are a nasty lot, and do all sorts of nasty things to each other. Men are far more likely to do more and nastier things than women (that is not to say that women can't be violent criminals, but on balance, most of those are male). Many rapists commit their crimes knowing full well that there will be little evidence to prove that what they did was not consensual, and that it will be hard to prove a case against them. Bear in mind that most rapes are not the violent dragged-off-into-the-bushes kind, but happen when men take advantage of someone they know, often when under the influence of drink or drugs, in a private situation. You (probably) are not a rapist yourself, so wouldn't believe the sheer number of women this happens to. The odds are that several women you know have been raped, and you know nothing about it.

Anyway, rant over. Short answer:

No. You are wrong.

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Re: I really hope he gets the boot

He's a human being after all. Would any human being "want" to get arrested by a TLA notorious for prisoners going poof?

Those two women he allegedly raped in Sweden are human beings as well. It's worth remembering that he was in Sweden for some time after the leaks he is allegedly worried about, without any apparent concern about rendition to the US. He only seems to have become worried about this after he ran away from Sweden to the UK after these allegations came to light, and he only 'sought asylum' in the Ecuadorian embassy after being picked up by the UK police so that the Swedish prosecutors could catch up with him, and bailed - which he promptly skipped out on. it's also worth remembering that the UK has a far less stringent extradition treaty with the US than Sweden does, so if he was, as he claims, seeking to avoid extradition there from Sweden, the UK is about the last place he would have wanted to come.

Occam's Razor would suggest that, rather than a vast conspiracy against him by US TLAs, the Swedish Government, the British Government, and the Ecuadorian Government, to lock him up (and lets not forget that the person who actually leaked those documents has already been freed), it seems much more likely that here is a guy with an inflated sense of self-importance running from justice from a country where the idea of sexual consent is a bit more rigorous than his home nation.

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European Commission: We've called off the lawyers over Ireland's late collection of Apple back taxes

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Helping out a mate?

do you remember who had the lowest incidence of infections animal diseases?

I guess the report in the news yesterday of the new case of BSE on a Scottish farm passed you by then.

...and if you think the EU is trying to withhold drugs and other imports (such as 60% of our food), the root of that problem is not with the EU, it will be with our own customs and border checks, which, if we leave the EU with no deal will not be up to scratch, meaning the trucks bringing stuff into this country won't be able to leave with any goods going back to the continent, in turn making their round-trips uneconomical. Nobody's going to pay for an empty 22-tonner to sit on a ferry between Dover and Calais for six hours when the margins in the logistics business are already slim. Even less so have a full truck sit at Calais for 48+ hours while its contents are checked, hoping that they aren't perishable.

The only organisation threatening to turn us into a third-world nation is the Conservative and Unionist Party who got us into this ridiculous mess in the first place, with no plan A on how to sort it out, let alone a plan B. But then again, their rich tax-exile donors are doing quite nicely off the economic damage it is doing to our country, so they are happy.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Weren't there protest in Dublin about hosuing costs recently?

Apple have their EU headquarters in Cork. For those that know anything about Irish geography, Cork is a good few hours drive South-West of Dublin, and Apple being based there is unlikely to be that cause of elevated housing prices in Dublin.

Now, if you were to talk about the other tech companies in Dublin, which bring people into the city, and the previous collapse in the housing market about ten years back, when loads of newly built houses in "ghost estates" had to be demolished, making developers understandably reluctant to build new housing, then you might be getting closer to the root causes of those housing protests.

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Silent running: Computer sounds are so '90s

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Re: I still get wound up...

"Do you have permission to trespass on this land?" See? It's one of those questions where the English "Yes/No" response is severely lacking. The Japanese have a response though, Mu!

Not having permission to do so doesn't stop you from doing it. It's like saying I can't be drinking my mug of tea because nobody gave me permission to do so.

Unlike the French system of law, where technically nothing that is not explicitly legislated as being legal is allowed, English law starts from the position that anything that is not specifically disallowed by law is allowed, such as trespassing on another's land without permission.

On the other hand, it's perfectly possible for a landowner to say to someone, "go ahead and trespass on that bit of land any time you want". The permission may be moot, as they would not have been forbidden from doing so in the first place, but seeking permission to go onto someone's land is generally considered good manners. Also worth noting that there are places where trespass is definitely NOT allowed, such as land owned by the MOD, which could be much more hazardous to your health than pretending to be a cow in a farmer's field.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: I still get wound up...

Because of course there are places in the world where trespassers do have permission... *AAARRRGGGHHH!*

In the UK, they're called public rights of way (usually footpaths or bridleways), and may cross private land, much to the annoyance of some in the farming community.

Also, as noted by the poster above, trespass isn't a crime in the UK. If you leave your front door open, and someone comes into your house, they're not committing a crime unless they cause damage, steal something, or become aggressive. I'm not sure you could even have them arrested if they refused to leave.

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Boffin

Re: Sage 50!

Sage 200 was worse than Sage 50 is? Are Sage numbering backwards or was that a typo?

IIRC Sage has a suite of products named Line 50, Line 100 and Line 200, incorporating different types of ledger in each.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Sage 50!

If it's using the windows beep, is it not possible to change the sound associated with that beep to silent?

Failing that, find the .wav file it's playing, rename it and replace it with a zero-byte file with the same name?

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Someone's in hot water: Tea party super PAC group 'spilled 500,000+ voters' info' all over web

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Tea Party hypocrisy

Well, Hilary didn't get locked up, so why would these guys? It's not like it was Confidential, Secret or Top Secret info, right?

Quite right, she didn't get locked up, just like you didn't read the OP's post properly. There was no mention there of Democrats chanting for the TP people to be locked up, their point was that by their own 'logic', those same people should now be chanting to lock themselves up.

Disclaimer - before you start categorising me as an enemy voter, I'm not a supporter of any US political party, I'm not even left-pondian, but I am perfectly able to observe and comment upon the idiocy on display there.

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Sure, Europe. Here's our Android suite without Search, Chrome apps. Now pay the Google tax

Loyal Commenter
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The EU can always fire back and say Google must make non-slurp versions of everything if they want to make manufacturers pay for them.

Don't forget the also-important advertisement free.

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Loyal Commenter
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At the moment, Android phones are cheaper because Google don't charge for all the other bits that they bundle with their money-makers (Search and Chrome). A phone with FF and DDG instead would be more expensive because Google would be charging a licence fee for the other apps, and most importantly, the Play Store. Of course, you could have a phone without those and side-load all your apps. Most users aren't going to want something that doesn't just "work out of the box" though, or which uses a third-party app store that has nothing in it but tumbleweed.

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As angels, rich dudebros suck: 1 in 5 Y Combinator women tech founders say they were sexually harassed

Loyal Commenter
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Re: How long will it be...

Apart from the fact that nobody is likely to approach an 'Angel' investor directly, it'll be the other way around (pretty much by definition of the term), you do know how vanishingly rare false accusations of sexual impropriety are by women against men are, don't you? So rare that it makes then newsworthy, and I can only think of one case that made the news in this country in the last couple of years (the false accuser, a female law student who made accusations against a man in order to get a deferral of her exams was imprisoned for her trouble).

What is sadly much, much more common is women not being believed or being victimised or ignored when something horrible happens. And that something horrible happens all the time because of arseholes that frankly make me ashamed of my own gender. If you want to be one of those victim-blamers, I've got a good hard kick in the nuts you can have. It's your fault apparently for acting like you wanted it.

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Dating app for Trump loners commits YUGE blunder: It leaks more than the West Wing

Loyal Commenter
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Trollface

If you've got nothing to hide, there'e nothing to fear!

Amirite?

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Leaked memo: No internet until you clean your bathroom, Ecuador told Julian Assange

Loyal Commenter
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Re: So in other words

I feel sorry for the Ecuadorians, he's clearly a vexatious asylee, and they must be sorely regretting their decision to let him in by now.

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So, by your reasoning, if I'm ever on the run from the law, I can come and sleep on your sofa, eat from your fridge, and if you ask me to clean the toilet after myself, I'm being imprisoned, despite the fact that I can leave at any time and am living rent free in your house, and you're not handing me over to the cops?

You, sir, are a total bell-end.

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Shortages, price rises, recession: Tech industry preps for hard Brexit

Loyal Commenter
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I was born in 1975 so didn't take part in the last referendum, obviously. But it was made incredibly clear, both by politicians and in the press at the time, that increasing political union was the goal of the European project.

Well said. It is, in fact, pretty much explicitly stated in the pre-amble to the Treaty of Rome, in 1957:

Full text of the Treaty of Rome.

But of course, to the quitters, facts and evidence are anathema. They are the purview of those horrible untrustworthy experts that Slithy Gove warned us about, after all.

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Re: And all we can do...

Worth noting that for the last march for a people's vote a few months ago, Bristol for Europe, my local campaign group, filled two coaches of people. There were around 150,000 people on that march (and a few hundred gammons / kippers on the counter-march). As of last week, BfE had sold out tickets for eight coaches for the coming march. If we use that as an indicator of how many people are likely to turn up this weekend, if the weather is nice, that will be somewhere north of 1M people trying to get into Parliament Square.

For a general rule-of-thumb, for each person who turns up to a demonstration, there are twenty others who also have the same strongly-felt political opinion (and politicians generally use this rule-of thumb when gauging public opinion), so lets call that 20M+ people. That is already several million more people than the 17.4M who voted to leave the EU in 2016. Of course, everyone on that march will be a Russian Troll™ trying to interfere with the democratic rights of those freedom loving quitters.

Such demonstrations are important (and an important part of democracy) because they are one of the best ways of making governments sit up and take notice of what the people are saying.

It's looking less and less likely that May will get a deal that will satisfy Parliament (and looking more likely that she will get no deal at all), it is up to us to make it known that it is time for her to stop playing the "will of the people" game and become a proper grown-up states-person who is able to put the interests of the country ahead of the interests of her own career, or her party's. And lets face it, the Tory Party isn't exactly going to come out the far end of this smelling of roses in any eventuality.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: And all we can do...

Going in to the Referendum it was made very, VERY clear that it was a one-time vote with a binding result.

I'm sorry, but that is total tosh. When parliament voted on the enabling bill for the referendum, the preamble for the bill, which is available on Hansard, so you can check it for yourself, explicitly stated several things:

- The bill was advisory

- The bill was non-binding

- For the bill to be made non-advisory and binding would require it to be re-written to require a super-majority and to include all UK citizens of voting age (which it did not, UK nationals living abroad for more than 10 years were excluded, skewing the results quite a bit)

Just because David Cameron then stated that the result of the referendum would be acted on doesn't bind parliament in any way. The Prime Minister may be the leader of the house, but they are not the ruler of the house, and the other 650 odd MPs are elected to represent their constituencies, not their party, and certainly not the leader of the party with the most votes.

The only reason the likes of May and Corbyn insist that the results of the referendum "must be respected" is that they know that for them to say otherwise would invite a political backlash against themselves. They have only their own interests at heart, not those of the country, which should be abundantly clear to anyone who has taken even a cursory glance at any politicians ever*.

*Hyperbole aside, some politicians are worse than others, an my local MP is actually not too bad. Those that rise to the top, however, do so not because they represent the people the best, but because they are the best at rising to the top of politics, which requires an entirely different skill-set.

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Take my advice: The only safe ID is a fake ID

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Silly first name.

Or are we all obliged to us Cyrillic when using a Greek or Russian name, or pin yin when communicating with a Chinese person .

Not sure you'll find many Greek names written in Cyrillic, which is the writing system introduced to Russian-speakers by Saint Cyril in the 5th Century, and is both similar to, and quite different from, the Greek alphabet.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Casino Royale

There's only only one decent Bond Film called "Casino Royale" and it certainly doesn't feature Daniel Craig in it...

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Silly first name.

...

Gráinne not Gronnyer

Cliona not Cleaner

...

Aren't Gaelic names fun?

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Bloke gets six months for fixing up Russia's US election trolls with bank accounts, fake identities

Loyal Commenter
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Re: When does the UK start sentencing people?

Exactly, nobody's about to start investigating their own sources of funding...

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Loyal Commenter
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Holmes

Re: Presidential Pardon...

Remind me again, does stoking racial (and societal) tensions favour the right-wing candidate, or the slightly-left-of-right-wing one more?

Hint: "Divide and Conquer" isn't really very socialist.

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Astroboffins discover when white and brown dwarfs mix, the results are rather explosive

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Interesting what a range of chemcials you can make just banging some near stars together

Actually, if my memory serves me correctly, beryllium isn't produced in stellar nucleosynthesis (or in the Big Bang for that matter) in any appreciable amount for some reason or other to do with the relative energies of fusion of the light elements. It's actually a lot rarer in the universe than any of the other light elements as a result, apparently being largely synthesised from cosmic ray collisions, according to Wikipedia.

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Don't make us pay compensation for employee data breach, Morrisons begs UK court

Loyal Commenter
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Re: You shouldn't be able to get to there from here.

Computer security is easy, for anyone who has never had any sort of involvement in it.

For anyone who actually knows about it, they know it is Hard. Reading a few of Bruce Schneier's blogs, or some of his books will give you a sense of just how hard it is.

Often companies whose main business is computer security get it wrong. Morrisons is a supermarket.

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What could be more embarrassing for a Russian spy: Their info splashed online – or that they drive a Lada?

Loyal Commenter
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Russia isn't part of the EU, despite what Jeremy Hunt might have you think.

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HMRC rapped as Brexit looms and customs IT release slips again

Loyal Commenter
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Re: no surprise

@Ledswinger

You're quite right, he did miss out "fantasist".

Nobody's going to argue that there are no federalists in the EU, but to loudly proclaim that the EU is an "ever more centralised single state of Greater Europe" belies a total disconnect with what is actually going on in European politics.

Of course, if UK.gov doesn't come to its senses and abort brextastrophe* before it is too late, that will still leave 27 sovereign states with their own vetoes on any federalist proposals, which is why none of them ever go anywhere when they do pop up. I can't imagine Italy, or Hungary, or for that matter, even Germany going along with such stuff, because: it's fantasy, and those who seriously believe it are, by definition fantasists.

*lets face it, we've got enough stupid portmanteau words to do with leaving the EU, one more isn't going to hurt now, is it?

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Civil rights group Liberty walks out on British cops' database consultation

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Funny

I don't recall you asking anyone if they wanted to hear your opinion either. It's almost as if you are an unelected AC.

Of course, saying the above is just as pointless and empty as your comment. You do know that the vast majority of people in the world aren't elected to their jobs, don't you? I fail to see how that would somehow invalidate their work.

Oh, I get it - I've heard that "unelected" nonsense somewhere before - you're one of those people that gets all red-faced about those "unelected bureaucrats" in Brussels, aren't you? I'm going to go have to poke the hornets nest on this one, and point out that Whitehall employs about ten times as many of those "bureaucrats" than The EU parliament does. Talk about "taking back control", eh?

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Re: Surely, as IT professionals, we shoud be relaxed ?

The difference here, of course, is that your average CRM database is full of crud spewed up by marketing droids (I'm surprised they managed 90% accuracy to start with) .

A police database will be full of data hurriedly entered by underpaid and overworked police staff, often not by the officer in the case, but by someone doing background and safeguarding checks on suspects and witnesses. Where information is entered by an officer, it will often be gathered from witnesses (who may be of questionable honesty and integrity), or consist of whatever the officer's body-cam happened to be pointing at at the time. You'd be lucky to get 50%.

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MIMEsweeper maker loses UK High Court patent fight over 15-year-old bulletin board post

Loyal Commenter
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Re: What the patent describes...

These were my thoughts exactly. Isn't a patent supposed to be both novel and non-obvious? Parsing an email according to the RFC is the exact opposite of novel, and virus-scanning any attachments and the body text before reconstituting the email (again according to the RFC) is pretty obvious.

If there's anything here patentable, it's the actual mechanism of doing the virus scanning, but IMHO, the surrounding steps are not (or should not be) patentable. I can only assume those bringing the case failed to pay any expert witnesses to state the obvious to the (clearly non-technical) judge.

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Why are sat-nav walking directions always so hopeless?

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Tea with milk Good tea-related rant

Which reminds me of a particularly rough french ferry crossing from Cork, in a 'cosy' 'titanic steerage' type cabin and my Dad insisting on his morning cornflakes even despite the only available milk on board seemingly, goat.

This surprises me. Presumably, this was the Irish Ferries crossing between Cork and Swansea. If so, the people operating it are going to have been Irish, which happens to be the nation in Europe that drinks the most tea. One would have thought that they, of all people, would know what they are doing with the milk.

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A story of M, a failed retailer: We'll give you a clue – it rhymes with Charlie Chaplin

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Profitability

Maplin's opening of "big box" stores in retail parks (and other prominent, high-rental locations)- meant that they essentially *forced* themselves (#) into having to be a mass-market retailer of more mainstream tat at high markup

...

(#) No doubt at the pushing of their private equity owners, mind.

I wonder how many of those private equity owners were also investors in those retail parks? Another nice little way to siphon money out of the firm in the form of ground rental.

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UKIP doubled price of condoms for sale at party conference

Loyal Commenter
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Rage? What I'm seeing is a whole load of mockery, with a smidgeon of satire.

Does this fill you with rage? Does it make your face all red like a shouty man on BBC QT?

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Re: Eh?

You are Kate Hoey AICMFP

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Loyal Commenter
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Or

"So no-one else has to clean up your mess when you pull out"

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Loyal Commenter
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"Because withdrawal is never the best method"

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HP Ink should cough up $1.5m for bricking printers using unofficial cartridges – lawsuit

Loyal Commenter
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Re: HP Instant Ink?

Also, HP printers are the only make who supply Linux software (which is actually NOT bloatware). So altogether, I am a happy HP customer.

Funny, I used to have a parallel port monochrome laser, made by Samsung (back in the days back before they were trying to out-Apple Apple). When parallel port stopped being a thing on motherboards about 15+ years ago, a cheap USB-parallel cable did the trick. I never had any trouble getting a driver for this under Linux, and the last time I bothered playing with Linux was 10+ years ago.

And there's not a snowball's chance in hell I'd install anything on my home PC or network that reports back to HP with details of what I've been doing, even less so of paying a subscription fee for it! My current colour laser needs at most one or two cartridges replacing a year at a cost of around £12 on ebay. The light starts flashing well before they've run out, giving me ample time to order a new one and get it delivered.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Lexmark next

The difference being that when it comes to printers, most of the complicated bits are in the handle.

Not strictly true - many inkjets have the print head in the cartridge (not that I'd ever advocate using an inkjet). Monochrome laser printers usually have the imaging drum as part of the toner cartridge, and colour ones as a separate consumable. The only 'complicated' bit is the laser, which these days is a mass produced £0.0001 laser diode, and the control electronics, the most advanced bit of which is probably the voltage switching power supply.

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Loyal Commenter
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Re: Lexmark next

It's not just inkjets with the issue. Laser printers do this as well, plus other naughty tricks.

I know this only too well, as my Samsung colour laser printer decided that after an arbitrary number of pages, the section with the main imaging drum wanted to be replaced, at a cost of about £100. A quick google search and a helpful youtube video later, and I was online ordering a 47 Ohm resistor. Opening the front of the printer, wrapping the legs of the resistor around two of the the pins inside the front cover, and power cycle later, guess what? The count is back to zero, and the printer is still imaging pages perfectly well. Nice try Sammy, but I'm keeping the remaining £99.90.

No doubt the imaging drum will need replacing some day, but guess what - I'll decide when.

BTW, they also do a nice little line in replacement waste toner tanks (they have a little window in them that gets occluded when full). Rather than spending £££ on a replacement, emptying the tank into a bin and wiping the window with a cotton bud does the trick nicely.

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I want to buy a coffee with an app – how hard can it be?

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Try travelling with First Bus and their (cr)app

I think the "never pay more for the day than the cheapest option" probably explains the lack of interest in Oyster from First Bus et al.

There's a reason why they're known as 'Worst Bus' round here.

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UKIP flogs latex love gloves: Because Brexit means Brexit

Loyal Commenter
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I'm pretty sure there was always a pretty large intersection between UKIP members and internet trolls, particularly those who like to post on forums in barely understandable gibberish with RANDOMLY interspersed ALL CAPS!!!!11!!eleventyone!!11

See also: Youtube commenters.

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FAIL

I think you missed your icon there Mr. ShoutyCaps->

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Apple hands €14.3bn in back taxes to reluctant Ireland

Loyal Commenter
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How deep in Apple's pockets must these politicians be to be refusing this tax being forced onto their country and the benefits it could have for their constituents?

You have to balance the effects of the immediate cash injection to the coffers of the Republic, with the "attractive to tech companies" image the country has, and its potential negative impact on inward investment if other large companies decide to relocate their European operations to, for example, Luxembourg, instead. If I remember rightly (correct me if I'm wrong), Dublin is also host to the European headquarters of HP, Microsoft and Dell, amongst others.

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We're doomed: Defra's having a cow over its Brexit IT preparations

Loyal Commenter
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Facepalm

Maybe as a remoan wanker you could offer some advice

If advice had been listened to, we wouldn't be in this mess, would we?

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Trollface

Does Brexit make a difference to DEFRA's IT? It's not exactly covered itself with glory before Brexit was happening. SNAFU.

Well, now Slithy Gove is in charge of it, rather than those pesky experts (what do they know, eh?), I'm sure the department will go from strength to strength.

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First it was hashtags – now Amber Rudd gives us Brits knowledge on national ID cards

Loyal Commenter
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Re: Not wishing to trust Big Gov, but--

Most national ID cards are exactly that - an identity card. Not an 'entitlement' card that links to a database. No RFID chip or magnetic stripe that gets scanned when you go to pick up a parcel from the post office, or open a bank account. No big database collecting tracking information in real time from those scans and swipes.

The card isn't the problem, it is the Home Office's avowed desire to use it to collect data on your movements and activities, eroding your right to privacy. That's the reason May hates the ECHR, because it gives us those rights to privacy, enshrined in an international treaty.

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It's September 2018, and Windows VMs can pwn their host servers by launching an evil app

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Re: "see i told you so"

Only enable images on web sites where you really, really need to see images.

If you really don't want to see any images, just use lynx.

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HTTPS crypto-shame: TV Licensing website pulled offline

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hardcoded http needn't be a problem (although it is untidy, IMHO, all links internal to a web site should be relative), as long as the server is configured to redirect all http requests to https. The fact that they serve anything up at all on http is the real problem.

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Re: TV licensing agency

Anybody who disbelieves this, I highly recommend you to cancel your TV license, remove all BBC channels from your tuned TV, and then watch the highly threatening letters roll in from the BBC tv licensing gang.

And they are just that - threatening letters. To prosecute you, they need to prove that you own a TV, use it to receive broadcasts, and are not paying the licence fee. Unless you are silly enough to be watching BBC news in front of the window when their 'enforcement officers' call by, then they don't have that proof. They can't enter your property without a police warrant, so if they come calling (which is vanishingly unlikely), you can quite legally tell them to fuck off and close the door.

So, those threatening letters? Just cross out the address, write 'return to sender' on the top and pop it back in the nearest post box. At least that way, it's not cluttering up your household recycling.

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we're not aware of anyone's data being compromised.

Well, if you're not using HTTPS, you wouldn't be aware of it, almost by design. Not being aware of the man-in-the-middle doesn't mean he isn't there. All it takes is a poisoned DNS server, redirecting requests to a proxy, and someone can be listening in on all the unsecured connections for any domain that DNS server is serving up the address for.

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