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* Posts by streaky

1475 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

Trademark holders must pay for UK web blocking orders – Supreme Court

streaky
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Boffin

Can. Worms. Open.

with Cartier's barrister, Adrian Speck QC, claiming that ISPs were "profiting" from rights-infringing content and therefore ought to divert those "profits" into the costs of court order compliance.

That's quite a leap in law. By the way it's not massively differentiated from how you end up with the EU taxing links. Problem is it opens up a can of worms.

By this legal logic carriers profit from DDoS attacks and should be liable for damages incurred. By this logic funeral services providers profit from car accidents and should pay costs for them. Just because somebody profits from an event, legal or otherwise, doesn't make them liable. Then again I've always said that carriers should be forced to require all their customers to deploy something that produces the same effect as BCP-38. Oh hey, there's an ambulance for you to chase lawyers of this world.

Like I said it's a leap, a deeply illogical one.

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GDPRmageddon: They think it's all over! Protip, it has only just begun

streaky
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Mushroom

No but I might be saying that other countries are hypocritical when it comes to this stuff, especially certain EU states I already named. Actually not might be, they just are.

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streaky
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Brexit.

The EU hasn't stopped data flows to the US with FISA, secret executive orders and congress in the US not recognising the right of privacy (or any constitutional measures for that matter) for non-US citizens outside the US. Germany also has similar legal fabrications in their legal system, which FWIW the UK does not have - a UK court treats a Philippine person in the Philippines the same legally as a British person in the UK.

If the EU has a problem with UK data protection they can fuck right off even more than they already can honestly. At least what we do is basically out on the table. The same can't be said for the French or German security services.

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Off with e's head: E-cig explosion causes first vaping death

streaky
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Re: limit vaping to 20 watts

limit vaping to 20 watts

There's no issue with wattage. The problem is directly related to unregulated mods. You have an unreg mech mod and you short it it's going to be whatever the battery chucks out in a short. THAT is the problem. If you're going to regulate such a thing FWIW, keep it sensible, it has to be at least 150W. Minimum.Again the problem here isn't a regulated mod; it's unregulated ones.

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streaky
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Re: Here we go again

Mechanical mod, misused.

Mech mod. Period.

They're dangerous, one of the fundamental issues with vaping regulation missing the key points. We know what's dangerous, risky and what isn't and none of the regulations are addressing any of this.

Mech mods are dangerous, even for experienced users. People saying they're not are exactly the kind of people who are going to blow their own faces off; if you're saying it's not dangerous because I'm smart you're not half as smart as you think.

There's no reason for this to be a thing. Use the right battery chemistry and a *regulated* mod. AFAIK there's been no serious incidents where users have used regulated mods whereas all the incidents I've ever seen are directly related to mech mods. There's simply no reason for them to exist and certainly no reason for them to be sold, or legal. They're not cool, they're overpriced - and you're going to hurt yourself.

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Government demands for people's personal info from Microsoft reach all-time low

streaky
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Re: Government requests for people's data from Microsoft fell

Maybe there is no longer any need for it to be "requested".

No joke I'd assume that means this, it'd be interesting to do a statistical analysis of customer numbers of Microsoft, Google, Apple and a few others and compare it with volume of data requests to see if there's a relative change. If I was Microsoft I'd be doing this right now.

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Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

streaky
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

All in all it feels like a FIA PR exercise to the environmental lobby

I've said it before - there's a way out of this for F1 and the FIA and it isn't electric cars. It's HICEVs - essentially normal engines fuelled by hydrogen. It's wins for everybody; environmentally, for car makers, and for fans of racing. Doubt it'll happen because of the electric car cabal wasting everybody's time and money though.

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streaky
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Re: Why should he?

I wouldn't recognize her or most other tech CEOs.

Nope, me neither. If she'd just mugged me I wouldn't be able to pick her out of a line-up and fwiw same Intel's CEO.

Some of us have to actually do work and couldn't care less about c-levels.

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streaky
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Re: F1 is a Car Crash

in fact it's much better as there are no ads

Speaking as somebody who actually has Sky Sports - clearly you've never seen Sky Sports F1; there's plenty of ads.

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

streaky
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The hell is a blackout?

On a more serious note of the 5 people that still actually use a landline 4 of them use wireless phones that take power from the mains anyway. The odds of that one person needing to call 999 is almost zero.

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Google, AWS IPs blocked by Russia in Telegram crackdown

streaky
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Re: GLAP

This is politics, not technology.

It's the technological implementation of a political will. And that implementation is embarrassing to banana republics.

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streaky
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Re: MInor Correction

The difference is one is a person talking, the other is a country going out of their way to actually make something happen. Also relieving people of opposition via 5th floor windows.

I don't know at what point torture made it into the discussion.

Also snoopers charter isn't a counter-argument, it's a case-study.

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streaky
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Black Helicopters

Re: MInor Correction

blah blah Amber Rudd blah blah

But as all of us with our heads screwed on stated at the time the stuff AR stated didn't matter because what she was talking about simply isn't a thing. You'll note it hasn't gone anywhere.

It's not a reflection of what "her" world looks like in any way, it's a reflection of some countries are completely lawless and others aren't. We have the rule of law, for AR to get her way (we can debate how serious she ever was, apparently you think she was more serious than I do) - what she was talking about would never make it through the Commons and if it made it through the Commons it'd never make it through the Lords and if it made it through the Lords then British courts would put a stop to it right pronto.

Spot the difference?

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streaky
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GLAP

So smart.

This is the same Russia that the mainstream press here is scared are going to hack our nuclear power stations to self-immolate?

Give me a break.

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Congressional group asks FBI boss Wray to explain Apple lawsuit

streaky
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Re: Still...

Which questions would you ask?

If we give you powers to force decryption via frontdoor (btw, no, it's not a backdoor) what's to stop people using crypto technology developed elsewhere that's outside the reach of said powers?

If the answer is "nothing" - protip: it's "nothing" - what's the net benefit to the US of you having those powers?

Protip #2: people stop buying Apple devices so, y'know, it's the opposite of a benefit.

All the wrong questions.

The answers to the questions that have been asked are effectively "because". In fact some of the questions that have been asked are essentially why aren't you decrypting things for fun and profit yet, you definitely should be. They're leading questions.

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streaky
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Still...

.. asking *all* the wrong questions.

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What's an RDBMS? Don't ask the UK's data protection watchdog

streaky
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Re: Derp

It is not possible for the ICO to do a 'surprise raid'.

Hence my point that the ICO shouldn't have taken the lead. Data protection isn't the most serious of the allegations with this case. They can get a warrant later for the stuff the police have collected and separately prosecuted at their own pace.

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streaky
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Derp

Not defending the ICO but this whole thing was mishandled from top to bottom. Firstly the guy wanted to make a name for himself so instead of going to the police he went to the press who dutifully plastered it out in public for all to see and give CA plenty of time to duck and cover. Secondly, yes, it is a job for the police, not the ICO (not initially anyway). It's true that data protection laws are alleged to have been broken, but also if the guy is correct so have tech crime laws like (several sections of) the CMA. The police can just go to a magistrate and get a PACE warrant without alerting them that it's coming.

Reality is though the guy seems to have been complicit by his own account and left it very, very late to be both a whistle-blower and be protected as one.

Regardless of involvement of the police though, this was utterly balls'd up by the press right from the start.

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Facebook supremo Mark Zuckerberg has flunky tell UK MPs: Nope, he's sending someone else

streaky
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Re: Rule Britannia!

The UK is hardly going to help itself in this situation by going it alone outside of Europe

I don't know where people get this nonsense from but it isn't even worthy of satire. Every time remainers spout this crap another 20k people convert to the cause because they realise how retarded their side is.

You may now downvote me for speaking truth.

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streaky
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Re: The heat is on

He knows the UK MPs just want to grandstand for domestic consumption

To be fair this almost never actually happens. Even when Rupert Murdoch showed up he was fairly treated. Asked tough questions and came across poorly, but he was fairly treated.

Zuckerberg's problem is that as CEO of a fairly major organisation he doesn't seem to do public very well.

Zuckerberg better hope that his peon can answer all the questions they want to ask to their satisfaction, parliament can hold people in contempt for not appearing and also, frankly, has the power to recommend legislation that could hurt Facebook which frankly might go down quite smoothly. Personally I'd want to ask them questions about their tax affairs and booking UK sales to Ireland to avoid (some would say evade but I couldn't possibly comment) paying tax as a more important issue but that's me.

FWIW being held in contempt can cause issues with the fit and proper persons test that I'm sure Zuckerberg would prefer to avoid.

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Meet the open sorcerers who have vowed to make Facebook history

streaky
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Just Kill Me..

and entails extending IMAP (b.1986) to create secure, authenticated group chat.

No, please, make it stop.

It's like these people who think PKI is about indentity as opposed to securing a two-way communication and we end up with the shitshow that is is EV,

STOP making protocols do things they're not intended to do. Just stop. You overcomplicate the protocol and it ends up being useless at the thing you wanted to do anyway, and nobody will use it.

There are plenty of secure "chat" protocols that work very well, we don't need this. Also nothing but anybody who thinks people use Facebook for chat in great numbers is a tool. Go back to sleep.

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YouTube plan to use Wikipedia against crackpots hits snag

streaky
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Facepalm

Derp

Google made its fortune by capturing the labor that went into building the web

I realise google bashing is fun for many and often reasonable, but lets at least try to keep it sensible - unless 'reg is trying to be the Breitbart of tech in which case carry on..

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Elon Musk invents bus stop, waits for applause, internet LOLs

streaky
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Actually tunnelling under stuff isn't the expensive / controversial / time-consuming part.

No but it's what makes it particularly infeasible in the megacities where you'd hypothetically need this stuff most.

Honestly the best answer to transport in megacities is reducing the number of journeys people have to take which is apparently what has caused TFL to "lose" 20 million journeys a year - people working from home.

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Vaping on the NHS? Don't hold your breath

streaky
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I used to smoke 20 a day and I found 12mg when I first started to be a problem if I was chain vaping for long periods, but people should start at least on what they're comfortable with. I find one of the issues is people trying to combine switching to vaping with cessation, which is trying to quit smoking and vaping at the same time; that's not going to work in most cases. Switch to vaping at whatever is comfortable (the TPD makes this a serious issue in the EU which is exactly part of the issue this article is discussing) but if you can, do it. When you're comfortable vaping you can reduce nicotine, maybe even some day quit but I find the idea of trying to quit smoking and vaping at the same time to be an absurdity in compounding issues - in my view it's why traditional quit aids themselves don't work. Quit smoking and THEN quit nicotine.. if you want to - but you don't really have to.

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streaky
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Re: what you never hear talked about...

I love hearing from people who haven't read any of the medical research it really makes my day. The threat to second hand vapers as it were is small enough that it's effectively zero. There's reams of research on this, this aint the 1930's, we have the technology to find out what's in the vapour.

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streaky
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Re: I found it stupidly easy to 'give up' with vapes.

Lady behind the tobacco counter at tescos

Yeah that stuff you can buy in a supermarket is no good for this. The juices all taste like ass and the ecigs themselves are no good for anything - and they're a rip off for refills. May I suggest finding a vape shop and asking for advice. Okay your start up costs are going to be higher getting yourself a proper mod and tank but you'll be happier with it in the long run. If anybody tries to sell you an unregulated mod walk out the shop and find another one though..

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streaky
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Re: "does this read more like an ad-icle"

You can ingest pure coffee in large amounts with no risk of death

You *can* kill yourself just by drinking coffee. It happens.

AFAIK there's no reported cases of anybody vaping themselves to death intentionally or otherwise. If you drank a teaspoon of the 72mg/ml nicotine I have it will kill you but if you drank caffeine that relatively strong that would kill you too. They're both poisons, deadly poisons. There's a long list of reasons they're comparable; not least because the research shows them to be about as dangerous as each other in vivo at normal usage doses, which is to say they're not at all.

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streaky
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Re: No Stalling here

They did analysis of why, including surveys and it's for reasons like the regulation making people think that smoking and vaping are equivalent in terms of risk when they very much are not. I linked the review of legislation, health and behaviour evidence above and it is well worth reading but here it is again.

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streaky
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Re: Public health strawman

Tobacco industry lobbying is how we got in the shit state we are in, stuck inside the EU with the TPD going out of its way to kill as many people as possible. OTOH this gem

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streaky
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Re: I found it stupidly easy to 'give up' with vapes.

My experience, they're nothing like cigs, barely meets the action habit, just about covers the chemical dependency.

Mind if I ask what gear you're using? It should easily cover the dependency and habitually is basically an irrelevance when that is the case. Plus the right juices and equipment you'll be happy doing it.

When I first started I wasn't interested in stopping smoking, tried a bunch of different equipment I wasn't happy with and continued smoking. Found some I was happy with and a juice I liked and I just stopped smoking. Even kept a packet of cigarettes on my desk which is a golden rule of don't do it when you want to quit smoking; switching to vaping like flicking a switch, and since gone down to 6mg/ml nicotine with no issues. My relationship with smoking is fine - I have no issue with people smoking near me because I have no craving for nicotine that I've known people who stopped decades ago longing for. I'm still not bothered about not smoking, I'd do it in a flash but I'm happy vaping and can't think of a single compelling reason to smoke over it; and I certainly don't *need* to smoke.

It shouldn't be a problem which is why I'm always interested to hear why it is for some people.

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streaky
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Re: Nicotine is an addictive neurotoxin however it is taken.

Yeah, in high doses. The stuff is nasty lethal, it's one of the strongest poisons there is. It isn't consumed at those levels though. Caffeine is also poisonous if you take enough of it.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15935584

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streaky
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Re: "does this read more like an ad-icle"

It's been proven that Nicotine is far less addictive when vaped, Proven. Also it's a "neurotoxin" in the same way as coffee is. And it's about as dangerous in normal consumption levels, which is to say it's not really. Should we also ban coffee? How about alcohol?

Also your argument is basically that people should just carry on smoking as opposed to finding some safer way to consume nicotine which is pure unadulterated nonsense.

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streaky
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Re: Tobacco is a carcinogen whether or not you burn it

Tobacco is a carcinogen whether or not you burn it

Vaping isn't tobacco. Has nothing to do with tobacco.

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streaky
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Re: Regulatory approval

TPD was written *for* the Tobacco industry, explicitly. They're the only ones who can. Products the tobacco industry are buying/producing are garbage though.

The EU is corrupt. But don't take my word for it. http://www.bath.ac.uk/research/news/2015/02/24/tobacco-lobbying-eu-directive/

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Venezuela floats its own oily cryptocurrency to save the world economy

streaky
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Re: That's the theory, anyway...

More important than how many there are is how many they sell. Protip: it'll be less than the maximum.

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streaky
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Should have called it..

The Pedro.

Just saying.

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UK.gov's Brexiteers warned not to push for divergence on data protection laws

streaky
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Re: All thats missing

The *only* way for the UK to "reverse" brexit now is to rejoin. Single currency and a 30 year waiting list. Not worth our time even if you're a remainer. I see at least 22 people are easily confused by truth though.

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streaky
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Boffin

Re: All thats missing

20 months post referendum and not a plan in sight, not even a sniff of one, its as if they have no idea what they are doing.......

There is a plan I'll let you into the secret.. it's really complicated..

Want to know it?

The UK is leaving the EU. The end. Get over it already, it's happening regardless of what you want. On the what happens next - it's completely irrelevant, the EU doesn't want any sort of deal they've made that clear and for the UK that's far and away the best outcome sooooo.. The negotiations are a complete charade from both sides.

Before you get uppity downvote me for truth: I'm just relaying reality here, get a grip on yourselves.

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UK Home Sec Amber Rudd unveils extremism blocking tool

streaky
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Re: 99.995% is impossible

Here's a video we've already told you is a terrorist video. Is it a terrorist video?

TBH this isn't how that works. It's here's a curated set of ISIS/not videos. Here's another *different* set of ISIS videos mixed with other, which are/aren't, what's the accuracy rate? If they did it the way you say their reputation would be in tatters by the end of the day, I doubt they're that stupid.

That being said with real world data the reality is it's going to be massively inaccurate. It's entirely possible for a tool like this to exist and kinda work but I'd suggest only using it for flagging videos for a real person to look at - although as others have pointed out meat-based AI fails at this sort of thing too.

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Bruce Perens wants to anti-SLAPP Grsecurity's Brad Spengler with $670,000 in legal bills

streaky
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One man's unethical is another man's successful. Not for nothing but people are dumb when faced with legal threats, jump the shark and take the cheapest option rather than playing it smart and going nuclear, scorched earth policy. If you win and win hard and the other guy pays the fees who cares what it costs - in fact, the more the better. You might consider that unethical, I call it a smart play - for no other reason than as a deterrent.

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Assange fails to make skipped bail arrest warrant vanish

streaky
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Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Surely the fact that he is still being persecuted/prosecuted long after removal of disputed facts, is grounds enough for reasonable cause that justice has not and is not being served and servered by judges?

That he's a bail skipper isn't a disputed fact, and that's what he's wanted for - at least today - and that's all that matters. If people are allowed to hide until everybody forgets about them it brings the entire legal system into disrepute. Given the people who put up his bail were let off for being simpletons it's fairly important that he not get away with it for that and because explicitly he's high profile, which is to say it passes the test of being in the public interest to prosecute him for that alone.

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streaky
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Re: @ Ben ... A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Just a nit... being a grammar Nazi... the word is regardless not irregardless. ;-)

Trouble with grammar Nazis is they're almost always wrong. Irregardless is a valid word in English, whilst being strange at a technical level it is completely legitimate to use.

Also there's no such thing as Standard English which is precisely why English is such a great language, it evolves; in contrast to for example French. Hell, English is born of evolution.

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streaky
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By this argument, people are allowed to choose where they spend their custodial sentences. I don't see that being allowed to become legal precedent.

Precisely. He isn't being held in an actual prison then he isn't being held is the legal standard; being on the lamb in South America doesn't count else Ronnie Biggs would have never served time when he landed back in the UK; it doesn't count as time served and arguing it does is completely absurd. Sooner Assange realises this the sooner he'll be out of prison and deported to Australia so he can be deported to the US. If you're gonna fuck with legal systems at least learn how to do it right, be in a non-extradition country before you do it.

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In America, tech support conmen get a mild slap. In Blighty, scammers get the book thrown at them

streaky
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Re: Too mild in both cases

I'm wondering how long it's going to take for the next 2008-type crash.

Not that long but the eurozone banks still haven't fixed the structural issues that caused 2008, US banks have. Next crash aint coming from the US.

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EU bods up GDPR ante: Threatens legislative laggards with ‘infringement procedure’

streaky
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Re: In the words of Sir Humphrey

Just in case nobody gets that quip about the Germans, I direct your attention here. The last time it came up the German courts backed down to avoid being ruled against; but still uphold their belief that the German courts have primacy when they don't. Basically the German courts don't understand that the rules apply to them too, which is why they [Germans] enjoy being in the EU so much when other states that are around their GDP/Capita don't.

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streaky
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Re: In the words of Sir Humphrey

Couple of fixes: the Germans will continue to pretend their courts are supreme to EU law they don't agree with (protip: they're not), the Irish can't afford to enforce it despite being the state where it matters most, the Italians are too busy drinking espresso to notice it and we (the British) are off. That said it's going into national law anyway - and we resent it because it's half-baked, like most things that come from the EU.

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streaky
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Re: 2 Countries.

because European politics and machinations are so transparent

I'm regularly downvoted on 'reg for speaking truth about the EU but this is one of the few areas of clarity. Regulations automatically apply and don't need transposing into national law, states *can* if they chose to but they don't have to, it just supersedes any law in conflict.

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streaky
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2 Countries.

"just two countries having adapted their national laws"

The "R" in "GDPR" stands for "Regulation". Those 2 countries are ijuts because regulations don't require changing national law, they automatically apply and are supreme. If they wanted countries to change their own laws they should have made it a directive.

FML people are dopey. This is absurd on so many levels I don't even know where to start.

Nice to see people confusing directives and regulations - especially when it's the EU itself - it's always good for a laugh.

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streaky
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"the UK goverment want to hold data on EU citizens"

This is utterly untrue. That being said if you're a business doing business in the EU you'd arguably need to follow the regs for that data.

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