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* Posts by streaky

1421 posts • joined 5 Jul 2010

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Why did top Home Office civil servant lobby Ofcom for obscure kit ban?

streaky
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Redaction

Can we talk about how that's the most idiotic piece of redaction in all of history.

Firstly there's nothing in there requiring redaction from any perspective so why did it happen, and secondly what the actual fuck on being incompetent at it?

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streaky
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Re: Please mind the gap

that it provides some sort of gap in full take surveillance

Well it probably does to an extent but I doubt this is the real reason (certainly they're monitoring all mobile phones, all the time, c/o Gemalto). The civil service' primary role in government is witness protection for BT, anything that harms their market position must be stamped out, with prejudice. Hence the Ofcom link. natsec is just an excuse (as it tends to be).

Sure, though, if you operate a gsm gateway you can generate your own keys and decide your own cipher strength, all you need is the ability to write to sim cards which is a 10 quid on ebay type deal, and there's plenty of companies that will sell you blank writeable ones.

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France may protect citizens' liberté with ban on foreigners buying local big data firms

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Not like invest to exit is a thing or anything. I don't like it myself - it's why Europe and moreover the UK has nobody who is on a level with the likes of Microsoft or Google; but it *is* where the money is coming from. If you ban it the money stops, unintended consequence is you get less start-ups, you attract less talent and you get less tax receipts.

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Worst-case Brexit could kill 92,000 science, tech jobs across UK – report

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Not those exact words, but near as damn it. I can list companies, but I shouldn't need to - people should be aware of what has been said by actual businesses.

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streaky
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LOL

Meanwhile, in the real world, the massive tech investment continues with corporations saying "no we don't give a shit about brexit actually, in fact, it's why we're investing here"

Most polite thing I can say about Sadiq Khan is he's a clown who won't get re-elected, and weirdly not because he's delusional - but because he's incompetent. Weird that. This City Airport nonsense didn't help his case, especially when he's claiming to be some sort of environment mayor, undoing Boris' ban on their expansion - Labour have shown to what degree they'll take money to kill people.

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1 in 5 STEM bros whinge they can't catch a break in tech world they run

streaky
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Re: Isn't it a small minority

This commenty says to me: 'I was rubbish at my job so I'll blame 'diversity' for the fact that I never go promoted.

This comment says to me "I'm rubbish at my job so I'll blame the fact I'm not a white male for the fact I can't get ahead". Surely you see how lame this game is?

All anybody sensible wants is an even playing field on both sides. I'm personally all about meritocracy, you get the best person for the job, no matter what they are and you go from there. Employers can't, nor should they be, artificially trying to solve society's past ills. Simply doesn't work, why would anybody try to hire somebody who isn't the best fit for the job they're trying to fill? It's a nonsense, any company doing this isn't going to be in business for long unless they have more money than sense (see: google et al).

I literally couldn't give a toss, I have no issue getting hired - but I can understand why people are annoyed; and women and racial minorities have to work with the very people they're actively trying to piss off, that's a recipe for stupidity. Regardless, companies are actively doing themselves harm which I find utterly hilarious, so carry on. Incompetence is pervasive through management culture in tech so there's nothing new here.

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streaky
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Re: Isn't it a small minority

Let the race to mediocrity commence.

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No wonder Marvin the robot was miserable: AI will make the rich richer – and the poor poorer

streaky
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Re: Poor Poorer.

Not wanting to go full nerd, but I'm fairly sure this is what Roddenberry was trying to say with the economics of Star Trek - that there's a point where we don't have to do anything, basically the system gets *so* efficient that people can't even work if they want to and capitalism just fails to function and people have to do things because they want to as opposed to because they need money. At that stage cash stops being a usable thing.

I'd hate to predict how far along that path but there's things coming down the mountain that when they hit we might get to that stage. Self driving cars, robots in the home that can physically do things you'd otherwise do yourself and obviously the encroachment of factory automation - the more there is the less jobs there are for less skilled workers. If I don't need a cleaner, don't need an uber/taxi driver, don't need to make the things I'd buy that's a huge chunk of the unskilled workforce, the capitalist system dies with it.

I don't think it's a huge problem in the long term, I think we'd all get by with not having to work, I could cope with a perpetual holiday if I don't need to pay for things - but the transition will be massive social upheaval and we might already be there.

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streaky
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Poor Poorer.

Strictly speaking, if allowed to run its course, what will actually happen is it'll end the economic system.

If nobody needs to (or can) work and the rich own all the wealth and literally can't find enough ways to spend it the capitalist system dies. There's already evidence western civilisation is on the border of this point, one only has to look at the sheer volumes of cash governments are pumping into banks to keep them lending and the proportions of low paying service industry jobs in some countries.

If Germany ever near completely automates its car industry (and it will within the next 25 years, it'll need to just to stay even remotely competitive) it'll be the final nail in the coffin and the world will be forced to reinvent itself, and all that accumulated wealth will mean nothing. Peak capitalism has passed, it was some time in early 2008.

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CPU bug patch saga: Antivirus tools caught with their hands in the Windows cookie jar

streaky
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Isn't placing your trust in ONE vendor who by nature can't catch everything ALSO bad juju?

The chances of you getting hit by a virus or malware that a reasonably competent AV vendor hasn't accounted for and another has and you happen to have picked the right AV vendor combination to cover that venn diagram is almost nil - in fact it is nil. If you're a target for the CIA, usually you'd know and frankly you should be taking precautions like, I don't know, maybe not so much with the running of the Windows. Also, yeah, therein lies the trick when choosing AV.

Each to their own, but running two AV products at the same time isn't really viable, potentially it could do more damage than malware could.

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Re: Logic

I can't tell if this is serious or not ^

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streaky
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There are people who run multiple AV products

This kind of thing is extremely bad practice, most people who work in security and AV vendors have been telling people to not do it for at least a decade, at least as far as active protection goes. Race conditions playing around in kernel memory space is bad juju.

Just don't do it.

Now having AV soft where one does your active protection and another that can scan but actively protecting the system is kinda viable, the answer in that case would be yeah, you better hope that the one you have doing the protection is the one that is compatible. If it isn't..

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Re: Logic

You'd have to actively disable things to get into this state, namely defender. Sure defender is garb, it wasn't I don't think ever supposed to be that great but I'm sure defender will set the key (edit: Microsoft do explicitly list it on their spreadsheet). Defender will only disable itself, and will always disable itself if you're running other AV.

If you've specifically decided to go naked as it were, it's kinda your own fault and you should be paying attention to things like this. As for lawsuits, you're the one making the positive step not Microsoft, there's no liability here.

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India denies breach of its billion-strong 'Aadhaar' ID system

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Please..

do the needful.

God I hope that is google translate at it's best and not how the complaint is actually worded - though I suspect it is.

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Nvidia: Using cheap GeForce, Titan GPUs in servers? Haha, nope!

streaky
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Re: Unenforceable.

Bohhooohoo nvidia gpus aren't artistic work.

What are you talking about. Nvidia are doing *fine*.

Couple of things, using copyright to enforce licensing clauses that don't pass the laugh test that directly relate to a piece of hardware you bought because a company makes the hardware that you pay through the nose and hands out drivers for for free to make sure you can use and therefore buy the hardware in the first place is *absurd*.

Secondly if you can't do business in the GPU space because GPUs don't make enough money (bahahahaha, again doesn't pass the laugh test) then don't make GPUs, go open a coffee chain.

Also Nvidia are having no issues licensing decades old patents thank you very much.

By the way, like I said, even if what you're saying here is valid (and it isn't, lets be clear) - how exactly could nvidia possibly hope to enforce it?

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streaky
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Re: Why would one want to use Nvidia?

It's not 2008, this driver thing isn't really worth talking about, AMD and nvidia have fairly solid linux drivers that perform perfectly fine. DKMS solved most issues and if you want open source nouveau is perfectly (more than, in fact) adequate these days.

Also AMD gave up on being competitive around the launch of the R5-9 which is why I abandoned the laborious wait for a RX Vega and bought a 1080ti hybrid instead.

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streaky
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Re: Unenforceable.

More importantly who cares what nvidia think. They're in no position to enforce regardless. They're not going to send the GPU police to your DC to check if you've been naughty or nice. So your card dies in half the time their overpriced gear does. I bought a $1000 card, got two years use out of it by which time it's obsolete anyway, saved myself $9000 and oh dear they won't cover it under warranty (they couldn't prove regardless), oh dear what a shame never mind.

GeForce and TITAN GPUs were never designed for data center deployments with the complex hardware, software, and thermal requirements for 24x7 operation, where there are often multi-stack racks

Also this, right here, is bullshit. That's my problem nvidia, thanks.

I've been telling people for years that the nvidia DC-approved GPUs are a complete waste of time and money, hilarious that it seems people have finally cottoned on to nvidia's price gouging (which is so extreme that it'd embarrass even Apple) - and even more hilarious that nvidia think they can do anything to stop it. Stop ripping people off and people will buy your "enterprise" (enterprise here is a synonym for bullshit, as it usually is) gear.

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UK.gov needs help getting folk to splurge on full fibre and 5G

streaky
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Re: End Openreach, BT, Monopoly

Nothing to do with BT's monopoly that it obviously abuses in the view of anybody who pays attention. Anybody could challenge BT's position and they do.

The problem here is the government throwing taxpayer funds at BT (and this has been going on since long before we had a tory government) for building shitty networks that aren't fit for purpose. Basically what they've said is here's a huge pile of cash, go connect people at 10mbit. What they should be saying is here's a big pile of cash, you must connect everybody to the internet at 10-100mbit depending on how close to the centre of a city they are and you must only use the cash for building out infrastructure that works at at least 300 mbit and is capable of 10gbit+ with existing technology if it's ever needed, which is to say install actual glass fibre directly to people's houses. Reality is though BT should have been doing this in the 80's.

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EE Business Broadband digital transformation: Portal offline until July

streaky
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Yup.

Showing across EE's entire business honestly.

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Los Angeles police tell drivers not to trust navigation apps as wildfires engulf area

streaky
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Re: Don't drive into a raging wildfire...

This is the point. It isn't don't trust your GPS system, it's open your fucking eyes and look where you're going. Literally just occurred to me though, this could get interesting if self-driving cars ever become the norm and you're napping in the back and your car drives you into a wild fire and says fuckit you're on your own friend.

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Quentin Tarantino in talks to make Star Trek movie

streaky
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Re: Well Discovery has the occasional swearing

an insult to Gene Roddenberry's Legacy

BPLZ.

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streaky
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Re: Well Discovery has the occasional swearing

I'm told hardcore Trekkies hate it

Nope, we love it.

Check reddit trek nerdville for double confirmation. It is, as a matter of fact, epic.

Only people who hate it are pretenders, people who have probably never even seen it.

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Why does no one want to invest in full fibre broadband, wails UK.gov

streaky
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Re: All aboard the gravy train…

I disagree, although I totally see your point.

Certainly at the bare minimum when BT is replacing cable anyway and when new housing is being built (and especially in this case) BT should be specifying that house builders lay fibre to people's houses, at the very minimum so it can be upgraded in future.

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Re: All aboard the gravy train…

They're pushing towards, regardless you don't have to rip up pavements to do a national FTTP roll-out - seems like one of those mythological ideas people have about the way things work. Regardless if HO can do it locally with no government help and be a viable business it can be done nationally by BT with the government help that they are getting. There's plenty of this going on in the rest of the world if you want other examples.

None of this would be so bad if BT didn't know exactly how to do it.

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streaky
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Re: All aboard the gravy train…

the timeframe for return on capital is unsuitable for the private sector

Explain Hyperoptic and peers.

The actual reason is BT are happy getting free taxpayer funds to *not* do it thank you very much, one of the fundamental reasons why current government strategy is broken.

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Net neutrality nonsense: Can we, please, just not all lose our minds?

streaky
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Re: What's really going on..

If Netflix had to pay its fair share of overall internet backbone support costs as a percentage of IP packet traffic, their business model likely would fail. Ditto Youtube.

Pretty sure this is my point.

You don't just magic a service into existence and expect everybody else to pick up the tab just so you can be viable, for much the same reason as I don't ask 'reg readers to buy me a new McLaren every year. i.e. the world doesn't work like that.

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streaky
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What's really going on..

Netflix and a few others have managed to do something Russia could never do - bend the entire psyche of the planet to their will with zero blowback. What's relevant here is Netflix don't want to pay for infrastructure to carry all the bandwidth their service uses caused, ultimately, by no peers taking traffic off them because there's no mutual benefit. Never was, never will be. It really is quite impressive how their PR machine has completely deluded millennials into thinking it's about them. It isn't.

There are solutions to this that won't cost netflix huge sums of money to deliver content, they're already using some of them - as much as I like stranger things and mr robot if these services aren't viable at a price point with the infrastructure we have and without netflix, amazon, google et al (to be fair to amazon they do have mutually beneficial traffic arrangements, google too to a lesser degree, it's mostly netflix causing the problems) et al investing then they're simply not viable.

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Huawei's Honor 9: The only mobe of its spec asking 'why blow £500?'

streaky
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Re: huawei and honor updates...

Can't speak for this range specifically but I've found Chinese devices to suffer with this issue badly, it's an area where Chinese tech companies need to put a bit more effort into keeping up with the Joneses. I'm always wary of more expensive items from China specifically because of this.

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China plots new Great Leap Forward: to IPv6

streaky
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Re: RFC 2460..

128 bit addresses don't fit in any standard data type

Define standard. Use a math lib. GUIDs are 128 bit ints too and they're everywhere. "hard" and "i can't be bothered" aren't the same thing.

Also IPv4 and IPv6 coexist happily if people stop listening to consultants who sell them stupid ways to migrate their networks. You're doing it wrong, coexistence was solved many many years ago, there's a solution for every problem and your problem might not really be a problem.

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streaky
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Re: RFC 2460..

Something is obsolete when the purpose it serves is better served by something more modern. Not just because it's old.

Yeah alright I may have not considered that people might assume that I meant it's old is the only reason. It's still usable but now we have new information there's technical reasons why it would be obsoleted given half a chance.

Anyway, IPv6, just do it.

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streaky
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RFC 2460..

Technically speaking IPv6 is RFC 1883 - it was named IPv6 and used 128 bit address space so this is arguably true - and was written in 1995. Of course they're not exactly the same spec but it's important to note how disgusting it is that a protocol that was designed so long ago that it is arguably obsolete (wall time) is hardly deployed by anybody, everybody looks like an idiot in this scenario.

IPv6 deployment is *easy* and we should stop pretending it's difficult and just get it done.

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Dark fibre arts: Ofcom is determined to open up BT's network

streaky
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Seperation..

despite the legal separation of Openreach

I take issue with this. Despite the fanfare Openreach is "separated" from BT like Youtube is separate from Google, i.e. in name only, and not really even that. As long as we pretend they're actually distinct companies when they're not nothing will change.

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Mythical broadband speeds to plummet in crackdown on ISP ads

streaky
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Re: Well...

The problem is VM are really an amalgamation of lots of different networks. Some were good, some were bad and they've done nothing to improve the situation. So in some parts of the country you get advertised speeds and in other parts you get massive contention and frequent kit failures.

Worse than that there was a time when they flogged ADSL gear on BT's network branded as virgin product which did them massive reputational damage. Whoever came up with that one was a moron and should have faced the firing squad.

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Abolish the Telly Tax? Fat chance, say MPs at non-binding debate

streaky
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Re: "Least worst option"

To be fair they did take the head of the BBC out to the woodshed not that long back. The MPs know full well there are better options, just the kind of people who read the guardian would set their hair on fire so they're scared of pulling the trigger. Maybe after we leave the EU so they're not doing what they do best and tying up the country in court cases without merit.

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streaky
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Re: Threatogram received from Crapita today

I dropped them a 1 line email containing my house number, postcode and a few words stating I don't watch TV. Suddenly the letters and threats stopped..

This does work... for a time.. then it starts again. Eventually they stop reading your emails/letters and decide that you can't possibly be not watching TV because nobody does that. I usually just wait for them to show up and tell them to go fuck themselves, they normally get the message.

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SSL spy boxes on your network getting you down? But wait, here's an IETF draft to fix that

streaky
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Re: "it works by essentially not trusting said equipment."

Lets pretend that RIPA/ICR is supreme to the ECHR if the ECJ decides they're incompatible.

Untested and legal are not at all the same thing. It's best to just not do if you don't have an ethical sounding lawful excuse. Don't want data escaping? Restrict it to as few people as possible and do due diligence on people and not for nothing - don't allow people to connect to whatever they like. Way more reasonable and reliable than intercepting private comms and worse it's a bit bolting the door after the horse has fucked off with your customer db; who even has time to audit that much data?

If you let me have access to data and you let me connect to things if I really want to there's nothing stopping me asset stripping that data and you'd never know. Why? Because I'm competent. I don't care how good your systems are so, yeah, what's the use of your system?

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streaky
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Re: I don't get it.

It really is a solution looking for a problem. It's also not a solution.

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streaky
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Re: "it works by essentially not trusting said equipment."

a government will very much struggle to insert a CA into every citizen's device

It's not that difficult really, literally any root exploit would allow it, or they can force keys onto systems when they pass through customs. I'd assume just as likely they'd force a CA to miss-issue in controlled (targetted) numbers and nobody would notice which is what things like that HPKP are (were - RIP) for and what Expect-CT does absolutely nothing to prevent.

One assumes in China for example there's a lot of extra root CA keys nobody can explain in operating systems. We've literally had cases of this getting out and hitting the wider world and it taking a long time for anybody to notice.

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Vlad the blockader: Russia's anti-VPN law comes into effect

streaky
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Re: Western democracies would do this if they could get away with it

And yet here we are with no great firewall blocking out vpns and access to the actual internet.

You're confusing I don't like who won with it's not a democracy.

Easy to do when you're hiding behind AC though.

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streaky
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Re: Western democracies would do this if they could get away with it

Western democracies would do this if they could get away with it

"if they could get away with it" .. "democracies"

You see the problem with your argument right?

Sure of course they would but they can't so what's your point?

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Re: I bet Trump......

Can't pull this stuff in the west because it'll end the economic system as we know it. I literally couldn't do my job.. They either want tax revenues or they don't and if they don't they should let me know so I can get paid in a tax haven like Branson.

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Oh, Google. You really are spoiling us: Docs block cockup chalks up yet another apology

streaky
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Re: Double negative

The potential for intelligence agencies must be vast.

If you build it, they will come: with subpoenas. Just because you can build it doesn't mean you should.

Completely anecdotally funny how when I have private discussions with people with my phone in the room I suddenly get adverts for that thing popping up on my phone. Funny how a lot of other people say exactly the same.

Funny how a few days ago I forwarded my Imax tickets for Thor Ragnarok to my third party email client on my phone and 2 seconds later Android is showing me Thor related adverts. Mysterious right?

Not only do they (apparently) listen in the room to *everything* being said, they also (one assumes) either read data being passed to third party apps or more likely read content from notifications from third party apps. This is of course all done surreptitiously with no way to disable it.

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Donald, YOU'RE FIRED: Rogue Twitter worker quits, deletes President Trump's account

streaky
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That court case would be a media circus. Twitter and Trump would probably want to stay clear. Also yeah, Twitter's own ToS and internal guidance probably validate the action.

If I was twitter I'd have workflow in place that prevents accounts of a certain size or type from being deleted without a cosign from somebody in management.

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streaky
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Twitter didn't say that deleted accounts aren't recoverable. They said that tweets (content) deleted by account holders are *generally* not recoverable. Doesn't seem absurd based on observations and semi-sensible engineering decisions.

Firstly - it seems like they don't delete things in real time, something comes along an jettisons things; but they're just hidden until that happens. Secondly when you "delete" a whole account it probably gets archived so it can be reactivated, even after that point. There's sensible evidence of this. If you wanted to kill all Trumps tweets you'd have to delete his actual tweets, and they'd probably live for a short period.

On top of that I wouldn't be surprised if Twitter make extra effort to back up accounts of people with large follower accounts - in case something happens. I know I would.

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Jupiter flashes pulsating southern pole, boffins understandably baffled

streaky
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Alien

ALIENS

Just saying, called it, prove me wrong snowflakes!

:D

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RIP HPKP: Google abandons public key pinning

streaky
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Re: Still waiting for DANE

It's worse than that, one of the strongest perceived threats to crypto security is state actors (well, it's not perceived, it's a fact) - and state actors in most cases will have far more ability to screw with DNS than anything else.

There's a moral hazard here though - securing PKI this way calls PKI's existence into question. If a domain owner can specify keys for sites it operates and DNS is cryptographically secured in terms of data content (records signed by domain controller, as opposed to the DNS provider) then PKI providers will probably face questions about the necessity of them continuing to exist. Security of DNS record would be the prime concern of domain registrars and DNS providers but when DNS is secured properly and you can specify any key and it's equally secure as PKI infrastructure would otherwise be (and arguably more so) then they're going to have an issue. That's why expect never to actually see a secure DNS system; because it's not in the cert authorities best interest to secure it.

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The EU is sooo 2016. We're all about the US now, say Brit scaleups

streaky
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However I don't see how Not having access to the EU talent pool will help compete against US companies

This is where your post goes off all half-cocked. We're not talking about nobody will ever cross the channel ever again. We're talking about leaving the EU. We're talking about ending the no questions asked, no validation needed, no case need be made immigration system and replacing it with one fit for purpose. How effective it'll be is a question for another day but once we have a government that is allowed to tailor the system to fit we can boot them out if they're getting it wrong and opt for another choice.

The only way to make this work is for the UK to leave the EU, so that's what we have to do.

My bet is that the UK will not do better trade deals on its own simply because "There is strength in numbers"... and I don't see what leverage the UK will have when negotiating with larger economies

Dunno, what leverage does Switzerland have? What leverage does Singapore have? We know we can be more competitive and operate fairer terms with most of the world's economies than the EU allows its trading partners so I don't really see the issue. The other leverage is that because we're not massive with a massive complicated pile of interplay issues - and one voice and nobody to need to horse trade with - the deals themselves don't have to be nor will be massively complicated. The EU's size is a barrier to trade deals, that's why the EU is still negotiating with China about negotiating to have talks. The supposed Japan deal will never get off the ground and neither will the EU's fabled merging of EU and NAFTA.

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