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* Posts by John Brown (no body)

10785 posts • joined 21 May 2010

Dead retailer's 'customer data' turns up on seized kit, unencrypted and very much for sale

John Brown (no body)
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Re: QED

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQYPCPB1g3o

Yep, definitely fun, but I'm surprised they didn't have a minimum wage monkey taking the drives out of the caddies and flog the results on Ebay.

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iFixit engineers have an L of a time pulling apart Apple's iPhone XS

John Brown (no body)
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Coat

"Every time I call anyone who answers using an iPhone I hear "The connection here isn't great", then they garble up intermittently, which results in a short and confusing, less useful conversation."

Well, obviously they are holding it wrong!

(Sorry, but no one else said it yet and someone had to)

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UK cops run machine learning trials on live police operations. Unregulated. What could go wrong? – report

John Brown (no body)
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"And what of the ‘types’ who were led astray and in inaccurate direction?, bound, drugged and thugged with a view to dire disruption? becoming practical prisoners?"

Is AMFM1 now posting as AC then replying to himself? Or is AC AMFM2.0?

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I want to buy a coffee with an app – how hard can it be?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Has anyone?

"Considered the benefits of having a flask (or thermos, for those who only recognise brandnames) of coffee handy for these occasions."

As a roadwarrior of 25 years standing, the first thing I do in the morning is place the flask of hot water, the small tub of instant coffee (took a while to find a good one (for a personal values of good)), a sweetener tablet dispenser, a cooler bag with ice-pack and a pint of milk and a proper mug, all on the passenger seat in easy reach, with a towel/coat/whatever to hold it all in place with the seatbelt where it's all easily accessible while in a motorway services or a lay-by, or even the customers car park.

I discovered many years ago that a flask of pre-made white coffee starts to curdle by the end of a long day. Likewise, a flask of pre-made black coffee leaves a horribly disgusting "skin" on the inside of the flask.

I have considered a small 12V espresso to be kept in the boot, but discounted that as just a step to far on the scale of faffiness (and that I'd rather not be standing outside in the rain waiting for it to "perc" :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Soda jerks

"And thanks also to the procrastinators who, not content with waiting to look at the board until asked by the server what burrito they want, carefully study all the drink choices before settling on their usual liquid candy."

On the rare occasions I go into fast food/drink emporiums, I'm usually overwhelmed by the choice. There's rarely a queue at the times I go in so the issue is the staff asking me what I want before I've even had the chance to raise my eyes to the "menu" to find out what they sell. Even though there's no queue, the staff get very impatient waiting for me to read and assimilate the menu options before I can even begin to make a choice. These places are designed around regular/frequent customers and have no patience with new customers. That strikes me as an odd way to do business.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: only £2.90

"It doesn't have to be drinkable....It's more important to be seen with the "right" branded cup"

FTFY

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I don't drink coffee

"The thing is, though, that with everybody going cashless, there is nothing to put in the tip jar. It's even funnier since the PFY wanted paying in something other than cash."

I've been in pubs and restaurants (proper ones, not those place that McD, KFC, BK call "restaurants") where when you pay by card, the card machine asks if you want to add a "gratuity" and if so, how much.

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John Brown (no body)
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"Lyons airport - where is that?! Anywhere near Lyon?"

No, it's on the corner and serves High Tea while you wait for your plane. Unlike coffee shops, the service is nippy!

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Memories of Not The Nine O Clock News

"That's $900 *a*night*. Breakfast extra."

Anyone happy to pay $900 or more per night really doesn't need to worry that breakfast or anything else will be an extra charge.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Try travelling with First Bus and their (cr)app

"Always baffles me when someone rolls their own great thing its not just made available to everyone else as a spin off. Particularly in the public sector."

Other than TfL, is there any other public sector run transport system?

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Spent your week box-ticking? It can't be as bad as the folk at this firm

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Reminds me of the time ...

"I was then told that I wasn't allowed to speak to the warehouse staff due to unspecified "union" issues."

Probably because the y new database system was either going to make people redundant or the union were looking for the warehouse workers to be paid extra for being "data entry clerks" or ever "data operatives" in addition to their existing duties.

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Bouncing robots land on asteroid 180m miles away amid mission to fetch sample for Earth

John Brown (no body)
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Re: No, no, no, no, no

"See, what you've got there right, are a load of replacement washing machine parts, only they've bloomin' gone and delivered the things to the wrong asteroid. "

Zanussi?

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In a race to 5G, Trump has stuck a ball-and-chain on America's leg

John Brown (no body)
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Re: remind me why we need China for 5G...

"Seems to me that if they're effectively tarriff'd out of business, we can do pretty much anything we want to, in the USA, without them."

If the US wants to go it alone, with different standards to the rest of the world, then that's just fine. The rest of the world will go with the standard that costs the least for the same results. In a trade/IP war with China, who do you think will be able to sell at the lowest cost for the longest time period, probably below cost, to the rest of the world, the US or China?

Obviously it's way more complicated than that in reality, but for better or worse we are in a global market now. Stupid spats like Trumps trade war are not "easy to win" because every countrys economy is intertwined with the economies of many other countries, both allies and "enemies".

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Brits pay £490m extra for mobes they already own – Citizens Advice

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Astonishing isn't it

"The problem with calling the company is that you reach a call centre who can't deal with your account."

When my wifes phone was paid for, we phoned Virgin and they couldn't have been more helpful. I asked what sim only deals they ahd we could switch to and the nice lady at VM looked at the usage pattern and suggested an unlisted £5 per month deal for something like 200mins/2GB data/unlimited texts. That's more than she needs at a very nice price. She's been on that deal for about 4 years now. I think it's now £5.50pcm after prices rise(s).

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Judge: Georgia's e-vote machines are awful – but go ahead and use them

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Bollocks

"A lot of places will be sending out absentee ballots before the end of the month."

If an absentee ballot is what we call a postal vote, then yeah, we do them too, and all in the 20-odd day window.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Queues and competence.

"do not typically align with the party controlling the elections board."

There's one of the primary problems right there of course. An election board should be apolitical and be seen to be so. Or at worst have an even number of members split across party lines equally.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Scanning?

"People who say "hand counted paper ballots work where I live and will in the US too" don't understand US elections. As I keep saying every time someone brings this up as if to say "stupid Americans just do things like us" when your ballots and precincts are nothing like ours."

When did electronic, paperless voting become the norm and is it the norm in every state? How did they cope before they came along and how do the states not using them cope? And finally, if the voting system is so large, complex and convoluted that only electronic voting is feasible, maybe the problem you should be dealing with is the size and complexity of the ballot and not the methods of vote casting.

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The Reg chats with Voyager Imaging Team member Dr Garry E Hunt

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Where is this man's Knighthood?

"Let’s hope that UK elects to continue being part of ESA, "

There's no reason why not, it's not an EU body and Brexit doesn't affect ESA membership. The UK Gov seems to be interested in space science (well, building and selling satellites and the attendant tech anyway) so I'd be very surprised if we pulled out of ESA any time in the near future.

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UK.gov isn't ready for no-deal Brexit – and 'secrecy' means businesses won't be either

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Hmm

"Noooo! Are you telling me the result was leave but you dont know what that means? We voted to leave, to go, not to remain... but you find it ambiguous? I am not quite sure how to explain this better but the result was to no longer be in the EU aka"

So, you're a hard Brexiteer. Obviously that's what you voted for. But it's quite evident that many who voted for Leave had other ideas, including a soft, negotiated exit. You can deny that as much as you like, but thems the facts. You only have to look at the range of public statements on exiting the EU from the various factions of politicians to confirm this.

As for you're comment about remainers not agreeing on their position, I suspect you've not thought that one through very well. A vote for remain was a vote for the status quo. Everyone voting remain knew exactly what that entailed.

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John Brown (no body)
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"You could, in fairness, replace "a no-deal Brexit" with absolutely anything that this government has to plan for and that sentence would still stand up."

Even if there is a deal, no one knows what it will/might be until it's all finally agreed anyway, so the upshot is, no one can be prepared for *any* deal.

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John Brown (no body)
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"For us that means paychecks!"

Unless you're working for a US company, then it's your pay cheque you should be worried about, not just checking it's correct.

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Microsoft: 'So, we can buy GitHub?' EU: 'We'll tell you on 19 October'

John Brown (no body)
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"Dude, we've changed, yeah?"

Is this the same MS who got find and forced at add the Browser Choice thing to Windows and are now testing a "warning, you are attempting install some shitty insecure browsers instead of our super duper secure Edge browser"?

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NHS smacks down hundreds of staffers for dodgy use of social media, messaging apps

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Policing private life?

"Yes, discipline staff for revealing stuff that should be confidential, but don't discipline them for being humans and having a normal social life. That's not acceptable."

That very much depends on how public the forum is and how identifiable the users and/or their place of work is.

Most contracts have something along the lines of "bringing the organisation into disrepute" which very much can constrain what you do or say when outside the workplace.

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Sysadmin misses out on paycheck after student test runs amok

John Brown (no body)
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Re: sci-fi ships were the order of the day at my first job.

"Nah, I tend to stick to boring, functional names."

Yeah, clever or geeky naming conventions only really work when you've only got up to maybe a dozen or so boxes to look after as was pretty usual back in the 80's or 90's. When it becomes dozen, 100's or even 1000's, you need a proper boring naming convention, especially when said server are all identical looking boxes in a server room, or even scattered around the globe in remote data centres.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: sci-fi ships were the order of the day at my first job.

"No one likes the test server Rimmer though..."

Well, apart from Rimmer not being a ship, I guess it's a VM anyway since it's a hologram and really there :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: "Snoopy characters"

"The Phil Silvers Show."

I always thought those "named after the star" shows were just the result of lazy people who couln't be arsed to think up a decent title.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I didn't but my collegue did.

"After payroll day was told, 2 people did not get paid at all. Colleague said, "Only two didn't get paid? That's not an issue." I did suggest he may have a change of attitude if he was one of the two..."

LOL, upvoted, but in his defence, he probably meant that dealing manually with only two payroll failures isn't an issue the way 20-30 or more would be.

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Git it girl! Academy tries to tempt women into coding with free course

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Post school or at school?

"Their case is different to that of schools. It is hard to see how every child will be keen to be a programmer, or even be tempted by coding, just as it is difficult to see how every child can become a top sports star."

You're right. But all school kids do PE at school even though 99.9% won't ever be pro sports stars. Likewise they all do English, Maths, Science etc. Until they reach GCSE level at which point they get to choose. They all need to do a bit of everything so they can make a more informed choice of what to do later. Having the basic of programming can be just as beneficial in many walks of life in the same way the basic of maths can be useful. eg I've never had a need to solve a quadratic equation since I left school, but I have use practical trigonometry now and then. Many who do basic programming at school may never use it again but will retain enough be able to knock out a few simple batch files/bash scripts to make life a little easer if and when required.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Schools need to step up to the plate

"Schools are buying Apple devices exclusively, of course Computing Labs are going to be expensive."

The schools I deal with who went with iPads still also use Windows desktops.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Schools need to step up to the plate

"As I think everyone here will know, you really don't need lots of expensive kit to teach IT: business cast offs work fine."

In principle, yes, but managing a group of disparate, older PCs adds in lots of extra support time and costs too, something few schools have. It might work in a minority of schools where they have someone with the skills and interest to support the old kit and source the parts when the older kits breaks down, but if/when that person moves on, they have a problem again.

Then you also hit (sometime unfounded) worries over regulations etc regarding disposing/selling of electrical equipment. Someone has to test it for electrical safety and be responsible for the certification if anything goes wrong. Lots of businesses really don't want that hassle so when refreshing their PC fleet include disposal of the old kit as part of the deal. Those taking the old kit may refurbish and sell on or just subcontract the collection down the line. Then the school has concerns/worries of buying in and insuring second-hand kit that might not even last a year.

Most of the schools I deal with very much prefer to buy new with a 5 years on-site hardware warranty. That's desktops, BTW. They few schools I've dealt with going for minimal levels of desktops and have handed out chromebooks or Tablets seem to have ongoing "user damage" repair costs which far outstrips the cost of having lots of desktops. Likewise, a very small number have mobile trolleys full of laptops they move from room to room as required and also end up with lots of user damage.

Regulations that are real, regulation that people misunderstand, the ubiquitous "health and safety" mantra and which budget gets spent (capital versus running costs) are what make it difficult to use recycled/second-hand PCs in schools

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Princely five years in US big house for Nigerian biz email scammer

John Brown (no body)
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ordered to pay $2.5m in restitution

Does "restitution" just mean fined or does that "restitution" actually all go to the victims?

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Russia: The hole in the ISS Soyuz lifeboat – was it the crew wot dunnit?

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Shutterstock!

"It's like The Reg are paying a small fortune for a shutterstock account so they have to make the best use of it, and always come up with these shitty fucking condescending images."

A while ago, a Reg job advert had selecting and sourcing these images as part of the job description. I'm not sure if that post as been filled yet or not.

Personally I'm of the school of thought that if the picture is not directly related to the article, don't put one there at all.

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Euro bureaucrats tie up .eu in red tape to stop Brexit Brits snatching back their web domains

John Brown (no body)
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Re: sacrebl.uk!

" it's that unusual "

Oops, that should have been "it's NOT that unusual" :-)

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John Brown (no body)
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"You dont need to be American to have a .com domain,"

That would be because .com is international. Americans have access to .us domains though, here's the 123-reg FAQ on who can register .us domains. Note how you must be a citizen of the US or have a business presence in the US.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: Double standards?..

"You need a UK address (PO box not accepted) to register a .uk domain. So stop moaning about it."

Exactly. It's a clickbait storm in a teacup.

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John Brown (no body)
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"the re-moaners can cry all they like about the reasons why they think people voted, but its nonsense like this .eu pettiness and much worse that grind peoples gears."

Oh, FFS, it's what all civil servents do throughout the world. Did you never watch Yes [Prime] Ministers? Or is that before your time? If so, dig it out and watch it. It's an eye opener.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: sacrebl.uk!

"Unsure how many .eu sites are actually essential but I'm surprised that many registered in the UK in the first place."

I spend quite a lot of time on the UK roads and it's that unusual to see .eu addresses on the backs of lorries. Oddly though, mainly British haulage. Other EU based haulage companies seem more likely to use the own national TLD.

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John Brown (no body)
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Happy

Re: Well that's the end of the .eu domain

"Cloud Cuckoo Land is the literal translation of classical Greek "Nubicuculia," the name of a perfect city in the sky made by birds in Aristophane's play The Birds."

It it better than Hitchcocks version?

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Florence and the Machines: Data centers brace as hurricane smashes into US coast

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Hate to point this out but....

"Your datacentre is up? Whoopie-do unless I can access it and it hosts useful apps to the patient, they can get there, and someone can use it..."

Those data centres are supporting business well outside of the storm zone. Not protecting them would cause the storm impact to be far, far more widespread, ie not just across the US but possibly affecting customers worldwide.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: I hate to say it

"But here's a case where corporations operate more efficiently than government agencies tasked with similar responsibilities."

I'm not sure "efficient" is the right word. Government can't be seen by the public to waste money preparing for something that may not happen (I know, I know, government waste!). Corporations can't be seen by shareholders to not protect their investments and profits.

Imagine the outcry if government put 100's of people on stand-by, with more than needed fuel/water etc all placed ready to move at a moments notice and then the storm never hit, or was less than predicted. Or put the right amount of resources in place and then the predictions were exceeded? Corporations generally prepare for things to protect their income. Governments react to situations so as to minimise cost (not always realising that costs after the fact might be more than protection before the fact)

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Google Chrome 69 gives worldwide web a stay of execution in URL box

John Brown (no body)
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Plugins/extensions

"Chrome 70 implements a Shape Detection API that allows web apps to do things like detect faces in images, read barcodes and parse text in images."

No wonder browsers are turning into bloat-monsters.

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Trump shouldn't criticise the news media, says Amazon's Jeff Bezos

John Brown (no body)
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Re: "As far away from Trumpton as possible."

"I'll see your Trumpton and your Chigley, and drop you a Clanger"

We need more Wombles to clean up the mess!

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John Brown (no body)
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"HE IS STILL PRESIDENT"

You're right, and it's very, very scary. Let's just hope HE'S NOT A PRECEDENT.

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UK.gov finally adds Galileo and Copernicus to the Brexit divorce bill

John Brown (no body)
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Re: Remind me...

"A sector poised to benefit from Brexit: pitchfork sales. Possibly also tar & feathers."

Flaming torches. You forgot the flaming torches. You can't have a good march or proper tar'n'feathing without flaming torches. And no, a torch app on your mobile phone is NOT acceptable!!

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John Brown (no body)
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"the Russians were the ones who saved the ISS project."

Yes, and no. The US wanted the Russian space program to continue and have put a lot of money their way to help ensure that. Maybe not so much in the last few years other than taxi fares, but it was partly to help retain the Russian space expertise in Russia and not have them selling out to the highest bidders all over the world. Rocket engineers wanting to Get Rich Quick can build all sorts of upwardly mobile explody things for other governments if their own government can longer no longer pay them.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: To anyone pro-Brexit

"And after all, the majority voted to leave"

You should define "majority". You can't claim the "don't knows/don't cares" as positive for either side. It certainly wasn't a majority of eligible voters, and was barely a majority of those who voted.

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John Brown (no body)
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Re: To anyone pro-Brexit

"We agreed a set of rules for the referendum. We agreed that the result would be implemented, on the basis that +1 vote was enough."

I, and many others, never agreed to that, it was forced on us. A vote with such a possible monumental significant change should have a been based on a distinct and significant majority and I said so at the time. Basing a referendum of this magnitude on a simple "+1" majority was monumentally stupid without compulsory voting. No one knows what those who didn't vote thought and neither side can claim all thier votes or discount non-voters as "don't care". The 25%(ish) who didn't vote failed to do so for many reasons and can't be simply tarred with the same brush. I'm sure quite a few didn't vote because they either thought it was a waste of time, ie leave would lose, and a few might even have been so confident in a leave win that they didn't bother.

The Brexit vote had even larger ramifications to the UK as a whole than the Scottish Independence vote, yet was treated with such disdain that no one bothered to place similar conditions on it, eg minimum turnout + significant majority in favour.

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John Brown (no body)
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Facepalm

"Who would have thought that Brexit was so complicated"

Ummmm... anyone who thought about it for ten minutes?

WHOOOSHHH!!!!

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New MeX-Files: The curious case of an evacuated US solar lab, the FBI – and bananas conspiracy theories

John Brown (no body)
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Conspiracy Theorists

Funny how they always assume that only their own country is capable of spotting $whatever and so their own TLAs can easily cover it up. Or that every other government in the world will also cover it up if their people see/find $whatever. Or there's a shadowy world government that's really in charge.

The reality, obviously, is that there are other solar observatories completely independent of the US systems and they have announced the impending doom of the human race. Only the US citizenry is unaware of it. The rest of us are rampage, pillaging and looting. it's all a plan to piss off the survivalists. They're missing out out on their life's dream event.

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John Brown (no body)
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Pint

Re: Proof

I love the partisanship whenever Trump is insulted and the downvotes accrue. FFS people, get a sense of humour. He's only a politician (and newly minted at that), not the saviour of the human race. It's alight to insult or laugh at pols, even if you support them.

Have a pint and calm down

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