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* Posts by Sir Runcible Spoon

5133 posts • joined 29 May 2007

Alexa heard what you did last summer – and she knows what that was, too: AI recognizes activities from sound

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Yeah

Of course amazon et all will pish all over their good priniciples and aims, but there's still a small chance to carve out out a niche for privacy respecting alternatives because of these guys/gals work.

Fair point, well made.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Paris Hilton

Re: Not before hell freezes over ...

"Even if it belongs to your significant other and it houses something priceless to him/her, meaning percussive maintenance may well result in lawyers/solicitors?"

Especially then!

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Joke

Re: skewing their data - be very careful

"Apologies for the extreme example."

Don't apologise, there's a pretty good chance that whatever we can imagine will be trumped by reality in about 0.2microSheepFartSpeedInAVacuum

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Facepalm

Re: Amazon Prime-ed

You've actually provided a useful example - and one that would therefore never happen.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: The title is no longer required.

Not 'Salmon Fishing in Fly's' then?

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AI's next battlefield is literally the battlefield: In 20 years, bots will fight our wars – Army boffin

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Terminator

Re: "Humans are going to be a lot less visible and we will get used to it."

"Humans will probably be the least effective, and are often the weakest link in the cyber world."

Doesn't it concern anyone else when a phrase like 'humans are the weakest link' is directly correlated to AI driven military hardware?

Shit, how blind/corrupt are these people?

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Take my advice: The only safe ID is a fake ID

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Hugh Jorgen

"I used to know someone whose real name is Richard Large..."

He has a wife you know....

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Aliases are fun

My Uncle, who'd had a stroke (and consequently a bit lairy at times) was at a weeding of a Mr David Hunt. At full volume across the hushed church he said

"It's a good job his name isn't Isaac".

I laughed like a drain, most everyone else just went pale and shocked :D

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: A different name for every site?

"That "prefix your email" thing dosnet work for yahoo,"

In the settings you should be able to create a single alias, with multiple variations.

For example - base alias = something@yahoo.mail.com

All the variants would then be along the lines of something-<variant>@yahoo.mail.com

You can have *lots* of variants.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: A different name for every site?

"You would end up with sons called "Opening Batsman" and daughters called "Big Tits""

Thank you for my second laugh of the day :D

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Joke

Re: Aliases are fun

" I have three books published on Amazon that are under this name and not my own."

What, Anonymous Coward? How do we know it's really you then?

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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WTF?

Re: Irish names in Irish or English.

. I have now 12 books of names for people with fresh babies

!! As opposed to...??!

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Pint

Re: A different name for every site?

"Glod Glodsonsonson."

Thank you for my first out loud laugh moment of the day :)

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Pint

Re: Competition time.

Avast isn't that far aware from Vista either.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Joke

Re: Silly first name.

My Starbucks name is "Tex". Good job no-one there asks for a surname to go with that... I'd answer "Piss".

You could say 'Message' as your surname for Tex :)

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Silly first name.

"I pronounce my own name as Allister."

Have you tried 'Dare, Alice' as your weekend pseudonym?

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Super Micro China super spy chip super scandal: US Homeland Security, UK spies back Amazon, Apple denials

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Black Helicopters

Perhaps TPTB don't want anyone looking too closely at the *actual* chip blueprints?

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AI-powered IT security seems cool – until you clock miscreants wielding it too

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: In Your Dreams, Sir Runcible Spoon

I am suitably terrified, even though I only studied the barest spattering of what was available at the time of my state sponsored education, although at a bit of a loss as to how learning more about it would lead me to feelings of contentment and satisfaction (I lie, but to admit the truth would be like admitting I believe in Unicorns).

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Terminator

Re: William Gibson

I'm pretty sure that the article asking 'does knowledge of AI make you less afraid of it' is a case of taking something obvious and stating it in reverse.

The actual truth of the matter is simple..

The less you know of something, the more afraid of it you are.

(also: Familiarity breeds contempt)

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Uncle Sam gives itself the right to shoot down any drone, anywhere, any time, any how

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Thumb Up

Re: @jake

"Mīn lyfthærnflota is ful ǣla."

Wonderful use of juxtaposition Jake :)

Now we just need somewhere for the eels to fit in.

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It's over 9,000! Boffin-baffling microquasar has power that makes the LHC look like a kid's toy

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Joke

Re: LHC = 27Km circle

Perhaps it's two small black holes that are squeezing out electrons like tiddlywinks?

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Contractors slam UK taxman's 'aggressive' IR35 tax reforms

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Headmaster

@Lost In Clouds of Data

Whilst I find your work laudable, did you have to teach them Northern?

Ah, well, better than now't.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Facepalm

Obvious Prediction comes true

https://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/3012243 [Thursday 27th October 2016 09:49 GMT]

"What I don't know is if I am somehow deemed to be an 'employee' and wotnot, does the company/agency I am working with have to pay their side of things too? (Such as pension contributions and holiday/sick pay etc.)."

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Soft eng salaries soar by 25 per cent – and, oh yes, devops is best paid for non-boss techies

Sir Runcible Spoon
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@LucreLout

“The economy works fine. Capitalism has lifted more people out of poverty than have been lifted out by all other ideas combined. ”

Only if you employ checks and balances. At some point, someone has to cough up for all that debt. Spiralling interest payments can bring down governments.

At some point the system will seek balance, whether that’s a worldwide debt erasure, collapsed economic system or the whole world just goes bankrupt I have no idea, but I doubt it will be pleasant.

I have noticed a huge drop in product quality since the 2008 crash, because a lot of quality producers went under. What we are left with now are mostly the bottom feeders of production, lowest common denominator stuff - we’ve gone backwards in so many areas.

What will we have after the next crash? Personally I’m just hoping we can still eat and put on some lights in the evening.

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UK taxman told: IR35 still isn't working in the public sector, and you want to take it private?

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Flame

MOO

The day HMRC determines that my clients get to tell me what to do is the day I start looking at re-locating my business.

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Brit tech forges alliance to improve cyber security as MPs moan over 'acute scarcity' of experts

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Joke

Re: Half-life calculated yet?

“It is as critically important a job as it is soul-crushingly pointless. Good luck!”

Damn you, I was perfectly unhappy with my head in the sand until you reminded me.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Sigh.

From what I’ve seen they are having enough trouble defining what cyber security actually is, probably because they don’t realise that it’s a vague term that covers a lot of different roles.

Over the years I’ve attempted to explain what I do in more condensed form so non techies can grasp what I do for a living, but in the in end I have given up and now just say ‘I work in computers’. That seems to satisfy 99% of people as they ‘understand’ that, but obviously is completely meaningless - it’s just a way for them to express their tiny minds :)

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: If... (oh why bother)

Some CNI is managed by private companies. One in particular pays a pittance for salaried staff, so it has a hard time recruiting specialists/competent people.

Assumng HMRC continues on its path to ram ir35 changes down the throats of contactors in the private sector, I expect this will have a huge impact on the ability to recruit even contractors. Plenty will work abroad once the pay differential becomes meaningful.

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Heatwave shmeatwave: Brit IT departments cool their racks – explicit pics

Sir Runcible Spoon
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In my experience cold air is usually pumped into the underfloor space, allowing the racks to vent warm air out the top and drawing the cooler air in from below.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Devil

Re: Never seen the managers, project managers and PMAs do work!

Rapid power down of 100+ servers -> Breaker Switch >:)

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Wrong Type of Leaves

British businesses should ask how they do it in California.

I believe they use this quaint thing called 'money'. IT Depts. in the UK don't get to see a great deal of that.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: That last picture

Pin it in place with a toolbox and you've got yourself a Spanner Tree!

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UK privacy watchdog to fine Facebook 18 mins of profit (£500,000) for Cambridge Analytica

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Missed a trick?

Yeah, but didn't they breach the law twice?

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: A poorly formed...

They fined them the maximum they could under the law, what else do you expect them to do?

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Ouch... that must have hurt

GDPR allows for much bigger fines.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Unhappy

Re: Conclusions?

"https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44466213"

About this article - it mentions that we could end up facing negative decisions by AI with no way of knowing how it was arrived at.

If I, as a human being in a position of authority, make a decision, aren't I expected to be able to provide a rationale for that decision?

Surely if an AI system provided a decision with no ability to provide the rationale behind it, then the decision is not valid and could be challenged in a court of law? Perhaps I'm being overly optimistic. (There's probably no perhaps about it).

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Paris Hilton

Re: Conclusions?

"It's people choice to use it. It's a free service"

Did you not hear about it creating profiles for people who have never had an account?

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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WTF?

Missed a trick?

The UK's ICO <snip> ruled Facebook had twice broken British data protection laws <snip> it has served Facebook with a notice of intent to fine the biz <snip> £500,000 <snip> the maximum allowed

So why not fine them once for each breach for a cool £1m?

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It's mid-year report time, let's see how secure corporate networks are. Spoiler alert: Not at all

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Network Complexity

Over the last few years I've been involved in projects which are starting to bring together multiple security products under one 'support' umbrella - in an area that's secured from the rest of the environment and locked down tight.

This is the future of network security (well, it's the present for some people, just not the majority).

I foresee a boom in holistic security products that provide both remediation and incident response capabilities, along with risk/threat analysis/monitoring (both real time and forensic).

Right now it's actually quite difficult to cobble all these things together into a single platform from which to conduct your security operations as it involves multiple vendors and suppliers etc. - it can get pretty complex once you start taking everything into account, especially for a large corporate with high value assets spread over the globe.

However, it *is* starting to happen, which means there will be a demand for more integrated solutions that don't require as much design effort to get right. And no, it doesn't involve AI anywhere (unless you are referring to some of the managers I've had to work with).

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I see you're trying to leak a file! US military seeks Clippy-like AI to stop future Snowdens

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Terminator

Where will it end?

This isn't really about making AI smarter, it's about making humans dumber.

Keep giving people mental crutches and they'll forget how to walk - it's already happening to a large extent - AI will just accelerate the process beyond repair. One day we will have no-one left who can train people on anything, as everyone will have forgotten how to think.

It's inevitable at this point..Judgement Day is coming :)

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CEST la vie, IR35 workers: HMRC sets out stall for ignoring Mutuality of Obligation

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: Fine HMRC...

What about when I want to invest my company profits to grow another aspect of my consultancy?

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: @Herring: Just a question

The thing is, the client cannot sack me as I only work for *my* company - that's who pays my salary at the end of the day.

The client can terminate the contract, at which point I need to source more income for my company by securing more contracts so that I can keep myself employed. It isn't rocket science.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: where does MOO fit in?

"Similarly, a contractor doesn't have to request leave, they can say "I'm not working tomorrow" (or even, by contract, just not show up, although this is discourteous to the point that the client may just tell them not to bother coming back)."

I typically inform the client when I will be taking leave, but provide them with an opportunity to let me know if it will cause them any problems. 99% of the time it's a non-issue, on those rare occasions when a client says it will cause them issues on their project I work with them to come up with a work-around (such as providing some training to one of their permies to cover the gap whilst I'm off) - it doesn't mean I won't take the leave, but as you say - it's polite to mention it.

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Boffins build neural networks fashioned out of DNA molecules

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Boffin

Dury was right

There ain't half been some clever bastards!

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'Plane Hacker' Roberts: I put a network sniffer on my truck to see what it was sharing. Holy crap!

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: So... who pays for the 3G/4G data connection?

I can see where Wayland is coming from with that comment, but it doesn't cover vehicle use on private land - you don't need a licence for that, so driving *isn't* illegal without a licence.

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Re: What about the Toyotas that get sold to the Middle East ...

I thought you said 'pringle-mounted' and wondered if that would extend the range. /nerd

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Sysadmin cracked military PC’s security by reading the manual

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Joke

They're always building better idiots :P

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Euro bank regulator: Don't follow the crowd. Stay off the cloud

Sir Runcible Spoon
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Windows

Re: They catch on fast, don't they?

Shit now I feel old, because I've been telling people that for 20 now :(

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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Mushroom

Re: Crufty CICS?

Get them to upgrade to Microsoft Access, it's da bomb!

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Sir Runcible Spoon
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When will they learn? (Beancounters)

Outsourcing something doesn't magically make it cheaper, it just hides the costs.

If you want to know how much something costs, work out how much it would be to set up a team with the requisite skills (assuming you don't have them) plus the hardware and the time required, you can save support costs by retaining some of the people that build the thing if you like, or just get in drones and let them call the vendor. That's probably going to be the cheapest model in the long run, although it is a lot more hassle to manage and you can't blame someone else if it goes Pete-Tong.

If another company offers to do it for significantly less, you have to start looking at where they are going to hide the charges. A company that does this well and protects themselves from hidden costs can look forward to being sacked as a customer as the outsourcer will likely be losing money on you hand over fist.

Get the right people and you can half development time, remove expensive support contracts and create a lot of good will with your customers, leading to repeat business and continuity. That is a *lot* cheaper in the long run than the scenario's I see playing out every day, where the external supplier provides sub-par developers who do a crap job, then you have to get contractors in at 3* the price *in addition* to sort out the mess, then hand it all back to the people who fucked it up in the first place. Oh, and you can at least double the development time too.

They (beancounters) really need to learn how to count properly, but that would require a level of trust in your IT specialists - I don't see that happening any time soon. I often get the feeling that cost is the last thing they are actually worried about, no matter what they might say.

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