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* Posts by Roland6

4163 posts • joined 23 Apr 2010

Upset Equation Editor was killed off? Now you can tell Microsoft to go forth and multiply: App back from the dead

Roland6
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> its software engineers, lacking access to the ancient app's source code

Suspect given the issues around backtracking on Win8 and TIFKAM, suspect much code was deliberately deleted around this time in a fit of corporate "burn your bridges behind you" madness.

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OK, Google: Why does Chromecast clobber Wi-Fi connections?

Roland6
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Re: when in tandem...

>Long time Draytek user

Suspect you may already be aware that Draytek have released updated firmware for many of their products, including legacy products, this month.

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Roland6
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Re: Back in the day

There was also the concept that for certain types of messages, only the most recent were relevant, so you simply overwrote old messages. The art was selecting a queue/buffer size that meant when full there was a good chance of it holding a meaningful sequence of messages.

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Roland6
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Re: BT HomeHub?

>I just concluded my HH router's 2.4GHz chip had died because I kept losing that SSID (5GHz worked fine).

Agree with your reasoning, however, it doesn't quite work on my setup. I have an EE Brightbox2 with two SSID's on each of the 2.4 and 5 frequency bands, recently one (and only one) of the 2.4 SSIDs has started to disappear (also about once a day) and then after a couple of minutes reappear... Not knowingly added any new devices...

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Roland6
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Re: Google really at fault?

> Can't the router just drop the packets? It's UDP after all.

Suspect that is the workaround the router vendors have implemented, in fact probably just a variation on a firewall rule.

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UK taxman has domain typo-squatter stripped of HMRC web addresses

Roland6
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LoL!

"The four sites were stripped from the Whois Foundation and transferred to HMRC by order of the DRS."

Anyone what to buy a domain?!

http://whois.domaintools.com/hmrc-onlines.co.uk - Domain is available at $10.99

http://whois.domaintools.com/hmrc-tax.co.uk - Whilst this claims the name is for sale, the name is not available for registration; however, hmrctaxes.co.uk and 83 other variations are, starting from $10.99...

http://whois.domaintools.com/hmrcsubmitareturn.co.uk - Still registered to Whois Foundation, but can be yours for $799.

http://whois.domaintools.com/hdmrc.co.uk - Still registered to Whois Foundation, but can be yours for $799.

It does seem we haven't heard the last of typo-squatting, I suspect HMRC, having got a favourable DRS ruling, will now begin leaning on ICANN to make it easier to protect the 'unique' subdomain elements; potentially, making it harder to register hmrc-tax.com.ru.

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Roland6
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Re: Typo squatting for selling the domain is one thing

It sounds like all the domains held by this outfit ought to be examined and removed from their control - what possible legitimate reason could they have for wanting to hang on to them?

I think that is another reason HMRC insisted on using the fully public approach. By doing everything in public they encourage both user organisations to look up the Whois Foundation and domain registrars to do some research - since they can see the real details behind the "private" registrations. What is not being said and thus needs others to look at, is whether the 53,954 .uk domains represents the entire extent of the domain names held, or whether there are tens of thousands of domains in other local domains, including .com.

Also by winning their case, they have made it significantly easier for other domain owners suffering from typo-squatting to use DRS to take control of such domains.

Interestingly, HMRC also puts ICANN on the spot, as can it really continue to permit the Whois Foundation to continue portraying themselves as being associated with the ICANN Whois service.

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Shhh! DropBox 'quietly files' for IPO

Roland6
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Pint

Re: @Charlie Clark

>Have a nice jug of foaming brown thunder juice on me!

Either the pint is being pulled wrong, or the keg has been overgassed. A good and well drawn pint will be gently effervescent and have a small head of foam... :)

Have a pint of hand-pulled cask beer !

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Dropbox thinks outside the … we can't go there, not when a box becomes a 'collection of surfaces'

Roland6
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The new logo is basically 5 identical diamonds in a particular arrangement and as such can be reproduced by anyone with basic Powerpoint [Aside: other drawing packages can be used.] skills.

Previous versions of the logo required a level of artistic and design skill to get the 3D perspective right.

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Apple agrees to pay £136m in back idiot taxes to UK taxman

Roland6
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Boffin

Re: Let me guess ..

To put the numbers (ie. £180 and 2.29mm) into (a) context...

My researches indicate the new polymer £5 and £10 notes are 87.5 microns thick..

(can someone with a micrometer confirm this?)

So convert your £180 into 10 x £10 notes and 16 x £5 notes and make one stack out of them and the pile will be 2.275mm high...

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Roland6
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Re: Let me guess ..

Based on this article Revealed: HS2 'abysmal value for money' at 10 times the cost of high-speed rail in Europe, £180 buys 2.29mm of track - but that is at autumn 2016 prices...

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Sky customer dinged for livestreaming pay-per-view boxing to Facebook

Roland6
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Re: The real point

". So, how is he liable. That's like saying if someone steals your car and runs someone over, you're liable as it's your car. The person actually doing it is liable, nothing to do with the device or account involved."

Whilst the person who actually did it is liable, as the owner of the vehicle you also may incur liability - particularly if you hadn't reported the car stolen, depending largely on whether the police can identify and apprehend the person who was driving the car.

[ http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/hit-run-driver-caught-camera-7299122 ]

Also in this case the guy will have signed an agreement with Sky probably for both his usage of Sky TV and of his broadband...

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Watt? You thought the wireless charging war was over? It ain't even begun

Roland6
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Re: Efficiency?

>Plugs and sockets wear out

What? not within a few years - my 2011 iPad2 still charges etc.

>The socket on a device also is vulnerable to water penetration

Solved problem: Rubber seals, modern waterproof coatings as seen on several vendors phones, magnetic conectors as seen on the MacBook...

Although agree if you try and charge your device with water in the socket, you may encounter problems...

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Take notebooks: About those new Thinkpads...

Roland6
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Re: @Roland6 - @fruitoftheloo

Over the years there have been various factors reported that impact the longevity of laptop batteries. I suspect usage style and sophistication of battery management utilities play a major part, and whether having a battery no longer able to hold say an hour's charge is a user-noticeable issue or not.

For example, for many years, I would use the laptop for an hour train/flight commuting to/from work, hence it would quickly become visible when the battery became unable to last journey. However, presently due to not having the hour-long commute, having a battery that only lasts circa 15 minutes isn't a problem.

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Roland6
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@gsf333 - whilst I get your point, the real issue is that this is a T-series Thinkpad, which is presented and sold as a laptop to be used by mobile workers ie. everywhere.

At one time you could hot swap batteries (well you had about 30 seconds to do it in), which at times could be handy. I think part of the problem is how well catered for mobile workers (particularly in our larger cities) are now, with many public places and trains having power sockets (and WiFi), however, step outside that environment and things can get much more problematic.

In fact, most stay plugged in 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Anyone know if this is how they have designed these newer laptops internally

From my experience the answer is no, frequently using your laptop with the power connected still kills the battery.

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Roland6
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Re: Workstation?

Not been able to locate a Lenovo specification to clarify the situation, however, I did come across this article:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/12204/lenovos-thinkpad-t580-launched

It would seem to be correct the T580 doesn't come with a "a professional-grade GPU", instead the options are: NVIDIA’s GeForce MX150 GPU or Intel’s HD Graphics 620.

If you really need the Quadro then you need the P52 variant. Which given Lenovo are targetting the P-series at designers, engineers, and video artists ie. users of 3D modelling, CAD etc. and who want to use ISV-Certified applications (see https://support.lenovo.com/gb/en/solutions/ht101713 ), makes sense.

So suspect the "workstation end of the market" is a different workstation market to that being targetted by the P-series...

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Roland6
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Me-to! - How to devalue a brand

Anyone hoping that the much-loved seven-row keyboard would return to the mainstays will be disappointed. That was an expensive treat for hardcore fans in the 25th Anniversary Edition.

Interesting, the retail prices for replacement keyboards indicate there is a £10~15 price difference between the seven-row keyboard and the newer 'me-to' keyboard. So whilst I appreciate production cost savings - particularly when you are producing at volume, I do have to wonder whether this decision is a little short sighted, given those who buy a Thinkpad are those who will happily pay a premium for a premium laptop, particularly one that loudly proclaims itself to be a Thinkpad.

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With WPA3, Wi-Fi will be secure this time, really, wireless bods promise

Roland6
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>After that it's a matter of taking a walk to the location and having 'a quiet chat' with whoever's operating the rogue AP - which is almost always a phone unintentionally left in tethering mode.

The chat is probably more beneficial in increasing a user's security awareness than simply blocking their device and them getting frustrated at things not working for reasons unknown.

In clearing one client's building of ad-hoc networks, we identified a business need and so modified the requirements for the WiFi infrastructure to include the capability (and procedure to invoke) for user departments to request a private WiFi network and non-corporate Internet connection (eg. needed to permit some staff to monitor how the website looks to the public).

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Roland6
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>the full branded cisco gear does the same.

I seem to remember that AirDefense also did similar.

The key was in setting it up so that AP's could correctly triangulate clients within your premises. So if you were running a secure network, you could prevent people from within your building, connecting to external networks or unapproved ad-hoc networks. Likewise, you could terminate connections (to your network) for people leaving the building.

As someone else has noted WPA3 will need to support this security feature, although it's implementation is likely to differ.

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Microsoft patches Windows to cool off Intel's Meltdown – wait, antivirus? Slow your roll

Roland6
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Re: Done...

>...the patches and done all the benchmarks.

No change.

Are you sure the patches have actually been installed and enabled and not left in the "off by default" setting?

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Roland6
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Re: The point of the brand new reg value

yeah, but win security centre knows what av is installed for most major brands, hell, team viewer knows it. wouldn't be beyond the realms of mankind to check that automatically would it?

Well it would make sense on consumer systems for Win Security Centre to set the key, however, suspect there are valid installs where Win Security Centre isn't running or cannot reliability determine the AV software installed, hence MS have left it to the AV vendor to set.

Because of the circumstances under which it blue screens, it is worth manually setting this and seeing if your 'old' AV causes a blue screen or not, as you can always delete the key via safe mode.

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Roland6
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Re: The point of the brand new reg value

Is that only shiny new anti-virus software with updated shitty dependencies on Windows internal gubbins knows to set it.

It must be really shiny and new AV software, as a machine currently running MBAM 30-day trial doesn't have this key...

So just because you are running a current subscription AV doesn't mean this KB will be installed, you need to check that the key exists and then do the install.

The absence of the value suggests that old anti-virus is present, which will probably kick the patched Windows in the 'nads.

It also suggests that no AV is present.

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And we return to Munich's migration back to Windows - it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

Roland6
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It is reported that over 4000 windows hosts of various kinds remained after 10 years because their role couldn't be properly replaced due to software not being available.

It does make you wonder, if having decided to spend €100M on IT, they didn't ask the question what if we spend this money on renewing our legacy software, by placing contracts with Munich based developers...

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Roland6
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Re: 10 years to migrate 16000 PCs and they're going to go back to Windows ?

The big cost of the SAP catastrophe at my company was due to the requirement to completely revise every aspect of their existing business model to fit the SAP way of doing things.

Well at least they went about it the right way! It was quite common for businesses to try and make the package fit the business and thus largely negating the benefits of using an off-the-shelf package.

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

Roland6
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> I'm looking forward to the first generation of Skynet CPUs to go into my Colossus build.

Better hope that A.L.I.E. doesn't get there first.

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Roland6
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Re: Late to the party

>We made it go mainstream. Our Tuesday report was the basis of ... and BBC coverage

Recommend from listening to the BBC Radio News interview of the El Reg reporter, that El Reg invest in some verbal communication and media skills training. The poor guy obviously wasn't used to talking to the media, but well done for standing up and doing the interview.

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Roland6
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Re: Daily Telegraph hackette on the BBC World Service this morning @Archtech

The BBCs article on the subject does have a comments section:

The BBC have done several articles on the subject; not all have comments sections:

Jan 3: Major flaw in millions of Intel chips revealed - No comments section

Jan 4: Rush to fix 'serious' computer chip flaws - Has comments section

Jan 4: Intel, ARM and AMD chip scare: What you need to know - No comments section

Jan 4 - 4 hours ago: Meltdown and Spectre: How chip hacks work - No comments section

I think you will find that the majority of articles on the BBC don't have comments sections.

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SuperFish cram scandal: Lenovo must now ask nicely before stuffing new PCs with crapware

Roland6
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Re: before stuffing new PCs with crapware

does that include Win-10-nic (as 'crapware')?

Well from what I understand about Windows 10 consumer versions and the definition of "Covered software” used by the FTC then my anwser is 'Yes'!

Is that a bad thing? I say no as it might kick MS to update the Windows software and EULA so that they revert to the form they were in for Windows 7 and previous, with respect to privacy etc. ...

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Roland6
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Re: Removing all crapware

Given the definition of “Covered software” (see the definiton on page 7 of the FTC/Lenovo agreement linked to in the article) which is sufficiently broad to include MS Office Starter Edition and Windows 10 (given what we know about it)...

If you live in the USA, the revised process would seem to be:

Order Lenovo PC having ticked the "no crapware" box(es)

Open package, take out system, connect all cables

Put rescue disk in drive, power on to boot from it

Completely wipe the HDD/SSD using gparted

Crapware is now gone.

Install Fedora Linux

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That was fast... unlike old iPhones: Apple sued for slowing down mobes

Roland6
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Re: Planned obsolescence

But the 5c (stuck on iOS 10.3.3) probably isn't affected...

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Ubuntu 17.10 pulled: Linux OS knackers laptop BIOSes, Intel kernel driver fingered

Roland6
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Re: The Intel Driver bug is possibly a bit more present than Intel lets on.

>I have had several Dell branded laptops unexpectedly become totally unresponsive (apart from the power button lighting up) while installing the Windows 10 Creators or Windows 10 Creators Fall updates

Agree there are problems which seem to be associated with UEFI.

WRT Windows 10 Creators Fall update, what surprised me with a bunch of HP laptops, was that the one a user updated, purely using the MS WUP service was bricked [Issue was reported in the HP forums at the time and got some press exposure.]. However, on the others by firstly doing an HP maintenance update (using the preinstalled HP tool) and doing as instructed, namely reinstall the BIOS that had been installed some months previously - doing a full overwrite/reset, the subsequent MS updates worked without problem.

My hypothesis was that an update (via MS?) did something to the UEFI memory that was causing the Fall update problems, by performing a full BIOS refresh, I was setting the BIOS and the relevant UEFI memory area to a known state.

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Roland6
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Re: Accidental Aardvark

>THAT is the kind of BIOS tool that is needed - not something that REQUIRES WINDOWS to run.

Well the question is whether the Intel tool will run on BartPE or similar...

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Roland6
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Re: Lenovo does not sell laptops with Ubuntu

@Youngdog

"Canonical works closely with Lenovo to certify Ubuntu on a range of their hardware."

That clearly says it is Canonical's responsibility and not Lenovo's, thus Wayne is right that Lenovo have no culpability. Also currently, Lenovo UK list no laptop that can be purchased with Linux pre-installed.

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We have standards, says 3GPP as group starts to lay groundwork for 5G

Roland6
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Ovum predicts there will be 400 million 5G users by 2022, ... Of those ... 15 million from the UK.

Comparing with the takeup of 3G and 4G services, I would say that number is being highly optimistic, unless Ovum are assuming either: One of EE, Vodafone, O2, Three are going to massively upgrade their network by then and force customers to switch from 3G/4G to 5G. Or, they are assuming that phones capable of using the 5G frequency bands will available and networks will be using the 5G bands for 4G/LTE traffic and thus this counts as '5G'.

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Roland6
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Joke

Well if you only need one mast for the whole country....

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UK.gov pushes ahead with legal right to 10Mbps

Roland6
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Oops! FTTCoE should have been FTTPoD. Although given the prices attached to FTTPoD, don't see BT providing it at a 'normal' customer price.

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Roland6
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>But 10Mb/s is shite. Really poor, it should be pitching at 100 or better.

But think in the context of a USO. 10Mb/s at the end of a 1+km cabinet to home line?

Effectively it means installing FTTC cabinets everywhere and then installing either FTTP or FTTCoE...

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Roland6
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Re: The turn of the millenium called...

>I think your mistake there is using BT ADSL. -1 vote

In the 'remote' parts of the UK don't expect third-party LLU equipment to be particularly performance or new, I've repeatedly seen this, even though my line is circa 20m longer than my neighbours, I got better speed off the BT LLU than they got off the Sky LLU - however it was still sub 512kbps... Basically, the numbers of subscribers doesn't justify regular tech refresh.

>you should be able to get a wholesale BT product from someone else for less. +1 vote

Generally, this also means you are likely to get a lower contention ratio and thus able to make better use of the limited available bandwidth.

>As for EE, look for special offers +1 vote

Agree, also do the online speed check using your full details a couple of times over a few days and then wait for them to call you, then you can negotiate a deal...

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Roland6
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Re: "not economically feasible"

It will also free up capacity on the existing lines making for a far nicer experience on them.

That's the joke or lie!

HS2 isn't due to be around until 2034 at the earliest, however, Network Rail et al are already taking decisions, such as implementing new timetables in 2018 that reduce capacity on the existing London-Birmingham and London-Nottingham lines...

Additionally, where I live, it is currently under 1 hour into London, under the new timetable, the new 'fast' service will take 1 hour 15 minutes! Naturally, the price will also be increased.

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Roland6
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Re: The turn of the millenium called...

>Lol, my last letter from Virgin Media said I had downloaded 17TB !

Big iCloud user are we? :)

https://discussions.apple.com/thread/7344937?start=0&tstart=0

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Roland6
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Re: The turn of the millenium called...

>I have 4G coverage only from EE (and 8Mb from BT ADSL), so I pay £60/month for 100GB and I get about 70Mbps.

The problem with Three (and others) is getting a sensible data allowance and piece of equipment.

For example: Three's HomeFi currently gives you 40GB pcm for £24, which if you want more than this (without incurring the 1p/MB out of bundle charge) you have to resort to SIM swapping with a 40GB SIM at £17 pcm. Whereas with EE you can get 100GB and 200GB data only plans. However, the Three HomeFi (a Huawei’s B310 Wireless Router) is better suited to the task of being the home network router than the EE dongles.

Personally, I would purchase a router like the B310 (available from Amazon for around £100), add the external antenna and drop the EE SIM into it.

Obviously, you can try putting a phone SIM into a mobile broadband dongle, but since Three will detect and block them, I've never really bothered, and accepted that the mobile networks don't really want high volumes of home/tethered traffic over their networks.

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European court: Let's not kid ourselves, Uber. You're a transport firm, not a 'digital service'

Roland6
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Re: So...

I think you misunderstand

Err no, I suggest you read the text of the Uber submissions to TfL where they play the game - we don't employ any taxi drivers, we just provide an app, the drivers are the responsibility of our customer, the Uber London taxi co. ...

it's pretty much the same with many other companies with subsidiaries in multiple countries.

Agree, I purchased 3 DVDs on Amazon.co.uk last week, all in stock at 'Amazon', only after placing my order did they reveal that each DVD would be supplied by a different 'Amazon' subsidiary and I subsequently received three packages through my letterbox, naturally each via a different courier/mail service. [Aside: full marks to Royal Mail who outperformed the couriers and actually delivered next day, the day Amazon forecasted for all three deliveries...]

Hence why we should give credit for the ECJ for not being suckered by Uber's deliberate obfuscations.

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Roland6
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Re: So...

The trouble is, and this seems to be what the ECJ has managed to wade through, 'Uber' isn't one company; there is 'Uber' the app developer, 'Uber' the platform operator, 'Uber' the taxi company (which is likely to be a different entity in each geographic region 'Uber' offers services in) and is the one the drivers contract with, etc..

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Ofcom sees off legal threat over 5G auction terms

Roland6
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Problem with Ofcom at the moment is that the large telcos are pulling the strings and Sharon White is just being a puppet. Ofcom is meant to be on the side of the consumer, not on the side of the large telcos.

I think this gives real grounds for further appeal.

Ofcom's legal obligations are clear:

Section 3(1): "It shall be the principal duty of Ofcom, in carrying out their functions;

(a) to further the interests of citizens in relation to communications matters; and

(b) to further the interests of consumers in relevant markets, where appropriate by promoting competition”

[Source: https://www.ofcom.org.uk/about-ofcom/what-is-ofcom also see http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2003/21/notes/division/2 ]

However, the judge was very clear in his summing up:

In the Decision it sought to strike a delicate balance between protecting competition and consumers, on the one hand, and setting restrictive caps which were not disproportionate to BT/EE.

[Source: https://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2017/12/court-rules-favour-ofcom-ee-three-uks-5g-spectrum-fight.html]

Nowhere in Ofcoms regulatory duties is it required to "strike a delicate balance...".

So Ofcom now need to justify its approach wholly within the confines of its legal and regulatory obligations.

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TalkTalk banbans TeamTeamviewerviewer againagain

Roland6
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I think they also do something horrible to VPNs, as she can't get onto the network of the charity she consults for from home. Their IT say it's a common problem with TalkTalk.

Not just TalkTalk, Virgin, Sky and probably others.

Basically, going back a bit, all of the above blocked the standard VPN ports on their home/residential broadband, because if you read the T&Cs the service was not intended for business usage - home working is business usage.

I don't know about their current policies, but I do know that Demon (before they became Vodafone) didn't block traffic and EE's Home/residential broadband offerings are fully home office compatible.

I think in the headline rush for speed (and TV), people have overlooked the detail:

- Are VPNs supported

- What is the traffic filtering and shaping policy

- What does unlimited really mean

- What is the contention ration

- What is the down/up speed ratio

- What are the SLA guaranteed down/up speeds

etc.

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Roland6
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Re: Shall we block email too?

While we are about it, might as well block HTTP/HTTPS, as we know these protocols are also used for scams...

And just to be safe, perhaps we should add DNS to the list...

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UK.gov needs help getting folk to splurge on full fibre and 5G

Roland6
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Re: End Openreach, BT, Monopoly

...and you must only use the cash for building out infrastructure that works at at least 300 mbit and is capable of 10gbit+ with existing technology...

G.Fast is capable of 300Mbps+ over circa 100m of copper.

XG.Fast is capable of 10Gbps - over circa 30m of copper.

So why do you need glass fibre? ...

But you didn't specify a distance requirement! :¬

WRT 10gbit+ service, it might be helpful to note that many national backbone networks are only 10Gbps...

The fundamental problem is building a network today that is fit for tomorrow at a reasonable cost. Thus for example the Milton Keynes cable TV network (designed 1970s) was capable of doing much more than broadcast TV, since it was a full coax network, the only problem, it had used thousands of unidirectional signal splitters because they were cheaper than the bi-directional ones and thus the cost of upgrade (ie. retrofit bidirectional splitters) becomes prohibitive. A similar thing happens with LANs, we deployed lots of 100Mbps LANs and WiFi access points, all works fine until you decide to turn the network into a multimedia backbone and you discover the latency and throughput of the APs and switch backplanes just isn't up to the demands of realtime voice etc. which is what happened to many companies in more recent decades.

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Roland6
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Re: "The market will provide"

.. but making it compulsory to put in FTTP cabling on new build and renovated property would be a good move wouldn't it? The complaint from Openreach et al is that the costs are heavily loaded towards the last mile...

Interestingly, it would seem that BT/Openreach aren't the issue here, from a reading of this article from Sept-2016:

Openreach offers free FTTP broadband to more new-build homes

It would be interesting to know the reasons why not all 'new site' orders get FTTP, the inference from the tone of the article is because of the developer...

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Roland6
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Re: End Openreach, BT, Monopoly

"I'm knackered regardless. ... even though all existing properties connected to the cabinet were paid for by the Welsh Government."

So your problems aren't just with BT, they are with the Welsh Assembly who couldn't properly manage the BDUK contract.

Both central government and the quango's set up by local government, up and down the country, should carry much of the blame for the failings of the BDUK project. It was their collective lack of backbone and understanding of commercial realities that created the framework that enabled BT to deploy in a way that in many areas made it commercially unviable for a third-party operator to step in and provide service.

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A million UK homes still get crappy broadband speeds, groans Ofcom

Roland6
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Vodafone do if you buy the "video package" etc.

This does seem to be a rather interesting way through the net neutrality minefield. Instead of giving traffic from preferred sources priority, simply charge the customer more for the privilege of receiving such traffic outside of their traffic allowance, naturally as the customer is paying for the traffic as part of their subscription the ISP can now legitimately route this traffic differently based on customer demand and not on payment from content providers...

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