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* Posts by JimmyPage

2712 posts • joined 5 Mar 2010

Scrapping UK visa cap on nurses, doctors opened Britain's doors to IT workers

JimmyPage
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Re: UK IT shortage

Don't be silly.

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JimmyPage
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Re: our NHS will be short staffed

Our NHS is short staffed.

FTFY.

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Leeds hospital launches campaign to 'axe the fax'

JimmyPage
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Flame

One word missing from the entire article.

And that's "patient".

As an NHS patient, I'd rather have the option to have EVERYTHING emailed to me, (would certainly help when they misplace my records) way before this tomfoolery.

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The grand-plus iPhone is the new normal – this is no place for paupers

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

Re: the news media's 'millenial' bashing wholesale.

Shame you didn't bother to stop and process what the poster was saying. It wasn't a value judgement (although it says a lot about you that you read it as such).

Seemed a statement of fact to me. Millenials are growing into a world where they won't be able to buy houses (not their fault). They are therefore deciding to spend their money as they see fit, rather than in the manner to which the previous generations would have understood. Again, no judgement.

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You'll never guess what you can do once you steal a laptop, reflash the BIOS, and reboot it

JimmyPage
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Security vs. convenience

It's possible to devise a chip that can fry it's own circuits - say if the wrong passcode is entered (or entered twice ...)

The reason such chips haven't been developed is because despite offering Hollywood-blockbuster levels of security, the first time one ACTUALLY fried itself, and some moronic user puts on their Daily Mail sadface with a headline about how they "lost" £1,500 simply because the entered the wrong passcode (or their darling brat did) and it's game over. So no point in spending a kings ransom on the R&D only to be told that HP/Dell can't sell a machine with such a feature.

Those with long enough memories might recall the "scandal" in the 80s of the pisspoor security around cars - bent twig and you're in. After taking repeated pastings, the manufacturers delivered some pretty good security. Of course the first headline was "man stung for £1,500 after losing his key". Security vs. convenience. Guess which won ??????

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Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

JimmyPage
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Er ... weren't the 90s-noughties browser wars fought over this shit ?

And MS lost ?

Certainly for personal computing needs these days, MS really aren't in that strong a position. No one *needs* Windows that much. (Moribund workplaces don't count).

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Expanding Right To Be Forgotten slippery slope to global censorship, warn free speech fans

JimmyPage
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Boffin

Google split ?

I wonder if there's a solution in separating Google the search engine, from Google the ad-slinger ?

Ad-slinging requires the Googly goodness which fucks around with the nature and order of results returned. There's no question that Google have had their sticky little fingers in the pot, and can hardly claim "wot, me guv ?" when told that if they can manipulate those search results, then they can jolly well manipulate these search results.

However, if a search engine is just returning a list of what's there - warts and all - then it has a pretty good defence of being a common carrier. Unless we are going to start reindexing dead-tree archives ?

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Voyager 1 left the planet 41 years ago – and SpaceX hopes to land on Earth this Saturday

JimmyPage
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Re: Women-give-better-directions-than-men

O'Reilly ?

From bitter experience, women are very good at adding all sorts of irrelevant details to the directions ... I mean "carry on until you get to the A454, turn left, 500 yards, your're there" is succinct. You don't need to know about any roundabouts, superstores, churches, or other landmarks on the way.

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Vodafone hounds Czech customers for bills after they were brute-forced with Voda-issued PINs

JimmyPage
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WTF?

3 strikes and you're out ?

Sorry, unless it's involved some very sophisticated playing with spacetime, WTF don't sites just lock an account after 3 incorrect tries ?

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Could you hack your bosses without hesitation, repetition or deviation? AI says: No

JimmyPage
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Boffin

Re: Career progression

It has been a source of puzzlement for years - no, decades, why IT workers with admin prvileges are so reluctant to use these for their own benefit.

Well, firstly, it's a pretty crap setup if "admin" access is a synonym for "access all areas" for a single person, unless it's a small outfit. In which case there's probably other mechanisms in place (like working next to your boss). Even going back 10 years when I was sysadmin for a small business, there were things I didn't have access to (the directors email, for one).

And even if you had genuine God access, the question is how to use it "to your own benefit" ? Because if you could devise a way to do so - and make it undetectable then (a) what are you doing being a sysadmin, and (b) well .... how do we know it hasn't happened ?

Finally, it's a hard enough life getting the systems to do whatever nonsense the business is crying out for today, let alone getting it to do something off piste.

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Windows Server 2019 Essentials incoming – but cheapo product's days are numbered

JimmyPage
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Linux

Re: I'd like to find a usable replacement for Exchange

https://www.linux.com/learn/microsoft-exchange-alternatives-linux

as a starting point.

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JimmyPage
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Is Cloud computing Smart Meters for IT ?

Once you've put all your eggs into the cloud basket, how long before "demand management" becomes a thing ? You want to use CPU cycles at peak times ? Then pay a premium rate for it.

No pay, no play.

On a slightly different tack, how essential is *Windows* server? I'm pretty sure I could easily run a SME on some carefully configured Linux servers.

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HTTPS crypto-shame: TV Licensing website pulled offline

JimmyPage
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Facepalm

redirecting HTTP to HTTPS

Isn't this the sort of thing a first year Comp Sci graduate used to be able to do ?

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Huawei Mate 20 Lite: A business mobe aimed at millennials? Er, OK then

JimmyPage
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Forget the phone, it's Android I have problems with ...

Almost every single issue I have with Android (and there are enough that it's an issue in itself) has resulted in viewing hundreds of "support" forums whose advice never seems to work. Mainly because they insist there's a button or a setting somewhere. And there is. On *their* version of Android.

Case in hand. MrsPage recently wanted to send an SMS to a group of contacts about a medical support group they are in. Should have been the easiest thing in the world shouldn't it ? Just create a group for those 5 contacts, and send to group.

It was only then that it transpired the stock *Android* contacts app does't do groups. Anymore. It used to , but the feature was removed sometime ago.

So after finding over 20 articles telling me how I could have done it, I finally got the answer on hit 21. You need to install the *Google.Android* contacts app.

I really have no idea how anyone could run a business with such an amateur approach to features and support.

(As for Apple, seems their native email client doesn't do groups either...)

I'm guessing the switch to BYOD has allowed this to happen.

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Archive.org's Wayback Machine is legit legal evidence, US appeals court judges rule

JimmyPage
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Boffin

Maybe HTML6

can include a simple checksum for a webpages static content ?

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Microsoft sharpens its claws to cut Outlook UI excess, snip Ribbon

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

RE: Outlook is buggy, lacks features and is very unreliable.

So, use something else.

Ah, *now* you get the point .....

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I've seen the future of consumer AI, and it doesn't have one

JimmyPage
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RE: isn't it just some sort of expert system

If the "expert" is a 2 year old child, then yes: bang on the money.

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

Re: 3D TV

They'd have realised that trying to decide on a standard by throwing differing incompatible systems at the market was a surefire way to fail.

Even amoeba have more intelligence about how cooperation can lead to bigger payoffs.

Maybe next time ...

1) form a consortium

2) share resources, and develop a technically correct solution, not a marketing perfect one

3) license it to others, so they can share in the wonga

4) bring to market

instead of doing it backwards ?

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JimmyPage
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FAIL

Proof (if it were needed)

that there's nothing "I" in AI.

Many years ago, understanding natural language was (correctly) touted as the gold standard of AI.

We're still as far off that as we are fusion power. And just like "fusion power" we can fake it few a sneeze of time.

I'll believe in AI when a system can look at a picture of a knife, a fork and a spoon sticking out of a mound of earth and tell me:

1) what it is, and (more importantly)

2) I have wasted my life

(Not necessarily in that order).

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Anon man suing Google wants crim conviction to be forgotten

JimmyPage
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Meh

But even before the first transistor was invented ...

and Rehabilitation of Offenders Act or not, there has always been an option to scour national and local newspaper archives and ferret out the recorded news - with names - from the original conviction.

So in one respect, nothing has changed.

Yes, Google, etc make it *easier*. But it was possible before.

Even if Google didn't exist, it's pretty likely that local and national newspapers would have digitised and monetised their archives anyway. The only difference being you might have had to pay to see the results.

All of that said, I agree with the concept of rehabilitation. Otherwise you may as well lock someone up for life for any criminal offence.

(Part of the issue here, is the enormous amount of "crimes" that successive governments manage to invent. But that's a seperate debate).

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Spies still super upset they can't get at your encrypted comms data

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

governments can always legislate

So ? (Although I'd leave the UK out of this sweeping statement ....)

Or rather, "So what" ?

No amount of legalese will ever change the laws of mathematics and the principles that underpin encryption. You may as well complain that it getting dark at night is hampering your crime solving ability, and await a low making it illegal for the sun to set.

A much better idea might be to go back to your elected overlords and suggest they think more carefully about what should - and should not - be "illegal".

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Fruit flies use the power of the sun to help them fly in straight lines

JimmyPage
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The other superpower of fruit flies appears to be evasion.

Because their minds are running waaaaaaaaaay faster than our mammalian neurons. They see the world in ultra slow motion.

(Little tip ... they take off *backwards*. You can splat them if you aim a little up and behind them).

I'll believe more in this AI bollocks when someone can rig up some software to track a fly - in real time.

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A decade on, Apple and Google's 30% app store cut looks pretty cheesy

JimmyPage
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FAIL

Re: Microsoft ?

how desperate Microsoft is to attract developers

Not so desperate they didn't manage to break every single incarnation of Windows Mobile with it's successor. 8 broke 7.5 which broke 7.1 which broke 7.0 which broke 6.5 which broke WinCE ....

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Chap asks Facebook for data on his web activity, Facebook says no, now watchdog's on the case

JimmyPage
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Elephant in the room ?

Whilst it's right and proper there should be privacy safeguards in place for people that have Facebook accounts, how about the same for people that don't have Facebook accounts, but that Facebook knows about (and can sell the data on to other parties) ???????

I'm not explaining how again.

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You want how much?! Israel opts not to renew its Office 365 vows

JimmyPage
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the greedy bastards of this world won't make any money.

downvoted for lack of imagination. There's plenty of money to be made, still. Just spread across a wider userbase than a few EnormoCorps. Part of the problem now is that the EnormoCorp have managed to supplant the elected mechanism of government with the unelected privilege of wealth.

Seems Eisenhower could not have been more right. Probably the most prescient president the US had.

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Super-mugs: Hackers claim to have snatched 20k customer records from Brit biz Superdrug

JimmyPage
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Holmes

386 ?????

I guess it might really have been. But that's such a baggage-laden number in IT, it does suggest that it was the first number the person quizzed could think of.

"Did I ever tell you the time I sang in a barbershop quartet in Skokie Illinois .... ?"

Been a while since we've had a call for more El Reg icons. But a "Oh, really ???" one might be an idea ?

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It liiives! Sorta. Gentle azure glow of Windows XP clocked in Tesco's self-checkouts, no less

JimmyPage
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Joke

Tesco PoS terminal

correct on both counts ....

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Microsoft takes another whack at killing off Windows Phone 8.x

JimmyPage
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Mushroom

Backward compatibility ???? In *all* platforms.

It used to be an IBM point of pride that you could still run 30 year old code on their latest boxen.

Certainly up to XP, MS made a similar boast with Windows.

Fair enough, you wouldn't expect XP to be able to handle 2002 hardware onwards. Hence Vista/7. But you'd expect it to run something for Win95 - or even Win3.1/3.11.

So how come the phone OS market turned that on it's head, and lead to a situation where it's almost expected that the latest version of an OS will break older apps ? Which strongly suggests an unstable or infant platform. Not something the corporates are going to look to.

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JimmyPage
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Unhappy

The most incredible thing is ...

Windows Phone - from 7 onwards - was actually quite good. Having run it alongside Android and iOS, it was my preferred UI.

Quite happy to go public on this.

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If you drop a tablet in a forest of smartphones, will anyone hear it fall?

JimmyPage
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mature market ?

In other news, car sales remained fairly flat, as did washing machines, microwaves, and cookers.

Oh, hang on. That's not news. News is communication about the unexpected.

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Apple pulls iOS 12 beta 7 after less than 24 hrs

JimmyPage
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Rollback

Is it possible to rollback this release ?

And Mrs Page wonders why I wait months before I'll update her iPad.

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Google keeps tracking you even when you specifically tell it not to: Maps, Search won't take no for an answer

JimmyPage
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Pirate

Alternatively

can't someone come up with an app to spaff false location data back to Google to make their data sets useless ?

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Samsung Galaxy Note 9: A steep price to pay

JimmyPage
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The one thing I wholeheartedly agree with Jobs on ...

is stylii. If you need them, you've failed.

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UK cyber cops: Infosec pros could help us divert teens from 'dark side'

JimmyPage
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@Waseem Alkurdi

All very well. The problem is that people who don't know about Islam prefer getting their facts from the UKIP-EDL "scholars" interpretation of it.

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Top Euro court: No, you can't steal images from other websites (too bad a school had to be sued to confirm this little fact)

JimmyPage
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Boffin

how exactly were the school to know of the copyright in the first place?

I can see some sort of metadata being legally (or lawfully) required for images on t'net.

Maybe webservers could be setup to automatically wrap a default set of details around every image download. And audio. And video ?????

Yes, they could be stripped by the unscrupulous. But they could also trigger some sort of infobar in a browser, so you know the score ????

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Build your own NASA space rover: Here are the DIY JPL blueprints

JimmyPage
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I'm daydreaming ...

and imagining they did the same for the Apollo craft ...

Imagine building your own Saturn-V, plus command, service, and lunar modules.

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2TB or not 2TB: Microsoft fiddles with OneDrive as competition offers twice the storage

JimmyPage
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Re: And when they can the whole lot ?

Seems MS have the best trollbots on the net. Shame the stuff they flog isn't as good.

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Cache of the Titans: Let's take a closer look at Google's own two-factor security keys

JimmyPage
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Ah, the tyranny of choice ...

the inevitability of obsolescence.

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Holy ship! UK shipping biz Clarksons blames megahack on single point of pwnage

JimmyPage
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Happy

Clarkson hack ?

Was it just me that remembered Jezzas red-face moment a few years ago ?

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Now that's a dodgy Giza: Eggheads claim Great Pyramid can focus electromagnetic waves

JimmyPage
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re: no electroplated items have been found

#1 Absence of proof is not proof of absence.

#2 Maybe they just didn't electroplate.

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JimmyPage
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Has The Register been hacked by the Express ?

The Great Pyramid of Giza, the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, has remained an architectural mystery.

To who ? Obviously the thickies that read tabloid journalists haven't got the smarts to work out how buildings work. But people who have take the time and effort to improve their understanding by "learning" (some folk may need to look that one up in a dictionary) don't use words like "mystery".

How was it built?

it was built by cutting blocks of stone, and placing them in position. Yes it is hard work (which probably accounts for some lack of understanding by modern standards). But entirely possible. As we can see BECAUSE IT'S THERE.

Why are its dimensions so perfect?

Why are any buildings dimensions "so" perfect ? Because they were built to a plan using the (ridiculously simple) tools to maintain angles and lines.

Don't get me wrong. The Pyramids are a fucking classy piece of work. An amazing legacy. And doubtless a lot of techniques and knowledge that were extant at the time of building have been lost. But "mystery" ? We can even have a stab at what they were used for. Sodding big mausoleums. We can also have an educated guess that they build a pyramid because - clever as they were - they couldn't build a hemisphere which would have represented the night sky they did worship.

Here's an interesting clip ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5pZ7uR6v8c hopefully takes some of the "woo" out of the discussion. Which is not to say "wow" - as it is amazing.

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Think tank calls for post-Brexit national ID cards: The kids have phones so what's the difference?

JimmyPage
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Alert

Re: Policy Exchange...

Funny, I rarely see the "exchange" part of their name in action.

Let's put that right, shall we ?

Their "policy" is for ID cards. My "policy" is that they can fuck off to the far side of fuck and stay fucked off there forever.

Seems equitable.

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JimmyPage
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Let's get one thing straight. Right here. Right now.

The Windrush generation were BRITISH CITIZENS. And as such needed no "ID" to prove their right to reside in the UK.

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Dixons Carphone: Yeah, so, about that hack we said hit 1.2m records? Multiply that by 8.3

JimmyPage
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New scammer SOP ?

1) Trip big companys (ideally one with a pretty shit reputation to start with) data breach alert system.

2) Wait for said big company to self-report, and hit the headlines

3a) Flood the interwebs with your carefully crafted phishing emails that look like they are the sort of thing said big company would send out.

and/or

3b) Also hit the phones for some old school phishing.

4) clean up.

Notice how no data was lost - or needed - in the making of this scam.

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Tech Shutdown Blows: IT chaos cost Brit bank TSB almost £200m

JimmyPage
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FAIL

And lessons learned ?

Zero.

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Outage outrage: TSB app offers users a TITSUP* encore

JimmyPage
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WTF?

Does it really take 3 months to change banks ?

Because I can't think of any reason why after April someone wouldn't.

If I ran a shitty business, I'd be curious to see who out of my customers is also a TSB customer. Because I know it would take an atomic bomb for them to switch.

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Spidey sense is literally tingling! Arachnids detect Earth's electric field, use it to fly away

JimmyPage
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Human analogue ?

MrsJP has always been able to tell if there's a storm coming. far more accurately than the forecasts (which are right about 1 in 3 times).

Now, she has MS, so her central nervous system is fucked. I've always wondered if that's made it sensitive (or more sensitive, which is an interesting line of research) to electrical disturbances.

Sometimes I wonder why people - especially scientists - seem surprised by findings like this. Life on earth has been around the best part of 4 billion years. It would be incredible if it hadn't found ways to work out what was going on in the environment. Whether electrically, chemically, magnetically, or indeed by radioactivity. Plus harnessing any useful outcomes of quantum effects. As I believe photosynthesis is supposed to work.

I notice other posters have commented on dowsing. Whilst I have no time for woo, I sometimes despair at the counter-productive and dangerously religious anti-woo cabal that tries to restrict scientific enquiry by dismissing things a priori as woo. They're just as bad as creationists.

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Google releases lite PC-snooper, 'cos full mobile management is hard

JimmyPage
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Linux

Linux ?

accidental omission ?

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HMRC told AGAIN to toughen up on VAT-dodging online traders

JimmyPage
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Re: Hmm

"It is estimated that the UK is missing out on between £1bn and £1.5bn a year from online VAT fraud,"

Which I bet will cost £2billion to collect ....

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Canadian utility makes blockchain upstarts bid for their ravenous rigs' electricity supply

JimmyPage
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Tech equivalent of the Golden Triangle ?

(for those whose history is up to scratch).

I guess the holy grail here, is to be able to charge twice or three times for the same electricity. A bunch of cryptominers strategically placed below a town means you can charge twice ... maybe making the town a tourist destination means you get to charge thrice ???????

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