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* Posts by Lars

3015 posts • joined 21 May 2007

Space policy boffin: Blighty can't just ctrl-C, ctrl-V plans for Galileo into its Brexit satellite

Lars
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Re: Ongoing costs.....

@Justthefacts

If you had a look at the ESA "fact sheet": https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileo/Facts_and_figures

you might find it's possible that people might realise it's possible that the "Operational lifetime:" is indeed "more than 12 years", and not three to four years.

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"Galileo support will presumably come in later models.".

The same chip set is apparently used and Samsung S8+ is mentioned as one.

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Re: Spexit!

@Voland's right hand

Where did you get this from "It sucks royally very far up North and far down South."

According to ESA:

"the Galileo navigation signals will provide good coverage even at latitudes up to 75 degrees north, which corresponds to Norway's North Cape - the most northerly tip of Europe - and beyond.".

Also "Galileo is interoperable with GPS and Glonass, the US and Russian global satellite navigation systems".

And why would anybody ask the Russians permission to sail on international waters.

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Re: Genuine question...

"nothing really to do with NATO ".

i can see your point but "nothing" is a bit strong as it's also true that most of NATO members are EU members too.

Albania

Belgium

Bulgaria

Canada

Croatia

Czech Republic

Denmark

Estonia

France

Germany

Greece

Hungary

Iceland

Italy

Latvia

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Montenegro

Netherlands

Norway

Poland

Portugal

Romania

Slovakia

For the complete NATO list.

And there are also some strongly associated countries like Sweden and Finland.

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Lars
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Re: Strangely in the last week or so....

I would not blame the EU for kicking us out if we voted to try and get back in".

Not to worry, we in the 27 know it wasn't business and the better informed who voted leave and we all have our own gullible, if not perhaps so many from our own "world leading" boy schools, perhaps because not so many exist.

Much time and money has already been spent on this folly.

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@Michael Habel

It's about keeping up with the technology and supporting the "domestic" industry (too).

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Tesla autopilot saves driver after he fell asleep at wheel on the freeway

Lars
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Re: Arrested for being drunk

Horses used to do that, at least to the front of the stable, I was told long ago. And no GPS.

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Boeing 737 pilots battled confused safety system that plunged aircraft to their deaths – black box

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"What happened to that",

Boeing had to become modern as they realised they had to go fly-by-wire with the Dreamliner, as there was no choice. The wings are simply too complicated for anything else.

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Tech bosses talk kids' books! Could they show a glimmer of humanity? You only get one guess

Lars
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Re: When I were a lad ...

Oh dear, oh dear Veti,

Is it shocking to you that England is a product of Europe, people, language, religion, culture and geography.

I have not claimed the industrial revolution did not start in England, nor will I, but it's the result of a chain of events that started in Europe. And one of those highly important events was to take the church out of science. It's not quite like that today but you might recall how hard it was, even lethal, to claim the earth was not the centre of the universe.

As for the "priest", his was Imam Hamid al-Ghazali.

This might help.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wp6cnp1kZBY

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Re: When I were a lad ...

@Voyna i Mor

Let's agree, but you used four words against my one word, and it's an interesting topic.

One interesting question is this - "why did the industrial revolution start in Europe".

More than one thousand years ago our friends around Baghdad were far ahead of us in mathematics and science in its various forms. But then a priest stepped in and progress stopped.

Then about 500 years ago a chap, Martin Luther, broke the power of the Catholic Church in Northern Europe and what we call the Age of Enlightenment become possible*.

The priests started to preach in their native tongue but teaching Latin in schools did not end.

As the good programmer I think I was and good at copy/past as you have to be, here is some regarding Latin.

"Latin was originally spoken in the area surrounding Rome, known as Latium.[4] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek, and French have contributed many words to the English language. In particular, Latin and Ancient Greek roots are used in theology, biology, science, medicine, and law.".

While I did not attend a "Latin" school I had my fair share of phrases in Latin as it's part of our European heritage.

And my favourite is - Ceterum censeo Brexit esse delendam.

*according to Bertrand Russell

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Re: When I were a lad ...

"Back in the day the English élite school system taught Latin.".

It was the same in other European countries too, and the reason in one word is "Europe".

Perhaps England is a bit more of a museum in that respect. Incidentally I would never send a kid to a only same gender school.

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Re: Waldorf Salad Education

"The first school based upon Steiner's ideas was opened in 1919 in response to a request by Emil Molt, the owner and managing director of the Waldorf-Astoria Cigarette Company in Stuttgart, Germany, to serve the children of employees of the factory.". (for free).

Nothing elitist in that background, but if you put a high price on it and there are a limited number of school it will, no doubt, feel like that, but there is nothing against science and computers and so forth.

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Big data at sea: How the Royal Navy charts the world's oceans

Lars
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Re: I suppose at least the RN have one ship that works

@DamnedIfIKnow

No, you are so wrong and why did you not check you facts before writing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light

"The speed of light in a vacuum is defined to be exactly 299,792,458 m/s (approx. 186,282 miles per second). The fixed value of the speed of light in SI units results from the fact that the metre is now defined in terms of the speed of light. All forms of electromagnetic radiation move at exactly this same speed in vacuum."

"The effective velocity of light in various transparent substances containing ordinary matter, is less than in vacuum. For example, the speed of light in water is about 3/4 of that in vacuum."-

Perhaps you just came from the pub writing rubbish like that.

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Re: haha

I just have to ask you if you think it's a coincident that boat is boot in German, båt in Swedish and Norwegian pronounced as in German and of course båd in Danish, boot in Dutch and bateau in French and Bát in Icelandic. But the Klingons did not copy it from English as it's Duj.

Barca and barco in Italian and Spanish.

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Re: I suppose at least the RN have one ship that works

And I forgot to point out that whales can communicate through large distances because of this, and not because they are particularly laud. (plus frequency).

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Re: I suppose at least the RN have one ship that works

"Meanwhile, the bungling clowns of MoD still have 57,000 civilian staff sitting on their arses pushing paper.".

Oh dear, what would you like them to do, be involved in some war still be pushing paper.

It's like with the two new floating airfields, long may they parade the Atlantic and the Pacific with the Americans and stay out of harms way, it's a beautiful sight, and the officers are well dressed like in the best opera.

Sound and light are funny, in a way. Light travels fastest when there is no resistance but slower through air and even slower through water.

Sound again is just the opposite, from "nobody can hear you scream in space" to a bit better/faster in air, and a lot faster in metal.

Lay your left ear on a rail trail, send your buddy some hundred meters away with a sledge hammer to hit the rail. You will see him hit the rail and then much later you will hear it through your left ear and then a bit later through your right ear.

And you will never feel the speed of sound is much to boost about.

Then for a beer, if not hit by a train.

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Blighty: We spent £1bn on Galileo and all we got was this lousy T-shirt

Lars
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Re: FFS

"This non-EU nation is in the project."

You find it all on the wikipedia like, and of course information on how much different countries pay.

"In July 2004, Israel signed an agreement with the EU to become a partner in the Galileo project.[61]

On 3 June 2005 the EU and Ukraine signed an agreement for Ukraine to join the project, as noted in a press release.[62]

As of November 2005, Morocco also joined the programme

....."

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OpenStack 2018: Mark Shuttleworth chats to The Reg about 10-year support plans, Linus Torvalds and Russian rockets

Lars
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Well said about Linus

I have come to the same conclusion too. long ago.

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Brexit: UK will be disconnected from EU databases after 2020

Lars
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Re: Just build a wall down the middle of the Channel

Sure, but like then and now there was a different currency in each country. NKR, DKR, SKR. I think there was a similar system between the Rand and the Dollar, and there is now "The Rand is legal tender in the Common Monetary Area between South Africa, Swaziland, Lesotho, and Namibia, although the last three countries do have their own currencies pegged at par with rand."

This has nothing to do with a single currency shared by 19 countries.

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Re: Just build a wall down the middle of the Channel

"and the Scandinavian one fell apart with WWI".

I wonder where you got that from, it's rubbish. There was a time when Sweden/Finland, Denmark, and Norway plus other regions around the Baltic was ruled by one queen*, but that is a long time ago and the "monetary" systems then have nothing to do with today.

* a very interesting person, buried in the Vatican, if memory serves me (without the Wiki)

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"As a member of the EU, we can't even begin to start proper trade talks with anyone.".

Nor can France and Germany and the rest. Wonder how they manage it, and making Trump so upset.

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Re: Guys, guys, Project Fear Mark 75 can be wound up now!

One could add "Each new President is nominated by the European Council and formally elected by the European Parliament, for a five-year term".

It's a limited term and that is why a new President will be elected.

The European Council, charged with defining the European Union's (EU) overall political direction and priorities, is the institution of the EU that comprises the heads of state or government of the member states, along with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission.

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Lars
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Re: Guys, guys, Project Fear Mark 75 can be wound up now!

"The EU won't ask".

Such a mythical animal, I wonder what it is.

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Re: Ah, the UK gov

"The EU exports more to the UK than the UK sells to the EU.".

To export you have to produce something somebody needs and wants to buy, I have got the impression that the UK export industry is a lot more remain than leave, but sadly they are experts.

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Lars
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Re: Ah, the UK gov

"IIRC even the current size of the UK bureaucracy far exceeds that of the EU administration.".

About 33.000 for the EU and +400.000 for the UK.

"Bureaucrats", often called civil servants. are mostly hired and some amount of knowledge is demanded, not quite so with politicians.

(take Raab who suddenly found out about the traffic across the channel)

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Re: re: Scotland

"if memory serves Greenland left the EU while remaining a part of Denmark.".

To make any sense of that one sentence a few more are needed.

"Greenland, the world's largest island, is about 79% ice-capped. Vikings reached the island in the 10th century from Iceland; Danish colonization began in the 18th century, and Greenland became an integral part of the Danish Realm in 1953. It joined the European Community (now the EU) with Denmark in 1973 but withdrew in 1985 over a dispute centered on stringent fishing quotas. Greenland remains a member of the Overseas Countries and Territories Association of the EU. Greenland was granted self-government in 1979 by the Danish parliament; the law went into effect the following year. Greenland voted in favor of increased self-rule in November 2008 and acquired greater responsibility for internal affairs when the Act on Greenland Self-Government was signed into law in June 2009. Denmark, however, continues to exercise control over several policy areas on behalf of Greenland, including foreign affairs, security, and financial policy in consultation with Greenland's Self-Rule Government".

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/gl.html

PS. 91% of export is fish.

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Holy moley! The amp, kelvin and kilogram will never be the same again

Lars
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Re: @A.P. Veening Economists - In 1889?

Why not the keel too, it's heavier than led. There was one well known and quite successful French yachtsman who had a keel of uranium in his offshore racing yacht for that reason.

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Re: Le Grand K's fate

@Voyna i Mor

Sorry for misunderstanding you. They did use the 10.000 km as the distance from the equator to the pole by simply saying it's 10.000 and thus 1m is what it is. The exact distance to the pole doesn't change that, it would be like pointing out that each feet is not exactly one foot.

English is my third of four, but that had nothing to do with my mistake.

Have beer on me.

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Re: Sad case of science ignoring the evidence

"Are there any physicists around who can argue that gold would not have been a better choice?".

I don't know, but I would guess that the economists and others would had been against it much because 40 prototypes were produced to start with.

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Re: Le Grand K's fate

"the period of the Earth's rotation and its circumference - neither of which were in fact constant.".

The period of the Earth's rotation, was a very funny thing to write and has nothing to do with the metre.

The "assumed" distance from the equator to the pole was divided by 10.000.000.

(the circumference 40.000 km).

A glimpse into the British soul we find in this "On 20 May 1875 an international treaty known as the Convention du Mètre (Metre Convention) was signed by 17 states.".

Britain was not among those 17 states.

There used to be an absolutely marvellous account of Britain's indecisive journey towards the metric system, but I cannot find it any more, perhaps it was too revealing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_metric_system

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Brit boffins build 'quantum compass'... say goodbye to those old GPS gizmos, possibly

Lars
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Re: GPS accuracy

The Wikipedia has this on accuracy for Galileo: 1 metre (3.28 feet) (public), 1 cm (encrypted).

15 feet (4.6 metre) is clearly too pessimistic for GPS.

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UK.gov to roll out voter ID trials in 2019 local elections

Lars
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Re: Sledgehammer for the wrong nut

"BUT - postal voting is entirely different."

Why would that be, I go to a post office, and I identify my self, vote, pen and paper, and the rest is the same.

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"Not everyone has passports or driving licences.

Hence, day-to-day life doesn't require it."

That is probably true in more or less the whole world.

The fact that most European countries have the possibility to get an ID card doesn't mean you have to carry it with you all the time.

@Jeroen Braamhaar

A safe way to insult some of the Brits is to suggest they could learn something from some foreign country and it gets even worse should a foreigner suggest it.

Look at how quickly that topic regarding the NHS is dropped here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYYi0kYB3_U

BBC Politics Live 5/11/2018

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IBM sits draped over the bar at The Cloud or Bust saloon. In walks Red Hat

Lars
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Re: ???

"Is this news good for SUSE or bad for Suse".

Should make no difference, or are you playing with the name.

"Their name at founding was "S.u.S.E" and it was chosen as a German acronym for "Software und System-Entwicklung", meaning "Software and systems development". The full name has never been used, however, and the company was known as "S.u.S.E", which was shortened to "SuSE" in October 1998 and more recently, to "SUSE".

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Official: IBM to gobble Red Hat for $34bn – yes, the enterprise Linux biz

Lars
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Re: It's all about the buzzwords

"And "Linux" only 6".

The word "linux" hasn't really ever been used commercially. IBM was rather instrumental in taking linux mainstream, or should I say mainframe, something that started in IBM Germany.

The only TV add I can remember about linux was the one IBM made, with that young kid, 20 years ago?.

Red Hat was of course my first linux in 98.

With now more than 260 comments I know I am not going to read them all, much because they will be very similar, and largely negative. Quite frankly could anybody mention a merger met with great applause. I am still searching, to no avail.

All the same, I wish them all the best, and linux will prevail regardless of how this works out.

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SCISYS sidesteps Brexit: Proposes Irish listing to keep EU space work rolling in

Lars
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Re: Well that's weird....

Hello Justthefacts, weird you didn't do some more "fact cheking". And who is this "the EU claims" chap, any link to him you could provide.

There is more or less what you need on the Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Space_Agency

Including this.

"EU and the European Space Agency

The political perspective of the European Union (EU) was to make ESA an agency of the EU by 2014,[69] although this date was not met. The EU is already the largest single donor to ESA's budget and non-ESA EU states are observers at ESA".

On Canada.

Since 1 January 1979, Canada has had the special status of a Cooperating State within ESA. By virtue of this accord, the Canadian Space Agency takes part in ESA's deliberative bodies and decision-making and also in ESA's programmes and activities. Canadian firms can bid for and receive contracts to work on programmes. The accord has a provision ensuring a fair industrial return to Canada.[37] The most recent Cooperation Agreement was signed on 2010-12-15 with a term extending to 2020.[38][39] For 2014, Canada's annual assessed contribution to the ESA general budget was €6,059,449 (CAD$8,559,050).[40] For 2017, Canada has increased its annual contribution to €21,600,000 (CAD$30,000,000).".

I would assume the UK will eventually apply for something similar.

And there is of course https://www.esa.int/ESA

I would suggest you read before you write, I have found it very useful to do it, and at times I have not, which has annoyed me a lot.

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Shortages, price rises, recession: Tech industry preps for hard Brexit

Lars
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Some Brexit fun

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh0ac5HUpDU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRAU6hODSck

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWqiGQyAj1I

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UK space comes to an 'understanding' with Australia as Brexit looms

Lars
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Re: RE: Mooseman

"The NI doesnt want a border, the UK doesnt want a border, ROI dont want a border.... who's left?".

Only the reality.

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Re: RE: Mooseman

@Wellboot

Try "brexit truth" instead then, it's as interesting.

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Re: They should talk to Canada and India next

Canada already takes part in ESA.

"Canada

Since 1 January 1979, Canada has had the special status of a Cooperating State within ESA. By virtue of this accord, the Canadian Space Agency takes part in ESA's deliberative bodies and decision-making and also in ESA's programmes and activities. Canadian firms can bid for and receive contracts to work on programmes. The accord has a provision ensuring a fair industrial return to Canada.[37] The most recent Cooperation Agreement was signed on 2010-12-15 with a term extending to 2020.[38][39] For 2014, Canada's annual assessed contribution to the ESA general budget was €6,059,449 (CAD$8,559,050).[40] For 2017, Canada has increased its annual contribution to €21,600,000 (CAD$30,000,000)".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Space_Agency#Canada

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Re: RE: Mooseman

Britain is world leading in overseas territories.

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Re: RE: Mooseman

"The UK can unilaterally decide not to enforce a border or implement our side as we wish".

Only if you are prepared to break that international agreement you have signed.

I would suggest you would enter "brexit lies" into your browser and remember how it all started.

Some suggestions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBxWiRz6A9E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTt8XafbA60

.......

Enjoy.

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Re: Tigra 07

"Plus, the majority of what we get back is agricultural subsidies and regional aid".

That is a silly comment, the pork mentioned earlier is all about "that only EU members are allowed big lumps of Galileo pork", pork for British industry.

A lot of the money put into Galileo has ended up in Britain.

The pork comes from being a EU member. Ten other net contributing countries seem to understand it.

How so many Brits fell for the snake oil salesmen is still beyond me, (but then I look at your cabinet, and I listen to the Eton boys).

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UK should set its own tax on tech giants if international deal isn't reached – Chancellor

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Re: A thought experiment

"For everything. there's a Python Sketch".

A slight but very sad correction, it's not "there is" but "there was". And how you would need them now.

Still they were able to foresee both the frogs, moggs and borises of today. What they could have made out of them. Some have apparently taken some time off and one has escaped across the pond, well fed and slightly embarrassed about the old country, sad.

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Re: A thought experiment

@ djstardust

I very much agree, but I have to add that I use a Nokia N90 and I have a working Communicator too.

Did Hammond have any views about the tax heavens.

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Volkswagen links arms with Microsoft for data-slurping cloud on Azure

Lars
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Re: Peace and quiet

"How will they fix the issue of there being say 4 people".

Not a family guy are you.

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Trump's axing of cyber czar role has left gaping holes in US defence

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The sad thing is

That it's difficult to know if it's better there is no new cybersecurity czar than one elected by Trump.

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While the UN laughed at Trump, hackers chortled at the UN's lousy web application security

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@Teiwaz

Easy there Brit, I have a sad feeling you have, with your own two party system, looking at the direction of travel*, been able to mess up Britain more than Trump has in the USA.

What a modest guy he has become, did not reveal Mexico will pay for the wall, or has he suddenly become generous too.

To be a bit serious, he did not address the UN, but his own home front. He probably expected the audience to be quiet or applaud out of politeness, (like on Question Time).

Regarding Americans, you cannot laugh him out, you have to vote him out. or he will amuse you for about six more years, remember he is also the fittest President in American history. and he is the biggest up there and down there (she is fake news).

* does that expression make people sound very educated.

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Amid Trump-China tariff tiff, Cisco kit prices to resellers soar up to 25%

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"China's leader just changed the rules to stay on idefinitely...".

That impressed Trump a lot. I wonder why...

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