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* Posts by Lars

2897 posts • joined 21 May 2007

No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

Lars
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive (@ Shadmeister)

Hi Shadmeister.

I wrote this regarding that 10 days ago:

"Re: Well, duh

"Which one of them is going to take up the UK position in the financial world? Or pay the UK share of the budget?".

Don't worry, it will be a combination of the size of the budget, the amount payed out to some countries* and perhaps a slight increase for the ten who pay in more than they receive. Some business will leave the UK for the EU and be helpful in that respect. The UK is less than 15% of the EU.

Things will be solved as before, what would be the choice.

*thinking of Poland and Hungary who are on a dangerous traction since some time and might end up with much less support."

What is there to add, perhaps that the EU is a 20 trillion "business" and one trillion is 1000 billions. One billion here or there is really just pocket money.

You might perhaps wonder why a guy like me who is not British, if a member of the club, bothers to explain his opinion about Brexit or not Brexit.

Let me explain it like this. If I had a son who publicly wanked at a bus stop I would express my kind opinion about it firmly. If on the other hand (oh well) it was somebody "foreign" I would most likely sneer and look the other way. I hope this helps.

No other European country has, like Britain, since the thirties, undressed, exposing a rather weak education standard and a rather defunct political system. What else is there to say.

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Lars
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Re: EU Are Being Vindictive (@ Shadmeister)

"The EU need to accept that we are leaving and rebalance their accounts to accept the reduction in funding, due to funding from the UK being withdrawn".

They will, that has been agreed upon in that first part. Asking for more time to leave having all the old advantages will not be "on the house", not that you asked for that, (not that I claim I understand your sentence fully).

The EU will not prevent the UK from leaving, only the British can, and I think they should, for reasons they have to grasp all by themselves, many have.

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Lars
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Re: Ja, Christoph...

"sounds more like "want to make the cake and eat it too"

I would rather refer to the "cherry picking". It's also still in response to May's read lines.

Some times I wonder if British MPs have taken "Yes Minister" too seriously and think that showing some courage is off the table for them.

As for the billion, that will be recovered by the EU when Britain finally kicks out that awful Euro clearing malarkey.

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Silk road adviser caught, Kaspersky sues Dutch paper, and Vietnam's tech clampdown

Lars
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Re: Vietnam, uh?

Any specific country in Europe you are talking to.

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Dinosaurs permitted to mate: But what does AT&T Time merger mean for antitrust – and you?

Lars
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Re: "The US approach maximises consumer welfare"

Must have been a typo.

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Citation needed: Europe claims Kaspersky wares 'confirmed as malicious'

Lars
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Re: They learned from the best!

"Whatever happened to that treaty which got signed after World War II which prevented both the USSR and the EU from expanding their borders? So, like, who's the aggressor here? I have my own ideas about that.".

Not so fast, trying to explain history in one sentence is indeed <sigh>.

There was no EU then and independent countries apply to join the EU. There is no treaty against that. The USSR fell from inside and so did the wall, remember Gorba. So far so good.

There are indeed those who claim that the NATO expansion was against a not written promise but again there is no such treaty.

What has happened in Ukraine and the Crimea is clearly against a treaty however.

You could try Stephen Kotkin on that, among many others.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnWp_kr4tfc

PS. Try to base your ideas on facts.

PPS. Regarding Karspersky I have no facts, consequently no idea to share.

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First A380 flown in anger to be broken up for parts

Lars
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Re: "From my experience (Emirates), I'd rather fly A380 than B777"

"My last flight to Washington with an Air France Airbus was quite uncomfortable.".

Somebody spoke French on that flight?.

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Lars
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Re: This underlines one more thing

"Airbus had plenty of time to see that coming. "

Maybe so, but meanwhile they have, according to the Wiki:

"As of May 2018, Airbus had received 331 firm orders and delivered 226 aircraft; Emirates is the biggest A380 customer with 162 ordered of which 103 have been delivered".

And I assume RR is not too unhappy about it either.

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Oddly enough, when a Tesla accelerates at a barrier, someone dies: Autopilot report lands

Lars
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"Born before or after the bomb?"

If you are 73 then you are probably born 1944, and before or after the bomb. If you try hard you may understand why I know it.

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Lars
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Born before or after the bomb?

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Lars
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Re: When will we learn? It's all about the money again.

@ Dodgy Geezer

What a funny and so British thing to claim.

The Comet was interesting like the Titanic or the first British airship that crashed on its maiden flight.

Disasters are always interesting and there are often important things to learn from them.

As you mention pressurization I assume you believe the Comet was first there too, but all the normal suspects like the French, the Germans, the Americans and the Russians had that before the Comet. Also the British Avro Tudor before the Comet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabin_pressurization#History

The Comet set no standards, all that could have been learned from that disaster was the importance of good craftsmanship and quality control.

There are quite a few stories, of variable quality, regarding the cause of the "problem". The square windows are mentioned, and did not help, but a well made plane could have square windows. A more plausible explanation was that the rivets were forced through the skin and not predrilled causing small cracks in the aluminum skin.

Think of thin folio, it's very hard to break by pulling it, but give it even the smallest crack and it will snap easily.

Claiming metal fatique is very far fetched as those plans were doomed the day they were built, nor was metal fatique anything new in any field.

The British, very self centred, view is of course that had it not been a disaster Britain would have become a leader in that field. I doubt it a lot, Boeing was well on the road. They used the huge experience from their bombers and they got it right with the engines under the wings, there was no way the British could have prevented them or won. Looking back at the flying boats, they won that competition too.

So, Dodgy Geezer question your information, people who don't do it might end up being run by caricatures like Bojo, Mogg, Davis and a Vicars daughter.

The one impressive thing about the Comet was how much effort was put into finding the reason, only those tests should have been done before and not after.

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Lars
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Re: These are all valid questions

"HumoUr and quips are how the Brits deal with disaster". Yes, but what about Brexit, humour and quips?.

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Lars
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Re: Apple engineer was driving...

"Bzzzzt! Wrong! He wasn't driving.". Yes, but he should have been driving to stay alive..

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Lars
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Re: Lack of LIDAR

"despicable attempts to pin blame on the victim".

This is really the standard procedure in industry. If you have followed "aircraft investigation" it always starts with the manufacture, be it plane or engine, blaming everybody else first. I am not sure there is even any choice in reality to this. (How would that work)

I remember a helicopter crash involving a Sikorsky. I took more than five years and a hell of a lot of money to prove it was the fault of a Sikorsky hardware part. Might have been less expensive to just let it go, but then again there are insurance and all the lawyers and what not.

There is a "sobering" sentence in one of the links provided - “Traffic-Aware Cruise Control cannot detect all objects and may not brake/decelerate for stationary vehicles, especially in situations when you are driving over 50 mph (80 km/h) and a vehicle you are following moves out of your driving path and a stationary vehicle or object is in front of you instead.”

So indeed people expect too much from an autopilot, any brand.

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Shock: Google advises UK peers against more legislation

Lars
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"A quick Google tells me that 300 hours of video are uploaded to Youtube every minute".

Who is forcing them to accept that amount.

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No lie-in this morning? Thank the Moon's gravitational pull

Lars
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Re: That's easy to fix, it would still be 24×60 minute hours in a day...

"by shrinking the minute to 45 seconds your objection is fully resolved, why complicate things, there's no need for that.".

You are not there yet. All you have to do is to shorten the second accordingly.

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I see a satellite of a man ... Galileo, Galileo, Galileo, Galileo, that's now 4 sats fit to go

Lars
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Re: What's the point of this?

Oh dear,

"The problem stems from a cooling liquid leak in the aircraft’s wing pod sensors, which are used to recognize hostile jets or incoming attacks. Without the defense system the Eurofighter jets are not combat ready."

So what about the rest, with more than 600 built and used in Austria, Italy, Germany, the United Kingdom, Spain and Saudi Arabia. The air forces of Oman, Kuwait and Qatar are export customers,..

Is it a new problem/discovery, does it affect only the German air force.

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Lars
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Re: What's the point of this?

Any link to your claim about "10 working eurofighters of 70", or is it just bull..

The Wiki has this: 24 April 2018

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurofighter_Typhoon#Germany_and_Spain

"Germany already operates 130 Typhoons in an air defence role."

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Lars
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Canada is a non-full member of ESA.

What I find so funny is how some Brits fool themselves to believe Brexit is considered such a splendid idea among the Commonwealth countries. The reality is very different and leaving the EU Britain is destroying the bridge for the CW countries through Britain to the EU.

Brexit is a deeply stupid goal* and the CW countries are hardly too keen to bail out the UK.

In other news regarding Galileo "following its exit from the European Union. As a result, Airbus plans to relocate work on the Ground Control Segment (GCS) from its Portsmouth premises to an EU state".

*Disclaimer, while one has to assume Brexit means Brexit I still feel the fat lady has not yet started singing.

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Your F-35s need spare bits? Computer says we'll have you sorted in... a couple of years

Lars
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"I have never heard of Trump being called a socialist.". Well, lifetime presidents are more common among socialists so we have to wait and see.

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Chief EU negotiator tells UK to let souped-up data adequacy dream die

Lars
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Re: Well, duh

"Which one of them is going to take up the UK position in the financial world? Or pay the UK share of the budget?".

Don't worry, it will be a combination of the size of the budget, the amount payed out to some countries* and perhaps a slight increase for the ten who pay in more than they receive. Some business will leave the UK for the EU and be helpful in that respect. The UK is less than 15% of the EU.

Things will be solved as before, what would be the choice.

*thinking of Poland and Hungary who are on a dangerous traction since some time and might end up with much less support.

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Lars
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Re: Well, duh

"Works for Norway & Switzerland.". Yes, but neither agreements satisfy May at the moment. Both are available.

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Lars
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Re: The more I listen to the EU...

@ Phil O'Sophical

I don't think your "Logical Analysis" is all that good at all, She and SNP, the Scottish National Party are for an independent Scotland. She was for remain regarding the EU referendum like most of Scotland. She has been straightforward regarding independence and the EU all the time. Who knows, Scotland might fit in with the Nordic countries very well.

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As Tesla hits speed bump after speed bump, Elon Musk loses his mind in anti-media rant

Lars
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Re: unexpected honesty

What has changed for the worst is the concentration of ownership (influence) of the press in both the UK and the USA, but not only.

There was an article in ElReg, that I did not read, but assume claimed that a company with a clean and decent loo probably is so too.

I would rate news sites in a similar way, from the comments section, the Guardian is the winner there.

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US websites block netizens in Europe: Why are they ghosting EU? It's not you, it's GDPR

Lars
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Re: Total B.S.

No, not at all, I am fairly sure the majority of Americans would like the GDPR enforced in the US too regarding how their personal data is used.

And we have Microsoft who tells us that they will extend GDPR to the whole world. Applying a higher standard is quite normal in industry.

"GDPR for everyone, cries Microsoft: We'll extend Europe's privacy rights worldwide".

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/05/22/microsoft_promises_to_extend_new_european_privacy_rights_worldwide/

So lets hope the "Brussels effect" sets in:

"The combination of market size, market importance and relatively stringent standards of the European Union can have the effect that firms trading internationally find that it is not legally or technically feasible, or economically viable, to maintain lower standards in non-EU markets. Non-EU companies exporting globally can find that it is beneficial to adopt standards set in Brussels uniformly throughout their business."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brussels_effect

There is no reason at all to believe Americans are less interested in privacy matters.

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Ongoing game of Galileo chicken goes up a notch as the UK talks refunds

Lars
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Re: More likely

Something like that*, but it's also more likely that some Brits forget that Galileo has other third party members too, and in a ruled based system that might create very logical conflicts to take into account too.

* the no money, no honey will apply as before, however, as running the system needs a budget.

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Oracle nemesis MariaDB tries to lure enterprise folk with TX 3.0

Lars
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Re: Postgresql is the real winner

Postgres is one open source database of many choices.

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Zuckerberg gets a night off: Much-hyped Euro grilling was all smoke, absolutely no heat

Lars
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"That is why the EU only has an effect in the rules it passes not in anything it debates.".

Yes indeed, rules and laws are needed, nasty or less nasty questions by whoever, where ever will make no difference. However, this applies to any country or jurisdiction not only to the EU.

The debates are needed to agree on rules as the EU is not a system run by a one party government with a toothless, if loud opposition.

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UK digital committee fumes: You didn't answer our questions, Facebook. (Psst. EU. Pass 'em on)

Lars
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Re: Guess what!

"While the EU does write the laws on data protection,". And I would claim there are Brits who would claim the laws on data protection are actually written by the British. Go figure, become a Brit.

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Lars
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Re: Guess what!

Size matters, Facebook has more users in the EU than in the USA. The French, for instance, could also say "No one cares about France any more" because he didn't go to Paris, but they are not that dumb, perhaps.

Apart from that, Zuckerberg knows the EU has been able to take actions against American companies, like Microsoft and others in the past.

Then again I suppose you were perhaps just kidding a bit.

The evidence he gave to the European Parliament wasn't worth much as he didn't really answer the questions, but he is not off the hook by any means.

You find it on youtube.

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Re: Guess what!

food.inc is still on youtube, there are good reasons to have a look at it.

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Hitler 'is dead' declares French prof who gazed at dictator's nashers

Lars
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Re: Um… Why?

Some very well known Hollywood stars did that too to have the appropriate grin, and why not. All that gold has become old fashioned, if not everywhere. To some part I think that has happened to lipstick too unless you are about 80 and American. Smile.

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Undocumented alien caught stealing orbits in our Solar System

Lars
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...or a solar sail...

That will take you downwind only, like a balloon in a steady wind. Nice but totally rudderless, and you will start out with the speed of the earth around the sun of about 108,000 km/h. There is really no sailing, as we who know, know it, in a solar sail, no rudder no lateral plane. You would leave the sun like a corkscrew, round and round, further and further.

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Boffins detect antimatter thundering down from Hurricane Patricia

Lars
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Re: What I want to know

Instead of a CT scan ask for a MRI.

"Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a safe and painless test that uses a magnetic field and radio waves to produce detailed pictures of the body's organs and structures. An MRI differs from a CAT scan (also called a CT scan or a computed axial tomography scan) because it doesn't use radiation."

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Lars
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Re: What I want to know

bananas?

Pleas don't pull Brexit into every thread, anti-matter?.

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Trump’s new ZTE tweets trump old ZTE tweets

Lars
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Re: I just want to say . .

Yes, have a listen to Tillerson, it's almost like he spoke about some moron he got to know.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkJ5-jspPd4

(Or perhaps he is thinking about the Brexiteers)

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Honor bound: Can Huawei's self-cannibalisation save the phone biz?

Lars
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HMD global

HMD Global Oy, branded as HMD, is a Finnish mobile phone company, made up of the mobile phone business that Nokia had sold to Microsoft in 2014, then bought back in 2015. The HMD Oy (limited company) began marketing smartphones and feature phones under the Nokia brand on 1 December 2016, the firm develops and markets. The company has exclusive rights to the brand for mobile phones through a licensing agreement. It was created by inheriting Microsoft Mobile's feature phone business, which was sold by Nokia in 2014. They are in a "close partnership" with Google and use the Android software on their smartphones, whereas on their feature phones the Series 30+ platform is mainly used.[ The HMD brand is only used for corporate purposes and does not appear in advertising, whereas the name Nokia Mobile is used on social media.

HMD is headquartered in Espoo, opposite Nokia's head office, and the company is largely run by former Nokia executives. The first CEO was Arto Nummela, a Nokia veteran for 17 years, until July 2017 when President Florian Seiche took over as CEO. Manufacturing is outsourced to Foxconn. Nokia has no investment in HMD but remains a partner, setting mandatory requirements and providing patents and technologies, in return for royalty payments. HMD use a marketing strategy advertising the Nokia phones as "pure, secure and up to date" (referring to a stock Android interface and its commitment to fast updates) as well as brand trust and nostalgia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMD_Global

Or is this information old ( last edited on 17 May 2018, at 04:29.)

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How could the Facebook data slurping scandal get worse? Glad you asked

Lars
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Re: On curves, and being behind them.

Just the Robber Barons of to day.

"Robber baron" is a derogatory metaphor of social criticism originally applied to certain late 19th-century American businessmen who used unscrupulous methods to get rich."

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Airbus windscreen fell out at 32,000 feet

Lars
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Re: Blown or sucked....

"blown out or sucked out. High to low pressure would suggest blown"

Such an important question indeed, but from the point of the pilots I would agree the window was blown out. But then again in a similar accident in the USA the woman who later died was no doubt sucked almost out of the broken window.

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You have GNU sense of humor! Glibc abortion 'joke' diff tiff leaves Richard Stallman miffed

Lars
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Meh

The joke is a reference to the USA

Seen from Europe (not sure about NI) it's a very sad "joke" about a country where religion and men still believe they should have the right to decide if a woman can or cannot have a legal abortion if she wants one.

A very sad joke.

Having had a look at the link "Mexico_City_policy", it is also a sad joke about a two party system.

"The policy is a political flashpoint in the abortion debate, with Republican administrations adopting it and Democratic administrations rescinding it. The policy was enacted by Republican President Ronald Reagan in 1984,[3] rescinded by Democratic President Bill Clinton in January 1993,[4] re-instituted in January 2001 as Republican President George W. Bush took office,[5] rescinded on January 23, 2009, as Democratic President Barack Obama took office[6][7] and reinstated on January 23, 2017, as Republican President Donald Trump assumed the office.".

I give Stallman credit for sticking to his guns.

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Mike Lynch's British court showdown v HPE pushed back to 2019

Lars
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Re: Caveat Emptor

"Naturally Autonomy said they were worth more than they atually were".

While that is normal it tends to be about the future value not about cooking the books for that purpose.

The company involved with "due diligence" also would assume the books are real.

The EU also assumed when Greece applied for membership that the books reflected reality.

Odd all the same.

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NASA dusts off FORTRAN manual, revives 20-year-old data on Ganymede

Lars
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Re: Don't understand

The first response to your question would be, - yes what a shame, but there is the budget, the people, the project of the day first.

As has pointed out, the first problems seems to be to find the way (hardware, new or old) to read the media, tape or what ever. The next problem is to understand, find out, what those bits, the record, actually represents.

The rest like the language is probably less difficult.

There is an immense amount of data lying around from space exploration, from several countries, that will never be used.

Is that a problem, probably not, as there is an immense amount of new data created all the time.

It's the same in many other fields too, there is more stuff in museums about what not, that will never be studied in detail.

It's a bit like having a bunch of people, and a budget, to watch each new video on YouTube, they will never catch up.

And my point, FORTRAN, summer 1967, Helsinki University, free of charge, how smart we felt about it, and it was all IBM, of course.

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Eurocrats double down on .eu Brexit boot-out

Lars
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Re: In Next Month's News

"I love upsetting remoaners.".

With what?

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Lars
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"what on earth is going on within the European Commission when it can emit two directly contradictory statements within a month of each other.".

Influenced by Davis perhaps.

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Incredible Euro space agency data leak... just as planned: 1.7bn stars in our galaxy mapped

Lars
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Joke

Re: Exciting

Are you sure you have enough pixels.

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Lars
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Re: Obligatory

More like 1035 miles an hour at the equator and some 6000 around the sun.

As for maths I think some on this thread think about it more like arithmetic.

Doing some copy past:

Is there a difference between math and arithmetic?

(1) the study of the relationships among numbers, shapes, and quantities, (2) it uses signs, symbols, and proofs and includes arithmetic, algebra, calculus, geometry, and trigonometry. The most obvious difference is that arithmetic is all about numbers and mathematics is all about theory.

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Blighty stuffs itself in Galileo airlock and dares Europe to pull the lever

Lars
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Re: Yet Another Satellite Navigation System

"There is a reason the Royal Navy doesn't rely on GPS".

So very true, long ago, like when there was no GPS. Learning navigation using the sun and stars is a tradition in many navy's.

Before GPS there was Decca and Loran.

(or did you just forget the Joke Alert icon with your comment)

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The European Commission, no that would be like claiming Britain is run by the 'unelected' bureaucrats, right now, perhaps a good idea, however, why do you think Britain, a member of the EU can leave, if the Commission is in charge and why is it that the UK can veto decisions in the EU,

Give Radoslaw Sikorski, a former Polish Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of National Defense, a chance to explain how it actually works, in his speech at the University of Greenwich.

(and why so many Brits don't quite get it)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pI54yarKz_o

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Re: EU friends apparantly @ ArrZarr

"One of the key reasons is precisely that Galileo is European." Which is the least compelling reasoning I have ever seen.".

If you want to fall behind in technology and let your industry rot, then indeed, why bother with Galileo and similar. Britain showing the way?.

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Yes.

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