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* Posts by VinceH

3123 posts • joined 26 Nov 2009

Windows Update borks elderly printers in typical Patch Tuesday style

VinceH
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Pint

Re: KB2952664

What AC said. Oh so very much what AC said. I agree 100% - and have a pint for saying it for me.

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Amazon Key door-entry flaw: No easy fix to stop rogue couriers burgling your place unseen

VinceH
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Re: Ah, human desire for convenience.

"On a separate note: splell chex on this window appears to flag non-Brit splellings: neighbor is flagged, neighbour is not. Color and colour likewise. Is this new? Has El Reg gone all King George III on us poor cross-pondians?"

I would imagine your browser is doing the spell checking - so if you are in Overpuddle and it's flagging up spellings that are right for you, and wrong for us, that suggests the browser's language is set up wrongly.

Or as an afterthought, what with a significant new version of Firefox having been released very recently, is it possible the developers have tried to be super clever (and in so doing, possibly given themselves need of a facepalm) and are trying to base the language on the site/TLD?

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VinceH
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Facepalm

"Maybe because it's out of reach."

Wait! Are you suggesting the easiest way to deter thieves is simply to put things up high where they can't reach them?

THAT MEANS THE ENTIRE LOCK INDUSTRY IS ONE BIG CON!

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VinceH
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Re: Flawed

Exactly my thoughts as I read those bits in the article. Pick a delivery driver, any delivery driver, and while the miscreant might have a wasted day hoping he'll reach a household with this idiotic device installed, if he does get led to one it could make it all worthwhile.

Also, from the article:

"One potential fix would be for the CloudCam to include extra storage, and cache video locally for some period of time after it is knocked offline. That would then capture footage of any attempted reentry.

But that approach is not only imperfect – a potential thief could keep the camera offline until the cache was full "

Yeah... or he could just nick the camera in order to dispose of the evidence.

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Pastry in a manger: We're soz, Greggs man said

VinceH
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Re: Spineless of them to give in

Rich 11 replying to flatpackhamster's comment that "Attacking Christianity in Britain is like kicking a child in a wheelchair."

"Rubbish. A child in a wheelchair is a human being and has the same value as you and I. Christianity is a religion, a man-made concept which is open to question and criticism however much a number of people might value their belief in some particular one."

I may be wrong, but I think you're actually making the same point flatpackhamster was, rather than countering it. I don't think he was likening the two different things, but making a point about the attitudes of the sort of people who complain about a sausage roll in a nativity scene.

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Alexa, please cause the cops to raid my home

VinceH
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Re: So is Alexa now the.....

Actually, no - my bad (memory).

I thought the line was "Get in the car if you want to live" - but it isn't, it's "Come with me if you want to live" and I've been misremembering it for a while.

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VinceH
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Terminator

Re: So is Alexa now the.....

"Waltz with me if you want to live."

I'd have gone with "Get in the groove if you want to live." - Closer to the original.

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User asked help desk to debug a Post-it Note that survived a reboot

VinceH
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"My other half has this annoying habit of saying less words than she needs to describe a problem, for example it won’t work."

Someone I know has a broadly similar, but not quite the same annoyance. When asking for help with a problem over the phone, I tell him to read out what it says on screen, but he'll skip bits. So I tell him to read it exactly and he'll re-read it, and now the skipped bits become "blah blah".

The words he's skipping are usually the important ones that'll give me a clue - he's skipping them because they're the ones he understands least.

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UK Land Registry opens books on corporate owners

VinceH
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Re: May I introduce you to...

"It's English, how many rules do you want?"

It's English - there can never be too many rules.

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Look, ma! No hands! Waymo to test true self-driving cars in US with Uber-style hailing app

VinceH
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Re: Sounds fishy

"If he was blind, how did he know there was no one in the driver's seat? The driver could have been mute."

If you switch out mute and replace it with deaf, I think I've seen that documentary.

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Google's answer to the Pixel 2 XL CRT-style screen burn in: Lower the brightness

VinceH
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Coat

When asked for a comment on this issue, Google replied "We are become Apple."

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This could be our favorite gadget of 2017: A portable projector

VinceH
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"The rest of us go camping to get away from the hi-tech world for a little while"

Stay away from camp sites and try a little wild camping* - you're then less likely to encounter other campers, let alone other campers with gadgets like this.

* Though these days I'd rather opt for hotels and nice beds.

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ATM fees shake-up may push Britain towards cashless society

VinceH
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A quick bit of searching, and the figures come from a PPRO blog post titled The UK is going cashless - which mentions those stats, but doesn't link to any published results of the survey.

If wandered to their contact page and sent them this:

In your blog post dated 10th August 2017 - titled "The UK is going cashless" at https://www.ppro.com/blog/uk-going-cashless/ - you state that 26% of us would never choose to pay cash.

According to my maths, that means there are 74% that gave a different answer. I've had a brief search for the results of the survey itself that you refer to in that blog post, but can't find it (and you don't appear to link to any published results) - could you either tell me where it is, or provide me with the full results for that question?

Similarly with the associated statistic - that 26.35% find it irritating to pay by cash. How does the remaining 73.65% breakdown in terms of the actual question asked and options given? And was a similar question asked to determine how many people find it irritating if they have to pay by card?

As it stands, it looks as though you have cherry picked some results for the purposes of your blog post and to back your own position, but without the full results those statistics are, to be blunt, meaningless.

They'll probably think I'm some kind of internet crackpot and ignore me, but you never know.

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VinceH
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That's what I was wondering. FTA:

"Given the option, 26 per cent of Brits would never choose to pay cash when buying an item in a shop and more than a quarter (26.35 per cent) find it irritating when they have to pay by cash rather than card, according to a survey commissioned by global payment experts PPRO Group."

If 26% of Brits would never choose to pay cash, that means there are 74% who either would choose to do so, or who don't mind either way - assuming the three most obvious choices. Personally, I'd like to know the overall breakdown of answers to a question like that, rather than having one cherry picked and thrown at me because it suits an agenda.

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VinceH
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Online shopping for things like groceries is madness. You have to trust that you're going to get a decent shelf life on the things you buy, whether the fresh stuff is as fresh as it can be, etc - whereas if you shop in person at a real shop, you can ensure you get the best possible from what's on display and available.

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For fanbois only? Face ID is turning punters off picking up an iPhone X

VinceH
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Trollface

Re: TouchID has same problem

"You're perfectly free to do that. The iPhone X offers Face ID, it doesn't require its use."

You're right - and as such (despite what the headline says), it's not the Face ID that's turning this punter off picking up a p-p-p-p-p-penguin an iPhone X.

It's the fact that it's an iPhone.

(Obvious troll is obvious)

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SCO vs. IBM case over who owns Linux comes back to life. Again

VinceH
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Re: You Seppos really need

"We'll get right on that ... as soon as you fix your government."

I think both may be way beyond repair by this stage.

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Punctual as ever, Equifax starts snail-mailing affected Brits about mega-breach

VinceH
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Re: CallCredit Noddle are terrible too.

I keep reading 'Noddle' as Noddie - which, mis-spelling of Big Ears' mate's name aside, sounds like it could be right.

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Comet 67-P farted just as Rosetta probe flew through the gas plume

VinceH
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Alien

Re: Theories

Yeah, it was clearly an attempt to push the probe off course - but all they managed to do was cause it to fluff its landing.

(Sorry... forgot to use caps - damn!)

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So long – and thanks for all the phish

VinceH
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Re: "that particular director is on holiday - so the perpetrator knows that much"

That's always possible - I know that director is on Facebook. It sometimes happens when another director is away as well, and I expect he's also on Facebook.

However, the opening wording of the email I received this week is making me think the knowledge is coming from meatspace. I'm not there every day, but most of the time my days are fairly regular - except the last couple of weeks when I've been there very infrequently.

The email opened up with "Are you available".

I doubt if the director has mentioned my schedule on Facebook, so my sneaking suspicion is that it may be someone working on the same trading estate who sees me coming and going, and isn't sure when I am/am not going to be there.

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VinceH
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Optional

"A typical spear-phishing attack plays out like this: when the time is right a maliciously crafted email is sent to the victim. The fraudsters spoof a familiar trustworthy account, belonging for example to an executive, senior manager or supplier, and instruct the recipient, such as a finance officer or accounts clerk, to carry out some routine financial transaction."

For one of my client companies I (and a couple of the directors) get something quite regularly - and I had a good example only a few days ago: An email claiming to be from one of the directors, saying he needs me to set up a CHAPS payment.

When any of us get one of these emails purporting to be from one of the directors, it's always when that particular director is on holiday - so the perpetrator knows that much, at least.

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Dell forgot to renew PC data recovery domain, so a squatter bought it

VinceH
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www.dellbackupandrecoverycloudstorage.com

TBH, if I saw that domain name I'd automatically assume it was something dodgy.

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VinceH
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Pint

Grr! You beat me to it! :(

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Assange™ says Trump's voter-targeting firm asked WikiLeaks for something

VinceH
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"I can confirm an approach by Cambridge Analytica [prior to November last year] and can confirm that it was rejected by WikiLeaks that I was worried about people forgetting me because I'm irrelevant, but have this thing I can say to get myself in the news again."

There. Fixed.

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Your shoe, chewing gum, or ciggies are now your extra password

VinceH
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Re: I lost track somewhere

So when you see someone taking a picture of their left shoe (or whatever) you know now that when you mug them and steal their phone, you also need to steal their shoe.

Or if they're taking a picture of something less practical to steal, such as their right ear (the 2FA image may include the surrounding hair, so just lopping it off won't be good enough), take a photo of it with your own phone while you're mugging them. You can then show the picture to their phone.

Yup. This is a really good idea, and completely without any potential flaws. Sign me up.

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UK financial regulator confirms it is probing Equifax mega-breach

VinceH
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Optional

"the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which could fine the firm or revoke its right to operate in the UK"

Yeah, but in all likelihood they'll issue a light 'slap on the wrist' fine at most, and Equifeck will be able to continue as normal.

I hope the investigation includes exactly how data stored in the US up to 2016 due to a 'process failure' that was supposedly fixed came to still be there in 2017. If I receive anything in the post from Equifeck to say I'm affected, my local MP will get a letter highlighting that very point - and I'd urge anyone else affected to do the same.

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Watchdog slams HMRC, Amazon over 'dismal' response to UK biz hurt by online VAT fraud

VinceH
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"As for eBay, I've lost count of the number of times I've asked for a VAT invoice from a seller, and been fobbed off with all sorts of crap."

This is also a problem on Amazon. I don't use eBay much, but I expected it would be the same problem. This particular problem is completely separate from the one the article is about - but it is one that could easily be solved.

Marketplace providers such as Amazon and eBay ought to be legally obliged to provide an invoicing system on behalf of VAT registered traders. Ordered something on Amazon from a third party seller? You get the invoice in the same way you get the Amazon invoice - go to the order and just print the invoice from there. After all, they should have the seller's details - including their VAT number.

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Software update turned my display and mouse upside-down, says user

VinceH
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Re: Every day's a school day

"

"rotated the mouse 180 degrees, so the 'tail' could point away from her"

In all my time I've never heard this one before. Yay for Fridays."

I sort of have in that I encountered someone who decided that the mouse lead going towards the back of the desk was impractical. If it came towards the front, she figured she could take the mouse off the desk and put it on top of the PC (that was underneath) when not in use.

I pointed out to her how the mouse would work if she did that - but she only finally accepted what I said when she actually tried it, and promptly put it back how it was before.

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UK Treasury Committee chairman calls on Equifax to answer for breach omnishambles

VinceH
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"Why are the details of 700,000 non-US "customers" included in along with test data?"

Because Equifax fucked up - this data was stored in the US in error; the result of a "process failure."

Equifax knew they'd fucked up - this process failure was supposedly corrected in 2016.

But Equifax have clearly fucked up the correction of the fuck up, given that the data was still there to be hacked in May 2017.

And, of course, they also fucked up by not keeping up with patches, resulting in that hack.

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Fear the SAP-slap? Users can anonymously submit questions about licensing naughtiness

VinceH
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Re: Complex licensing

"I have to say, for this reason, when people who don't work in IT talk to me about IT and are so keen to tell me that they've just moved over to SAP, or Oracle, or whatever, I shake my head and walk away. Some day it will come back to hurt them. Many of them don't even know what it is and certainly don't work in a company large enough to justify it, they've just heard that other bigger people do, so they end up on the same things."

^This.

The subject is very timely because where I am today, one of the front-office guys said to me last week that "we need SAP." Knowing eff all about it, I looked it up, and decided that we don't - but asking the guy for more details (such as which SAP product specifically), he wasn't able to give me any, other than "a potential customer uses it, but they can't use us unless we do too."

Unsurprisingly, that sounds like utter nonsense to me - if true, it would surely means no SAP-using business can use the services of any non-SAP-using business; the logical progression if that claim were true is that if we used this (unspecified) SAP product, our suppliers would have to as well - and would the same problem occur the other way? Would our customers also therefore need to use it?

So his reason was probably down to his not having a clue about it (as per what Lee says above), or whoever he's spoken to at this potential customer not having a clue about it (ditto) - or both.

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VinceH
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Re: Who owns the data ?

Homeopathic software, then. Once any given piece of data has been in contact with SAP, it carries the memory of SAP (and is therefore subject to licence fees) forever more.

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Equifax: About those 400,000 UK records we lost? It's now 15.2M. Yes, M for MEELLLION

VinceH
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Does she come from the planet Z'k$ty92##gq5^, like my mum?

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VinceH
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Re: Too glib

Pretty much the same applies to me - but with social media, even if you've given a fake DOB and/or made sure its not made visible (preferably both), you still have the issue of those who know you wishing you a happy birthday on the day in question on those sites.

I've always discouraged this*, but it doesn't stop some from doing it. All I could really do when that happens is try to unlink it somehow. For example on Facebook IIRC it was possible - and perhaps still is, dunno - remove a third party comment from your wall/timeline. Although even if you do, the comment will still be on their timeline.

* Not for this specific reason, but just because I'm a grumpy old bastard, and I have no interest whatsoever of celebrating (or even being reminded of) my birthday, online or IRL.

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VinceH
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Facepalm

As it fills in those blanks, of course, that information will be stored along with the rest in one of its databases, where it will be perfectly secu... oh.

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VinceH
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Re: Time for a New Best Practices

"Aside - are those, "find your drag queen name" (and similar) games where you use the name of your first pet and the name of the street where you grew up just social engineering to reveal this sensitive information?"

Yes. I've been pointing this out to people for many a year - usually when anyone relays them to me. Many people pass them on innocently on social engineering sites, thinking they're a bit of fun, but they often reveal potentially valuable data.

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VinceH
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"And what the hell is all this data on UK citizens doing on their US based servers?"

This is a question that needs to be properly addressed. As yoganmahew pointed out in response to a previous article on this:

Regrettably, the investigation shows that a file containing UK consumer information may potentially have been accessed. This was due to a process failure, corrected in 2016, which led to a limited amount of UK data being stored in the US between 2011 and 2016.

This 'process failure' was supposedly corrected in 2016... yet the data was subject to the hack in May 2017. We can only assume that the correction was to stop data being sent to the US, but not to actually remove the data that was already there as a result.

Not only, but also:

The information was restricted to: Name, date of birth, email address and a telephone number, and Equifax can confirm that the data does not include any residential address information, password information or financial data.

But now it's "names, home and email addresses, telephone numbers, and account recovery questions" - so the 'process failure' resulted in more data being stored in the US than Equifax claimed (reading between the lines of their statement at the time - they didn't say what was stored due to this 'process failure', only what was accessed).

This needs to be dealt with properly - full fat legal action and fines, not just the usual mild slap on the wrist.

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Leaky-by-design location services show outsourced security won't ever work

VinceH
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Re: You are shitting me?

Please see the last paragraph.

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VinceH
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Unhappy

Re: You are shitting me?

"Yes, and now some CAMERAS (as in dedicated devices) come with GPS antennae."

As long as you are aware, and know what steps you need to take to address it, this isn't a problem - that certainly applies to me, and I would think you and most El Reg readers.

The real problem is everyone else - and not just knowing that the location data can be used as described, but actually giving enough of a shit to want something done about it.

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Star Wars: Big Euro cinema group can't handle demand for tickets to new flick

VinceH
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Re: spoilerific

"Though I am intrigued as to WTF that squawking hamster-come-penguin-come-whatever is. "Merchandising opportunity" I guess."

Exactly that, yes. It's something cutesy that all the children will want and pester their parents to buy for them at a stupid price because not only Star Wars but Disney Star Wars. And then there will be a new version that waddles along the floor and squawks if someone is in front of it, at a bargain price of even even more than the stupid price of the previous stupidly priced one, and all the kids will want that.

Et bloody cetera.

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Is that a bulge in your pocket or... do you have an iPhone 8+? Apple's batteries look swell

VinceH
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Facepalm

Re: Wrong Swelling

"Yawn... funny we have that same thing in my workplace but its a Samsung that wont connect to wifi easily"

Congratulations, AC! You win today's prize for missing the point by such a huge margin.

The point wasn't "Oh look, iThings have trouble connecting!"

The point was "Oh, look, an iThing owner proceeded to tell me how good iThings are, immediately after having a problem with his iThing in front of me."

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VinceH
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Re: Wrong Swelling

"Given the views of iThing owners about their iThing"

I was reminded in person of just how silly they can be earlier this week.

In an office, iThing owner asks me for the WiFi key, so I input it into his iThing for him. It claimed to have a good signal strength (and we were only about 10-15 feet from the router through some very thin walls), but it failed to connect. I tried again, being more careful when inputting... same problem, then a third time.

At this point I grabbed my own phone to check if everything was as it should be - mine was connected no problem. I suggested he go out into the hallway and just tell it to connect again and see what happens - and after a couple of attempts it connected.

He then commented on my phone, suggesting I should get an iPhone because of how good they are.

Er... yeah. No thanks.

(Note: I've no idea which model it was - one of the larger ones, certainly, but beyond that, pass.)

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Royal Bank of Scotland customers say digital services gone TITSUP

VinceH
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If(total_number_of_customers >= number_of_customers_affected) claim = "only a small number of customers were affected";

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Blade Runner 2049: Back to the Future – the movies that showed us what's to come

VinceH
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Re: Autonomous vehicles

See also: Christine (1983). Although that's technically a horror film, rather than science fiction.

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Google touts Babel Fish-esque in-ear real-time translators. And the usual computer stuff

VinceH
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Re: Where's the fun?

"Also, I don't like people in my shoots. "

Ah, it's not just me, then. It depends where/what I'm taking a picture of, but sometimes I'll wait around for bloody ages to take a picture of something with no other buggers in shot.

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Rosetta probe's final packets massaged into new snap of Comet 67P

VinceH
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Alien

"What are you looking at? Boulders."

And, at the bottom left, a mahoosive space moth.

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Dropbox thinks outside the … we can't go there, not when a box becomes a 'collection of surfaces'

VinceH
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Re: was that a dare?

The mountain of dribble is necessary.

Without it, nobody would have noticed that the logo had changed.

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Patch your WordPress plugins: Scum are right now hijacking blogs

VinceH
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Unhappy

Re: Oh Joy?

"example.com/wp-json/wp/v2/users"

Oh, FFS!

I have three WP installations, and I've wanted to migrate away from it for a long time. Two would be easy to deal with, but I've held back because of the third - which is huge and would be a big job. But with stupid shit like that, it looks like I'm going to have to find some time, which is in VERY short supply, to start looking at this.

(The one mitigation is that the only user accounts are my own.)

Thanks for the heads up.

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NatWest customer services: We're aware of security glitch

VinceH
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Re: PayPal Fail

Ryanair have in the past similarly had a password set up that doesn't validate the password according to the rules they declare: Second half (ish) of this.

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VinceH
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Coat

Re: Had simi9lar issues

"No. My 9th digit is an 11!"

So that would be 'B' (or 'b') then?

I think I'll be needing my coat again.

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NASA, Roscosmos: We're building a lunar space station!

VinceH
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Thumb Up

Re: Deep Space Gateway

"has a certain ring to it"

I see what you did there.

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