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* Posts by Daniel von Asmuth

473 posts • joined 19 Aug 2009

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What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++

Daniel von Asmuth
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Holmes

Re: Disagree....

C++ has so many features it has become unlearnable. It cannot be completely specified in less than 1000 pages. It is almost impossbile to write a C++ compiler from scratch.

Just learn the core features and try to invent a new language based on those.

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Low AI rollout caused by dumb, fashion-victim management – Gartner

Daniel von Asmuth
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Re: Over-hyped, over-paid and over here

Ai has become pretty good at playing chess and go and more applications are expected before this century is over. In the year 2525, maybe citizens no longer have to vote in ballots, as computers choose politicians. A thousand years onwards, computers could replace politicians altogether.

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England's top judge lashes out at 'Science Museum' grade court IT

Daniel von Asmuth
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Windows

Re: Trivial...

Nice idea, except that theire are no trivial document formats, only legacy formats like various derivatives of ASCII and EBCDIC.

FTP over TCP over IP over Ethernet or ATM? Hardly a simple protocol! You may have nmore success with Kermit over serial lines.

P.S. I wonder what kind of 'Science Museum grade IT' the UK justice is using? Analytical Engines? Enigma machines? Sinclair Spectra? BBC Micros?

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Monday: Intel touts 28-core desktop CPU. Tuesday: AMD turns Threadripper up to 32

Daniel von Asmuth
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Gimp

Re: Gimme speed

A 10 GHz CPU? Try to revive the old Alpha AXP architecture. Forget about complex instructions and speculative executing or hyperthreading; say hello to even longer pipelines. Use photonic chip interconnections. Focus on low latency and smile when you see fewer TFLOPS in benchmarks, and expect huge cooling requirements.

Amdahl's Law will tell you that most programs will receive less than a 100-fold speed-up if you run them on 100 cores (instead of 1), but but tasks can be parallellised to some degree.

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USA! USA! We're No.1! And we want to keep it that way – in spaaaace

Daniel von Asmuth
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Alien

Where do you want to go tomorrow?

So, if the moon be too small, the Red planet too cold, hot Venus must be the place where America is going.

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Linus Torvalds decides world isn’t ready for Linux 5.0

Daniel von Asmuth
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Considering that MS-DOS after vesion 2.10 had too much bloat.....

Windows NT was a good idea, but then Microsoft wanted it to be compatible with MS-Windows and the development schedule started slipping....

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Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

Wrong again

You had PC-DOS and MS-DOS, with different version numbers.

Then you had MS-Xenix and MS Lan Manager

Microsoft cooperated on early versions of OS/2.

You had MS Windows 1.0, 2,0, 3,0, 3.1, 3.11, 3.2, Win32S, 4.0 (a.k.a. Windows 95, 98, ME).

You had versions of MS-DOS like 7.0 (a.k.a. Windows 95)

You had Windows NT 3.1, 3.50, 3.51, 4.0, 5.0(a.k.a. Windows 2000), 5.1 (XP), 5.2, (2003), 6.0 (a.k.a. Windows 2008), 6.1 (a.k.a. Windows 7), 6.2 (a.k.a. Windows 8), 10 (a.k.a. Windows 2016), etc.

You had Windows CE which begat Windows Phone.

You have Microsoft Midori. (versions? )

Nothing weirder than the version names of Ubuntu that went from 'a' to 'z' and then restarted or OpenSuse with version numbers 10, 11, 11.1 , 11.2, 12, 12.1, 42, 42.1, 42.2, 16.

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'Moore's Revenge' is upon us and will make the world weird

Daniel von Asmuth
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Coat

Re: Perhaps IETF's YANG might help here?

I am not sure what problem YANG is supposed to solve, but Moore's lay implies that within n months (for some value of n, you can buy ten-billion-transistor-chips which makes support for those protocols possible.... It'll work with Windows 11.

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Daniel von Asmuth
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Re: "chips in general are now cheap"

Look at the selling price of the fastest highest-core-count Xeon processor.

The price of cheap chips just was raised a bit, but then it consumes unprecedented amounts of electric power.

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Your F-35s need spare bits? Computer says we'll have you sorted in... a couple of years

Daniel von Asmuth
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Mushroom

What Weird War?

You can call it the Second Gulf War or the War Against Tea, but we've been fighting it for almost 17 years now and it involves a rather long list of nations in one role or another.

......

so if the enemy manage to shoot down an F-35, it will phone home and order a couple of millions of spare parts before hitting the turf, kool!

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Un-bee-lievable: Two million Swedish bugs stolen in huge sting

Daniel von Asmuth
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IT Angle

Two million bugs?

I wrote programs with more bugs than that!

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Cisco turns to AMD Epyc for the first time in new UCS model

Daniel von Asmuth
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hot chips

8 sockets holding up to 256 cores (2 threads per core) consuming 1440 kW (not counting rest of the hardware). Wonder what it will cost. Performance would be in TFLOPS range. ... For heavy computing loads one SMP 8-socket box sounds better.

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UK Home Office's £885m crim records digi effort: A 'masterclass in incompetence'

Daniel von Asmuth
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Coat

Where's the news angle?

That would be the fact that this one cost ten times the amount of other major failed government IT projects and tthe author fails to explain the exorbitant cost. Other countries have enough incompetence of their own.

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US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

Daniel von Asmuth
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Mushroom

The upside

Hitler's Mein Kampf entered the public domain 70 years after his death and will now become proscribed again.

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Kaspersky Lab's move from Russia to Switzerland fails to save it from Dutch oven

Daniel von Asmuth
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Big Brother

Transparent Like Windows

Whereas the German government is still investigating the security of the data that recent Windows insist of sending to Redmond, the Dutch puts blind faith into the U.S. and joins any sanction aganst the S.U., ehr, Russian Federation.

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Microsoft programming chief to devs: Tell us where Windows hurt you

Daniel von Asmuth
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Re: "We want to ask developers, what is your pain point"

Let's start with the funky memory models of PC-DOS (and 16-bit Windows). Then we mention the TSR applications of DOS and the 'cooperative multi-tasking' of 16-bit Windows. Visual Basic gets an unhonorary mention, together with GUIs in general. Did you notice that Windows is so bad they keep changing the GUI with every release?

It's not that 640 KB was a whole lof of RAM, Microsoft abused it to turn MS-DOS into a bloated feature-overflowing monster. ...and that was before they created all those other buggy incompatible documented APIs, which keep you searching for some documentation. ...where old source code needs updating for every new version. Did we mention that you cannot find the OS sources anywhere, let alone fix them? That you cannot even peruse www.microsoft.com with their own Internet Explorer 2.0 (and maybe not even version 6.0).

Windows is expensive, slow, bloated and insecure, but more importantly it lacks stability - the infamous Blue Screen Of Death. Finally, only a handful of elite companies are eligible for technical support, that the rest of us cannot afford.

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IBM bans all removable storage, for all staff, everywhere

Daniel von Asmuth
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Re: I see why they would do this, but ...

Who needs removable disc packs, mag tapes, paper tapes and puch cards, floppy and zip discs, MO discs, CD-ROM and DVD??

"The field service guys will just carry a second miniature laptop"

A laptop obviously counts as portable storage, just like cell phones, digital watches, cameras, etc. Not to mention paper, which may contain information that can be scanned and digitised. Anything weighing under 100 pounds shall be deemed portable.

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Every major OS maker misread Intel's docs. Now their kernels can be hijacked or crashed

Daniel von Asmuth
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Isn't it time for a new platform with no backwards compatibility?

You mean the iPhone or iPad?

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Daniel von Asmuth
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Windows

Re: "Can anyone offer a reason for using this segmented crap "

Raad Tanenbaum's book on computer architecture, particularly the part about the design of the virtual memory system for Multics, and you find no reason to think that there is anything wrong with their combination of segmentation and paging.

Then read about the Intel X86 design and figure out that their trick for addressing 16-bit address registers together with 160-bit segment selectors to produce 20-bit adresses was easy for Intel, but hard for developers.... Intel & Microsoft: a marriage made in hell.

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Windows app makers told to think different – you're Microsoft 365 developers, now

Daniel von Asmuth
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Linux

"Our mission is to make Windows the best dev box for you"

So Microsoft turned Windows 10 into a Linux distribution .

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UK age-checking smut overlord won't be able to handle the pressure – critics

Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

Re: A sledgehammer to crack a nut.

How hard can it be?

- every web site should serve a 'content-grade: ' HTTP or HTML header = { 'line noise' | 'advertising' | 'harmless' | 'fiction' | 'non-ficition' | 'fake news' | 'religious' | 'political' | 'action' | 'realistic violence' | 'erotic' | 'soft porn' | 'hard-core porn' }

- creating an account on a PC or Microsoft web site should require the user to enter his/her aage

- every browser should have a plug-in that checks the 'content-grade' header and the user's age and if age < 12, reditrects to http://www.teletubbies.com/

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Sir Clive Sinclair dragged into ZX Spectrum reboot battle

Daniel von Asmuth
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Gimp

Re: Answer me this

..with a built-in iPhone X

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Eurocrats double down on .eu Brexit boot-out

Daniel von Asmuth
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.EU ! 4 U

This will affect only a few British citizens and companies. A far greater effect will be when the former indenpendent nations of .IT, .FR, .DE, .BE, .PL, .AT, etc. become subdomains of .EU.

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Astroboffins peep at the largest orgy of galaxies banging into each other

Daniel von Asmuth
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Re: The odd random thought ....

Also 13 bn light years to the other side given the speed of light is constant and the universe roughly homogeneous.

(Note to self: don't ask who are watching)

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Daniel von Asmuth
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Alien

Re: Long, long ago in a galaxy far, far away...

All 14 galaxies will eventually spiral into one another and merge to create one gigantic elliptical galaxy.

I wonder how long this 'eventually' may take.

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US sanctions on Turkey for Russia purchases could ground Brit F-35s

Daniel von Asmuth
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Black Helicopters

Re: "nd what's the problem with an ally (*) buying a potential adversary's kit?"

Most certainly not. You can be sure that the export versions won't be as capable as the Russian home forces versions (not to mention having some hidden capability to render the export version unusable or materially ineffective if so required).

So we get second rate Americal weapons like the F-35, while theire top aircraft do not get exported. Maybe the EU should put sanctions on countries that didn't buy the Eurofighter.

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Exposed: Lazy Android mobe makers couldn't care less about security

Daniel von Asmuth
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Devil

Whose money in it?

IT people who earn their money with the assumed security of their customers will advise them to patch their software. Overwhelming eveidence shows that software that security patches fix one error at beat, leading to more fixes and patches and never to software that is actually secure, impenetrable and bug-free.

Therefore, applying security fixes ownly shows you pretend to care about security.

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A developer always pays their technical debts – oh, every penny... but never a groat more

Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

All words and no numbers.

The national debt of the United States of America currently stands at 21 T$. How much is their national Technical Debt? Is it included in the former figure? How much technical debt is due to Microsoft Windows? The Intel x86_64 processors? How do I calculate the technical debt of my project?

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Law's changed, now cough up: Uncle Sam serves Microsoft fresh warrant for Irish emails

Daniel von Asmuth
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Alien

Extraterrestrial clouds

The government is "unquestionably entitled" to all information stored or transmitted anywhere, rendering moot the word 'extraterritorial'; for the time being this does not apply to extraterrestrial space beyond reach of U.S. missiles and rockets.

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UK Court of Appeal settles reseller's question: Is software a good?

Daniel von Asmuth
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The good, the bad, and the ugly

Software that contains one or more bugs should be classified as "a bad".

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HPE burns offering to Apollo 6500, unleashes cranked deep learning server on world+dog

Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

Does it come with Domain/OS preinstalled?

n/t

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Programming languages can be hard to grasp for non-English speakers. Step forward, Bato: A Ruby port for Filipinos

Daniel von Asmuth
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Headmaster

Re: Nothing new here

ALGOL 68 allows for every natural language to define its own set of keywords

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ALGOL_68

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Tech giants should take the rap for enabling fake news, boffins tell EU

Daniel von Asmuth
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Holmes

Blame the news on the messenger

Is it the politicians, salespeople, priests and scientists who create the fake news in the first place? Or is it the paper mills, copper mines and glass foundries who provide the means for distributing it?

"More people are confident they can identify false news or misinformation than not"

Our country is blessed by the gods and most people think they are better drivers, better lovers, more honest, smarter or have more common sense than average.

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Tim Berners-Lee says regulation of the web may be needed

Daniel von Asmuth
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Angel

Divine intervention?

That Web may have been nice when it was an internal bulletin board at CERN, but taking it world-wide was a mistake. To really make a hell out of it required commercial exploitation combined with government regulation. If you want freedom, you must grant it also to fraudsters, terrorists, scientologists, used-car salesmen and paedophiles.

Now would be a good time to pray....

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Slingshot malware uses cunning plan to find a route to sysadmins

Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

Re: Eh?

MicroTik runs RouterOS, which is a Linux distribution. The filename heavily suggests Windows code.

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The Java release train is moving faster, but will developers be derailed?

Daniel von Asmuth
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Windows

Re: What's the point? Java is a dynasty of programming languages!

"Java used to evolve with comfortable though frustrating slowness"

The reverse is actually true. Look at how the major programming languages C, Pascal, Fortran, Ada, COBOL and PL/I are evolving: slowly and in backwards compatble manner.

On the other hand the Javas are a dynasty like the North-Korean presidents or Algol, where Algol 60 and Algol 68 are completely different languages. Microsoft made the same mistake by not providing a compatible successor to Visual Basic 6, which means it is still in production.

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Paul Allen's research vessel finds wreck of WWII US aircraft carrier

Daniel von Asmuth
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Re: MH370?

We all hope Allen will turn up Amelia Earheart's plane next....

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Mobile World Congress: 5 buzzwords, an homage to Windows XP and a smartphone snorefest

Daniel von Asmuth
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Facepalm

Really?

"Microsoft’s rather good Android Office applications"

That comes as quite a surprise after the total disaster of Microsofts Office appplications for DOS, Windows and Macintosh.

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BOOM: Server shipments up as huge clumps of white boxes suddenly fly off shelves

Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

Hype! What hype?

After superscalar processors some academics have come up with hyperscalar computer architecture, which has little to do with the mathematical term hyperscalar. (Wikipedia).

Nothing to do with https://www.hyperscalers.com/

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Why isn't digital fixing the productivity puzzle?

Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

It depends on the definition

These people seem to be looking at the correlation between profits (GDP growth) and unemployment (total hours worked). It would seem probable that economic growth leads to lower unemployment rates and there are figures to support that. However, it could lead to the growth of hours worked exceeding the increase in poducts sold, and eventually to the next recession.

Or you define productivity as units produced per (wo)man-hour. That will lead to the conclusion that a single overseer running a factory with hundreds of robots equals fantastic productivity. Isaac Asimov realised this in 'The Naked Sun'. It just means that all that robot labor is not counted.

I thought the industrial revolution proceeded in three waves:

1) James Watt invents steam engine, leading to big centralised factories

2) Henry Ford introduces the assembly line, leading to high labour division

3) Norbert Wiener introduces cybernetics, where workers' hands and eyes are replaced by detectors and actuators.

The microprocessor revolution appears to have decreased the productivity of office workers and increased the number of offices, but that was offset by huge growth in the IT sector, which became highly productive.

The latter nineties showed renewed economic activities, until the dot-com bubble burst, which led to stagnation, clearly seen in the IT sector. The size of the workforce has shrunk due to automation, specifically in the U.S.A. (China and India still grew). which meant lower disposable income for the masses (the GDP effect is offset by a steep increase of the wealth of millionaires and billionaires) and lower demand for goods, which lowers economic growth.

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Oracle open-sources DTrace under the GPL

Daniel von Asmuth
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Pint

Re: Open source tools

Which makes this a good day for the GNU GPL.

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Arrrgh! Put down the crisps! 'Ultra-processed' foods linked to cancer!

Daniel von Asmuth
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Paris Hilton

Re: This is a perfect example of the press stating that correlation means causation...

It could be the other way around: cancer patients are more likely to end up in hospitals or other situations where they will be fed unhealthy ultra-processed food.

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Are you an open-sorcerer or free software warrior? Let us do battle

Daniel von Asmuth
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Big Brother

Re: Sorry...

You've been reading George Orwell's nineteen-eightyfour.

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Monday: Intel defector touts Arm server chip. Wednesday: Intel shows off new server chips

Daniel von Asmuth
Bronze badge

what the dell is a low-fastidiousness poweredge processor?

Support for half a terabyte of memory looks underwhelming.... Is 110 Watts supposed to be low-power?

Is Intel QuickAssist the fastest helpdesk in the industry?

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Women beat men to jobs due to guys' bad social skills. Whoa – you mad, fellas? Maybe these eggheads have a point...

Daniel von Asmuth
Bronze badge
IT Angle

Re: Yet more contentless studies by academic hot air balloons?

"The real world shows that engineering and abstract thinking is an occupation best left to the male brain."

How come programming is traditionally a female occupation?

"We see that there's this rise of women in high-paying jobs". I guess we'll also see a complementary rise of men in low-paying IT jobs.

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Dell goes on Epyc server journey with AMD

Daniel von Asmuth
Bronze badge

Not Lying

NL-SAS is no Dutch tradition, but seems to be a consumer disc with a SAS interface....

https://www.techrepublic.com/blog/data-center/how-sas-near-line-nl-sas-and-sata-disks-compare/

2 TB? Guess you need to switch to SPARC or POWER for some main memory.

If AMD is faster than Intel, is that because AMD's heaviest processor has 32 against 28 cores or are they comparing same-price models (for similar parts, Xeon is slightly faster, but AMD a lot cheaper)?

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Ghost in the DCL shell: OpenVMS, touted as ultra reliable, had a local root hole for 30 years

Daniel von Asmuth
Bronze badge

Re: wasn't really 64 Bit

Alphas on 32-bit NT were really slow.... one reason for the demise of DEC.

This of course was until Windows 2000... After a row Digtal laid off a team of engineers working on 64-bit NT, after which Microsoft cancelled the project which was still in Alpha stage. Somewhat later they started a port to IA64 (Itanic), which was released with much dealy.

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Daniel von Asmuth
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Terminator

Re: The sky is falling in

VMS supports remote access using SSH or Telnet, that makes a lot of networked systems vulnerable.

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Open source turns 20 years old, looks to attract normal people

Daniel von Asmuth
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WTF?

Open Source versus Free Software

When the *BSD community meets the Linux community, focus turns to the ideological difference between Open Source (like MIT license) and Free Software (like the GNU GPL).

Open Source favours proprietary software and is championed by Microsoft, whose Windows contains a lot of Open Source code. Their customers do not profit from this is any way, and the original developers barely get their name on a list that the public doesn't get to see.

Free Software uses the Copyleft principle to protect the rights of its developers and end-users. Yes, some strange deal between Canonical and Microsoft made it possible for Redmond to include Linux in Windows without making its entire kernel GPL code.

Free Software promotes innovation: you are free to use an existing code base, rename the product, add any killer features you can, and sell it at a premium as long as you share the source code. Major hardware vendors support Linux which is a lot cheaper than having to develop an Operating System of their own, thus computing becomes commoditised.

The existence of Free Software preserves your right to keep the source of your own software closed, as long as you don't mix free and proprietary code.

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