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* Posts by Terry 6

1915 posts • joined 31 Jul 2009

10 years of the Kindle and the curious incident of a dog in the day-time

Terry 6
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Re: Cost

Mildly irrelevant, the cost difference varies by amounts not in line with VAT. And Kindle ebooks don't have the print and delivery costs. Also 20% of significantly less cost price wouldn't bridge these gaps.

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Terry 6
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Cost

Actually, these days many of the books I want for my Amazon device ( A Fire, not a Kindle anymore) seem to be pretty expensive too. Sometimes almost as much as the printed and delivered book, sometimes even costing more. Other times the Kindle edition does seem to be dirt cheap. So, Guards Guards by Sir Terry comes up as £7 print delivered and £5 Kindle. For a couple of quid I'd choose printed unless I wanted it now or/and portable.

More to the point; Lucy Worsely's book on Jane Austen is actually £13 for Kindle,but just a tenner for the printed version - whereas Jane Austen's actual novels are a fiver printed and £0 for the Kindle download. Sort of makes me a bit mistrustful of Amazon.

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Mythical broadband speeds to plummet in crackdown on ISP ads

Terry 6
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Re: Red herring

I asked them about that. In fact they do say that they up the speed slightly above the offered.

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Terry 6
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Re: Red herring

Nick Kew

Maybe you're just trolling..

Else, what is not clear in any "up to" statement is what is actually likely to be provided. "Up to 80% off" means that possibly as little as that there is at least one item somewhere that had been reduced by 80%. Up to 200 mb could mean as little as that a lucky individual somewhere might be able to get 200mb sometimes. OFCOM have insisted on this being actually available to at least a rather small percentage of punters somewhere. For the rest the offer is purely smoke and mirrors.

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Terry 6
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Flame

Weasel words

The fact that the ASA allows such phrases at all tells us all we need to know about the ASA and nothing about the broadband or any other product. Clearly "Up to..." is fully 100% meaningless in any context ( e.g.the " up to 80% off " in the sales when nothing anyone wants to buy will be reduced by >15% ).

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Boss made dirt list of minions' mistakes, kept his own rampage off it

Terry 6
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Re: We turned it on its head

That sounds like a good place to work.*

*Unless it's a fantasy. I've never heard of anywhere like that.

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Royal Navy destroyer leaves Middle East due to propeller problems

Terry 6
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My guess

The part is in a sealed unit that so that the ship has to be sent back to the manufacturer for a replacement.

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Open-source defenders turn on each other in 'bizarre' trademark fight sparked by GPL fall out

Terry 6
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Re: Motivated by ego

Donn Bly

That's a nice point. In effect is ego fed by approbation for what they produce or by power and control. And are there different groups- producers and controllers- within the orbit of these organisations being fed differently?

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Terry 6
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Personalities

Hmm. Maybe it's just that these various organisations, in the Open Source and similar spheres, are full of people who are motivated by ego.

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It was El Reg wot won it: Bing banishes bogus Brit bank banner ad

Terry 6
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Re: https://advertise.bingads.microsoft.com/en-us/resources/policies/report-spam-form

Good point. The spam reporting link implies a place to report an annoyance - to be duly ignored. Not for a serious report of criminality.

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Help desk declared code PEBCAK and therefore refused to help!

Terry 6
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FAIL

Re: It's PEBKAC

It's presumably either or both, depending on which you choose to use. And there is no qualitative difference because it's merely an identifier ( of an oblique sort). It's more worrying that people presumed to be logical ( as in techie minded) don't see that.

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Terry 6
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Re: daily i wish

There's also that thing I sometimes see/experience when the cursor is flashing in the box, but the computer needs you to actually click in the box for it to be there properly.

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Terry 6
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Corporate systems

That issue, and many more that I've helped to resolve over the years, mostly at a human rather than IT level, comes from a system that is computer centric, not user centric. Even at a "three letter company" ( Of which there have been more than a few in IT - marketing like the three letter combo) most users just want the problem to go away and are not IT experts themselves. As soon as you introduce the element of users having to choose where to report the problem there's an element of auto-diagnosis. And the more basic the issue (e.g. floppy in drive) the more likely for that to go wrong. A little bit of user knowledge doesn't help here, tending to mislead. A generic support desk with expertise to direct calls to the right person ( you don't even have to tell the user who that is) is more useful. (Only not a generic support desk with a script reading non-technician, please)

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OnePlus 5 x T + five short months = Some p*ssed off fanboys

Terry 6
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Re: I'm pleased with my 5.

My 5 updated Android and the Oxygen OS a few days ago.

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Terry 6
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Re: Poverty phone

Just the sort of idiotic comment that plays into the hands of the over-priced flashy phone makers.

But let's not feed the trolls any more than that.

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Terry 6
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I'm pleased with my 5.

As to a 5T - Oh well, there's always a new model along just after you buy any IT kit these days.

What can we do ( apart from chasing everything that arrives)? The 5 does a good job for me. In a few years time there'll be something even better, probably. That's how it goes.

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It's artificial! It's intelligent! It's in my home! And it's gone bonkers!

Terry 6
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Re: When I was a kid.....

They are all there to serve the corporate borg that made them.

It's (usually) not that when they're designed in most cases, I suspect. But then the corporate beancounters get in on the act and decide that they can make even more money by harvesting their product.

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Terry 6
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Sign me up for one

mistook her for a charity collector and has just launched a salvo of pepper-spray into her face.

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Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

Terry 6
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Re: Not sure about Office?

Hmm I take your point. But really education should be about getting educated, and being educated ought in turn also make people more employable. But employability shouldn't be the primary purpose. Having an educated, thinking population should be. Otherwise we end up with a kind of utilitarian skills based training system for the masses rather than a broad based education, which becomes reserved for the rich and powerful who don't need to seek jobs, either not needing to work or going from public school to Oxbridge then into a privileged, reserved niche. As was once the case. And it looks more and more like we're going back to those days.

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Terry 6
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Re: Outlook

A good question that I've asked myself many times. 'nux systems and Open Source software do seem to be based on enthusiastic developers providing what interests them, as far as I can see. So maybe a decent Outlook alternative doesn't ring their bells. It took long enough to even get calendar integration into Thunderbird. I dunno, maybe Open Source developers aren't interested in keeping appointments so don't see why they should develop software for it.

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Terry 6
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Irrelevant

It actually makes no difference whatever to the users which OS is used - providing it does what they need without them having to interact too much with the machine itself . The more the users are aware of the machine the less well it is doing its job. Ideally the work PC should be taken completely for granted, just being the box that takes the input and provides the output. OS differences only become visible when something doesn't go right. Maybe the software won't do something that it reasonably should be able to and can do on other devices. Or it hides away functions that users do need and camouflages them with functions they'll never need but can't easily hide ( e.g. the poxy "Ribbon") Or it crashes/slows/freezes. Or maybe it's cosmetically unpleasant - this is someone's desktop they will be working inside it day after day, hour after hour and might want their colour scheme, pictures, screen saver etc.

The only real questions are; will the OS support the functions the users need, how easy is it to support the users and what are the TCO figures? Included in that are there a small number of users who have specialised needs and can these be accommodated with supplying a small amount of different hardware/OS? It's not that many years ago that the education department I worked in had Windows PCs everywhere - but media resources used Macs for DTP And why not.

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Terry 6
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Re: Baffling

When it would have been easiest for me to switch fully to 'nux, a while back ( I was already dual booting) the Outlook issue was the one that kept me back. I had my Outlook calendar synchronised across devices, beautifully and integrated with my email so that it was always visible. And I had conditional filters that sent and filed stuff where I wanted it. But Thunderbird, with Lightning, didn't give me that degree of utility - in seeing my diary or creating my filters. Outlook is so much more powerful. And I'm yet to find anything in Windows or 'nux that touches it. LO does me fine for everything else, and even when I was working full time in a complicated job it would have been more than adequate. But Outlook was my lifeline. Filters along the lines of Put emails from x into the management folder, unless the subject was tea money etc. is beyond TB's filters.

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Terry 6
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it's only a good alternative to Office 2003. Which, give or take a version or two, does rather make me wonder what the vast majority of users do that needs more than Office 2003 was able to provide. TBH I suspect that most probably don't even use more than the original Word for Windows provided.

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Amazon to make multiple Lord of the Rings prequel TV series

Terry 6
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Re: Oh Hell!!!

The Beancounter mentality is fixed on It worked, it made money, lets do it again and make money again (If they can do it as a subscription TV production, and fill lots of lucrative hours even better) . Sometimes that's correct, financially. In the short term. So in time we may well have Star Wars 93 - the Return of the Chequei. Paddington 7, The Spy with the Golden Zimmer Frame, Not Quite as Fast but still Pretty Furious and so on. While the punters are prepared to pay and see this stuff it will keep happening.

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Terry 6
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Oh Hell!!!

Yet another accountant drive "franchise" written in a spreadsheet, devoid of imagination, creativity or anything approaching a novel plot.

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Audio spy Alexa now has a little pal called Dox

Terry 6
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Unhappy

Cynical

You don't have to be old to be cynical. Now I'm old, but I was always cynical. The trouble is, no matter how cynical I may have been over the last half century or so, reality has always gone further.

Just think vehicle emissions testing.

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Mm, sacrilicious: Greggs advent calendar features sausage roll in a manger

Terry 6
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@unwanted triumphalism

Until your irrelevant comment the only finger of fun was being pointed at Greggs and their significantly irreligious Advent calendar. But if you must open the door be prepared for the response.

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User asked help desk to debug a Post-it Note that survived a reboot

Terry 6
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Re: Xerox photcopiers

Don't confuse the example with the point. Arguably "Fall Edition" tells the same story.

( BTW Sorry about the misplaced character )

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Terry 6
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Re: Xerox photcopiers

world series does include Canada

Er, the bit of North America sandwiched between Alaska and the rest of the USA hardly makes it a <b< world </b> series. A North American series, OK, Yes. And the "Letter" format isn't the " correct " one. It's not even used for letters, come to that. A4 is the standard used most places. And having devices/software that default or require to create documents in Letter format is a real PITA at times.

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Terry 6
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Re: Xerox photcopiers

AC. No

Some programmes/templates/resources automatically generate American sized pages, either as a default or in some cases as the only option (Yeah , we all know Americans forget about the rest of the planet - think World Series ). If it is trying to send to Letter and failing, rather than just sending a warning message or printing over > 1 page then the fault is at the set-up end.

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Terry 6
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Re: Non-standard non-intuitive

The point was I shouldn't need to. Designs should be reasonably standard and even more important, controls should be clearly visible or at least easy to locate. This little programme ( and the stupid Win 8.x "charms" ) omit that consideration.

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Terry 6
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Non-standard non-intuitive

To be fair ( why not for once) too many users will have had experience of non-standard or illogical equipment and software with controls and switches that aren't anywhere you'd expect them to be, or that can be triggered by accident. I have a drop down resource monitor that appears on my screen from time to time, I think when I've dragged the mouse down from the top. I'll be bugg***d if I can make it work at will*. Or prevent it appearing. It hasn't got a name on it so that I can Google it, and it vanishes when I move my mouse towards it. I guess it was designed on the Windows 8.x model, of the stupid invisible "charms". But common sense would have been to at least put the name in the sodding thing so that the user can identify it.

*I've just taken the time to experiment. It appears when the cursor is about 1mm below the corner on the top right. I assume top left would be the same, but who knows.

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Terry 6
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Re: PBKAC

I forgot to add the most recent one. A user at the library where I volunteer called me over to the computer she was using to complain that her email wasn't there. Some polite questioning and I found she didn't know she needed to log in to her email (web) account. I didn't venture to explore further- like how she normally got her email; the "don't go there" alarm was ringing too loudly.

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Terry 6
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Re: PBKAC

Unfortunately it's a support issue if a user calls for support. Because it's only after the intervention that you know it wasn't really a support issue. And you don't want to deter real support calls by being too difficult. It's all part of life.

As for the turning the monitor on and off, we all know that litany of "The email isn't working " (BSOD)/"The computer won't go on" (Screen is on, but not the box or vice versa).. And my favourite, though I've only had this a couple of times, "I can't find my work" ( They'd saved to a memory stick, a different memory stick!)

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Capita forced to pay out £66m to investors over Connaught fund farce

Terry 6
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Bouncy

Somehow Crapita can screw up time and time again, but they still bounce back and get new contracts.

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Parity calamity! Wallet code bug destroys $280 MEEELLION in Ethereum

Terry 6
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Re: we had to carve the 0s and 1s on slate.

I tried to find an image of the computer we had at school in the early 70s and failed. It was red, IBM and resembled one of their supermarket tills. It was programmed in numbers - none of yer high level languages. But it could do stuff, and we could write and debug programmes there and then. Otherwise we had to use special pencils on cards that were sent off in a pack to the university's computing centre and which came back with a result ( or more often an error) a week or two later..

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Terry 6
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FAIL

Re: A tragedy? @ Richard Boyce

Cynic_999

The perfect definition of an economic bubble there.

As in "My shares in these South Sea companies are earning me more than my salary......... " and so on.

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Terry 6
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Re: This is when I know I'm getting old...

Computer tape. Luxury. I remember when we had to carve the 0s and 1s on slate.

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Alexa, please cause the cops to raid my home

Terry 6
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In fact the BBC website sometimes, like the recent crypto-currency loss story seems to run tech stories after they have appeared on El Reg. So much that I have a cynical suspicion that they get the stories by reading them here.

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Terry 6
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Thank you

Another reason to avoid it.

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Uni staffer's health info blabbed in email list snafu

Terry 6
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What year is this?

It's not as if sending to a list instead of an individual was exactly a new risk. And staff of everywhere have no excuse whatsoever to make that mistake. Even once.

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IBM's next turnaround tool is ... a new open-source font?

Terry 6
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Maybe I got this wrong

Maybe I keep getting it wrong when all these corporates make superficial changes to their businesses when things are tough. Maybe that's why I'm neither rich nor a businessman. But I always imagined that successful business meant finding or creating things that people want to buy, and selling it at a price they were willing and able to pay you.

But what do I know?

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Where hackers haven't directly influenced polls, they've undermined our faith in democracy

Terry 6
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Re: "Corrupting the debate"

Corrupting the debate is sometimes using access to the media to push people further along the road to where you want them to go. Such as blaming minorities for current failures, or advancing bar-room views that have no basis in logic or fact. Find a mild prejudice and whip it along.

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Give us a bloody PIN: MPs grill BBC bosses over subscriber access

Terry 6
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Problerms with subscription models

* Novelty and experiment - this needs either a guaranteed revenue stream or a lot of courage and no interference from bean counters

* Minority programming - ditto

*Controversial programming - you literally can't afford to piss off viewers by making statements they don't like

*Planning - you can't afford to commit money until you know how many viewers you'll have

*Competition (1)- ( controversial this, maybe) needing to compete with the lowest common denominator, and hence racing to the bottom to get viewers.

*Competition (2) - There are bigger organisations with massive budgets and economies of scale who can invest in attention getting programming (not the same as better).

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Firefox bookmark saving add-on gives users that sync-ing feeling

Terry 6
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Pale Moon?

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Terry 6
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Re: Trust and basic common sense

I wonder,how many commetards have made how many posts over how many years all saying you'd be mad to trust any important data to an online service. At most we should use this for the back up of the back up of our backups.

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Official Secrets Act alert went off after embassy hired local tech support

Terry 6
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Re: Some people.

"accidentally hit WiFi button on the side of the laptop and turned it off" etc. Glue! Brilliant idea, except that some keyboards turn the wifi off by a thick finger hitting cntrl while an f key is being pressed. Cue mysterious loss of wifi, panic calls etc.

It's a f***ng stupid bit of keyboard design that allows any non-obvious loss of function to be triggered by a small error. There's a reason why it took 3 keys to do a reset.

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Over a million Android users fooled by fake WhatsApp app in official Google Play Store

Terry 6
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Re: Yawn

Handloclast, sorry. I did over react. I intended to convey that these scum steal other people's work and put a wrapper round it. Maybe it needed to be taken in context with my earlier posts. I should, had I thought of it, have added that they are really doing the same thing that used to happen with popular freeware programmes a decade ago - with scum like these (possibly the same ones) charging to sell freeware that could be downloaded without any charge at all. Except now they charge the advertisers - and it should be a matter of automatic acceptance that any advertised product promoted by this stuff is de facto a pile of crap. In fact, anything promoted by crap adverts forced onto "apps" is almost certainly as crappy as the advert.

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Terry 6
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Re: Yawn

I've never been abusive before, but you're an idiot. I was agreeing with you . Just going a bit further in my condemnation.

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Terry 6
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Re: Yawn

In fact...

The app is fraudulent. That alone makes it malicious.

The app takes someone else's product without adverts and adds advertising.

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