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* Posts by Tom 38

3494 posts • joined 21 Jul 2009

Max Schrems is back: Facebook, Google hit with GDPR complaint

Tom 38
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Coat

Re: that isn’t free choice

Pretty much yes. You can pay with anything you want, but there has to be a monetary value placed on it for tax purposes.

So you're saying I can't pay for it with sex then :(

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Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Tom 38
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Re: "opt-out was probably the best choice"

PII is a very specific legal term from the US about HIPAA. GDPR defines PD, Personal Data, which covers more things than PII.

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HTC U12+: Like a Pixel without the pratfalls, or eye-watering price tag

Tom 38
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Price

You put the price of a Pixel, and the price of a U11, but you don't think its worth putting in the price of the U12 you are reviewing??

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Blood spilled from another US high school shooting has yet to dry – and video games are already being blamed

Tom 38
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Re: Business leaders

The fact that is article appears in the Reg is the point of contention.

The article is on the register because, once again, an American goes nuts and kills a bunch of people, and once again their politicians line up to blame software developers. That's a cut and dry IT angle right there.

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Tom 38
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Re: Business leaders

Did you know there were 288 posts on this topic (289 now), and you've posted 37 of them, or ~13%. Don't shoot me, but does this topic hit a nerve?

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Tom 38
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Re: Can't deny reality

I could totally believe that in the US you will be required to have a license to procreate sooner than you will be required to have a license to buy a gun.

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Tom 38
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Re: It really is stunning

And, no one who owns a gun takes that ownership lightly.

Quite bold to talk for 50 million households - it seems at least one of those households didn't care too much, and left the guns available for other members of the household to borrow without them without noticing. I would call that "taking it lightly".

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IPv6 growth is slowing and no one knows why. Let's see if El Reg can address what's going on

Tom 38
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Mushroom

You decide that you want to put an FTP service up so that your aunts can see all the old photos that you've been digitising.

I'd rather kill hundreds of thousands of people to free up some IPv4 addresses than guide my aunts through accessing photos over FTP.

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EU considers baking new norms of cyber-war into security policies

Tom 38
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Re: Good luck with that

Coventry does have an unpleasant effect on most civilians.

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US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

Tom 38
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Re: Copyright extensions need to stop

The general rule needs and should be that once the copyright holder is dead all of his work should be public domain from the next year after (paperwork takes time).

So if someone comes up with something amazing, and they happen to die in an accident the next week totally nothing to do with Disney, Disney can just use it as public domain the next year?

Do you want hordes of recording industry assassins stalking our musicians?

Creation + min term OR life, whatever is longer.

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Facebook Android app caught seeking 'superuser' clearance

Tom 38
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Re: Oh Sorreee! Sorree!

I dunno, its not complete nonsense (apart from OP's examples). A better example would be Whatsapp. If I want to share media I've taken with people through Whatsapp, then I must grant Whatsapp the "Storage" permission. This doesn't give Whatsapp permission to read my media, and write received media to a particular folder, it gives it permission to create, read, update and destroy any user file in any location.

Effectively, if you want to be able to share media, you also have to open all your data to the app in question and trust that it won't look in other places.

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10 social networks ignored UK government consultations

Tom 38
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Re: "rapid removal of abusive and objectionable material"

The Tories may be Rudd-less, but they are definitely not rudderless.

There are in fact 7 different Tory rudders on the good ship Blighty - some people even have their hands on more than one rudder. There are also several engines, mostly operating in opposite directions and pulling the boat apart.

The captain just stands by the wheel murmuring "strong and steady, strong and steady" whilst the damn thing spins like a catherine wheel, and her crew keep tying her shoelaces together.

Rudderless would be a fucking improvement.

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Julian Assange said to have racked up $5m security bill for Ecuador

Tom 38
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"A person who reads nothing at all is far more informed than someone who reads nothing but newspapers"

Here's your problem: you don't believe anything you read in the "MSM", but you believe everything you read that is against the status quo. The problem is that you end up reading all kinds of nonsense mixed in with a very few valid concerns, and you cannot objectively see which is the nonsense and which are the valid concerns. Your distrust of "MSM" means that if you read one "source" that contradicts the "MSM", you believe it precisely because it is not from the "MSM".

I read Private Eye. If that's MSM, god help us all.

PS: He's not going to Sweden. He's not going to the US (well, not from either the UK or Sweden). Eventually he will come out of the Ecuadorian embassy, he'll do 30 days in prison for jumping bail, and then he'll be deported to Australia. What happens to him after that is up to him and his government.

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Tom 38
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I really can't understand why everyone seems to hate him so much now - this "squatting" isn't his choice, bet he isn't having fun there.

Think we need to remember why he is there

Whose choice is it? He's there because he jumped bail rather than be legally extradited to Sweden under a valid EAW. You can't get to pick and choose what laws apply to you and what ones don't; if he didn't want to be bound by our laws, he should not have come here. Why did he suddenly flee from Sweden in the first place? Oh that's right, he decided he didn't have to be interviewed by the Swedish police, got his lawyer to lie to them whilst he fled.

Can you spot a theme here?

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Tom 38
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Joke

Re: An anonymously sourced report claimed

Systematic ‘fake news’ Planted By Britain’s Intelligence Services

I'm surprised you trust the book referred to in that article, given it's written by one of those neocon Guardian journos.

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John McAfee ‘goes underground’ in motorcade to flee SEC

Tom 38
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Are StargatSG7 and BoB one and the same??

No, sometimes what Bob says makes sense..

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You're in charge of change, and now you need to talk about DevOps hater Robin

Tom 38
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This round of transformation might be the same squiggly pit of offal as the ones that came before. Throughout their career, the Robins have been force-marched through several searches for excellence and are now ready to ensconce themselves in a lovely, little cottage curating their model-train collection.

Yes, that's right - if you're not onboard with the DevOps mission, you're some miserly old fogey who collects model trains and it would be easier if you just retired or died, because no criticism of the glorious culture can be accepted. Fuck off.

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'Alexa, find me a good patent lawyer' – Amazon sued for allegedly lifting tech of home assistant

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Surely...

Gene Roddenberry owns most stuff with all the ideas he and his team came up with on Star Trek.

That's not how it works. A patent is about the process of doing something, not the idea of doing something. This is why there is/was not a patent for "Fixing atmospheric Nitrogen", but there is one for the Frank-Caro process, and a different one for the Haber-Bosch process, because although they both fix atmospheric nitrogen, they do so in different methods.

Gene Roddenberry came up with no methods.

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Fixing a printer ended with a dozen fire engines in the car park

Tom 38
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Re: Had the fire brigade called to a five star hotel, in Malta....

One friend of mine was so drunk he went to sleep with pizza in the oven, but had only turned the oven light on this avoiding the smoke and fury from the local brigade...

Pizza in the oven is fine, it just goes extra extra crispy. My record was 14 hours, it was quite crunchy by that point and I didn't have enough dip.

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UK's Royal Navy buys £13m mine-blasting robot boat

Tom 38
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We gave the pirates military support so they can run their own emirates and now they don't allow other pirates, just dig up oil and gas.

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FCC shifts its $8bn pot of gold, sparks fears of corporate money grab

Tom 38
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Re: Overcharge

[and WHY should _I_ pay for SOMEONE! ELSE'S! PHONE! LINE! with TAXES???]

Because they can't afford it and you can. It's a different attitude to "FUCK YOU ALL, THIS IS ALL MINE", but in many scenarios it works quite well.

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If you're a Fedora fanboi, this latest release might break your heart a little

Tom 38
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it's hard to make pip / wheel / whatever installations work on platforms that people actually want to use (Windows, Mac).

Chortle.

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Tom 38
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Linux tip: Avoid Nvidia graphics cards if possible

Yeah, who likes everything functioning exactly as the manufacturer intended, with perfect performance, zero glitches and perfect hardware video decoding.

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Cambridge Analytica dismantled for good? Nope: It just changed its name to Emerdata

Tom 38
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Re: I see no problem here

AIG changed their name to 21st Century and continue in business today.

"AIG" being American Insurance Group, traded on the NYSE as AIG? The ones selling insurance on aig.{com,co.uk}? That AIG?

"21st Century" being 21st Century Insurance, who AIG bought in 2005, and sold to Farmers Insurance Group (Zurich Insurance, really) in 2009 to pay some of their debts down, that 21st Century?

After they got, I think, $50 million,

Try $180bn.

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Publishers tell Google: We're not your consent lackeys

Tom 38
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Re: @AC

To my understanding the whole regulation concentrates itself on personal data, and what Google basically gets through analytics is nothing more but an IP address

..which is PII.

Glad everyone has done their training..

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if dev == woman then dont_be(asshole): Stack Overflow tries again to be more friendly to non-male non-pasty coders

Tom 38
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Re: Might the very thing that makes it so successful

In most cases* there is one recommended way and style of doing things

That's the typical techno-chauvinist answer that permeates eg. physics.stackexchange and math.stackexchange and makes them particularly unwelcoming to questioners who have their own perfectly self-actualised theories of the universe.

That's the typical answer of someone who gets offended when people say that they are wrong. It's not aggressive to be correct, the actual problem is the aggression of the person who takes offence at being corrected.

PS: Well done on dropping the starred footnote where I explicitly state that I am not talking about anything other than stack overflow.

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Tom 38
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Re: Might the very thing that makes it so successful

The thing is, there is right, and there is wrong. In most cases* there is one recommended way and style of doing things - if you aren't giving that way/style, then you are giving wrong advice.

There is nothing wrong with being wrong, but if someone is wrong frequently then perhaps they shouldn't be trying to give out advice. If they continue to give out wrong advice, they reduce the quality of the thing.

To the results: on SO you can identify your gender but most users do not, which means the entire survey has been about people who choose to announce their gender to a population of people who, by and large, do not give a fuck. There is a clear self selection bias

* SO. Not all the other boards.

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More Brits have access to 1Gbps speeds than those failing to muster 10Mbps – Ofcom report

Tom 38
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Re: Full fibre?

If you check out your fibre box, you'll see it probably has 4 access ports on it. BT will terminate the FTTH as a 1.2Gbps connection, which they then partition in to four, offering a max of 330Mbps for each connection.

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Tom 38
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Re: Lies, damn lies and statistics!

I don't know exact answers for those Qs, but for my Hyperoptic connection are copper gigabit ethernet to the basement, where there is a chain of fibre optics going from building to building. They recently did a 10Gbps test on my estate on a single fibre, so I would imagine "plenty".

Speedtests largely vary due to the demands on the speedtest servers; at a peakish time where I can still download at ~90MB/s, most pseedtest servers will only say around 500Mbps speed.

Latency depends on to what and where; google services are around 0.1ms away, works DC is 2ms away, works on prem kit is about 6ms away (and works on prem -> works DC is ~5ms, for comparison). Not bad for £38/month

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Eurocrats double down on .eu Brexit boot-out

Tom 38
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Re: In Next Month's News

Don't feed it or it will keep coming back.

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Hyperoptic's ZTE-made 1Gbps routers had hyper-hardcoded hyper-root hyper-password

Tom 38
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I pay £38/month for gigabit, but that was on a deal. My entire estate (~5k homes) has access to hyperoptic. We also all have BT FTTH, so no monopoly, but since that is ~£60/month for 300Mbit, not many people take that. From the wifi that pop up on my phone, there are a few BT, a fair few SkyFibre, and a lot of hyperoptic.

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Tom 38
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Re: The gigabit provider's routers are made by ZTE

Its not crap, it tops out at around 850Mbit - most routers would. If you want more than that, yes, buy a different one.

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Tom 38
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Re: The gigabit provider's routers are made by ZTE

Actually they were very up front about it. The engineer who did my install said that the router is pretty good, but they mainly chose it for its wifi performance, so if I wanted to get as close to 1000Mbit as possible I'd need a better router.

I use an ER-lite, and the ZTE router as an AP.

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The tech you're reading these words on – you have two Dundee uni boffins to thank for that

Tom 38
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(Seriously, it's amazing quite how prolific the Scottish are at coming up with cool stuff).

By this logic, John Logie Baird is English, because he was working in Hastings at the time?

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Revenge pornography ban tramples free speech, law tossed out – where else but Texas!

Tom 38
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Re: or things like revenge porn.

Ah, see, here in America we don't have peerless paragons of virtue who do not suffer from the lapses in moral integrity us mere mortals contend with to act as arbiters on controversial subjects

Yes, we can all clearly see the problems that your politicised judiciary cause you, but why do you need to be snarky about it?

Must be nice to have people so exemplary that they can be relied on to rule fairly on their judgments of "knowing when they see it"

It really is.

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Tom 38
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Re: or things like revenge porn.

I suppose if we are wondering if particular speech is worthy of protection, we can just ask you. Because you'll know it when you see it.

This is why we have judges, and why they are separated from the political process. Like hardcore pornography, hate speech doesn't need explicit listings of what is or isn't hate speech, we rely on our judges to "know it when they see it".

I think it works better than your "free speech". Our far right are laughing stocks of the country, yours arrange torchlit marches where they wear white hoods and shout anti-semitic abuse, and are condoned by your president "on both sides".

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Tom 38
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Unless that is you make an amusing video of a dog trained to make a hitler salute when certain nazi phrases are spoken in which case you are arrested, prosecuted and fined. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-43478925

I wish the law was that incitment to violence was a crime but other things aer not but that is NOT the law. Hate speech is an offence and that is disturbing.

Phrases included in that video included "Gas the Jews", followed by giggling. He then shared the video to youtube where it had over 3 million views in order to drive traffic to his other (equally shite) videos. He was supported in court by EDL's Tommy Robinson. He claims it "accidentally leaked" (on to his public youtube profile? pull the other one, its got bells on it) and didn't realise it had that many views.

We don't have free speech in the UK, and never have had. If you want to live in that sort of world, America is across the pond, enjoy.

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X marks the Notch, where smartmobe supercycles go to die

Tom 38
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Re: In defence ..

Speed is a major factor, and the battery lasts anything up to 4 days: given that my last "smart" phone was an iPhone 6 with a battery life less than a lemon with 2 elements stuck in it.

The last phone you had had a sucky battery after a while, so you went out and got a more expensive version from the same manufacturer? Truly, one born every minute.

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Yay, you've won your Fitbit lawsuit, folks. But, lawyers, about those filet mignon expenses...

Tom 38
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Re: 625 million claimants?

I simply don't believe that when there is an award of 4 cents per claimant, the claimant has only suffered a 4 cent loss.

If the awards don't accurately reflect the loss suffered by claimants, then the whole thing is an exercise in punishing companies and rewarding lawyers. What is the point in that?

Lawyers should only be able to claim for a set percentage of the award (20%?), which they can receive from the excess of a percentage of the claimed loss (50%?).

eg if there are 100,000 claimants and the claimed loss is $10 per claimant, the lawyers can claim at most:

award of $10m - they get $2m, claimants $8m

award of $1m - they get $200k, claimants $800k

award of $600k - they get $100k, claimants $500k

award of $300k - they get 0, claimants $300k

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Elon Musk's latest Tesla Model 3 delivery promise: 6,000... a week

Tom 38
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Headmaster

Re: Replacing the batteries.

Power != Range.

No shit. But the poster I was quoting said the power of an old car does not decrease. I even included it in the quote so it was clear what was being referred to. I find arguments that start with outright blatant lies difficult to digest.

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Tom 38
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Re: Replacing the batteries.

> How much power does your Petrol/Diesel

> engine lose after that sort of distance?

err...none, whatsoever.

Are you high? Engines degrade over time with wear and tear on the drive train, on the valves, maintaining compression etc. Do you really think that when you stick a 10-20yr old car* on a dyno it will generate the same bhp?

* UK average miles driven per year is <8k miles, (with large variance, I know! You don't need to tell me how you commute from Plymouth to Skegness every morning, IDGAF). For comparison, US average mileage is between 15-20k

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Cutting custody snaps too costly for cash-strapped cops – UK.gov

Tom 38
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Interesting definition of "not possible"

I didn't know you could use it to mean "our systems are shit and we cba to fix it".

I wonder how that would play at a GPDR audit: "Oh its not possible to generate a list of what PII we have, its spread over everyone's different machines. I know it's the law, but its just not feasible, so we'll just keep doing it the broken way. Still, good enough for the Home Office eh?"

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US government weighs in on GDPR-Whois debacle, orders ICANN to go probe GoDaddy

Tom 38
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If you want to do business in the EU, you must abide by EU law regarding personal identifiable information. So if Godaddy want to keep selling domain names to Europeans, or ICANN to have contracts with European registrars, the law applies.

If you weren't aware of this, you should get aware, because the fines will be stupendous - up to 20 million euros or 4% of global turnover, whichever is greater, plus actual compensation for affected people - not just paying bribes to lawyers and "privacy foundations" like they do in the US.

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NASA's TESS mission in distress, Mars Express restart is a success

Tom 38
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they sell an expensive bit of kit and then walk away, hoping that when you get pissed off with it you'll buy another one (from them - how likely is that?). This doesn't guarantee a stable cashflow.

It does if you are Apple. You start with them loving the device, as it is so much better than their N-1 model. Gradually, the performance degrades until they hate the device, and wish they had something better, something N+1. They get it, they are ecstatic about the new shiny, and the process starts over.

They can't jump to a different ecosystem, because everyone else in their circle is using the services provided to interact with each other, and they fear missing out.

PS: Modular phones truly would be dreadful. It has been tried before, clunky and with useless upgrades.

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Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

Tom 38
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Re: The modern F1 car is basically a wheeled computer,

It's trite to say that Kimi accidentally ran over his team-mate - he did nothing wrong, and went on the go signal. You might as well say the rear jack man ran over his team mate, he didn't signal the tire hadn't been changed, or whatever bright spark came up with the idea that if the wrench spins one way and then the other then the tire has been changed.

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Apple leak: If you leak from Apple, we'll have you arrested, says Apple

Tom 38
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Boffin

Re: Leaking the anti-leak memo to Bloomberg

..meaningless without Apple also giving an estimate of how many leakers they didn't catch

Problem with that is the same problem with declaring something bug free. Testing shows the presence, not the absence of bugs, as some nutty professor once said.

Now I must return to organising complexity, mastering multitude and avoiding its bastard chaos as effectively as possible.

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Exposed: Lazy Android mobe makers couldn't care less about security

Tom 38
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Re: No money in it

My point is: I would definitely pay more for a phone that was guaranteed to receive OS updates a reasonable time -- say version upgrades for three years and security updates for a couple more beyond that.

So get <anything that supports Lineage> and use that. My Oneplus2 gets OTA builds every week and updated to Oreo a while back.

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No password? No worries! Two new standards aim to make logins an API experience

Tom 38
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You don't have the NFC yubikey? Get the NFC one.

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Apple store besieged by protesters in Paris 'die-in' over tax avoidance

Tom 38
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Re: Isn't this a consequence of being in the EU?

If a French resident/citizen buys €1000 in ads from Google to show to people in Paris, that's €1000 in revenue that can pretty definitely be claimed as earned in France.

But if the same French citizen buys €1000 in shovels from Bobs Shovels (Ireland), the economic activity is in Ireland. Why do you think that services should be treated differently from goods?

I don't think it should, but I also think that these companies should be actually following the rules, and the tax offices should be validating and verifying. For instance, the bullshit that google do by having pre-sales account assistants based in the UK, and the ad sales based in Ireland, and claiming that the UK workers are a cost centre rather than how they derive their income - that's just BS.

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Fear the Reaper: Man hospitalised after eating red hot chilli pepper

Tom 38
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Mushroom

Re: Nominative Determinism?

When I was about 13, the gag in our rugby team was persuading someone that deep heat on your knob was a ticket to happyhappyfunland.

It is not.

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