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* Posts by david 12

1095 posts • joined 6 Jul 2009

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OK, this time it's for real: The last available IPv4 address block has gone

david 12
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Oh well. Time to transition to enhanced-IPV4 now.

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What Israel's crack majority-women Unit 8200 hackers can teach tech about diversity

david 12
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"a guy can make a remark that can make you feel so small and you don't want to talk in that meeting."

And another problem exists when, after this happens, you attribute it to race or gender.

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Microsoft has designed an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip. Repeat, an Arm Linux IoT cloud chip

david 12
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Re: Why go with Lenix? Why not create an RTOS if you’re gonna create a new OS

AS OS /is/ an RTOS. One of the group of RTOS's based on RT forks of the Linux kernel.

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Go away, kid, you bother me: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mozilla kick W3C nerds to the curb

david 12
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"altruistic standards bodies "

There are no "more altruistic standards bodies". You misunderstand the nature of the beast.

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It's April 2018 – and Patch Tuesday shows Windows security is still foiled by fiendish fonts

david 12
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VBscript is part of office? Was it traced back to Open Source?

Apparently, VBscropt os part of office. Presumably, that would be the Internet Information Server part of MS Office. Perhaps the part that is open source? Like the "remote code flaw in Windows Defender that was traced back to an open-source archiving tool"?

Or perhaps VBscript is part of Windows, and the remote code flaw in Windows Defender was traced back to a MS fork of an archiving tool.

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How life started on Earth: Sulfur dioxide builds up, volcanoes blow, job done – boffins

david 12
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Re: Sulfur?

FYI, the UK started going metric in 1670.-- Long before the United Kingdom was joined.

International agrrement was defered in 1790 because London wanted London to be the base lattitude for measurement of length: the French agreed in 1871

And I get downvoted for suggesting that the UK uses metric measures by consensus and agreement? Evidentally any mention of metrification triggers rabid responses.

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david 12
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Re: Sulfur?

Like you succumbed to the EU's metrification of measurments?

Or perhaps some of this is by consensus and agreement.

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Gmail is secure. Netflix is secure. Together they're a phishing threat

david 12
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Netflix

This is an information risk because Netflix alows different people to register with only the dot difference in the first part of their mail address.

Netflix thinks that

netflix.suck@gmail.com

is different than

netflixsucks@gmail.com

Why all the hate for gmail? It's netflix that sucks.

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Microsoft outlines some ground rules to prevent it from nicking your IP

david 12
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Re: TADAG

nm

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david 12
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"right to be a little surprised "

I suggest that the author is trolling.

Apart from 30~40 years of documented history, Bill Gates is on record as saying that his business edge was his legal knowledge and willingness to push the edge of legal behaviour

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Linux Beep bug joke backfires as branded fix falls short

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Re: Eh..

I was reading that wondering if somebody, in the chain or reporting, was confusing "very few computers have beep hardware" with "very few people have beep installed".

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Wanna work for El Reg? Developers needed for headline-writing AI bots

david 12
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My AI cracked the encryption

My AI decrypted NM5DXDSG1CWGQH0WWJAHLRL9GADXAZXJEU5IX3BK to news@theregister.co.uk

I trained it using "NM5DXDSG1CWGQH0WWJAHLRL9GADXAZXJEU5IX3BK" and news@theregister.co.uk.

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Super Cali goes ballistic, Starbucks is on notice: Expensive milky coffee is something quite cancerous

david 12
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Re: Wonderful California

Have you seen the California gender-neutral geometric restroom sign (triangle on circle)? I'm thinking that gender-neutral Californian restrooms are hazardous waste sites, if not actually radio-active....

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Apple, if you want to win in education, look at what sucks about iPads

david 12
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>I'm going to suggest that starting with LATIN and at a young age is wise as it is a difficult language to master, but once a person has developed an understanding of LATIN then other languages seem to come more easily. <

It may surprise some readers to learn that this is not a new argument.

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Uber's disturbing fatal self-driving car crash, a new common sense challenge for AI, and Facebook's evil algorithms

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Re: LiDAR doesn't work in the dark? WTF?

>Based on the video just of what's happening on the road<

(1) The video is not relevant to the LiDAR

(2) The reduced dynamic range of video gives a very poor representation of what the eye sees in the dark

(3) Actually, as shown elsewhere and reported by people who drive there, it's not that dark anyway: it's a well lit main road in a busy district.

(4) Because the video is so dark, you can't see that the district is actually built up, with crossings, includes places for pedestrians to cross the median.

(4a) Which explains why the woman is on foot: she's crossing as a pedestrain at a median break, so that she doesn't suprise drivers expecting pedestrians, not bikes.

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Programming languages can be hard to grasp for non-English speakers. Step forward, Bato: A Ruby port for Filipinos

david 12
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Re: Nothing new here

>wasn't saved in an intermediate form.<

Technical note: it was saved in an intermediate form. Opening it in a localized version of Access/Excel caused the intermediate form to be discarded/marked as invalid.

I don't know why that happened: it might have been because the library calls were incompatible between the localized versions, but that's not even guessing: I really don't know why the compiled form was discarded when you opened it in a different localized version.

Side: note: between the two versions I use, going one way I always get an error message and Excel spreadsheet breaks to the VBA code on opening. No code running on opening, just part of the process of identifiying, invalidating, discarding between versions.

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AMD security flaw saga, browsers broken, Lamo dead at 37, and more

david 12
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"tortured"

O ffs. What's next, "tortured" by being fed Marmite? "tortured" by being forced to listen to your ashole neighbours car engine tuneing and late-night music?

Manning was held naked in solitary confinement for long perionds.

Not even English has a separate word for every separate concept, but that's not an excuse for being deliberately misleading.

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Developers dread Visual Basic 6, IBM Db2, SharePoint - survey

david 12
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I don't trust anyone.

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Europe is living in the past (by nearly six minutes) thanks to Serbia and Kosovo

david 12
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Re: "after ignoring NTP for 25 years"

NTP was implemented in Win2K. It wasn't a very good implementation, but it's not "ignoring" NTP for 25 years -- because the 1975 date you suggest wasn't NTP, wasn't called NTP, wasn't anything like NTP as described in:

A New Fault-tolerant Algorithm for Clock Synchronization”. Information and Computing, vol.77, no.1, pp.1-36, 1988.

And where poster said "2 minutes" in the garbage post, he would have meant "2 seconds" if he had known what he was talking about.

(Recent implementations of MS NTP are aparently quite good, with milli-second syncronisation. I haven't tried..)

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david 12
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"after ignoring NTP for 25 years"

NTP dates to c 1985. If, as you claim to believe, MS ignored it for 25 years, that would put the first MS implementation at c 2010.

The rest of your post is of similar value.

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Use of HTTPS among top sites is growing, but weirdly so is deprecated HTTP public key pinning

david 12
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Re: I only just noticed...

--- but the https is still 256bit key, or something like that. So it's still visible in my old browser.

As it happens, I do most of my browsing in http, only doing more complex stuff (like posting) when I'm on a cumputer that supports modern browsers. This means that increasing chunks of the web are becoming invisible to me.

At the moment, forums.theregister.co.uk is still visible to me, as short-key https. When that goes, I'll be reading less of it.

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Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?

david 12
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Re: Going from 32 to 64 bit was so simple nobody really noticed it happened

VB6 runs on Win10 64. Some Apps don't run on Win64 (It really has nothing to do with VB6, which is, after all, the VS C++ compiler under the covers).

In particular what doesn't work is some 32 bit OLE controls used by some Apps.

Given that OLE is a technology for using independent and disconnected objects, there really is no technical reason why 32 bit OLE isn't supported with 64 bit OLE. It's a marketing and support decision from MS.

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david 12
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Re: Wedded to Intel

Not to downplay the commercial success of wintel, but MS was a multi-platform company right from the start. Their product, MS Basic, was provided on scores of OS and hardware platforms. As was MS DOS:

Like unix at the time, non-intel-MSDOS wasn't binary compatible, you had to compile for the specific platform. And non-PC-clone-MSDOS was only binary compatible if you used the OS primitives instead of PC-mapped hardware. That meant no DMA, no memory-mapped graphics, etc.

So different platforms have always been part of the MS programmer expectation, part of the culture.

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Bloke sues Microsoft: Give me $600m – or my copy of Windows 7 back

david 12
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Re: Re:Figure out your next step... (e.g. font type and size)

Actually, font size changes as you convert from one environment to another. As you no doubt know, fonts are specified in 'point' size, and "point" is a platform-specific non-portable dimension. Coversion offers 2 choices:

1) Keep the point size, reformat the document for different line length / body size.

2) Adjust the point size, keep the line length / body size constant by adjusting the font.

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Astro-boffinry world rocked to its very core: Shock as Andromeda found to be not much bigger than Milky Way

david 12
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4 billion years...

and if we survive that, only another billion years until the death of the sun

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It's official: .corp, .home, .mail will never be top-level domains on the 'net

david 12
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... and none of

.test

.example

.invalid

.localhost

are suitable for, or intended for, .local domains. Since the whole RFC is barely longer than it's URL, I can only conclude that anyone mentioning that URL in this context is trolling.

.local was in use. It was deliberately stolen for another use, in order to make trouble for people who were already using it. Because there is a group of people who (a) think every host should have a globally accessible MAC, IP address and URN, and (b) think that the internet should be reserved for people who agree with them.

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BOFH: We want you to know you have our full support

david 12
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octothorpe

... and it's called an actothorpe because the computer nerds who came up with that thought it was funny.

before that, it was just the hash, pound, or number-symbol key.

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So you accidentally told a million people they are going to die: What next? Your essential guide...

david 12
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Re: Management Mantra

>For a nice fee, he/she will willingly take the blame<

IT consultant. Notice how much IT consultants get paid? Notice how many external project fail? As the rats desert the sinking ship, failing projects are handed off to external contractors.

Been there. Done that. Got the paycheck.

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Crooks make US ATMs spew million-plus bucks in 'jackpotting' hacks

david 12
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Re: Times are a changing

...This is what you get for putting your ATMs in your Windows...

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Julian Assange to UK court: Put an end to my unwarranted Ecuadorean couch-surf

david 12
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Re: Oh do fuck off.

>You broke the law. In the UK. Now pay for it.<

Yes. Let's confiscate the bail money.

Now that's done, since the penalty is paid, the original warrent can be canceled.

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Perv raided college girls' online accounts for nude snaps – by cracking their security questions

david 12
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Re: Everytime I see "Mother's maiden name" on the list of security question...

Security experts recomend that the name of your first dog should contain at least 8 characters, with a mixture of uppper case , lower case, and numbers. Also, it should contain no common characters or subsets of your own name....

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Red Hat slams into reverse on CPU fix for Spectre design blunder

david 12
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re: danito

>So there you go, Windows needs a BIOS update because Microsoft is too lazy to implement microcode loading in the OS. If you have a Linux system and did the BIOS update, you don't need the OS microcode update.<

I don't know what you thought you meant, because you haven't explained it very well. Windows does do microcode updates, and has for years.

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Australia won't prescribe its national broadband network a high-fibre diet

david 12
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Re: I have FTTB

> I warn anyone I know on cable (including my 60+yo parents) to avoid NBN until as long as possible.<

Because the problem isn't the cable. Or the FTTB. Or the FTTN.

It's the contention ratio.

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Upset Equation Editor was killed off? Now you can tell Microsoft to go forth and multiply: App back from the dead

david 12
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Re: People who keep old cars and bikes going

It still has an equation editor built in. The only thing they have removed is Equation Editor.

Office still includes Word and Excel. It no longer includes Binder, Microsoft Mail, or Equation Editor.

If MS removed Excel from Office, you would still be able to make spreadsheets using Word tables and VBA. Would it work exactly the same? No, removing Excel would be much worse than removing Equation Editor.

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david 12
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Re: People who keep old cars and bikes going

>Microsoft have NOT removed equation editor<

Microsoft HAVE removed Equation Editor. They have not removed the ability to edit equations (except equations created using Equation Editor), because Office now has the ability to edit equations natively.

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david 12
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Re: People who keep old cars and bikes going

>Has anyone ever been prosecuted for making pattern spares<

Not in the USA, since the /reason/ it is legal in the USA is /specifically/ because of the strength of the after-market automotive spares industry.

Other countries (Aus, Malaysia), not so legal. It would depend on if the company (say "microsoft") was trying to protect the market share of a more recent product ("ms office 2016")

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Heart of darkness: Inside the Osówka underground city

david 12
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Re: VLF transmitter?

>It struck me that the site could well have been intended as a VLF transmitter<

VLF transmitter sites are located at the coast, not in the mountains. And the Germans did have a big VLF site, which was rolled up and taken east by the Russions.

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South Australia bins emergency alert app, contract

david 12
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Re: Why is this even an app?

>Indeed, why not just use sodding SMSes? <

Yep, we got sodding SMSes in Vic this year, telling me, in an outer suburb of Melbourne, scores of miles from the nearest river, to beware of flood events that didn't really happen in the remote parts of the state.

I understand from my American cousins that this is why they all have the alerts turned off.

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Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

david 12
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Re: some systems that will have a much worse impact

>so yeah it wouldn't "impact" you more than knowing your system is more vulnerable today than you knew it was it was yesterday. <

Well, interesting point: if it was this relentless context switching that made XP run slower than Win7, and made XP run like crap on VMWare, it would seem to indicate that XP is immune.

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david 12
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some systems that will have a much worse impact

>There are some systems that will have a much worse impact than others, for example machines that run over-provisioned guest VMs that need to <

Hmmm. Does this mean it will have no impact at all on my WinXP virtual macines on ESXi 4, because (apart from the fact all components are out of support), wasn't this context switch on every interupt the reason XP ran so crap on ESXi 4 ?

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Liberating SSH from Logjam leftovers

david 12
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HTTP internet is disapearing before my eyes

6 months ago I could still connect from devices that only supported 256 bit encryption -- because I could still use HTTP. In the last 6 months that's shrunk down to a few pixels in the big picture -- large chunks of the internet no longer support HTTP.

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Millions of moaners vindicated: Man flu is 'a thing', says researcher, and big TVs are cure

david 12
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Re: Expect better than this from the reg

On the other hand, the statemenst that "colds" experienced by men are significant with lower frequency but higher mortality and disability that in comparable groups of women, is replicated by pretty much every study in the area, so it would be more suprising if this "poor quality piece of research with methodological flaws" had come up with anything different.

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Leftover Synaptics debugger puts a keylogger on HP laptops

david 12
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>ifdef only makes sense if there is a "build" step and with an interpreter that isn't automatic<

However, most "interpreted" languages for the last 20 years have been compiled, as was BASIC in the 1960's, so that's a less useful distinction than perhaps you meant.

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Oregon will let engineer refer to himself as an 'engineer'

david 12
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>and doing math without a license<

The problem here, and it is a real problem, is that he claimed that the math was done by an engineer.

And in Oregon, the word "engineer" is/was defined to be someone who was licenced to safely do design calculations. (As such, he would, of course, have had insurance to cover design failures and incompetence.)

The new ruling is that the state government can't depend on a persons claim that they are competent: the state government is now permitted and required to make their own determination of that fact.

Oregon courts still rule that he can't call himself a lawyer and practice law: they don't have sufficient intelegance and morality to apply a consistant set of rules to lawyers and doctors and engineers.

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Hey girl, what's that behind your Windows task bar? Looks like a hidden crypto-miner...

david 12
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Say no to small windows.

Can't think of a reason why my browser should allow sites to open windows small enough to hide on the desktop. Can't think of a GOOD reason why it should allow new windows at all -- it's always advertising.

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Google Chrome vows to carpet bomb meddling Windows antivirus tools

david 12
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15 per cent more likely to experience crashes

So if Chrome never crashes, this will make no difference at all.

On the other hand, this will make a significant difference if Chrome is crashing all the time.

Are they telling us something about how unstable Chrome is?

(I've been using Pale Moon. Recent builds of that have been crashing /every day/ on all my various computers and OS)

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Windows Update borks elderly printers in typical Patch Tuesday style

david 12
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Re: backward compatibility NOT a thing with Micro-shaft

>No, because you can't trust the copy to be identical unless it's made simultaneously<

Like a book? Laser printer page copies can be made by electrically-refreshing the print drum, or by redrawing the print drum from memory. Secure printers are a specialised type of device, but available.

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david 12
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Re: backward compatibility NOT a thing with Micro-shaft

>To output ASCII characters at the correct speed over a parallel or serial port<

"Dot matrix" is not the same as "Daisy wheel".

The problem is, of course, somewhere with the connection between the Printer Drivers and the OS: the printers didn't suddenly stop working because of an electrical fault.

There are 3 ways to do printer control: (1) Send Windows print script direct to the printer as text. (2) Translate the Windows print script language to Postscript, and send the Postscript script to the printer as text. (3) Translate the Win print script to PCL (hp) or ESC/P (epson), and send the print language to the printer as a series of 7 or 8 bit bytes.

All three methods are used for dot matrix impact printers, dot matrix inkjet printers, and (dot matrix) laser printers.

All three methods commonly send blocks of characters as text (ascii) if the characters will be represented by a native printer font, and as bit-mapped images if the characters will not be represented by a native printer font.

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That 70s Show: Windows sprouts Sets and Timeline features

david 12
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Re: Sets = SuperBinder?

How do we get a review of Binder and Journal that doesn't mention the previous incarnations? Firstly, because MS press releases never mention previous incarnations of the product: acording to the MS journalist kits, all MS product releases are ex-nova.

And secondly, I can only assume that the author was an Apple user who never used Windows in the 90's and 00's.

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Exim-ergency! Unix mailer has RCE, DoS vulnerabilities

david 12
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>As a straight MTA however, not so much as that isn't really the use case Exchange is designed for and it's a very bulky option for solely moving messages<

???? Like many people, we use something else for MTA, for cost and other reasons. But when you run Exchange as an MTA, you turn off all the rest of the system -- you don't have to run the mail store or other services when you just want an MTA. It's designed that way.

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