nav search
Data Center Software Security DevOps Business Personal Tech Science Emergent Tech Bootnotes BOFH

* Posts by Aitor 1

894 posts • joined 25 Jun 2009

Page:

Ford giving 'leccy car investment a jolt to the tune of $11 BEEELLION

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Give me range...

But you wont be able to do that in 2020. as you wont be able to use you diesel and:

a) enter london wothout paying 32£

b) Same for Edinburgh

Unless it is an euro VI...

1
2
Aitor 1
Silver badge

My problem too

I can either sacrifice my front garden or not charge my car.. and yes, I probably cant put a charging station in front of my house.

As for batteries being charged in say 5 minutes.. I dont see how this could be done, the amps required would make it impossible.. and add to that the batteries would burst in flames...

So many things are going to change in the next years.. chargers everywhere I guess.

0
0

Intel AMT security locks bypassed on corp laptops – fresh research

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Annnnnnd....

AMD has the same crap, only different implementation, I dont see why it should be better, considering they have less money...

2
8

Cisco can now sniff out malware inside encrypted traffic

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: They are already using it for decades.

And that is how you get passanger planes shotdown for "accidental invasions of airspace".

5
1

Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: They will never work in an urban environment.

they will do that in a fraction of a second over radio.

Now, if you mix seldriven and normal cars.. I guess you need to signal somehow to the flesh driver..

1
1

Sky customer dinged for livestreaming pay-per-view boxing to Facebook

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: THAT Price for one View?

Sorry, but PPV has exactly the same problems as microtransactions: ppl who are happy charging 0.10 to 0.50 per viewer then somehow want 10£ or more...

8
4

UK exam chiefs: About the compsci coursework you've been working on. It means diddly-squat

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: So it all hinges on exams

It is.

Many employers now filter based on telephone inteviews and put give a notepad/whateverpad to program a solution to the problemas they subject the candidates to..

5
4

Woo-yay, Meltdown CPU fixes are here. Now, Spectre flaws will haunt tech industry for years

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Intel will benefit.

AMD cant produce mucho more than what they contracted.. so no huge slaes, as also the rest of the ecosystem would have to rump up production.

So it seems that what will happen is that people will use more of the dominant CPUs... this is, of course, INTEL.

2
1

UK drone collision study didn't show airliner window penetration

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Hmm

Even your approach, being better, is not as good as what is needed: the full front of an airliner on a sled as aerodynamics are important.

Then you could properly test it.. but it would be expensive.

The testing, while bad, seems better than we thought last time, good job reg for obtaining something.

I guess we all knowthat going for the windshield is not the true target, so my educated guess is that this is FUD and they are actually worried about the other critical part. And testing that would be many millions.. and they dont want to do it.

The UK government SHOULD make an agreement with other governments a do a joint study with other governments.. but somehow I feel that they dont believe that much in international cooperation. The components of airliners are basically the same all over the world, and the savings would be huge.

I will keep with the spirit of the article and not say the part of the plane that is most vulnerable... but yes, we all know.

3
1

Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: This is being very over exaggerated

It does affect me. Compiling times will increase and all our servers run on xeons... are quite sensitove to time, run virtualization sw and are io intensive. Great.

1
0
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Intel.

It seems they have decided to penalize all processors, inuding amd... now, they will use certain optimizations on intel micros so tjey only het about 18% slower. So amd will go 30% slower for no reason at all.

0
5

Merry Christmas, UK prosecutors: Here's a special gift... a slap from the privacy watchdog

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Haa Haa Haa

Toothless.

The main problem I see being a foreigner in the UK is that authorities canbreak tbe law with legal impunity. Nothing bad happens to tbem unless they create political problems.

In Spain and most countries (not including USA and Canada) it is a crime to make illegal decisions while knonwing they are illegal if you are an official. Granted that they are not prosecuted as much as they should and that it is not that difficult to avoid being prosecuted (being incompetent is not illegal).

I love the uk and I would like these people ignoring the law to be things of the past.

My 2 cents would be that records are improperly stored and the workers have too much work.. and because cuts have been made they just cant cope.

4
0
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Haa Haa Haa

The problem with fishing is that most fishermen are out of jobs because a few companies own all the fishing rights.

Even with a hard brexit this would not be solved. Yes, we would recover part of the rights, maybe 40%, but the one to win tbe bids for them would be the big companies.

And as we believe in free market they would mainly target the export market, and use the cheapest extracting method: big ships with few fishermen and most of them foreign.

6
0

Yes, your old iPhone is slowing down: iOS hits brakes on CPUs as batteries wear out

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: A flawed concept

wow, that is crap.. they throttle even connected to power? really?

7
0
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Supercap Solution

The problems is leakage and volume

Look here for leacage:

https://www.tecategroup.com/ultracapacitors-supercapacitors/ultracapacitor-FAQ.php

0.03mA might not seem much, but if you have them at 100% capacity you have 1.6mA, and you probably want them fully charged.. and that is a problem.

So you would need electronics to have them at the best compromise charge level, and also to prevent the supercaps from damaging the battery by leaving it 100% flat.. also you need electronics to balance the supercaps and adjust voltages.

Conclusion: you need to have your own specific IC to control these supercaps plus the real state for them to be inside the phone.

I would say that a company like apple should have the resources to pull this trick, but it is not as simple as just using supercaps. It only is if you are connected to a power supply.

Note: I know about this becuase I designed a system with supercaps, and they are trickier than you might think. I ended up dumping them as the cost was too high (5$ I think, considering board plus components, not supercaps) and they consumed way to much space in my board. They do work brilliantly.

I ended up using a Ni-Mh OTS solution. Lithium is not something I want to be responsible for (as in fires, etc)

4
0
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Economy

MicroSD cards make phones less reliable, use more power (as the process stalls) and are way way slower than UFS storage. So companies shun them.

As for user replaceable batteries.. well, it makes it impossible to have a thin sealed phone, and also they might disconnect and give problems.

So I understand their reasons, even if I myself prefer to have these options.

3
12
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Battery shape?

Vote up, but a small correction:most phones have a single battery composed of cells, as do most cars, but there are a few exceptions that have two batteries.

Also, there are quite a few modern cars that have clean electric systems.

4
0

How much will Britain's next F-35s cost? Not telling, says MoD

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Quality vs quantity

I would rather have quality over quantity.

In 1982 we had a navy that was very good against submarines, but rather lacking otherwise.

An expensive type 45 would obliterate enemies that are serious theats to Type 21s with little danger, as they can with aster missiles, using advanced sensors, etc. The 45 is capable of destroying air targets the 21 cannot even detect.

3
0

Google Chrome ad-blocking to begin in February – but what is it going to block?

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Thanks...

You make me feel paranoid ;).

2
0

UK teen dodges jail time for role in DDoSes on Natwest, Amazon and more

Aitor 1
Silver badge

No prison

As facts are presented, I am not happy with the results.

One of the big risks of running online services is DDOS. You either pay to whoever menaces you or go with DDOS protection schemes. Anyway you lose money, and nicurr in risks.

If people run a risk for conducting DDOS operations, most would stop.

4
5

UK.gov pushes ahead with legal right to 10Mbps

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Errr, no.

You dont need to dig.

I assume they have electricity.

If it really is three houses, use LTE with format1 or 2, and thats it. No need to dig, and plenty of BW for everyone.

this wont work if you have mountains or obstacles, but tends to be way cheaper than digging.

1
2
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Other Options.......

The farm should have LTE for a small fraction of the cost to put the cable...

0
3

SCOLD WAR: Kaspersky drags Uncle Sam into court to battle AV ban

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Best of luck with that

My guess is that the us government will either win or drag to case so it wins by default... just my 2 cents.

1
0

Ugh, stupid power supplies hogging server density, who needs 'em?

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Commodity ness is the problem

I agree, and then simple and efficient step down converters would suffice.

I have seen in some old datacentres that arrangement, I just dont remeber the machines that used that.

Also old Sun systems used 48v power supplies, etc.

There is an interesting article on step down converters here:

http://www.electronicdesign.com/power/aee-boosts-efficiency-lower-output-voltage-step-down-converters

3
0
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Doubts

I had my doubts, but the math seems legit.. it is a good idea and that number sold also means that they are easy to manage in big numbers.

Long live to Supermicro then, they seem to be able to beat ODMs.

2
1

Brit film board proposed as overlord of online pr0nz age checks

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: One to watch

But being anon would break the whole idea, this is, to know who is watching what.

4
0

Auto auto fleets to dodge British potholes in future

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Why?

What is the purpose of this?

As far as I understand the problem, there is not enough people/resources to fix the potholes, and finding potholes is not the main problem.

3
0

Seagate: Happy Xmas, staff – thanks for everyth... um, you 500. Can we have a word?

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: This is going to continue.

I would say there is plenty of life in HDD companies, as the memory is going up (before it busts, as usual), and HDDs are way cheaper for achiving.

My guess is that the HDDs will continue to gently go out of fashion tape style.. for example new 320TB LTO tapes are already working in the labs, for example.

2
1

'DJI Mavic' drone seen menacing London City airliner after takeoff

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: That is dangerous.

So 33m difference while flying probably at 250knots and going up at 200fpm at least, probably much more.

It is very difficult to judge that distance in my opinion. And the drone described is less than a kilo.. but the drone described CAN pull that.. it does a theoretical 984fpm, so as others have pointed out, three minutes to go up, about five to go down.. and 16 more to fly at most.

I agree in the principle of registered drones, so the idiots amongst us dont do these things, but please dont panic... the damage to the plane would be minimal, and birds continue to be a way greater risk.

3
0

IBM to expunge over 500 people in latest redundo round

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: The only way is down.

My guess is that there are still plenty of managers....

9
0

Drone collisions with airliners may not be fatal, US study suggests

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Stating the obvious, much?

While I agree with you on principle, I don't think that being forbidden to fly near airports we are going to see flocks of drones, so at worst a single engine would be affected.

Now, if the drone is big enough to hit both engines at the same time, I would call that a full size aircraft.

1
1

UK government bans all Russian anti-virus software from Secret-rated systems

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: I guess NOFORN doesn't apply anymore?

A nick is not 100% reliable.

As you say, profiles get built, and at any point they might be able to link it with you, even after deleting the account. I still post most things in my name, even those that some ppl might find liebellous.

As for the whole anti-virus thing, I can only guess that it is mostly more embargo under pretenses.

I do think that having sw that always runs in your computer and is reading your files in computers that have secret data is a BAD idea, unless it is you who controls said software. So why run US based SW when it is as likely to spy on you as russian SW?

3
1

Google to crack down on apps that snoop

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Use a Xiaomi phone

One alternative is to use a Xiaomi phone with Gapps.

Now, only Xiaomi and google will collect your information, and that means plenty of battery saved.

Of course, your information is not safe, as these two companies still spy on you, but at least you can prevent the rest from spying quite a bit.

1
0

Crown Prosecution Service is coming for crooks' cryptocurrency

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Not in Spain

In Spain and many other countries, having stolen goods is illegal IF you know they are stolen or have/should have reasonable grounds to suspect that.

BUT if you adquire it in good faith and with an onerous transaction, the authorities cannot confiscate it in those grounds.

As far as I know, the same happens in the US, one of the reasons that they can buy stolen art at auctions and not return it.

0
0

Used iPhone Safari in 2011-12? You might qualify for Google bucks

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Why bother ?

But the loss is clear.

Now you will receive a call from "London" that tells you that you had and accident, were missold PPI or had an Iphone.. so more junk calls.

2
0

The End of Abandondroid? Treble might rescue Google from OTA Hell

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Support

Charge money for support, say 5£ per major Android, and most people with a bit of sense would pay.

1
0

What will drive our cars when the combustion engine dies?

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Using fuel

We can create fuel from plants etc. It is not the most economical way of using the energy from the sun, but can be done.

It will mean more expensive plane tickets, but no that more expensive.

For other uses, like trains, it will be more rational to use electricity. Mind you, it is more energy efficient (and cheaper) to use a diesel locomotive than an electric one, but the diesel one is dirtier.

As for changing batteries as other people are stating.... it makes no sense today.

The reason for it not making sense is battery density.

With todays technology, the best available batteries for vehicles are Lithium Iron Phosphate, and those have a slightly initial energy density than regular Lithium Ion, but way longer calendar and cycle life. Anyway both have way lower energy density per volume than gasoline or diesel.

This means you have to use more volume.. so the batteries are distributed over the chassis.

This smart way of distributing batteries is what makes cars like the Tesla have such nice ranges.

If you put them on single/dual modules, you end up with a car like an electgric vw golf. Forget about 500miles range, say hello to 150 mile range. Yes, you can change these pretty quickly should you design a standard system for doing so, but people would rather have 500mile range and wait 30 minutes at the charging station.

As for using Hidrogen.. well, hidrogen is not a fuel source but a vector, and either you burn it or use it inside a fuel cell. Burning it is not as efficient energy wise, but the fuel cell is extremely expensive.

On top of that, hidrogen is quite tricky to work with, and very expensive to produce. As the cheapest way of producing it is using natural gas, you might as well just burn said gas....

Finally people complain about the source of all that electricity. And well, we can have more eolic + hidraulic + megahidraulic storage: pumping in reverse, and also mega batteries to soothen the loads. Not ideal, but workable.

4
1

IBM does what IBM does best: Raises the chopper again

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Margin and profit

It doesnt matter that much how many boxes you sell.

The important thing is how much money you make, and how much your competitors make.

As a brilliant example, look at apple: they take most of the profit!

IBM is doing the same: less sales, same or more profit.

The problem with this is, of course, that at some point you are irrelevant and your sales dont drop, they plummet.

1
0

Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Yep

Diesels are heavy mantenance engines.

Plus they consume not only diesel, but also adblue, need oild changes, filter changes, the turbos need replacing at least once, inyectors/high pressure pumps can go bad and a myriad of sensors get used up, en a lot of EGR valves. You also have to change bearings at certain mileage, and that is expensive.

On top of all that, the vibrations are not good for the rest of the engine components.

So it might be excellent TCO.. or maybe they break as much as tesla cars, and that is unacceptable for a semi.

2
0
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Electricity vs Petrol/Diesel prices

Efficiency?

You car is what, 60% efficient?

4
0

Thou shalt use our drone app, UK.gov to tell quadcopter pilots

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Could they perhaps...

The problem is

It will be required, but

A) Wont be ready to buy before it is mandatory

and or

B) will be overweight ue batteries like mad and or cost a fortune.

Also, this does prevent the law respecting ppl from using it, but not the not law abiding ones.

How do they plan to enforce this?

10
1

Munich council finds €49.3m for Windows 10 embrace

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: It's the software, not the OS!

+1

Browser based beats anything.

And you can use quite obsolete computers, on many many platforms.

But for that you need to redo everything, and many companies do not want to do that.

1
5
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: It's the software, not the OS!

The problem I see is that they dont seem to want to solve a problem, but to buy something.

IF 15 years was not time enough to make the software they needed, then they are doing the right thing switching to Windows, and given loads of money to accenture. After all, they don´t seem good at managing in general, so it is better to outsource decision making.

3
2

Increased level of rejections

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Altor

Well, I calmed down, I was going to delete the account, but ok, I guess I will stick arround.

One I agree, the fraud.. while I do think what I said, I agree it is wrong to post it like that, as otherwise it could be considered libel...

0
0
Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Increased level of rejections

I do take it personally, as my reasons for going into the website are that, personal.

I have been in the reg since it was founded (although I lost the details for my first account) by Mike, and

I must say I am just fed up.

I had one comment rejected fairly, but today I had one that makes no sense.

The quality of the articles has gently declined, and it is the community that really makes me come back, including the authors, etc.

Time to move on,as if I want pollitically correct content there are better sources.

Best of lucks and see you elsewhere.

0
0

Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: "When it's political, technology cannot do anything."

"800 or so total programs "

I dont think they are living in 2017.

While I do understand that there are quite a few software packages that need to be run locally (architectural ones, for example) I just dont understand how they can end up with 800 programs.

Maybe they should reign in their users, and instead of everyone running their own little IT kingdom

they should just focus on the job they have to do. I would love to see that

list and the justification.

Also, most local authorities I have been in contact with have such varied

needs because they are proving services outside their own responsability while

at the same time not providing correct services for the ones they should be

providing because of lack of funding.

Then again I might be wrong but when a large organization has such a varied sw list, something is wrong in the org itself... and workers are doing what they want, not what they should be doing.

62
8

Intel's super-secret Management Engine firmware now glimpsed, fingered via USB

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Hacking the processor

The horrible thing here is that you essentially hack the processor.. not the OS. So no defense is possible as of now.

they should have never included this in the processor.. it is horrible.

8
0

Stop worrying and let the machines take our jobs – report

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Re: Umm?

Cmon, be a bit more positive! on the whole, we are living in a better world every year!!

4
6

Qualcomm is shipping next chip it'll perhaps get sued for: ARM server processor Centriq 2400

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Ringbus

So it is a ringbus chip.. not for heavy loads but rather plenty of light loads....

5
0

Transparent algorithms? Here's why that's a bad idea, Google tells MPs

Aitor 1
Silver badge

Black box

"Many technologies in society operate as 'black boxes' to the user – microwaves, automobiles, and lights – and are largely trusted and relied upon without the need for the intricacies of these devices to be understood by the user."

So they are blatantly lying here.

Most of the users are unaware of how these work, true, but they know that many people understand how they work, and the knoledge is there for them to get them should they want to.

It is the same fundamental difference between google's unpublished algorithms and opensource.

Most people are going to use opensource programs and never bother to go into the insides.. unless they want or need to.

If the algorithm isnt publish you have a reasonable cause for suspicion, as these algorithms cannot be checked by the public.

So basically they made the wrong example.

A better one would be: "people are served by secret services as the MI6 and the CIA, and they have placed their trust in these fine institutions". But because they are seemingly unaccountable and black boxes, people have no trust in them!

39
1

Page:

The Register - Independent news and views for the tech community. Part of Situation Publishing