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* Posts by Jim 59

1998 posts • joined 24 Jun 2009

A fine vintage: Wine has run Microsoft Solitaire on Linux for 25 years

Jim 59

Re: "We live in a *nix world now"

"I've been consulting for companies for a quarter of a century and I have never seen a Linux workstation anywhere"

I think what you mean is:

"I've been consulting in Windows technologies for companies for a quarter of a century and I have never seen a Linux workstation anywhere".

...which is fair enough and not too surprising. But hear this:

I have been consulting in Unix technologies for companies for a quarter of a century. And I have seen Unix go from a high-end science/engineering/financial platform to an everyday commodity. I am writing this on a Linux "workstation" (laptop). Earlier I took a call on Unix (an Android phone). Later I will check my email on Unix (an Android tablet), probably while watching a Youtube video on Unix (a Raspberry Pi running Kodi). When I click "Submit", this comment will be transmitted by a Unix server (my Netgear router) to The Register's server (unix again),...

...well you get the point. Despite which, I like MS and I like Bill Gates. And I'm happy for Windows to dominate the Desktop.

8
5

They grow up so fast: Spam magnet Hotmail turned 22 today

Jim 59

Hotmail

Been using the free version since circa 1998. See no reason to change. Thanks, Bill.

By all means go to bed with Gmail. Be distracted by its slick features, while in the background it gets down to the brutal business of re-identifying your online ID, tracking your every activity, and building a picture of your every internet wandering, down to the last click.

In comparison, a bit of spam seems almost innocent.

16
5

Scrapping Brit cap on nurses, doctors means more room for IT folk

Jim 59

From which Tanzanian villages will we be removing doctors ? About 80,000 people die from Malaria annually in that country, many of them children, with about 11 million contracting the disease.

And from which Zimbabwean hospitals will the NHS be taking doctors ? Apart from other health challenges, the rate of HIV infection in Zimbabwe is about 100 times that in the UK.

What we are proposing will relieve some suffering in the UK, only by vastly increasing it in much poorer countries. Immoral?

4
0

UK judge appears in dock over Computer Misuse Act allegations

Jim 59

"A person who represents themselves has a fool for a client" is a well-known phrase in legal circles.

"and is also costing us > £1000 per hour in lost income".

9
1

You're in charge of change, and now you need to talk about DevOps hater Robin

Jim 59

Regarding stand up meetings, they are just as boring as the old fashioned sort, but more uncomfortable. And they go on longer, because everybody has to say something.

21
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Boss sent overpaid IT know-nothings home – until an ON switch proved elusive

Jim 59

+1 for "terminating a call with considerable prejudice."

26
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Modern life is rubbish – so why not take a trip down memory lane with Windows File Manager?

Jim 59

And it had a little filing cabinet for an icon, very sensible.

Here in Windows 8, the equivalent icon is a sort of tabbed paper folder stuck in what looks like a big shiny metal clip. You know, like we all keep paper files in. Not.

11
1

Mind the gap: Men paid 18.6% more than women in Blighty tech sector

Jim 59

Re: apples with oranges again

"I don't know what the point of all this is, but something tells me it's quite sinister."

Yes. The sinister part is that some mainstream politicians are pushing an obvious canard as fact, and using ideology to do it, when everyday observation, common sense and even their own research indicates the contrary.

Even that Reg headline above is jumping on the mendacious bandwaggon. "Men paid ...more than women". The lie starts there. Tell the truth. Here's some: "Women earn less than men". See the difference?

21
2

Which? leads decrepit email service behind barn, single shot rings out over valley

Jim 59

An opportunity for vulturecentral.com ?

11
0

Galileo, Galileo, Galileo, off you go: Snout of UK space forcibly removed from EU satellite trough

Jim 59

In all liklihood, Britain will continue to contribute to, and use, the Galileo system. In this period of negotiation, both sides are making big public statements, some sensible, some petulant, some bellicose. It is all part of the public negotiation process. Representitives of the EU are likely to make statements like this, in order to scare/influence/bargain with the other side and its citizens. And the UK will be saying similar things in return. This, in fact, is what really emerges from the "Department of the Bleednig obvious".

The UK has much engineering and scientific expertise. As time goes on, engineers, scientists and corporations on both sides are unlikely to repudiate one another's work just for the sake of it. That is also obvious.

Great cake jokes though.

9
0

Fleeing Facebook app users realise what they agreed to in apps years ago – total slurpage

Jim 59

Re: well

LOL

Dan 55: I think it's time each and every EU privacy regulator rip Zuck a new one...

3
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Teensy plastic shields are the big new thing in 2018's laptop crop

Jim 59

Memory

The nicest addition would be to slap Linux Mint on there instad of Windows. This would reduce the memory requirements considerably and increase the PCs lifespan.

7
13

Crunch time: Maplin in talks to sell the business

Jim 59

@Chris 125. Exactly. My Amazon backet is currently sitting at about £17.85 and won't be checked out until I think of something else to buy, putting it over £20 and saving about £4.50 shipping. It is a real inconvenience with Amazon, which Maplin could/could have taken advantage of.

Enthusiats will indeed travel for a £5 component which they really need, and might just buy a £20 multimeter while they are in the shop. But a £100 toy which is needed for a child's birthday in 4 weeks ? Not so much.

6
0
Jim 59

Maplin is like an old friend

Very sad. Maplin is like an old friend. I rember buying components there in the late 80s/early 90s - resistors, capacitors, tools, breadboard and so on. They were there for us, man. More lately, rechargeable batteries and just last year a Netgear router. All good stuff and still running well, even the bits form '89.

It was always going to be hard for Maplin - basically a mail order business with a few shops - to withstand the Internet. But they put up a good fight, and lasted longer than most.

They were/are also cheaper and more convenient than Amazon - no confusing delivery options or Prime rubbish, delivery was just free - and that Netgear router was about £20 less. However, Amazon will now be quietly reviewig their prices.

4
0

Yes, your old iPhone is slowing down: iOS hits brakes on CPUs as batteries wear out

Jim 59

Latest smart phone features: slowing CPU, full storage, cracked glass screen

My ancient S3: replaceable battery, upgradeable storage, indestructible plastic screen.

5
0

Investigatory Powers Act: You're not being paranoid. UK.gov really is watching you

Jim 59

Re: sort of confused ?

I really could have done without that changing room scene...

Calm down dears. I was trying on jumpers.

5
0
Jim 59

Re: sort of confused ?

@Geniality: "You choose to do that...

He doesn't really. In 2017 it is almost impossible to opt out of surveillance by one megacorp or the other (FB, Apple, Google, Amazon...). You might achieve it if you never touch a digital device, but to live a life without doing so is now more-or-less impossible (?).

This is of course, a different subject to government surveillance, which is a separate, possible bigger, worry.

Well I am off to star in a film now. First I will be visiting the local gym where I will be an unpaid actor on their CCTV, then it's off to Tesco, where I will perform for their cameras, then the pub for my close up into the bar minicam. I've already made about 10 films today doncha know, including "man in shopping centre", "customer in Next", "citizen in petrol station"...

29
2

What's that fresh, zesty fragrance? Oh, Linux Mint 18.3 has landed

Jim 59

Re: Not yet

Office 365 support - web interface?

0
0

Team Trump goes in to bat for Google and Facebook

Jim 59

Re: What did you expect?

Hi Big John, are you a bot ? You certainly sound like one.

Perhaps El reg needs a third voting button.

2
0
Jim 59

Re: Trump will want to be re-elected

@Big John are you a bot ? You certainly post like one.

5
0

Thou shalt use our drone app, UK.gov to tell quadcopter pilots

Jim 59

Flying anywhere near airports is obviously madness, for which operators should go straight to prison, and no mistake. Flying near a motorway endangers others, and flying near high voltage lines endangeres the operator. All pretty much common sense, as observed by kite flyers for the last 100 years, and remote-controlled plane enthusiasts.

But these new rules seem like an overreaction. I hate it when drone nutters annoy their neighbours or endanger others, but I quite like the way they can take arial video of interesting places. This "video" aspect is a significant freedom for citizens, and one the government is not to keen on. Are they using the (highly valid) plane-endangerment argument to slip in a bit of oppression on the side?

21
3

Don't shame idiots about their idiotically weak passwords

Jim 59

Nice advertorial for Redacted Firm.

11
0

A certain millennial turned 30 recently: Welcome to middle age, Microsoft Excel v2

Jim 59

Some people have used smartware in the past.

4
0
Jim 59

Smartware

Back when Excel was introduced Smartware was the king,...

It certainly was, Dr. Syntax. I remember my Father using it, with the help of a *huge* book bought from Byte in Gateshead. It included a database application, into which I typed many business records.

6
1
Jim 59

... how many applications or even operating systems are you still using of a similar age outside the Office suite?

Obvious 'tard-bait, but as it's Friday:

I am now logged into Debian, first release 1993, based on Unix initial release 1974. And editing a file in LIbreOffice, based on OpenOffice, based on StarOffice, released 1985. Yesterday I interviewd for a Solaris job. First release 1982 (SunOS). And I just used "vi" to edit a file. First relased 1976.

40
4

The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

Jim 59

Browsers are highly complex applications platforms, of course they are huge.

Is FF (25 million lines) more complex than the Linux kernel (15 million lines) ?

0
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Jim 59

Off topic, but I'm not sure why Firefox has lost so much ground to Chrome in recent years. I will stay with FF for the add-ons but if changing, I would consider SRW Iron (the de-Googled version of Chrome), but not Chrome, due to the Google stalkware it contains.

Also, I am not sure why these browsers are so huge. All they are doing is rendering a few fairly slow, sometimes encrypted data streams. 25 million lines of code in Firefox. WTF, can't anybody programme anymore?

11
3

Wait, did Oracle tip off world to Google's creepy always-on location tracking in Android?

Jim 59

Some of us stay away from Google as far as reasonably possible. I don't use Chrome or Gmail, always try to switch off "location" in Android (!), always use sites like Google maps, search & Youtube in the browser, and avoid installing the dedicated app if possible.

It's rather like having a nosy neighbour who spies on you through a hole in the garden fence. You block up the hole, so he drills another, so you fill that one in, and he drills a third, and so on and so on. Occasionally he will give you a free gift like a nice fruit basket. Under the fruit you find a microphone, hidden camera, little LED flashing...

8
0

Pastry in a manger: We're soz, Greggs man said

Jim 59

@rmason

Greggs views the global population as potential customers, whether they live near a branch or not.

1
0
Jim 59

On a secular note, going out of your way to mock 2 billion potential customers is not great sales strategy. Which might explain the "apology".

4
4
Jim 59

Re: Spineless of them to give in

Did you hear the one about the women in Spain who reported the nun who stole her... Never give religion a free pass. Not even Christianity.

"Jack the Ripper (British) was apalling. Never give the British a free pass, never."

9
20

Remember CompuServe forums? They're still around! Also they're about to die

Jim 59

Re: Quarter Century

@Jack of Shadows - In '87, you and the Duke of Edinburgh were the only two people on the Internet.

5
4

HPE's Apollo 'Skylaked', will get ARM-wrestling little brother next year

Jim 59

28 years ago, my first job came with an Apollo on the desk, and Aegis. Lovely. Screen was landscape though.

1
0
Jim 59

Unix engineers of a certain age get all excited when they hear "Apollo".

No, not the moon langings, Apollo Domain workstations.

5
0

Mm, sacrilicious: Greggs advent calendar features sausage roll in a manger

Jim 59

After searching extensively for a religion to lightly desecrate in support of a sales campaign, Greggs bravely chooses Christianity.

8
1

Uber loses appeal against UK employment rights for workers

Jim 59

Re: Not an employer?

“When allocating bookings, Uber deliberately does not tell the driver the destination and strongly discourages drivers from asking passengers the destination before pick up – so that drivers are not able to decline a booking because they do not wish to travel to that destination.”

Ah. So that's why Uber cars are available for rides from <big town> to <small village>, but not in the other direction. If all the Uber drivers in <big town> knew I wanted a ride from my <small village> back to <big town>, they would be available to take me, as it means no more driving for them.

A bug in the Uber algorhthm, perhaps.

4
0

Firefox 57: Good news? It's nippy. Bad news? It'll also trash your add-ons

Jim 59

Is this the end of Tiddlywiki ? Been using it in FF since 2007. No other browser supports it.

4
0

Irish priests told to stop bashing bishops

Jim 59

Re: That would be

@Martin 66 - What comments have you on the issue of Catholics, Anglicans, Pentecostals befriending each other and negotiating their theological differenes to come to a closer understanding ?

an ecumenical matter

0
0
Jim 59

Re: Tale from a Catholic

The last papal declaration on Freemasonry was made in 1985, with objections centering around the nature of Freemasonry as an alternative religion. I don't really think of Freemasonry as a religion, but it does seem to present itself as one.

At about the same time in the UK, there was a series of scandals when it emerged that prominent Establishment and Govt figures were Freemasons. It was judged that Freemasons were favouring other Freemasons (eg. for promotion/advancement), which is a moral problem, and was helped by the organisation's strict secrecy rules. It's reputation, at least in the UK, ver really recovered.

I think Freemasonry has reformed and modernised in the meantime, but who knows?

0
0
Jim 59

Some mix up, surely?

Thank you for these lovely words Miss Doyle, but I think you have accidentally sent our encryption / Stephen Fry stories to the Catholic Herald.

6
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Better filters won't cure this: YouTube's kids nightmare

Jim 59

"you'll have the Daily Mail screaming about kids seeing p0rn"

Meaning the mailonline website right hand sidebar ? "all grown up" "flaunts curves" "...stuns in a bikini..." "beach body.." "plunging dress" etc etc

Yes the Mail's juxstaposition is bazarre and rather tasteless. But the "beach body, plunging dress" etc, are all items you can see in public, unlike the pr0n.

2
1
Jim 59

incoming sweary rant, look away kids if offended.. pihole...emby...

Blimey, AC, well done. But not all parents are so expert, and YouTube should sort this out. They can start by switching off the ludicrous "autoplay" (and stop it from defaulting to "on" all the time). An obvious cach grab by those who used to say "Don't be evil", but no feature is more likely to show your kids awful stuff or blow your download limits.

YT could even censor kids stuff themselves. Actually watch and moderate every children's video. Publishing would be slowed but even a small team could build up a lot of content over time.

15
0
Jim 59

Tom and Jerry won seven Oscars? Excellent. Fully deserved. It remains the funniest thing to hit the screen ever, anywhere.

4 for Tom and 3 for Jerry ?

12
0

Don't worry about those 40 Linux USB security holes. That's not a typo

Jim 59

"...physical access is a prerequisite to an attack..."

Yawn. Next.

3
2

Superdome X gets pumped on Skylake to become Superdome Flex

Jim 59

6TB if memory? That's more than every Sinclair spectrum manufactured, put together. In fact it might be more than every 8 bit home computer in the UK.

4
0

Look out, Pepe: Martha Lane Fox has a plan

Jim 59

It might be a good idea, if they can keep the politics out of it. But what are the chances of that?

Will it eventually become a badge meaning "this website agrees politically with the people who awarded this badge" ? Given the condition of much of social media, it seems likely. The badge might then become just one more piece of ordinance in the ongoing "culture war".

Many things are better without the addition of politics. Remembrance is one example. If MLT and co can indeed produce something like the Fairtrade mark, and treat it as such, then it might just work.

3
0

Donald, YOU'RE FIRED: Rogue Twitter worker quits, deletes President Trump's account

Jim 59

Re: Fake news

Twitter's absolutely within their rights- and indeed responsibilities in many localities- to remove accounts without their registered user's permission. It's not YOUR account. It's /their/ network and /their/ account, which you use with /their/ permission. People seem to forget that.

What? Nobody forgets that. Has anyone suggested that Twitter doesn't have the right to delete its own data (user accounts) ?

5
1

Hardware has never been better, but it isn't a licence for code bloat

Jim 59

Re: code bloat is not necessarily slow

@Adrian 4

What causes bloat is the use of libraries and frameworks to speed development. Yes, they do speed it - providing they do what you want and you know how to use them. But very often, you're only using a small part of their functionality yet you get a large part of the baggage.

Exactly. "Hello world.c" might contain 2 lines, but how many lines after pre-processing ? 5000 ?

0
0
Jim 59

It has always been a license for code bloat

Moore's law: your new laptop is 1000 times faster than that Pentium in the loft.

Bloat: They take the same time to boot up. Also to run MS Word.

6
1

Osama Bin Laden had copy of Resident Evil, smut, in compound

Jim 59

Re: Probably gone down

No proof he was killed.

What sort of proof would convince you ? There have been no more videos or statements released by BL and no more has been heard from him. Al Quaida has not denied his death or contradicted the US account. If B-L was still alive, he could simply release a video and thereby securing a massive propagands coup.

The contention that he is alive would require an intricate conspiracy theory. Similar theories would used to claim that almost anyone is still alive. So, his death seems to be as sure as anyone else's.

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