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* Posts by ElReg!comments!Pierre

2541 posts • joined 22 Jun 2009

Hands on with neural-network toolkit LIME: Come now, you sourpuss. You've got some explaining to do

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Who tests the testing tool ?

In an xkcd-esque musing, I now consider looking into a model that would use an arbitrarily weighted combination of Fourier transform and metadata to classify images, just to confuse LIME users.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Confirmation bias, too

I think we can safely assume that these models will soon be trained on image sets classified by other AI models, amplifying exponentially any bias...

Of course, as is often the case for denounced AI flaws, the same can be observed with the flesh version of AI : NS (Natural Stupidity).

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Intel peddles latest Xeon CPUs – E-series and 48-core Cascade Lake AP – to soothe epyc mygrayne

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Roadmap timing

Well, Epyc is already being shipped with the next-gen coming soon, so Intel just HAD to announce something -anything- just to look like they're not sitting on their arse milking customers dry.

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30 spies dead after Iran cracked CIA comms network with, er, Google search – new claim

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Perhaps they did respond,

On one of their secret sites. Someone fire up the Google !

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We (may) now know the real reason for that IBM takeover. A distraction for Red Hat to axe KDE

ElReg!comments!Pierre

One "word"

JWM.

While I once enjoyed the cheerfulness of icon-based desktop environments, I realized quite a while ago that nothing beats the brutal efficiency of a lightweight windows manager + console. I have no particular interest in fancy backgounds, animations or desktop clutter. My computers are work tools, and them being more efficient means more time for me for non-work stuff -like computer games or mindlessly posting on El Reg ... oh wait. Bugger

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Does anyone use an IDE on RHEL anyway?

> With IBM buying RH and the decision to kill off KDE, Devuan is now looking really good.

Are you suggesting that Devuan wasn't looking very good before ?

As for IBM's gobble, from where I sit it may not be so ominous : RH commitment to the basics of the *NIX philosophyvhas been, erm "flaky" (to put it lightly) for some years now, and IBM is arguably not the worst sugar daddy to this respect (remember that RH was also cosying up to Redmond and Mountain View recently... and IBM may have lost some open-source love, but let's remember that it did save Linux' hide from the Darlek (*)(**) ).

As for the reasons of the gobble, everyone seems to be focussing on market value and growth speed. IBM strikes me as a steadiness-oriented business ; a mobile fortress rather than a racecar. It may not appeal to the younger generation, but it is key to IBM's core market even to this day : corporations that rely on mainframes. And to anyone who have worked with IBM customers the gobble was quite the obvious move : for the big'uns, while the backend is Z/OS, the frontend is RHEL.

(*McBride)

(**OK that more corporate interest than kindness of hart, but still)

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The D in Systemd stands for 'Dammmmit!' A nasty DHCPv6 packet can pwn a vulnerable Linux box

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Time to troll

I know about the Devuan images and even have downloaded the appropriate ones. That's when the aforementionned laziness of mine comes into play (the darn machine I singled out hosts a web server, a ftp server, a mainframe emulator and a few other toys that I'd rather not reinstall and reconfigure from scratch ... )

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Time to troll

> Just like it's entirely possible to have a Linux system without any GNU in it

Just like it's possible to have a GNU system without Linux on it - ho well as soon as GNU MACH is finally up to the task ;-)

On the systemd angle, I, too, am in the process of switching all my machines from Debian to Devuan but on my personnal(*) network a few systemd-infected machines remain, thanks to a combination of laziness from my part and stubborn "systemd is quite OK" attitude from the raspy foundation. That vuln may be the last straw : one on the aforementionned machines sits on my DMZ, chatting freely with the outside world. Nothing really crucial on it, but i'd hate it if it became a foothold for nasties on my network.

(*) policy at work is RHEL, and that's negociated far above my influence level, but I don't really care as all my important stuff runs on Z/OS anyway ;-) . Ok we have to reboot a few VMs occasionnally when systemd throws a hissy fit -which is surprisingly often for an "enterprise" OS -, but meh.

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What could be more embarrassing for a Russian spy: Their info splashed online – or that they drive a Lada?

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: 6 downvotes and counting

On a related note, in Canada US (GM) cars are generally rated as having a 5-years life expectancy - roughly half that of any other car...

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: 6 downvotes and counting

> If you know 30 people who own British cars, you've got a reliable monthly income.

Coming from the land of HD Motors, AKA "Our bikes need a supertanker on hold for your daily gas needs -and don't you forget your twice monthly servicing", that's a bit rich ! Even the now "resting" (in the Monthy Python's parrot way) Brit motorbike industry was never that bad !

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: 6 downvotes and counting

Reminds me of an old joke. You know why rich people drive Jags, but REALLY rich people drive Bentleys ? Well, everyone can own ONE expensive car, but maintaining a rolling fleet of three and having a mechanic on the payroll is what real money is for...

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Well, 2 pissibilities here

-GRU registered a car for one of its agents using a spoofed innocuous adress

-GRU set up a fake huge uni campus complete with fake students and fake profs and fake janitors etc to centrally register all its vehiclesn using it's agents real names.

I know which would make the best Bond movie !

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Secret IBM script could have prevented 11-hour US tax day outage

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Interesting requirements

In a well-managed production environment, an incident doesn't impact availability -or shouldn't, at least. So they have 4 hrs to fix individual incidents, and should things go very wrong they are allowed 25 min downtime per year. The 2 numbers have no direct connection.

> Which is less than the time allowed for them to even notice a problem exists at all.

Where I work we are held to a 15 minutes deadline on incidents, which means that the client is guaranteed that within 15 minutes of any potentially serious incident the client will have been informed and technical remedies will have been initiated. I hear that's not uncommon.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Since we went geoplex we're getting these 5 9s. So, not impossible.

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Fat chance: Cholesterol leads boffins to discover world's oldest animal fossil – 558m years old

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Kudos for the pun ; there is no "good" or "bad" cholesterol though. Cholesterom serves as a lipid transporter in the blood, and the transport structures ("lipid droplets", to simplify) have different densities depending on the direction of the transport (to or from reserves).

An imbalance in the abundance of these different structures reflects an imbalance in the lipid metabolism (it cut both ways : too little "bad cholesterol" also reflects an issue, altough -outside of metabolic diseases- it's much less common in our overfed societies).

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: So what does Cholesterol do in the body that's so important the genes are unchanged in

It's also the precursor to many hormones, transporters and such, but these roles are believed to be evolutionnary secondary -due to the abundance of the stuff- and in fact vary quite a bit across the animal realm.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: So what does Cholesterol do in the body that's so important the genes are unchanged in

It's essential for the cells' lipidic membranes properties, including mechanical but also signal sensing and transducing -receptors and "transducers" organisation- and ion exchanges (channels regulation), basically the cell's "life support" systems. So, yeah, pretty darn important.

On an unrelated note, claiming that "many of" ancient species -or even groups- still live today as the article does is a gross misunderstanding. At best you could claim that many groups still have living representants.

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Close, but no Tigar! Appeals court slaps judge, drags Apple back into touchscreen spat

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: AAARGH head hurts

* Apple in this case, but the logic also applies to many other would-be cartel with major political and financial leverage, of course.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

AAARGH head hurts

I quite clearly loathe patent trolls and their parasitic mode of existence. On the other hand I equally despise Apple's* bullying / lobbying techniques à la "we have teh monnies, obey or else".

I'm thus quite torn. But I think I can identify the culprit here. I'll keep it as an exercise for the reader.

On a perhaps-related note, didn't someone mention at some point that the US patent system was long overdue for a major revamp?

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Autonomous vehicle claims are just a load of hot air… and here's why

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Motoring Journalists

I don't know about the UK, but in France it would rather be "whatever their GM masters tells them to". Round these parts, merkin gas-guzzlers that practically need an oil tanker on-call to run for a full daily commute are considered "clean", while my German-made bike which sips 3 litres per 100 km is grounded on pollution alert days.

Sip-related tea-note: as any civilised tea drinker knows, tea is to be brewed in water heated from 70 to 90 celsius (depending on the tea), but NEVER in boiling water. That kills all the aromas.

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Who's using 2FA? Sweet FA. Less than 10% of Gmail users enable two-factor authentication

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Not Surprised

As a sidenote to my last comment, I should probably mention that our pro mail system is unreachable from outside the local network, and that I host my own mail server for sensitive personnal stuff. My Google accounts are thus only seeing mundane, unimportant material (as they bloody should)

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
Flame

Re: @AC Not Surprised

That's still entirely Google's fault.

First there's the fact that my cheapo smartphone doesn't have any room left for yet another app (mostly because Google insist that I keep its own Play-related apps installed and up-to-date even though I never used them, ever, and never will, and also partly because GNURoot Debian is more important to me than pretty much anything else -and nothing of that can be installed on my humongous SD cards because Google's own Android won't allow it without jailbreaking the phone).

And then I only use my Gmail account through IMAP -I only log in my Google accounts when Google forces me to do so because apparently logging in via IMAP from across the street (let alone from abroad) is apparently considered suspicious enough to warrant an account lockdown. Given that my mail apps have, to put it lightly, QUITE decent security features, 2FA would actually decrease both usability and security for me (stealing and unlocking my phone would be a whole lot easier than breaking my accounts from the user side, although of course if The Big G slips and gives access to my account from the inside I'm stuffed, but 2FA can't solve that).

There is of course a bit of stubbornness from my side, too : I couldn't be bothered to keep my smartphone with me at all times to save my life.

The day Google enforces 2FA, I'm gone. I can't be the only one.

Note that I do use 2FA for my banking operations, even though my bank doesn't mandate it. I choose the card-reader password generator, because even though it's a bit more cumbersome it's actually 3FA (webform login, physical card, and NIP). 3.5 FA if you take the card reader into account.

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F-35 'incomparable' to Harrier jump jet, top test pilot tells El Reg

ElReg!comments!Pierre
Pint

Re: It takes very little to be better than tha Harrier...

Just, as an all-around plane - one that should take the roles that were covered by F-14, F-16, A-6, the F-35 is just a so-so plane, and will have troubles against more capable ones.

An aicraft covering most of these bases have been deployed in operations around the globe for quite some time now, with reported superiority on both airspace control and ground strike over USA-built alternatives. The problem is, it's French.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
Gimp

Re: VIFing?

Fact of life: an experienced operator with good knowledge of his (/her) tool will almost always outperform a less experienced operator using a "superior" tool. Knowledge of the opponent's weaknesses (when applicable) also greatly helps. That's an universal truth. I see you point and raise a "Biplan vs Jet for night frightening operations" card on the eastern front during WW2. There is one well documented case of a direct victory for a biplan over a "modern" jet airplane (left as an exercise for the reader, yadda yadda yadda). Ultimately the performance problem is almost never with your tool but almost always with how you use it. (sizequeens notwithstanding).

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Hearts & minds propaganda, courtesy of MoD

> development started in 1957

Also missing (quite understandably) is the combat perfs. The gap would have been easy to cover but that's what you get for bailing out of the Rafale program - the reasons for this being, again, quite understandable, but directly in contradiction with the latter decision to switch to the American program. Politics is almost entirely about doing the exact opposite of what the previous administration did, just to prove how wrong they were. With the same result on costs and effectiveness, again and again. *SIGH*

(surely that vertical thing is mostly a gimmick, given how even the F35 program almost gave up on it in favor of the "short landing" option when it became evident that fans can't possibly compete with wings in terms of lift; feel very free to prove me wrong)

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German Bar Association says Nein to patent court block effort

ElReg!comments!Pierre
Pint

UPC and Battistelli lead to fear

Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate and hate leads to alcoholism. The bar association knows where its interest lies ! Prosit

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Infamous Silicon Valley 'sex party' exactly as exciting as it sounds

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Quite clearly scandalous

I've come by some of them silicon valley people. They routinely take FRUIT (at work, even). A non-negligible proportion JOG to work, while their less depraved colleagues exhibit an unnatural propension to use non-motorized BIKES. The white powder mentionned in the story was probably gluten-free, organically-grown, perhaps even fair-trade certified. One can only hope it was not some kind of quinoa derivative. This deviant, unnatural lifestyle is an insult to civilization and should defo be banned. What are we, animals ? I mean, one of the attendees even dressed up as a rabbit, confession of guilt if there ever was.

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WW2 Enigma machine to be seized from shamed pharma bro Shkreli

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Enigma / Poland

the taxi driver taking me back to the airport beating the traffic by driving on the tram tracks for sort distances.

If that got you weak in the knees, don't ever go to Vietnam, where the "occasional taxi takeover lane" is the sidewalk...

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Prison hacker who tried to free friend now likely to join him inside

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Undisclosed number of bitcoin

That could be worth anything between 2 cents and a few bazillions.

Why did he have to give that up? Computer and phones I get (he used them to carry the offences), but by essence bitcoins cannot be useful to the investigation. Or was it feared that he may use them to make unapproved purchases?

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Boss put chocolate cake on aircon controller, to stop people using it

ElReg!comments!Pierre
Facepalm

Re: Trygve Henriksen

Nonsense. Some of the measures you are recommending will also make life difficult for day-to-day work, and the others are just useless if not harmful. Storage and desk areas, that you recommend be placed in the furthest area of the server room, should really be completely separate and placed foremost so as to serve as additional access control. In the real world no raised floor or access ramp will prevent strorage of any kind of object, including very heavy ones. You would only create problems for yourself by increasing the hassle of removing them. No raised floor will prevent clueless people from thinking that storing it there is easier than chucking it in the lift and putting it in *proper* storage in the -creepy, dark, distant- basement. Or, god forbid, filing the proper paperwork to have it discarded. "recycling area"-type marking actually makes it WORST, as people do genuinely believe that it's now YOUR problem and will dump MORE garbage there. Trust me, been there, seen that, and quite often, too. We even had to deal with a "work accident" claim from someone who got a backache from dumping a small (broken) fridge from the rest area into a tech space. Said tech space being difficult to dump gabage into was designated an Occupational Hazard in the claim. Yeah, right. (this one didn't go through, obviously).

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Obvious design fail

Designing it "roomy" was asking for trouble. If there is spare space in a non-client-visible part of a building, it WILL be used as storage space until the room is no longer usable. You're lucky that you didn't end up hosting the cleaning staff's wheelie cart as well. I for one have never seen any place where that did not happen, and I've seen quite a few places on several continents. It's just a basic law of the Universe. If you want a garbage-free environment, design it with enough space for operation, but barely (of course that doesn't apply to client-visible places such as lobbies, where hundreds square meters of empty, wasted space seem to be desirable).

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Whois? No, Whowas: Incoming Euro privacy rules torpedo domain registration system

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: "Whois" is already basically worthless

Then add to that proxy registrars, and only the people who need to be seen as giving trustworthy info are actually found in the databases.

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US voting server in election security probe is mysteriously wiped

ElReg!comments!Pierre

"Low level format"

Also know to most techies as simply "format". There is no such thing as "high-level format". There is formatting, and there is deletion of the partition table. Microsoft's "quick format" is therefore not formatting anything. "low-level" format here would not be (more) indicative of deliberate mischief.

In any case on a machine that age, the most cost-effective wipe would surely involve physical destruction !

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Li-ion batteries blow up because they breed nanowire crystals

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Actually this kind of "dendrite" are a well-known cause of short circuits in electronics; similar-ish structures form from solder (especially lead-free solder), for example. The cryo-EM here is just a mean to "fix" the structures at various points of time, since dissassembling the batteries at room temp would probably destroy them.

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Oracle users meet behind closed doors: Psst – any licensing tips?

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Rotten

When users have to meet secretely and anonymously to try and understand licensing terms and avoid being sued to oblivion by their own supplier, perhaps it's time for them to understand that something is rotten and they ought to change suppliers...

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The case of the disappearing insect. Boffin tells Reg: We don't know why... but we must act

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Maybe if they collected less insects, there would be more around...

Eeeh, lad, I can remember the day when a fly killer spray did what it said on the tin. The crap you get sold now only works by drowning them

Mostly true, although you can still find the "good" stuff if you look properly. I have a can of that (used it twice I think; I am usually quite happy sharing the premise with unobstructive bugs). It works very well, although the instructions for inside use state that you should spray it quickly, exit the room immediately, close it thight and return only at least 1/2 an hour later and then open all windows etc.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
Pint

Re: Maybe if they collected less insects, there would be more around...

Or perhaps German instects are wising up and avoid traps. Took them long enough, too!

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Samsung to let proper Linux distros run on Galaxy smartmobes

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Some if this is already possible ...

Same setup here. It's still not as good as a physical keyboard, but it's at least usable.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Wine?

Why wouldn't it, but more importantly why would you want to do that?

In any case, it will not be a big change for me, I've been running GnuRoot Debian on my stock Android for ages, to do some network management and other offsite stuff. Better at local file management, too. Pretty much the only thing it can't use is the phone function, but who still uses that, amiright?

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US Congress mulls first 'hack back' revenge law. And yup, you can guess what it'll let people do

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: this going to go well

At least no-one will actually die, just spend the rest of their lives in legal disputes as the mess gets cleared up. oh... was that a hospital system I just wiped?

Some interesting scenarii to consider: find a poorly secured account on the, say, DoJ systems, log in there and use that to chuck whatever mildly worrying connections at a NSA subsystem.

Interesting side effect: as most people in charge have a very hazy understanding of "hacking", care to imagine what absolute mess would be achievable... heck, some network testing tools allow you to spoof the originating IP out of the box, no actual hacking needed...

I will say no more lest it gives Anonymous some "interesting" ideas.

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Software update turned my display and mouse upside-down, says user

ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: easier way

The person was a very experienced vi user who could touch type at some speed. This was about 30 years ago. I suspect he was typing ahead on a very slow response remote connection - so could not see the effect of his keystrokes for several seconds.

Excuses. You do not type :wq [Enter] in Vi without having checked what you were saving. Period. Even if that means waiting for several seconds for the feedback to come from the distant system.

Actually, it's funny to imagine that we will see a revival of these "slow connection ate my homework" anecdotes as more and more people use Office360, GoogleDocs and the like, where a dropped connection and a split second of inattention can mean that you either clicked the wrong button or did something you never wanted to do, due to slow GUI update. Plus ça change...

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: easier way

He mistakenly invoked the vi :x command for file encryption.

OK I'll bite

[escape]

:x

[random text relevant to the file being edited, and that will be taken as the keyword]

[Enter]

:w

:q

During all this, including the saving and closing, you need to not have looked at your monitor even once to check that your input is correct. That's at the very least 7 keystrikes not accounting for the keyword, so a very minimum of 8 keystrikes for a 1-character keyword (OK, seven if you condense the last 2 commands) if you do it purposedly. If you didn't mean to do exactly that, the random text is likely to be longer than 1 char, hence my "dozen".

Unless of course you were just hammering away in a tool that you don't undertand, in which case it's similar to hitting "by mistake" ctrl-a delete ctrl-s [enter] in, say, MSWord. All without looking. Only harder in Vi. While there is is no such thing as "probability zero", Vi users tend to have chosen the tool, and thus understand that command mode is meant to issue commands. That's why I was impressed by the level of gormlessness involved in the scenario.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
Pint

Re: use the mouse to move the pointer

Use a Wacom stylus/digitiser to sign your name.

That's not a pointing device then, but a drawing one. And in your use case a pen/paper/scanner would actually be more cost-efficient than a Wacom. But I get you point. When drawing stuff that is not easily mathematically modeled or digitally imaged, a drawing device is indeed useful.

Once the signature is digitized, though, duplicating it using only kb shortcuts is not cheating but efficiency :P

In my defence, that's not something I do very often hence the "in my experience" statement, and a mouse is not terribly useful at that either (hence your Wacom reference, I suppose)...

Still, have an upvote for reminding me to never * say always again.

*drats, did it again, didn't I ?

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
Pint

Re: Woosh

Fair enough. I don't want to be seen as body-shaming butterflies. That might upset the twittersphere.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Oh noes

migration of legacy Z/OS keyboard driven dumb terminals onto NT4 as late as 2005. Besides everything that is wrong with that statement

*chuckles* here, have an upvote from a fellow hopeless old fart deadwood experienced professional.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: easier way

In emacs its just C-z M-e M-Tab, followed by your keyword.

And Enter, presumably ? I'm not very familiar with Emacs, but it's similar in Vi, and I stand by my words; please feel free to fire up Emacs and actually try it -from edit mode- in fewer that a dozen strikes (assuming here that you don't use a single-character keyword) and without hitting a key that you wouldn't use in normal non-command typing. I'd be happy to see the answer, as that would be yet another reason to say that Vi is superior to Emacs (which is obvious to begin with but heh :P )

I would try it myself but for some reason I am a bit reluctant. Wasting a few hundred MB of valuable disk space to install an inferior editor* just to make a point in El Reg comments does not rank very high in my to-do list. Not until I get (more) seriously bored anyway :D

* prflblblblblblb also yo momma's so fat she could install Emacs on her underbelly without anyone noticing.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
Meh

Re: use the mouse to move the pointer

As an aside, our current labsystem is completely mouse-free once you've clicked on it's icon to fire it up...

in my experience, for long-term use of the same tool, keyboard-only is always more efficient, including for image or video editing applications. Of course said application has to allow for keyboard control, and with the current trend towards extreme infantilisation of IT users we now see applications (including "serious" scientific stuff) that are designed like toddler toys with bright and large colorful shapes and rounded corners as the only means of interaction ; of course these need to be clicked on -or better, punched on-screen- and are not KB-accessible, because UX means we're all back to kindergarten for some reason.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre
Pint

Re: easier way

he had earlier miss-hit some control key sequences - and the file was now encrypted with an unknown pass phrase of the subsequent text.

Wow, you'd need to be typing some very strange stuff while not looking at your monitor for at least a dozen keystrikes for that to actually happen in Vi. Oh, and you'd have to quit edit mode to enter command mode, which (unsurprisingly) involves a a key that is not used often. Usually escape, but I guess if you were really, erm, special you could set it to the "e" key and type in the ASCII code for "e" each time you needed to input that letter. Unsurprisingly, I'm not aware of anyone using that setup in the real world, but hey, there's no such thing as "probability zero". After all, I'm told some people devote a lot of time to chucking insults in Klingon at each other while banging bat'leths.

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ElReg!comments!Pierre

Re: Oh noes

it involves either pressing them with the palm of your hand (damned near impossible to operate a two-button mouse correctly that way) or taking your hand off the mouse to use them.

No, it involves moving the mouse with your fingertips, with your palm on the desk (in our colleague's case, at least. Can't speak for the user mentioned in the article). Actually given how we get told to use trackballs instead of mice because RSI, it might be better, come to think of it.

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OnePlus privacy shock: So, the cool Chinese smartphones slurp an alarming amount of data

ElReg!comments!Pierre
Paris Hilton

Re: myself on self-emailing photos

As a sidenote I recently had to ask a PFY for a contact list (off-work event). The guy trawled his phone's directory, took (very badly) handwritten note of the 3 phone numbers, shot two (very blurry) snaps of the piece of paper and sent them to me by email. I was (figuratively) fuming.

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