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* Posts by Mark 65

3125 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

30 spies dead after Iran cracked CIA comms network with, er, Google search – new claim

Mark 65
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Re: You're FIRED!

Sure? I thought suicide by multiple gun shots to the head was the norm.

Is that before or after you've locked yourself in a holdall?

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Oz spy boss defends 'high risk vendor' ban

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Both the United States and the United Kingdom governments have said that that's the case, and the companies involved—Apple and others—have also said there is no evidence of this.”

In other words "This hack goes so far and so deep we'd end up disrupting the World economy with the panic if the truth came out so we'll just lift the rug and sweep under. Trust us, it's better this way."

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Memo to Mark Sedwill: Here's how to reboot government IT

Mark 65
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After Maude's retirement, GDS was vulnerable and the leading lights left – many decamping to the Co-Op, following Bracken there.

That worked well then.

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Mourning Apple's war against sockets? The 2018 Mac mini should be your first port of call

Mark 65
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Re: Macs typically have a longer usable life than Windows PCs ...

These days? I'm not so sure. Apple's hardware is pretty reliable, but the fact that modern Macs are increasingly soldered together and unupgradable means that "planned obsolescence" is increasingly built into them.

To be fair, with 4 Thundebolt 3 ports you have upgrade paths for GPU and fast storage covered. This was not possible before in the older generations that had Firewire 800 and USB 2. You need only worry about whether the RAM is soldered in. As for the CPU, you should always think a little forward when buying.

Your chief concern would be making sure operating temps remain under control. Do so and these should last a fair while.

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Mark 65
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Re: Macs typically have a longer usable life than Windows PCs ...

I have a 5k iMac that is just over 3 years old. Cost £2,000 and needs a new main logic board. At a cost of £580.80 which is the price of a whole computer in the windows environment.

I have serious doubts about the iMac design. For anything other than a controlled 20 degree Celsius temperature controlled environment I think they simply end up burning themselves out. My graphics card shat itself. You've got a logic board issue. I simply think they end up running too hot thereby shortening their components' lifespan. They need to come out with a new modular desktop box. The iMac Pro may have plenty of power but I'd wager that using it regularly will come at a heavy cost (excluding purchase price).

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Mark 65
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Re: Macs typically have a longer usable life than Windows PCs ...

On the other hand, Apple gave up supporting my 2007 iMac in 2014, even though it still works - only the Bootcamp Windows gets security updates these days.

My 2008 iMac has just gone out of support for new versions of the OS, which did irritate me as the lowest hardware they support for Mojave is less capable than my machine in both GPU and CPU. I can move up to High Sierra from Sierra and still get security fixes or I can do like I have with my 2007 Macbook and install Linux on it and be supported for quite some time. Linux Mint installed without issue and runs snappily on the old hardware.

Official support for Sierra ends September 2019 and, presumably, High Sierra will be around September 2020. That would mean 12 years of support for that hardware. Support for 12 years is pretty good and I am only irritated by the lack of further support because it seems to be artificially enforced given the aforementioned supported spec.

I have to confess that I have a newer machine that is a Hackintosh. That is an acquired taste but I did it because there was no path available where I could have an Apple machine with user upgradeable and replaceable components. I had a sketchy graphics card in the iMac which I only realised was a recall item after the recall ended. It promptly shat itself shortly thereafter. I would have preferred to be able to replace the component myself but didn't have a clean-room to remove the screen and dick about with the internal layout and custom card form factor. This machine will last a very long time and would only be hindered on the macOS front by a change in architecture from x86 to ARM.

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Belgium: Oi, Brits, explain why Belgacom hack IPs pointed at you and your GCHQ

Mark 65
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Re: Bungling Brits ...

It's not as if you're the US, is it ?

No, but in all likelihood we were doing it at their behest.

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What could be more embarrassing for a Russian spy: Their info splashed online – or that they drive a Lada?

Mark 65
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I'm guessing the Audis, especially quattro variety, are still about 1 inch from the car in front.

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New Zealand border cops warn travelers that without handing over electronic passwords 'You shall not pass!'

Mark 65
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Re: And IF you have no electronic password or phone?

You can't ensure anything isn't pre-bugged which would be game over in any case.

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Mark 65
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Re: And IF you have no electronic password or phone?

TBH if it's a cheap shit phone then all it really is is a SIM case. Buy a new unlocked one at your destination and factor it into the travel cost. Quick search tells me I can pick up an unlocked 3310 for NZ$99 if I want.

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Mark 65
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...and what if your access details to your VPN are stored in a keypass file for security purposes?

You'd need to:

1. Have that file with you which would raise suspicion levels, or

2. Download it somehow in a secure fashion afterwards which seems a bit catch-22

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Mark 65
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Re: Security by Obscurity

No different from CCTV. Doesn't keep you safe but can help plot get a result later.

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Mark 65
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Re: If your phone is blank of all apps and data...

that would be reasonably suspicious in and of itself, no?

I'd argue that it's no more suspicious than a phone of someone you believe warrants investigation containing a heap of irrelevant shit, much like most of the World's phones, and nothing as incriminating as you'd like to see. Guilt is in the eye of the accuser.

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Mark 65
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Re: Is that Amber Rudd?

That statement and the point you make really just highlights the idiocy that is happening here. The rush to gather all information, justified and implemented in law by idiots and enforced by bigger ones.

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Chinese tech titans' share prices slump after THAT Super Micro story

Mark 65
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Re: Yet another example of the need for security

Fabbing is not particular dirty, though it is rather water intensive (yeah, I don't know why they have fabs in Arizona, either)

Tax breaks, subsidies and other gifts I'd imagine.

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Apple macOS Mojave: There's goth mode but developers will have to wait for the juicy stuff

Mark 65
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Re: MacOS vs iOS

I'm also not so sure that, just because someone buys an f*cking expensive phone they'll necessarily buy your expensive desktop. Most phone users are predominantly phone users. They might buy a tablet but I doubt there'd be much PC upsell.

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Mark 65
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Re: "I blame The Matrix for starting all this off, by the way."

Dark background emphasises colour which is why colour photos "pop" with a black boarder - no distracting bright white surround. Anecdotally I also find dark themed desktops easier on the eyes for prolonged use and tend to setup any apps offering it to default to it.

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Mark 65
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Re: News App

I've been using Thunderbird on Windows and Linux for a decade now, and it works very well.

Whilst I also use Thunderbird, primarily from a cross platform availability perspective, it annoys me with its habit of habitually shitting itself at least once per week. I can guarantee unlocking the (OS X) machine once a week and seeing the "Thunderbird fell on its arse again" crash reporter. I tired of submitting reports. I do use it to enable local folder copies of server mail accounts using the useful "copy folder" add-on.

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Mark 65
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Re: Wow!

Feel free to now enjoy what is widely considered the most bug ridden and least stable version of macOS in a decade. If you do insist on using High Sierra then make sure you stick to 10.13.4 because 10.13.5 and 10.13.6 have broken graphic drivers (which Apple has admitted is a known issue).

Unfortunately some of us are stuck with the infuriating nonsense whereby Apple refuse to support allow the update to Mohave and so High Sierra is the latest release I can go to on my top of the line 2010 iMac. At least it will continue to get bug fixes for some time.

The computer may be 8 years old but the never ending need for compute power pretty much ended back then. I have absolutely no need for a new machine to replace this and Apple knows that which is why they spin the usual bullshit lines and discontinue support. My machine has an HD 5750 with 1GB RAM which, whilst it doesn't set the world on fire, matches the the GT cards that are supported on the base 2012 machines. These cards have 512MB RAM. If that's not a "fuck you buy our new hardware" then I don't know what is. They could easily discriminate machine support to those that can handle it rather than the half-arsed manner they chose.

Ironically I'll have no such issue updating my Hackintosh machine which is one reason why I built one, as I had no intention of burning $3k when Apple deemed fit to milk the consumer.

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MIMEsweeper maker loses UK High Court patent fight over 15-year-old bulletin board post

Mark 65
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Re: The Patent Claim at issue

Generally Judges are not idiots and the defendants would have tried to take this apart, but failed. Since it survived then it probably has good merit.

...until it comes to technical discussions whereby Judges, politicians, <insert person in position of authority or power> etc suddenly become utter fuckwits. A large section of the population, irrespective of IQ, are utterly useless when faced with a computer or other interactive electronic devices and exhibit an extremely poor level of understanding so I see no reason why Judges would not fit in with this.

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Holy smokes! US watchdog sues Elon Musk after he makes hash of $420 Tesla tweet

Mark 65
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Re: Seriously?

I think the best virtue of Musk is his energy, audaciousness and vision to get these projects off the ground and running.

I think it is his knack of tapping into a rich and seemingly unending vein of taxpayer subsidy that is (corporately speaking) his best virtue.

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Groupon to pay IBM $57m after getting money off e-commerce patent settlement

Mark 65
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Re: IBM has patented things like breathing and movement, etc.

Don't do business in the US, problem solved. Most patents granted in the US are for things that cannot be patented in places like the EU.

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Building your own PC for AI is 10x cheaper than renting out GPUs on cloud, apparently

Mark 65
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Re: The Cloud..

People need to look at cloud computing much like power generation. Cloud computing - i.e. someone else's computer(s) - is peaking plant whereas your own machine(s) are base load. You activate peaking plant when the demand becomes too great for your base load generation to cope. Examples would be sales periods for retailers, quarterly reporting for financial institutions, overnight processing for trading houses etc.

I cannot see how running the same capability of hardware full time when it is owned by someone else as being cheaper than owning and running it yourself. It is Op-ex vs Cap-ex. They may well be able to buy that hardware cheaper due to volume discounts, but that saving is their additional profit not your cost reduction.

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Brexit campaigner AggregateIQ challenges UK's first GDPR notice

Mark 65
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Re: So this is punishment for supporting Brexit

Brexit took place on June 23 2016 and GDPR became legally enforceable May 25 2018.

You didn't read the bit about them still retaining the data post GDPR implementation did you Walter?

Is it just me or does GDPR sound like a German state security service?

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Whoa – oh no, Zoho: Domain name no-show deals CRM biz, 40m punters a crushing blow

Mark 65
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Don't forget your certs

Domain names are one thing but also don't forget to renew your certificates - expired certs also look amateur.

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Python joins movement to dump 'offensive' master, slave terms

Mark 65
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Re: We lost

I can't wait for the PC brigade to skull-fuck themselves into oblivion.

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Facebook flogs dead horse. By flog, we mean sues. And by horse, we mean BlackBerry

Mark 65
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Re: Hmmm...

I've said it before and I'll say it again - the vast majority of US patents used in this way are not valid and involve no inventive step or present anything that isn't/wasn't obvious to someone knowledgeable in the field. They are also only enforceable in the US which, handily, Trump is removing from trading with the rest of the planet so perhaps we won't have to put up with this shit for much longer.

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Nope, the NSA isn't sitting in front of a supercomputer hooked up to a terrorist’s hard drive

Mark 65
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Re: Am I being thick ?

they'll throw you under the bus in two shakes

Future tense? I think Whatsapp threw everyone under the bus some time ago, likely after being bought by one of the 5-eyes outsourced spying agencies. There's no way that treasure trove of metadata isn't well and truly sitting in Utah.

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Excuse me, but your website's source code appears to be showing

Mark 65
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Well, actually, it was Microsoft who submitted the patches as they were having trouble fitting all of the Windows source code in one repo.

Should've tried "fitting it" in /dev/null

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Apple tipped to revive forgotten Macbook Air and Mac mini – report

Mark 65
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Re: I want it to be true

They won't hesitate to give you that. The bigger issue is where they epoxy in the SSD and RAM and charge the fucking earth at the point of purchase for improvements. I understand the accountant/MBA theory on fucking the consumer over in this way but I really don't understand the real world practicality of it. At the end of the day you want sales and I think the upsell rate will be lower than expected but the destroy customer relationship one will be higher than first thought.

Fanboi loyalty only stretches to so many reamings. I have a Hackintosh for just this reason. Sure it can be a pain in the arse with security updates requiring kext fixes but I actually get the hardware I want - modular, upgradeable, didn't cost the earth, and it has a decent quiet cooling system.

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MyHealth Record privacy legislation published

Mark 65
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Re: Phew

Along with...

Judicial orders allowing MyHealth Record information disclosure would have a maximum lifetime of six months, and the citizen would have to be informed that their information is being disclosed.

up until the point at which they sneak in a little change to remove the notification "because national security".

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Connected car data handover headache: There's no quick fix... and it's NOT just Land Rovers

Mark 65
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Do these cars use a soft SIM or is it one that could be removed?

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Google risks mega-fine in EU over location 'stalking'

Mark 65
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Re: Confusopoly

I must say that this looks like a spectacular fail on Google's part. This new data law has been in the cards for yonks, and surely it must have crossed their minds that what they're doing is probably illegal. Did they consult a European lawyer, or rely on an American interpretation?

Simple answer - lobby dollars -> don't give a fuck. Just like most multinationals that have had their arse handed to them for bad behaviour, they simply don't care.

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Your Twitter app stopped working? Here's why

Mark 65
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Re: Why are so many [..] devs [..] willing to bet their [success to] Twitter / Facebook

On the other hand, there's not much you can get out of 140 characters of drivel, so it's not surprising...

Twitter has always struck me as having potential for sentiment analysis. Response to campaigns whether they be political or advertising. What music people are listening to etc etc. I believe there are a number of apps that perform these tasks and are likely getting reamed right now by the price hikes.

Anecdotally I know why developers entertain these services. I know someone who created a sentiment based music thingy (didn't really bother finding out what it did) that leveraged off of tweets. Made him a multi millionaire when he sold it so I guess he's happy. It's basically a low odds unicorn play. If you're the unicorn you get really quite rich else you're just another keyboard monkey.

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London fuzz to get 600 more mobile fingerprint scanners

Mark 65
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Sit around doing metadata searches waiting for you to incriminate yourself.

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Mark 65
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Re: Too one-sided

Well, yes. That's what the law says. The scanners are there to be used when somebody who would be liable to arrest because there are doubts as to their identity can, instead, have their ID checked on the roadside.

If you can confirm that Mrs Miggins is in fact Mrs Miggins, then you open up alternative avenues such as a voluntary attendance interview, on-street charge or a PND, rather than nicking her just because you can't confirm her identity.

Unless Mrs Miggins has been arrested and fingerprinted, how the fuck does it do that? I don't believe the "Shithole formerly known as the UK" is quite at the fingerprints-taken-at-birth stage just yet.

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Mark 65
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Re: Worrying

Software developed in-house?

*** holds down magic button combo ***

"The device is saying there's an active warrant for your arrest. You'll need to come with us sir..."

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We've Amber heard a NASty rumour: Marvell man touts private cloud box

Mark 65
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Re: Two words...

Why dump the Synology? When I updated my existing QNAP NAS to a newer i5 model the old one was flashed with Debian as it was out of support and now provides the on site hardware backup. I use webmin and OMV on it as I'm not after anything special. Just needs to sit there and pull data across. It's now over 10 years old so I've had my money's worth out of it. Just a new power supply needed a couple of years back. What these systems do provide is the low power draw small enclosures with hot-swappable disk bays.

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Australia's Snooper's Charter: Experts react, and it ain't pretty

Mark 65
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Re: Still Puzzled!

@Neon Teepe

As far as I can see the spooks are perfectly within their rights (under the proposed jackboot, sorry legislation) to pop around to see Bob and demand the original clear text or more likely the keys / decryption method that Alice is using. If they don't? 5 years in the chokey for both of em

Re-read the OP. The point is that the post states Alice and Bob are communicating but the method by which they are doing so makes it very difficult for the Government to know that Alice is communicating with Bob at all. That's the point of encrypted/coded public postings. Done carefully it'll be bloody hard to prove either made a particular post and hence ask for the keys. You think you're identifying the author of a post on a public forum made using a TOR/VPN or TOR/proxy combo? I don't.

The point most people miss is that this is never ever about terrorists, paedos and other criminals. This is now and always about control. Controlling dissent. Jailing whistle-blowers and journalists. Controlling the population at large and leaving them as piss-weak financial cattle to be milked.

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Mark 65
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Paedos and terrorists are the excuse, whistle-blowers and journalists are the target.

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Australia on the cusp of showing the world how to break encryption

Mark 65
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Re: iMessages in the Cloud

Just use Signal. Don't have the hardware dependency then.

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Sysadmin trained his offshore replacements, sat back, watched ex-employer's world burn

Mark 65
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Re: Not in IT...

I think it is obvious that when a Personnel Office gets renamed to Human Remains office, that things will be going down hill.

In the words of Dirt Harry "Personnel? Personnel's for ass-holes."

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Mark 65
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Re: Not in IT...

And most HR departments pretend they care for the employees but they don't. They are their for the company and that's it.

HR are there to see that you are disciplined and fired/made redundant legally. They are absolutely not there for your benefit. Ever.

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LabCorp ransomed, 18k routers rooted, a new EXIF menace, and more

Mark 65
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Re: Silk Road

I'd imagine that, in the judiciary's eyes, his actions and position amount to that of an organised crime kingpin. Hence the sentence.

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How much do you think Cisco's paying erstwhile Brit PM David Cameron?

Mark 65
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How much do you think Cisco's paying erstwhile Brit PM David Cameron?

Probably not as much as that c*nt Blair.

Who wants to hear from these twats anyway? I'd rather go on a sightseeing tour hosted by David Blunkett.

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UK spies broke law for 15 years, but what can you do? shrugs judge

Mark 65
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Re: So, as suspected the IPT is basically a blind, toothless watchdog

Given this statement

His successor in 2014, Philip Hammond, tightened this up to ensure the spies gave him a detailed review of what they wanted and why every six months before he would sign it off, giving him direct control over what types of bulk data they were slurping.

I'm not sure that we can really say anything was tightened up. If you just sign shit off anyway does it matter that you requested details? This is merely ticking a box and continuing the carte blanche directive.

I'm afraid that the UK is now fully a police state. Bipartisan support for national security nonsense that allows Stasi++ level monitoring of everything from everyone everywhere will absolutely no ability to do anything about it whatsoever. IPT investigates and says "yeah, whatever". Brilliant. It is an Orwellian wet dream. Don't even mention anything about Brexit as this clearly demonstrates you're all fucked whether you're in the EU or not.

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Oz researchers, uni unite against Defence overreach

Mark 65
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Re: What are they saying?

Reads a bit like the old US crypto export restrictions. The problem with research discoveries is that you may be first past the post but others are not far behind. This would seem to just hamstring the locals in that they could make first discovery but do nothing with it. Or not be able to be part of leading international research at all.

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Euro bank regulator: Don't follow the crowd. Stay off the cloud

Mark 65
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Re: When will they learn? (Beancounters)

As the saying goes, "accountants know the price of everything and the value of nothing".

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Apple is Mac-ing on enterprise: Plans strategic B2B alliance with HPE

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Re: Difficult Job

I was puzzled by them wanting integrity and honesty for a sales role.

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Git365. Git for Teams. Quatermass and the Git Pit. GitHub simply won't do now Microsoft has it

Mark 65
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They could tie it to some of their old file systems and get...

FatGit

or

ExFatGit

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