nav search
Data Center Software Security DevOps Business Personal Tech Science Emergent Tech Bootnotes
BOFH
Lectures

* Posts by Mark 65

2971 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

Ubuntu wants to slurp PCs' vital statistics – even location – with new desktop installs

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: You never know...

But how are they going to collect "Network connectivity or not"? I think their results may be biased.

3
0

Helicopter crashes after manoeuvres to 'avoid... DJI Phantom drone'

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: It's time...

Have to agree with other posters mentioning instructor/student error. Training in close proximity to any trees is no-no so someone really fucked up here and the drone story is a classic arse-cover.

3
0

Facebook told to stop stalking Belgians or face fines of €250k – a day

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Appeals.

As one poster mentioned - the fine just needs to be larger to cope with the extra wealth of today's corporations. There's only so many times you can appeal when your opponent is the Government vs dragging out civil suits with "normals" and the threat has to be a deterrent. Shareholders tend not to like large amounts of money heading out of the door especially if they are too large to be "the cost of doing business".

2
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Send Facebook data-pervs / tech-sociopaths a message

I'm still inclined to think that the Zuck is just a very well paid NSA agent.

Things do lend themselves to that suggestion. If you look back in history as to the lengths that the Stasi had to go to to collect information about your thoughts, intentions, circle of friends and what you were up to and compare that to the modern security services just having to tap into Facebook, LinkedIn et al where all information is offered up for free. Don't even bother responding with an "I use multiple accounts with misleading information etc etc to muddy the waters" as you are in such a minority it isn't even funny. Have a look around at the levels of addiction to this shit and you can only be left despairing for the future of humanity.

3
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Opt Out?

Yep, it's the old statutory rights part. I think the Yanks can bargain away any right they have but in the EU a contract cannot override statutory protection.

1
0

See that over Heathrow? It's not an airliner – it's a Predator drone

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Aircraft Registry

Exactly! Just because the military have been given access to fly drones in airspace does not mean every corporation and its dog can do so. A highly priced piece of military kit in limited numbers using flight paths does not extend to shitloads of commodity priced drones making point to point deliveries. Thinking it will is just fanciful. In fact I'd wager the predator would be the only type of drone able to go anywhere near your average sink estate and make it back. I love how these classroom theorists ignore how drone hunting will become the next form of amusement for bored teenagers and miscreants should they try using them en masse.

1
0

Data scientist wanted: Must have Python, spontaneity not required

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Salary isn't just a number

I'd argue that £47-55k in London is shit money. I know to people outside the capital that seems obtuse but that kind of coin wouldn't get you a great standard of living and you'd be unlikely to ever own more than a tent to live in. Most places you'd want to live within reasonable commuting distance/time of the capital are already very expensive to the point that I'd suggest that if you can't pull in more than £100k/yr I would consider living elsewhere for a better quality of life.

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

How does median exclude extreme values? Order values, find middle. That would not seem to exclude low-end outliers to me. High-end yes, but not low. Median is the more useful number though which I believe is the main point. Calling it an average when that covers mean, median, and mode is just lazy writing by the article's author. Average is generally taken to be arithmetic mean (expected value) however.

1
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: is there really a skills shortage?

I doubt that tube driver is a good long term career choice for a school leaver hoping to retire in 2048 now though.

Arguably it shouldn't be a role now given I was using the DLR in 2006 and it isn't like the need to steer the bloody things. There's that strong union for you....'cos...safety innit. I somehow doubt they'll be going anywhere soon - much like the trains on strike day. There's also the big ££££ to implement across an existing network to consider even though some elements could surely be fitted during any upgrade works - kind of a creeping automation.

Are there any train buffs on the forums that could enlighten us hypothesisers?

1
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

I'd go with the AC in that these are likely just low-end positions. Experienced people are more likely to be head-hunted in this area rather than go looking on whatever online job noticeboard is flavour of the month.

1
0

You're decorating it wrong: Apple HomePod gives wood ring of death

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Wood is not minimalistic.

@Adam: Boards and hence business people don't like listening to "tech nerds". They prefer to listen to MBA wielding "tell us what we want to hear" types. Boat not rocked, steady as she goes. Thus we have the corporate landscape we see today where products are not so much made to suit the customer but rather the customer is left with "that or nothing" optionality across competing vendors that then rake in the coin. I doubt it was a tech executive that came up with "sell them the same shit on a perennial subscription basis". It is hard to find any innovation without an attached privacy or fiscal pillage, or post sales control freakery. Adobe et al with subscription software. Hardware/software vendors that collect and sell your info and companies like DJI that sell you an expensive toy and fuck you over afterwards with restrictions on what you can later do with it - that is a breach of contract if ever I saw one, being a unilateral renegotiation of a contract without any agreement from the other party.

20
0

Arlo, can you go? NETGEAR spins out its security cameras biz

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Nice network connection you have there. Shame if...

Not sure about you but this "everything as a subscription" nonsense is really starting to get on my tits.

0
0

Bzzzt! If you're in one of these four British cities, that was a drone

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: explore public attitudes

Surely there must be a growing market for end-user hunter-killer drones. I guess you could get a DJI variant and attach something to the bottom of it so as to be able to dive bomb a pestilent drone from above causing its rotors to snap - need to be mindful of just where it is hovering first obviously.

It'd surely be interesting for someone using FPV goggles to suddenly see another drone appear a couple of feet in front of theirs possibly bearing a sign stating "Fuck off or else".

1
0

On the NHS tech team? Weep at ugly WannaCry post-mortem, smile as Health dept outlines plan

Mark 65
Silver badge

Goddammit stop being pragmatic, it is the entire antithesis of health/tax funded purchasing.

To be fair, if the NHS isn't on a sweet volume licensing deal then someone should be taken out and shot. In aggregate they have massive purchasing power, more so if tagged onto the rest of the Government (education etc).

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Proxy ?

If only the Department of Health would stop sending the legal letters...

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: The WannaCry outbreak has forced the NHS to overhaul its crisis planning...

To be honest if I had the choice between two unpatched OSes being exposed to the internet (by intent or incompetence) I'd rather it were a linux variant than Windows.

With regards Because the same folks that volunteered to make NHSbntu will give their time to maintain and operate MHSbuntu I'd imagine that the NHS would willingly pay for support and if not you at least have a system used by one of the World's largest health providers that you could no doubt punt to others.

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Piss poor written software

I think the problem Ken is likely that vendors across the board have some shit that was written eons ago that they are milking the dear life out of. The original authors have most likely departed and nobody wants to have a crack at a re-write due to the huge cost in terms of testing and certification. Thus we arrive at the point where you are in the market for million pound device X or thousands of pounds portable device Y and all of them come with Windows embedded and a shitty VB front end. Your choice is then take it or leave it. I hope this is not the case but from what I have witnessed in terms of dysfunctional front ends I suspect it may be so. The certification part is never going to help modernisation but is a necessary evil.

2
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: SMB

Also a lot of European ISP's will expose 445 to the internet.

At the end of the day you're responsible for your own perimeter defences. Operate a blacklist rather than a whitelist or whitelist something without adequate thought and it's your issue not your carrier's.

I suspect there may be an element of bullying/overriding within the NHS - senior X says this has to work so just get it done geek - and whilst it would not be operationally viable to necessarily go to the other extreme it is clear there needs to be a change. The article mentioned "cultural change" and that is the nail on the head for an incident such as this.

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: The NHS

Much as a geek i like the idea of using Linux over embedded windows it does nothing to solve the issue of boxes stuck in corners of the network and not being patched for a decade.

and I see little reason for important kit to be widely exposed. Segregated secure networks and all that. My guess is that much of the NHS networks (within and perhaps between hospitals and trusts) are just wide open once you're authenticated on them. Let's be honest here, the *nix/BSD variants are generally more secure by design that Windows. That is just the way it is. Not easily being able to classify your updates is just shitty and unnecessary and it is about time we moved away from vendors that don't give a fuck.

The NHSbuntu (or whatever it was called) was a sound idea and I think, if anything, this whole debacle highlights that the NHS is easily big enough to support a centralised area of IT expertise to ensure some kind of order, security, compatibility, and efficient purchasing. Leaving things to individual trusts becomes an in-built divide and conquer for vendors and has led to a disparate and dysfunctional landscape in the health sector. Who gives a shit whether doctors and hospitals have little whines and bleats about giving up certain aspects of their control or little budget corners of their empires - the whole thing is funded by the tax payer and it is about time it was done properly.

1
1
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Suits having meetings and producing reports is not going to help...

As previously reported by El Reg and noted in previous national reports, unpatched Windows 7 systems, in particular, rather than residual reliance on long obsolete Windows XP boxes (which crashed rather than further spreading the worm) laid the groundwork for the WannaCry outbreak.

I'm not sure what more management will get you when the principle problem was "it doesn't matter how well supported your PC OS is if you don't fucking patch it". Additionally the likelihood of having SMB exposed to the wider internet such that it is the suspected initial attack vector shows you don't really know what you're doing.

If we are talking about managers "taking the time to understand..." we are wasting our time. Anything you try to teach them will always be overruled by an accountant's whimsy or "vendor said X". What you need is a chief architect who has the power to overrule stupid-arsed management decisions. In any business you will always get a shouty twat that gets their own way with a really stupid idea - squeaky wheel and all that.

1
1

Dodgy parking firms to be denied access to Brit driver database

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Yes, parking debts ARE enforceable !

From the images in that article the double yellow lines are a bit of a giveaway that you cannot park there and her general arrogance (ignore rather than refute the penalties) was likely to have coloured the outcome as mentioned. I think her case was wafer thin at best, especially when she could have parked issue free for £40/mth.

0
1
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Um...

You need to be able to prove your case of breach of contract. I doubt many debt collectors would pay anything for such debts as the probability of success makes the NPV pretty close to zero.

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: dodgy parking companies

Do you seriously have to pay any fine a private parking company gives you? I mean, as long as you can leave the car park without paying is it actually enforceable? I can see how a car park owned by a municipal authority may be able to do so through by-laws as they possess law making authority, but a private company on private land?

If it is enforceable then the UK must be one of the most utterly fucked societies on the planet.

1
0

I'll torpedo Tor weirdos, US AG storms: Feds have 'already infiltrated' darknet drug souks

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: The biggest troublemakers are not on the darknet

You'd have to wonder how much street dealer addiction actually started out as prescribed addiction. As you state, they hand them out like sweeties but at some point need to turn off the supply. Then the visibly shady dudes take over.

The problem as I see it with people dealing in drugs, weapons etc on the darknet is that at some point your transaction makes it back into the real world, most likely for the physical delivery but possibly for the payment if you weren't really careful about the trail the coins left.

0
0

PC not dead, Apple single-handedly propping up mobe market, says Gartner

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: " it's moot to only talk about what professionals and enthusiasts use PCs for."

and not, for example, that PC sales reached saturation and replacement cycles got longer (especially since SSDs gave a big speed boost to machine that were only I/O bound).

^^^ this ^^^

I have a 2010 era iMac (2.93GHz i7) that I fitted an internal SSD to as the internal drives are a PITA and it's pot luck which manufacturer you get - I lucked out and got a Seagate which naturally shat itself. That machine is still good for whatever I need to do computationally over 7 years later.

I built a replacement and the end of 2017 for 2 reasons...

1. Tax deductions - may as well have something for the money as it'll be leaving the bank account one way or another.

2. NVMe drive and USB 3 as well as the ability to stuff it full of drives and RAM and easily replace any parts that fail.

3. Heat dissipation when under heavy load. iMacs aren't great when under stress in a hot climate.

1
0

You can't ignore Spectre. Look, it's pressing its nose against your screen

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Dedicated instances

And they have you to secure it - and you are better at cybersecurity than all the people at Google and amazon.

What makes you think they're so damned good? FFS Google were running non-encrypted comms between data centres and got absolutely fucking owned by the TLAs. Have Google never released security fixes for Chrome? Seriously, your argument is just so weak. They'd need to be orders of magnitude better because

1. The potential attacker is already on the hardware (shared resources)

2. As an aggregator of compute users they are such a big fat juicy target whereas Johnny SME just isn't as attractive.

You are also guilty of making assumptions as to how capable the OP may be. Plenty of talented people would rather not work for companies like Google and by all accounts they seem to have their fair share of chaff.

2
1

Microsoft works weekends to kill Intel's shoddy Spectre patch

Mark 65
Silver badge

They could have had patches for compilers, firmware, and BIOSes ready in that time.

They could have, if they gave more of a shit about their customers than apparently the CEO selling down everything he could in the mean time (courtesy of various financial media reports).

1
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: The WinTel Cartel...

It is demonstrably not gross negligence and I would expect such claims to be tossed out of court on day one.

*Ahem*. What about continuing to sell new models with the issue still in place once you know about it? They need to be sued into oblivion because they simply don't give a shit.

For negligence, you need to have a situation where a knowledgeable person would, if aware of the action, think that it was careless or unwise.

See the above point about continuing to issue new models with the design fault in place. Any argument about "it takes time to redesign, test, and fabricate chips without the issue" should be met with "tough shit, that's a 'your problem' not a 'my problem'". There are very few industries where you can continue to knowingly sell defective goods. "Not fit for purpose" seems to spring instantly to mind in terms of consumer protection.

2
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: "...nobody's explained why..."

I know why...

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich sold off a large chunk of his stake in the company after the chipmaker was made aware of serious security flaws, according to multiple reports

An SEC filing last November showed Krzanich sold off about 644,000 shares by exercising his options and another roughly 245,700 shares he already owned

That reduced Krzanich's total number of shares to 250,000, which is the bare minimum that an Intel CEO should own, according to The Motley Fool

Courtesy of searching for "intel director share sale". That last point tells you all you need to know - bare minimum holding for a CEO says "fuck this company"

0
0

Thar she blows: Strava heat map shows folk on shipwreck packed with 1,500 tonnes of bombs

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Didn't anybody walk out the outline of a huge... ?

That could be fun. Map out some obscene words.

Or draw in the Superbad style

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: How accurate are these things?

Fitness tracker stuff is very competitive in my friends circle

We'd rather not discuss your friend's circle if that's quite alright.

2
0

Ubuntu reverting to Xorg in Bionic Beaver

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: I find this slightly embarassing

Even in Windows it's many years a crash of the shell doesn't bring down the whole session. Even the graphic driver can stop and be restarted, at least since Windows 7. If Wayland is way behind, it's far worse than Microsoft as well.

That may well be the result of a "needs must" development ethic on account of just how frequent the blue screen of death used to be.

0
0

FYI: That Hawaii missile alert was no UI blunder. Someone really thought the islands were toast

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: For "omni-shambles" read ...

Was that the title of the video they all watched on pornhub afterwards (according to the site's increased browsership)?

3
0

Watchdog: Uh, sit down, AriseBank. This crypto-coin looks more like a $600m crypto-con

Mark 65
Silver badge

According to Bloomberg, another watchdog agency, the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), last week subpoenaed cryptocurrency exchange Bitfinex and Tether, a cryptocurrency company that says it pegs the value of its digital coins to the dollar.

The CFTC has not disclosed the nature of its inquiry.

I believe it is along the lines of the pegging being *bullshit*. I read somewhere there is $2.3bn worth of the shit outstanding. No chance they have that sitting in Escrow somewhere.

I have to admit that I'm left marvelling at some of the shit these con artists come up with and even more so at the FOMO dickheads that buy into it.

Wonder how much I could raise with TwatCoin? Maybe a coin that uses the blockchain to verify that the jazz artists in the video you're currently strumming over have been properly financially compensated. Yep, TwatCoin ensures the egalitarian funding of smut.

3
0

Stop us if you've heard this one before: Tokyo crypto-cash exchange 'hacked' for half a billion bucks

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Portable gold

Gordon Brown cost us about £5 Billion when disposing of about 395 tonnes in Gold

Maybe he should have ploughed it into BitCoin?

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Occam's Razor

Stealing is easy, running away more difficult, but stealing, running away and spending your ill-gotten gains free from retribution/recourse is the hardest of all.

0
0

Lenovo's craptastic fingerprint scanner has a hardcoded password

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Security is hard.

But how many times does it need to be reiterated that a fingerprint is the user id not the password?

Why can the IT industry not understand this?

0
0

NHS: Thanks for the free work, Linux nerds, now face our trademark cops

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Shameful

f this is just about the cease and desist then bite back the bile and rebrand as something like Ubuntu for health

Just carry on with the work, rebranding as Medibuntu or something. It's not like there aren't other health authorities around the world, even if you stuck to predominantly English speaking, that would have to solve similar issues and get their systems to work with similar documents/messaging formats etc as well as potentially interface to equipment.

Short-sighted by the NHS on this one as they could have created this for their own use and then looked to sell it to private health and overseas markets.

0
0

Upset Equation Editor was killed off? Now you can tell Microsoft to go forth and multiply: App back from the dead

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: I hadn't noticed.

That statement sounds like the confessions of a sexual deviant.

4
0

Airbus warns it could quit A380 production

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Capacity

I always found BA to be great short-haul (weekend city breaks to the continent) but utter shithouse for long-haul.

We used to use them over Easy Jet and Ryan Air as:

The cost at the time was not much more.

Greater choice of flight times.

They gave you decent food.

The plane landed at the destination you were after not 100 mi outside in the country somewhere.

If there was an issue with delays etc you lost much less time as a result due to the airline's capacity to put you onto another flight and by them being a more important client of the airport.

Things may have changed since then though (2010).

2
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Shame

Same airline and age of aircraft?

1
0

OK, Google: Why does Chromecast clobber Wi-Fi connections?

Mark 65
Silver badge

I think they should just issue a statement calling out Google's shitty coding.

24
1

Ohio coder accused of infecting Macs, PCs with webcam, browser spyware for 13 years

Mark 65
Silver badge

Wonder if this malware appears anywhere on the House of Commons network?

0
0

Cisco can now sniff out malware inside encrypted traffic

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Add randomness

What's the chance of the Cisco kit having a handy zero-day they could use to help exfiltrate their bounty? Not like their software hasn't been full of holes in the past is it?

0
0

Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: They will never work in an urban environment.

The same way we do now. The occupants shout at the kids.

You're neglecting the fact that there is also ambiguity over whether the human driver will stop - elderly or Audi/BMW driver and you're taking a bit of a risk.

7
0

FCA 'gold-plates' EU rule, hits BYOD across entire UK finance sector

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Not that big a face plant is it?

Surely the key words here are "RELEVANT telephone conversation", which would be reasonable to argue means between traders, sales people senior management etc. (recieving a lunch order in the canteen of X-Bank would certainly not be relevant as far as the regulator is concerned).

I work as a developer on desk X. I hear some really juicy price sensitive information that I then use to encourage trading by a 3rd party. That is clearly a relevant telephone conversation and not covered by your writing.

Recording at the carrier level for a company provided SIM card is irrelevant if I have my own SIM card and phone.

The regulation seems generally unenforceable especially given the need to cover any and all communication devices and methods a user could have access to.

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

You seem to be missing the most important device when considering BYOD and that is the humble mobile phone. Also, don't forget that there is BYOD as in "do work on your personal device" and BYOD as in "I've got my personal mobile with me".

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

Ex-ante, how do you know it's relevant? You don't, therefore you record everything save you breach the law by missing one.

0
0
Mark 65
Silver badge

I can't see how you can ban someone from bringing their own phone to work. If they need to be able to make private calls after they leave the office WTF are they supposed to do? I also cannot see it happening as I think you would be on legally very shaky ground if you completely banned employees having personal mobile phones without replacing that with a corporate mobile phone and that gets very expensive very quickly as you then cannot ban private calls as you foisted this need upon them. Justifiable for traders, not so much for some base grade non-trading floor admin bod. Grab the pop-corn, this will be fun.

1
0

Supremes asked to mull legality of Silicon Valley privacy 'slush funds'

Mark 65
Silver badge

Re: Color me unsurprised

Goes to highlight, for me at least, just how fucked up the USA is as a society. No wonder they ended up electing an unstable wiggy orange muppet in a last gasp act of desperation.

Is the constitution just a token veneer over a turd sandwich?

9
0

The Register - Independent news and views for the tech community. Part of Situation Publishing