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* Posts by Charles 9

11771 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Airbus warns it could quit A380 production

Charles 9
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Re: Why not a cargo version

The US though has a robust rail network, and it's focus is freight. US freight companies know a thing or two about intermodal transport, so even in the heartland, an ocean voyage is followed by rail and only the last mile is done by truck.

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Charles 9
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Re: speaking as an airline customer

Are you willing to pay the MUCH larger ticket prices, though? Go back to the 50's where air travel was a luxury? Airliners have high fixed costs per flight which is why larger capacities make sense: to provide the economies of scale you need.

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Boffins split on whether Spectre fix needs tweaked hardware

Charles 9
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It's not G-men but rather accountants who are to blame here. If the money isn't in security, then it simply won't be there. The shareholders will insist on this.

You want an indestructible bridge? Tell us how you can beat physics and make a bridge capable of withstanding a meteor strike on a shoestring budget.

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Charles 9
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Re: Recall impossible?

Lesser in what way? Faults in cars can get people KILLED.

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Intel puts security on the todo list, Tavis topples torrent tool, and more

Charles 9
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Re: Th REAL question...

No, because it would take too long, cost too much, and people would STILL rather pay to beat the deadlines. Unless there's a mass exodus or an unaffected tech wins a huge contract, the opportunity cost isn't big enough yet.

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Self-driving cars still do not exist even if we think they do

Charles 9
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Re: What is a train?

It isn't a car or truck unless it can handle the last mile.

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Charles 9
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Re: Of course they exist.

You don't HAVE a self-cleaning oven, then. You ARE one.

Ps. Never had that problem. Maybe you're doing it wrong?

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Charles 9
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Re: Of course they exist.

So you're saying there's no such thing as a self-cleaning oven, for example?

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Remember those holy tech wars we used to have? Heh, good times

Charles 9
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But opt-IN or opt-OUT? Remember, one of the signs of true idiocy is the inability for the idiot to recognize the condition in him/herself.

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Charles 9
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Here's another war front that gets frequently overlooked: one with actual real-world consequences. How to deal with the Stupid User? Some feel we need to coddle them lest they take the rest of us with them, others feel they should just let Darwin sort 'em out.

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Everything running smoothly at the plant? *Whips out mobile phone* Wait. Nooo...

Charles 9
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And if given a Do It or Else (DIE) order?

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Charles 9
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Re: JUST STOP IT NOW!

Until you learn the demands for remote administration come from up top (like C-level), and these people tend to have connections...

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Ecuador tried to make Julian Assange a diplomat

Charles 9
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Re: under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations . . .?

And aren't those positions subject to host acceptance the ONLY positions where diplomatic immunity can seriously apply?

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Charles 9
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If it really IS the law, cite it.

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Data protection is best managed from the centre

Charles 9
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Re: Getting ahead of yourself here..

Oh, it's real simple, and practically instinctive. Better by far to have something you don't need than to need something you don't have. That's why many humans are packrats by nature.

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Brit transport pundit Christian Wolmar on why the driverless car is on a 'road to nowhere'

Charles 9
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Like any sensible prankster would walk in front of a camera in a clearly identifiable state. Dressing in black complete with mask in the dead of night would be a simple countermeasure. More technically-minded one would try dazzling the cameras with infrared or the like to make their footage useless in court.

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Charles 9
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Re: Why can't you program a bit of aggressiveness?

Because humans know liability laws favor them over the car because pedestrians are more fragile. If a malicious driver strikes and hurts someone, the court tends to favor the pedestrian unless the circumstances are extreme. Car visual systems just can't match the skills of the heavily-evolved eyeball and brain. How does an automated car respond when one or more pedestrians simply blockade the road and respond to horns with fingers (or worse, paint, so the car can't see them anymore)?

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Charles 9
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Re: Daft

So why can't we teach the cues to the computer? Is it because we don't consciously know these cues ourselves?

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Charles 9
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For (2), you would think trains would provide better utility until you realize the most important part of the trip is also the toughest to automate: the first and last miles.

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Charles 9
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Put it this way. Can you clearly see the other end of the convoy from the one end? The comparison is basically saying, "It would be a stretch."

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Charles 9
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Re: And of course the moral issue...

So you roll dice, basically. Why can't a computer do that? "Oh well, chips fell the wrong way" and so on?

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Charles 9
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Re: And of course the moral issue...

"What should the car do? And more relevant, what will the car programmers want it to do? No doubt the people who designed it want to minimise legal costs and bad PR."

Then tell me. What would YOU do?

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Charles 9
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Re: Driverless trucks though....

"And then you could put them on a special road to reduce traffic on the normal roads. You could make the special road out of two strips of metal which the truck wheels sort of 'slot' into"

Thing is, what if each of the trailers has to go to a different destination. Isn't that why trucks have their own tractors in the first place: to be able to do the crucial last mile themselves?

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Charles 9
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Re: Missing the point

I think you're overlooking that for the car to be able to overtake the human in all aspects, including "chicken" cases, you need to overcome the inherent advantage humans have of highly-evolved senses. We've developed an ability (through evolution) of being able to assess lots of things (often UNconsciously) with just a glance or a simple sound (part of why we can't teach it to cars--we often don't consciously know the clues). Thus humans can more accurately discern the trolls than any machine. As for kids playing chicken, kids don't do it with human drivers because they realize that a human driver might not see them--or go "Screw this" and run anyway. I read a recent article that notes that computers have a much easier time with higher-level functions (things that requires techniques like logic) than with lower-level functions (things that depend on "body" functions like manual motion and the senses).

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US shoppers abandon PC makers in hour of need

Charles 9
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Re: everyone replaces their PCs

"So PCs are bought when you need them to study or work, maybe waiting for some sale if you have to save some money. And you'll spend those saved money in gifts from the latest bling technology."

Plus like I said PC power is plateauing. Case in point; there are so many capable secondhand PCs on the market these days there's little need to buy new ones. After I built a white-box PC 10 years ago (I actually still have it), all the other machines I've acquired since then have been secondhand. When you can get a Core i5 with monitor, keyboard, and mouse for only $130 used, and you can upgrade the bits you need upgrading, why buy new? And even many of the subpar ones make capable media players with just a few cheap additions.

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Charles 9
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Market Saturation

This should be a warning sign that the PC market in North America is approaching saturation. Most everyone that needs a PC has one with enough oomph to get them through nigh anything they encounter on a daily basis. And thanks to cloud computing, there's less need for spare capacity that rarely gets used. Plus PC computing power is plateauing, showing signs of Diminishing Returns, further convincing owners not to upgrade. It happens to most markets eventually. The smartphone market is slowing down as well so it's not isolated.

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No wonder Marvin the robot was miserable: AI will make the rich richer – and the poor poorer

Charles 9
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But the thing is, automation's costs spread differently than human labor. It tends to have higher upfront costs but lower continual costs, not to mention a higher uptime ratio, altering the TCO math.

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Charles 9
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Well, that and a cleaner slate given a good chunk of Europe was in ruins and the able-bodied population had taken a noticeable hit. I mean, would the Renaissance have happened without the population crash caused by the Black Death?

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Charles 9
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Re: UBI

Ever heard the phrase, "It's a dirty job, but someone's gotta do it." A lot of these drudge jobs are also the kinds where machines would have trouble because they're drudgework: getting down in uneven, unpredictable conditions engaged in manual labor and so on. Basically, jobs that needs manual effort and a good set of senses: the kinds of things we got through evolution and can't easily replicate in a machine.

PS. Here's the biggest problem with UBI. Who pays for it that wouldn't have the power to go, "Sod this," and leave before being charged?

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Charles 9
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Re: AI is irrelevant

But AI represents non-humans taking over a lot of the work, and THAT'S serious enough because you increase the number of dead-ended humans: potentially past my aforesaid cliff edge.

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Charles 9
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Re: Poor Poorer.

Can't the haves simply close off the walled garden and then hash it out amongst themselves?

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Charles 9
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Re: Not panicked yet

"Multinationals these days are a problem, but they aren't directly ruling continents and could be brought under control with far less difficulty. The problem is largely bribary"

It's not just carrots but sticks. Today's multinations are much more mobile, so a bribe combined with a threat to pull up stakes (and take a lot of their tax revenues with them) makes governments sit up and take notice.

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Audio tweaked just 0.1% to fool speech recognition engines

Charles 9
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Re: Just like human senses

"They made a crucial distinction. Humans (and sheep) are very good at recognising faces we know, but very bad at recognising strangers."

We also lose the ability to recognize even faces we know if enough cues disappear. A famous case around the early 90's pretty much shot eyewitness testimony all to hell by showing a suffciently-covered (ex. beard and glasses) celebrity face was mistaken by nearly everyone for the defendant.

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90 per cent of the UK's NHS is STILL relying on Windows XP

Charles 9
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"Then you need to make your filtering proxy good enough to permit those connections that are desired whilst forbidding those that aren't. "

And if they're one and the same? IOW, a pwning attack can look too close to a legitimate request to raise your false positive rate too high and get complaints?

"Then you are too clueless to run a business."

Who says I'm running it? When you're told to DIE (Do It or Else), and there's no other ship to jump to, you come to realize a foundering ship is preferable to the sharks.

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Watt? You thought the wireless charging war was over? It ain't even begun

Charles 9
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Re: Effects on Humans & Animals?

But at least people know how cars kill people: they get hit by them. Just avoid them. But two REAL real fears are unknown dangers (or something so obscure as to be beyond our ability to picture it) and helplessness (aka foreboding: knowing something bad is coming but being unable to do anything about it). Like eating a "frankenfood" and finding out only decades later that it altered us to the state our children are defective and so on: by which time we're already past the point of no return.

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Charles 9
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Re: Effects on Humans & Animals?

Cancer, like radiation sickness, tend to be things that take a long time to become obvious, making it very tricky to trace what caused them in the first place. That's what makes things like radioactivity, genetic engineering, etc. so scary: you can't see the side effects right away, and by the time they do show up, it could well be too late to do anything to stop a disaster.

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Cisco can now sniff out malware inside encrypted traffic

Charles 9
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Re: Yes, there are concepts for that...

"If a company really wants to improve their security, they need to get rid of the well-liked 20-year tenure managers who have let their skills and training erode to the point where all of their recommendations sound great to the uneducated but in reality are worse than useless. They'll also save a buttload of money."

Except that's usually due to them being on the board and over your head. Suggesting getting rid of them short of a shareholder revolt is considered suicide.

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Charles 9
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Re: Yes, there are concepts for that...

That's what I mean. They don't conceal their techniques but pass them on to newcomers, raising the baseline knowledge. Sort of like how in WW2 the US would send pilots who survived their tours home to teach what they knew to the new pilots so they would be going in already with some useful knowledge.

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Charles 9
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Re: Yes, there are concepts for that...

Problem is, in cyberspace, burglars tend to blog their exploits, meaning newcomers come in already at a certain level of skill which keeps rising. That said, it can be tricky to obfuscate destination packets (masking post destinations) without getting proxies and the like fingered unless you've previously compromised legitimate sites for it.

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Cool disk drive actuator pillar, Seagate – how about two of them?

Charles 9
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Re: SSD wins! Who cares if HDDs have 16 actuators?!

Depends on what your slow drive is carrying. If it's stuff like media that's already compressed, best leave it alone.

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CPU bug patch saga: Antivirus tools caught with their hands in the Windows cookie jar

Charles 9
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Re: Us without AV

You're assuming the Stupid User is in a position to understand this stuff.

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Charles 9
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"This kind of thing is extremely bad practice, most people who work in security and AV vendors have been telling people to not do it for at least a decade, at least as far as active protection goes. Race conditions playing around in kernel memory space is bad juju."

Isn't placing your trust in ONE vendor who by nature can't catch everything ALSO bad juju? This sounds like a Catch-22. You either choose one and lose when something slips through or try to avoid monoculture and get bricked when they clash.

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US border cops told to stop copying people's files just for the hell of it

Charles 9
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Re: WTF!

"Seriously, how did we get to this..."

Simple. We're humans...

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Charles 9
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Re: What's the hit rate?

I disagree. The problem comes from up top, so it's going to affect all aspects of the bureau. Plus, drug shipping's still relatively fresh on their minds, so cargo entries tend to get scrutinized just as if not more thoroughly than people. At least cargo can be put through scanners similar to those used for checked baggage.

Put it this way. If it's coming into the country, regardless of the legitimate means, customs is going to want a look. Might as well have it on your person so it stays under your eye for as long as possible.

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Facebook has open-sourced encrypted group chat

Charles 9
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Re: Facebook hates The Man as much as you do.

No, it ain't the man until they can vanish people MiniLuv-style. Only States can do that and get away with it. Facebook isn't at THAT level yet.

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Charles 9
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"Also, Greeks and gifts."

I counter with "Don't look a gift horse in the mouth."

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Charles 9
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Re: No Thanks

"why do we need this? Plenty of alternatives."

Care to name some? At least one that allows re-establishing a secure group channel when you need to evict a client?

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Smartphones' security enhancements just make them more dangerous

Charles 9
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Thing is, edge cases don't STAY edge cases for long.

"The point I'm trying to make is that companies that tout the security of their products should endeavour to good security practice."

Problem is, security clashes with ease of use, and the prole prefers the latter to the former and is not likely to take training. How do you do a secure solution for someone who doesn't care about security (and yes, you MUST care about their security since they become weak links to compromise others)?

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Charles 9
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Not buying a smartphone; buying a little peace of mind. What price peace of mind?

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Charles 9
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Re: And, at the end of the day, the security is lower than a PIN-alone login.

There's really no way to improve the specificity of a test without affecting the sensitivity and vice versa? What gets in the way?

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