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* Posts by Charles 9

13521 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

The internet – not as great as we all thought it was going to be, eh?

Charles 9
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I don't know. I can't think of very much that both can't be done through a Web portal and is worth any serious time to the Average Joe. Perhaps you can elaborate.

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Charles 9
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Re: Secure Web Sharing without ads or tracking

One of these days, I want to set up an act where someone goes to the store and insists on Marlboro Lights to the exception of all else including Gold Pack, when given a Gold Pack insists they're Lights to the point of spelling the letters out on the box where they used to be ("See, LIGHTS! L-I-G-H-T-S!").

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Charles 9
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Re: Secure Web Sharing without ads or tracking

And people still call them Marlboro Lights, even those too young to legally smoke when the name was legally changed (to Gold Pack). Some ruts are just too deep.

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Oddly enough, when a Tesla accelerates at a barrier, someone dies: Autopilot report lands

Charles 9
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Re: No comment from Musk yet

"Lithium based batteries can be very power dense but they possibly should have limits on size for this sort of reason although it will stall electric vehicles until the technology is commercially replaceable."

You could be chasing unicorns there since the key element here is its power density. Meaning, is the main reason they're catching fire the fact they're made of lithium or the sheer amount of energy they contain? Because if it's the latter, then you've hit a common-mode fault, and anything of comparable (or higher--think hydrocarbons) energy density AND the ability to drain them slowly (versus, say, explosively) will have similar problems.

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Email security crisis... What email security crisis?

Charles 9
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Re: How about killing off HTML emails

UUencoding = attachments which can be poisoned.

And how do you FTP if you're behind a CGNAT, or worse, don't have access to a server or the port?

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Charles 9
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Re: How about killing off HTML emails

How do you convey the Mona Lisa in only words, then?

As for shared drives, heard of them, don't trust them.

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Charles 9
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Re: Too much is getting grafted onto the existing protocol

"There's so many little pieces, with spotty support. We need a fresh start where everything is mandatory, with a new MXX record in secure/encrypted DNS (can't use it with standard DNS) that includes certificates etc. to fully handle the "prove your domain is who it claims"."

What's to stop the domains themselves from being hijacked to provide a platform? Plus what if your DNS is spotty?

"It would use a different protocol than SMTP - might be something very similar like XRECV or whatever so you don't need to rewrite from scratch, but it is important that it can't be used with old clients."

It MUST work with old clients because many have no choice in clients. It's old clients or bust.

"The mail server would have a new daemon that basically acted as a directory service to get the public key of a sender/receiver for validation/decryption. The keys would be good for a short period of time like a week/month, and automatically re-fetched when needed or regenerated when yours expired."

And if Murphy strikes on the server, as it's sure to happen? Say goodbye to the e-mail which you already received.

"Two factor authentication would be mandatory. Everyone has a smartphone now,"

Not necessarily. Many people are stuck with dumb phones, or no phone at all by design, saying if they want to be reached at work, they'll bloody be at work. Plus phones get lost or stolen.

"and hopefully people with the new clients could help evangelize the laggards into conforming."

And if they DON'T because the laggards also happen to be over their heads?

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Charles 9
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Re: How about killing off HTML emails

Ever thought there was a reason formatted e-mail was demanded? Because some things cannot be reliably sent in plain text (the whole "picture is worth a thousand words" problem)? And since attachments can't be trusted, either, that's not an option, either? So what do you propose for someone who ONLY has e-mail as a possible medium?

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Charles 9
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Re: Microsoft announces threat intelligence service?

How will this fare against an increased prevalence in hijacked accounts? Where there's an evil will, there's a way.

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Charles 9
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Re: Unsecure

So basically, we're screwed. Any form of remote communication can never be sufficiently secured against a sufficiently-determined adversary (like a government-backed evil twin). Plus the malcontents are taking advantage of the very things that make our forms of communication useful (like anonymity), so there will never be a solution that doesn't carry significant collateral damage. Stateful Internet means Big Brother. Whitelists mean you can't receive truly useful stuff from newcomers, and registries can be subverted or hacked.

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Dust off that old Pentium, Linux fans: It's Elive

Charles 9
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Re: @ billdehaan

IOW, many computers weren't expected to be turnkey solutions 30 years ago. They weren't for the masses unlike today. If people pine for the "good old days", they probably pine for the days when people had brains and could remember reams of information and do trig on a slide rule like E. E. "Doc" Smith in the Lensman series.

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Charles 9
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"That's an x86-bootable chess game in 512 bytes."

But not fully legal IIRC, as in it doesn't follow all the rules.

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US govt confirms FCC's broadband speeds and feeds stats are garbage

Charles 9
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Re: A binary world

"Failing which, I say again: humans are unfit to govern themselves."

IOW, where are the alien dei ex machina to save us before we ruin the planet beyond recovery, because we sure as hell can't see it for ourselves? I mean, if people ENJOY lies, then perhaps we're beyond deluded: resigned to fate and simply trying to distract ourselves before the inevitable happens as the have-everythings hope they get the terminator drones in place before the have-nothings rise up en masse.

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Charles 9
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"Or maybe they just don't care about their students, or access to more customers and revenue."

Or may be they realize that students may not be the best customers in terms of access to money. I mean, isn't it one of the great cliches that your average college student is getting by on ramen packets? What the e-tailers want is access to the workforce: those who already have jobs. That's where all the accessible money is to be found.

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Charles 9
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The main problem is that the poles themselves are usually privately-owned, and due to anti-socialist sentiments the government usually can't intervene except in extreme circumstances, and there's usually cartel behavior going on behind the scenes to keep anyone but the chosen few from getting access to those poles.

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FCC boss slams new Californian net neutrality law, brands it illegal

Charles 9
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Re: Typical

"If Congress wants it to happen..."

And if Congress DOESN'T want it to happen, IN SPITE of the wishes of the people...?

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Charles 9
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Re: "is that if it works WITHOUT new regulations, why add them NOW"

Traffic analysis actually suggests UNregulated intersections tend to be safer because it FORCES drivers to be more vigilant. Kind of like a spike in your steering wheel.

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Charles 9
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Re: States' rights! States' rights!

I would much rather have mediocre service because everyone is using versus someone paying to hog all the bandwidth and squelch me. At least with the former there's potential for an upstart to offer better service and steal customers.

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Microsoft pulls plug on IPv6-only Wi-Fi network over borked VPN fears

Charles 9
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Re: Broken

"But it is broken, has been for a long time and it needs fixing."

It ain't broken unless I can't connect to El Reg or any other ordinary website. To the average Joe, THAT'S the definition of "broken".

"ISPs with any sense ARE pushing users to IPv6 because they know that it reduces the amount of IPv4 traffic - and that means less load on the CG-NAT gateways they are going to have to use, and that means less expense installing and running them."

But if they already have the machinery, and the bandwidth is going to be used either way, why do they care given the costs are already sunk and it keeps them having access to all those IPv4-ONLY customers?

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Charles 9
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Online gaming and VoIP will just switch to using go-between servers and keep going. That's how P2P and BitTorrent gets around the CG-NAT problem as well.

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Charles 9
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Re: It’s not going to happen

"I therefore suggest the lesson here is that if you are using a VPN solution, the time has now come when you need to get vendors to demonstrate their currently shipping products capabilities to support dynamic usage of IPv4, dual stack and pure play IPv6"

Many VPN providers refuse to touch IPv6 with a ten-foot-pole at the clients' request because they feel it's too much of a security risk, particularly for those clients who are using VPNs to work around "problems" such that just ONE slip and the game's up.

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Charles 9
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Re: It’s not going to happen

"We're not there yet, but eventually there WILL be something you need IPv6 to access - and it'll be a lot easier and less hassle using real IPv6 than some bastardised workaround to fudge access from your IPv4 address."

OR businesses will just pony up for the IPv4 addresses to STAY in business. Put it this way. Everyone's in the existing marketplace, and there's no compelling reason to move to the new one as storefronts will just pony up whatever it takes to stay in the old market where all the customers are.

Plus Internet traffic has evolved to work around even CG-NAT. Push solutions mean port forwarding is less of an issue (besides, most ISPs discourage home server use), and most consumer services like Skype and online gaming have servers that can be reached even through CG-NATs because things like "servers" are too geeky for consumers to grok.

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Charles 9
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Re: @ITS Retired - Welcome to the real world, MS

It's like what you see in American politics these days. It's all "I Reject Your Reality And Substitute My Own."

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Oz government rushes its anti-crypto legislation into parliament

Charles 9
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Or even better, a gig or so of pure random data purported to be an encrypted drive image full of kiddie porn (which is impossible to decrypt because it never was encrypted content to begin with).

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US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

Charles 9
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Re: Actually, good photography requires skill

"The images that have made me the most money were not luck. I was at the right place at the right time."

But how do you KNOW you're at the right place at the right time? Now, for predictable events, that's true, but what about for unpredictable events (like Baldwin Hills like I mentioned, which happened PDQ and the photographer happened to live a short distance away)? I'm not saying it's ALL luck, but it's at least a good degree of luck. Think about the "monkey selfie" and so on.

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Linux kernel's Torvalds: 'I am truly sorry' for my 'unprofessional' rants, I need a break to get help

Charles 9
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Re: @ Doctor Syntax -- Don't let the namby-pambys run the Kernel, Linus!

""The beatings will continue until morale improves" rarely works as a management strategy."

What happens, usually? A crewless ship (as I tend to see this most often associated with ships where options are...few)?

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Charles 9
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Re: @ Doctor Syntax -- Don't let the namby-pambys run the Kernel, Linus!

"One can to the right thing the wrong way. I'm not sure the ends justify the means, even in Linux kernel-land. I mean, why not simply state, "Your fix is not going into the kernel, period.", as opposed to a 15-paragraph rant with f-bombs and s-bombs and a paragraph on the back of each one to be used against them in a court of law?"

AFAIK, there's only ONE justification for going into a tirade: because they just won't take NO for an answer. And even then there's the risk of getting into a shouting match. At least with online there's no chance of it immediately escalating to fisticuffs which is what usually happens in a shouting match between two parties who each believe he/she is in the right.

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You'll never guess what you can do once you steal a laptop, reflash the BIOS, and reboot it

Charles 9
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Re: even simpler

Except the laptop itself I'd often worth taking. For parts, if nothing else...

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Charles 9
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Re: Security vs. convenience

Thing is, how many calls come in for bricked devices due to simple wear and tear or forgetfulness. Would also hate to think World War III could hinge on things like these...

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Charles 9
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Wasn't the problem, though, that they were SO feature-poor that programs routinely bypassed them and went straight to the metal?

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Non-profits push back against Big Cable's bumpkin broadband blueprint for America

Charles 9
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Re: Easy Answers

But suffer diminishing returns, particularly once things get crowded. There's just no substitute for physical cabling.

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I've seen the future of consumer AI, and it doesn't have one

Charles 9
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Re: A but not I

Intelligence can also be a survival tool. For example, what happens when a drought hits or the regular supply of food is no longer available? Instinct can't help anymore because it's out of resources. Then intelligence kicks in to find another solution. I mean, I doubt instinct would tell a Bushman in the Kalahari to dig into the ground for moist tubers and roots.

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Charles 9
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Re: Proof (if it were needed)

How about a spork with a tine missing?

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2-bit punks' weak 40-bit crypto didn't help Tesla keyless fobs one bit

Charles 9
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Re: Problem-solution dichotomy

Gas ain't cheap, plus ALL the neighborhoods are the same, so it doesn't matter which I pick, if I'm carrying grocery bags in the rain, I DO NOT want to set them down unless they're IN the car. Being able to open the trunk in these conditions can make a real difference.

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Charles 9
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Re: Problem-solution dichotomy

"The quality of the buttons in the keyfobs also seems to be low. I have had two failed ones, turning them into plain old physical keys. Not bothered to replace. At this point, a new keyfob apparenly would cost about the same as the resale value of the old car..."

I haven't had my fob fail so much as get dirty. But because the CR2032 batteries in them have to be replaced periodically (you usually get advance warning of this as the fob gets increasingly finicky), they can be opened and self-serviced. Every so often, I open them up, brush off the debris, and treat the contact pads and surfaces with 91% isopropanol. The most I've done since then has been to obtain a replacement casing which was thankfully inexpensive.

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Charles 9
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Re: Problem-solution dichotomy

"Have you people not heard of trolleys?"

Have you people not heard of wheel-locks? Many times the trolleys aren't allowed outside of the store for fear of getting stolen.

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Charles 9
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Re: Problem-solution dichotomy

"Oh! The humanity! I have to put this stuff down! I really don't have 15 seconds spare in my day to do this!"

NO, because there are many reasons why you don't want to put that stuff even for five seconds, one of the most common being bad weather. Do you really want to put your bags on the wet ground (because it's raining pretty hard and your car's outdoors--and I don't trust even plastic bags to be watertight)? Or how about on a slope because you're parked on a hill (Ask someone say in San Francisco), where the mere act of putting them down runs the risk of things escaping downhill? Or maybe it's the wife busy with an infant and other kids?

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Elders of internet hash out standards to grant encrypted message security for world+dog

Charles 9
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Re: A commercial alternative already available

Even in future, ONCE a key has been given? Last I checked, our eyes can't directly grok encrypted data, so it has to be DE-crypted to be useful, and that's where they get you in an "outside the envelope" attack.

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Article 13 pits Big Tech and bots against European creatives

Charles 9
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Re: Why do we have to keep paying for something, time after time after time?

What? Never heard of rentals?

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Generally Disclosing Pretty Rapidly: GDPR strapped a jet engine on hacked British Airways

Charles 9
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Re: PR damage minimisation

Nope, people get hit, life goes on. Unless and until it hits THEM directly (as in they lose all their money or something similarly drastic), they won't care about what happens to the other guy. Plus, that's why there's insurance.

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Charles 9
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Re: re. Reporting a breach shows awareness

I still think companies will just find a way to conceal their turnover numbers so that they can just chalk it up as The Cost of Doing Business.

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Dear America: Want secure elections? Stick to pen and paper for ballots, experts urge

Charles 9
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Re: Still won't fix the US'ans broken "Electorial college" system

"To fix that you have to fix the two-party system first, same in the UK, good luck with that."

So HOW do you fix a two-party, especially one so well-entrenched and with the electorate so echo-chambered?

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Charles 9
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Re: Somehow...

But that's all private spending. I'm talking about the budgets set aside to actually conduct the elections, which are all public money. IOW, don't you think this is all by design at every level of the government?

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Charles 9
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Re: In short, the British system

The problem here is that a PR system would swing the influence to the most populous parts of the country: the dense cities.

Frankly, I don't think a single system will be sufficiently satisfactory. Like the Connecticut Compromise, you need multiple systems. In this case, three. Count the votes three times: by person, by district, and by state: best of three wins. This can help to keep the influence of sparse rural states while still allowing for two more granular measurements.

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Charles 9
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Re: PENCIL and paper

How do you stop a Kansas City Shuffle, then, especially with the help if insiders ready to duplicate any form of authentication needed?

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Charles 9
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And if they're secretly in cahoots like the R-D conspiracy?

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Charles 9
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Re: In short, the British system

I still say it's possible with an organization as big as the Republican or Democratic parties, even to the extent of subverting law enforcement to turn aside or reverse any allegations.

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Charles 9
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Re: Somehow...

Not the ELECTION budget, which is usually FIXED...

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Charles 9
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And will always be weak due to the Perennial fear of Big Brother?

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Charles 9
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Re: share of moonballs

Two words: Papers, Please.

For many who lived through the Cold War, Socialism is a dirty word and they'd prefer anarchy instead.

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