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* Posts by John Sager

417 posts • joined 28 Apr 2008

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OK, this time it's for real: The last available IPv4 address block has gone

John Sager

Re: Compatibility

Hurrah for everyone who found it "simple" to migrate to IPv6. Now kindly share your tutorials rather than sniffing at us old dinosaurs

Actually ISPs are already doing that. I've had V6 for many years but I had to build my own Linux-based border router/firewall. And V6 runs seamlessly internally on all our hosts - Linux, Windows, Android - when they talk to inside & outside V6 servers. I was surprised and fascinated to discover on holiday in Hawaii last year that the local (cable) ISP provided V6 service. The cable router was an Arris box so that manufacturer seems to have cracked the amazingly difficult problem of supporting V6 in their border router (it must be hard as so few other router mfrs seem to be able to do it).

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John Sager

Re: I've been trying to get this happening

Perhaps the answer is to move social media to IPv6

That's already happened: ...:FACE:B00C:... in their V6 addresses, though they are still on V4.

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Danish Navy expert finds no trace of exhaust gas in private submarine

John Sager

Re: Hope the judge is keeping track.

Submarines have CO2 scrubbers that would quite possibly lower the concentration to well below atmospheric in the absence of breathing people. However, being a homebrew sub, he could have skipped on that feature.

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Europe dumps 300,000 UK-owned .EU domains into the Brexit bin

John Sager

Re: One more thing.

I don't suppose Vote Leave gave it a thought, or the Remain campaign for that matter. It wouldn't have affected the vote one iota.

There will be plenty of 2nd order effects like this, but we'll just work through them.

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John Sager

Plenty of venom still

Lots of venom in these comments, so Brexit is still a very sore point for some.

As far as .eu goes, I guess, as Mr Worstall says, their gaff, their rules. It does seem a bit petty though to threaten to cancel them all next March. I would be quite happy with no new ones from UK and possibly no renewals.

However it's all of a piece with the notion, almost a religion in the Commission, that EU is a very important symbol of the underlying dogma, and wishing to leave is heretical. Hence the excommunication. At least we don't have the Brussels Inquisition yet

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Java-aaaargh! Google faces $9bn copyright bill after Oracle scores 'fair use' court appeal win

John Sager

Re: so it's a win

You might hope that Judge Alsup would go that route but this will end up in front of a jury for damages.

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You must be yolking: English pub to launch eggstravagent Yorkshire pudding

John Sager

Re: NO NO NO NO...

Jamie Oliver? For Yorkshire Pud? Or is that a wind-up? When I were a lad my Mum's Yorkshire pud with golden syrup was the pudding to die for, and I still occasionally eat it now. I say pudding, as we had never heard the word 'dessert'.

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Linux Foundation backs new ‘ACRN’ hypervisor for embedded and IoT

John Sager

Re: Fractal?

No, you switch on the radio and all the lights go out

You jest, but I was coming back from the Joe Bonamassa concert in Birmingham the other night with a friend in his car - a recent BMW - and the rear reading lights kept coming on for no obvious reason. Apparently it's a known fault & not yet sorted by BMW. The lights are controlled off the Can bus.

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You always wanted to be an astronaut, right? Careful: Space is getting more and more deadly

John Sager

The main problem so far is getting decent radiation shielding out of Earth's gravity well, and if we were to go interstellar, out of the Sun's gravity well too. Of course if we were to turn into cockroaches it would help...

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Rant launches Eric Raymond's next project: open-source the UPS

John Sager

Re: You gets what you pays for with UPS

Too true. I've got a APC one now on its second battery, and it gave me fair warning that the first one was on the way out. However, like a lot of other people, I have reason now to hate systemd as it does shutdown in a completely different way, so the first power failure after I upgraded Ubuntu didn't shut the server down. It took me several goes at hacking on the apcupsd scripts to finally get it working reliably. It's still got a 'hope and pray' delay in the process to deal with an inbuilt systemd delay:(

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Cavalry riding to the rescue of DDoS-deluged memcached users

John Sager

Re: Auto responders

Well, I wouldn't like to be the one to test this in court, especially if the dosser was in the US. Then we get into all the extradition shit that a few naughty boys here have had to endure.

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Europe is living in the past (by nearly six minutes) thanks to Serbia and Kosovo

John Sager

Re: For those who wonder...

That's why they are going to use DC for the big windfarms in the North Sea. The routes are so long underwater that AC would lose too much reactive power in the capacitance to the seawater.

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Britain ignores booze guidelines – heads for the pub

John Sager

Shock! Great British Public not stupid!

Looks like most people gave this advice the consideration it merited, i.e. none.

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Oi, drag this creaking, 217-year-old UK census into the data-driven age

John Sager

Bitrot

Paper forms will last hundreds of years under the right storage conditions. CDs won't. I know ONS are probably acutely aware of this, but digital data will need to be re-stored (and perhaps restored) every so often, and we all know what happens to any funds that are supposed to be dedicated to this.

Apparently Elon Musk's roadster is carrying a quartz disk with Asimov's Foundation Trilogy on it. Something like that may possibly be the future of long-term storage, as long as the design of the reader is stored in some more basic long-term medium!

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Intel didn't tell CERTS, govs, about Meltdown and Spectre because they couldn't help fix it

John Sager

Re: Note that they didn't bother with open source operating systems

I suppose someone might have considered impact, in that *BSD et al are far less deployed in critical systems than is Linux (downvote farming here...). Versus the more who know the quicker it leaks, as events have shown.

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That microchipped e-passport you've got? US border cops still can't verify the data in it

John Sager

Re: Shiney - Lets Be Bad Guys

Last time I went into the US, last summer at Oakland, they had these ESTA checking machines, which had a long line of people trying to use, and they aren't especially easy if you've never seen one before. Then, of course, we had to join an even longer line to see the regular Immigration guy, with the usual photo and fingerprint dance. Since the desk guy has to scan the passport, why don't they do the ESTA check there?

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Amateur astronomer strikes it lucky with first glimpse of a Supernova

John Sager

Nova GSi?

WTF? That's a blast from the past, and perhaps that phrase is the only thing that might be even peripherally be associated with the subject of this article. Tone down the whimsy pls.

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TalkTalk to splash £1.5bn laying full fibre on 3 million doorsteps

John Sager

This is one of the arguments for having a non-profit do the fibre build-out & then rent capacity to ISPs. But for heaven's sake don't let the government anywhere near the planning & build activity! The big problem of course is how to incentivise the non-profit to maximise capacity and reach whilst minimising cost, and to keep the network upgraded as technology & service requirements allow.

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Morrisons launches bizarre Yorkshire Pudding pizza thing

John Sager

Re: Cow Orkers

Saw the second defn. Perhaps they meant 'norking'.

As for Lancashire, I'm very open-minded, even taking on, and liking, the other side's delicacies. But then I'm funny anyway, not liking Hotpot...

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John Sager

Cow Orkers, though orking a cow might be classed as animal cruelty or something worse.

As for Yorkshire puds, I have long liked, and regularly eat, a big YP filled with chilli-con-carne. I first encountered that decades ago in a pub in Lancashire.

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What a Hancock-up: MP's social network app is a privacy disaster

John Sager

Re: I guess he gets points for trying?

No! If he wanted to try, then surely he could get a lot better advice on how to go about it, though consultancy rates in this area are not cheap. Now, of course, he has crapped all over what little reputation he may have had. Perhaps a decent web security consultant might have been a better investment?

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Well done, UK.gov. You hit superfast broadband target (by handing almost the entire project to BT)

John Sager

Re: Exchange-only lines?

There are apparently regulatory & legal issues for BT with putting VDSL kit in exchange buildings, hence the FTTC cabinet outside. Go figure.

The village I live in finally got FTTC last year as there is an existing cabinet. They then took some of us who could benefit off EO lines and onto that cabinet so I now get 80/20 FTTC. However there are still dwellings in the village and the neighbouring one that are too far for FTTC and I believe that they are going to get FTTP eventually, in 2019 supposedly.

Well, I say 80/20 and that's what I get nominally. However the raw sync rate as reported by my modem varies quite a lot and can often dip below 80 even though I'm only 200 metres by line length from the cabinet. Not sure why yet - there's no obvious correlation with the weather.

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PC lab in remote leper colony had wrong cables, no licences, and not much hope

John Sager

Re: Ré causing, not curing chaos

Bloody Hell, that takes me back. As a teenager I tried to fix one of those. It had a dropper resistor wound into the mains flex...

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Elon Musk lowers his mighty erection for test firing: Falcon Heavy preps for maiden voyage

John Sager

Re: Kiss goodbye to that roadster

Nice idea, but I don't think even a Falcon Heavy has the delta-V to do that.

On a personal note, Musk gets a lot of flak, especially in the electric car field, but I forgive him all that faux-Green crap because of SpaceX and what that company has done to push forward the space business.

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Ey-up, mardy Rochdale council has dropped plans for ban on swearing. Thank f$ck!

John Sager

Ey up? EY UP??! They don't say that in Rochdale, At least not when I were a lad there. That's an expression from 't other side o 't hill! We didn't demean oursels wi' expressions like that.

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'I knew the company was doomed after managers brawled in a biker bar'

John Sager

Re: It's all fun and games until someone's toes freeze solid and shatter,

We made silver azide at school, filled a drinking straw and set it off in the local park. I was deaf for several minutes - never heard such a loud bang. The other one was a paint tin full of a stoichiometric mix of Fe2O3 and Al powder. Because it was so fine there was lots of air in the mix so once it got going there was a beautiful silver fire fountain and molten iron flowing across the ground. These days we would be banged up in Paddington Green pronto!

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Millions of moaners vindicated: Man flu is 'a thing', says researcher, and big TVs are cure

John Sager

Re: "No point using the nice stuff"

Ginger wine & cooking scotch in 1:1 ratio in the 'morbid' phase, then it has to be Highland Park in the recovery phase (and subsequent phases too!).

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Wondering why your internal .dev web app has stopped working?

John Sager

Re: Easy enough to fix

If you're developing stuff for the web then not using Chrome isn't an option. It is needed to be tested against if for no other reason. The Chrome stupidity, if I read it right, is that any request to a .dev url must use https as enforced by Chrome. Glad I didn't choose .dev for my own internal TLD many moons ago. I'm not going to change it, but if I were doing it now, I would probably choose something else.

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Rolls-Royce, Airbus, Siemens tease electric flight engine project

John Sager

Well, fan designs have improved a bit since Whittle's time so, as others have said, most of the thrust on a high-bypass turbofan comes from the fan. It's not outrageous to replace the jet core with an electric motor. I wonder why they haven't proceeded with a motor/generator integrated with the wing-mounted jets? That would give the same sort of hybrid performance as the approach that BAe are taking. Perhaps it compromises too many things (weight, diameter, length, etc) on the jet to do that.

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You live in the right galaxy: Milky Way to eat Small Magellanic Cloud even sooner

John Sager

Re: We're in for a bit of a shake up anyway

Hard to divine what motivates flat-earthers. Even I can see the earth is round just looking at the container ships at anchor off Felixstowe - you can't see the hull, only the containers. And simple (for a physicist) arguments about potential energy minimisation in a squishy planet under gravitation lead you to a spherical-ish solution.

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The Reg parts ways with imagineer and thought pathfinder Steve Bong

John Sager

Please can we have Lewis & Tim back now? Pity we can't get Lester back from the other side.

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Firefox 57: Good news? It's nippy. Bad news? It'll also trash your add-ons

John Sager

Re: Such is life. Have a look around - it's a constant race of arms.

They changed the voltage a while back to 230V so as to be in line with the rest of the EU

No they didn't. The allowed tolerance was changed by EU administrative fiat so that both nominally 220v (in Europe) and 240v (UK) would fall into the new allowed tolerance bands. I don't know whether recently installed LV transformers in the UK network have moved to be centred on 230v - can't be arsed to google it.

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Europe's one-patent-court-to-rule-them-all rocked by 'Brexit, EPO reforms, German laws'

John Sager

Re: How does the government work in Germany?

Was this a rhetorical question? Most parliaments tend to follow the second model, with the 'authority' ranging from the Politburo via the President/Prime Minister to the most munificent lobbyists.

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One-third of mobile users receive patchy to no indoor coverage

John Sager

Femtocell

I have had one for 8 years or so. Connects to Vodafone over 't Internet. I live in a hole RF-wise and it's been a godsend. I think all networks now provide these (need lucre though). I wonder what the household penetration is of these per network?

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Humble civil servant: Name public electric car chargers after me

John Sager

Re: Belisha Beacons

The public's attitude to politicians has evolved significantly since the days of Hore-Belisha, as witnessed by many comments here. He is obviously far too far up his own arse to realise this.

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Arm isn't saying IoT firmware sucks but it's writing a free secure BIOS for device makers

John Sager

Re: Good idea, I think

Regulation will probably be the final blow to those security blunders

You mean, like all those CE-marked devices from China?

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FCC Commissioner blasts new TV standard as a 'household tax'

John Sager

Re: ATSC 3.0 fixes a lot of problems with ATSC 1.0

Excuse me while I ROFLMAO! Being sorta involved when both DVB and ATSC were being developed, I never understood why the Yanks were so stuck on 8VSB. All the tests then in all sorts of environments showed that OFDM was better. Hence most of the rest of the world went with DVB or variants (Japan, Brazil).

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Twitter: Why we silenced Rose McGowan after she slammed alleged sex pest Harvey Weinstein

John Sager

Re: Sense of proportion

If Twitter is half the company they are supposed to be then they will have tweet analysis keyed to the T&C's, as well as lots of other stuff presumably. A phone no filter is not a hard regular expression, and they will get flagged.

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Q. Why's Oracle so two-faced over open source? A. Moolah, wonga, dosh

John Sager

Well, Larry is still making lots of dosh. Oracle's attitude won't change until that changes.

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WannaCry kill-switch hero Marcus Hutchins collared by FBI on way home from DEF CON

John Sager

I'll probably get downvoted for this but what the hell. I've been to the US countless times over the last 30 years both on business and vacations. I have never had any hassle from either the guys on immigration or the customs guys though I did once get asked a domain knowledge question by immigration related to the purpose of the visit. And I'll be going there soon on vacation. It's true that this time I'm taking a clean laptop rather than my normal one but that's the only concession I'm making to their increased paranoia. I would probably be more trepidacious if it were my first visit though, as they would have no previous history.

Having said all that, I hope the guy gets it sorted PDQ, though I wonder if there is more to this than 'security guy gets nabbed by the Feds for no apparent reason'

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Don't make Aug 21 a blind date: Beware crap solar eclipse specs

John Sager

Re: Curiousity and dead cats...

It works in space, but not on the ground - too much glare from the atmosphere. Flying high also lets them see wavelengths that get blocked by the atmosphere, as well as extending the eclipse period by flying along inside the shadow.

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John Sager

I've got two different types. One is cardboard glasses with a plastic filter. They have a CE mark & say 'tested at Durham University'. The other is a rectangular filter with both ISO and CE marks, and says 'Meets the requirements of ISO 12312-2-2015 and EC directive 89/686/EEC'. Both give me a dull orange disc viewing the sun, with no fuzziness. Both were bought from Amazon UK.

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Deutsche Telekom G.fast demo pushes G.Fast faster, further

John Sager

I can't imagine it goes further. 212MHz spectrum on a phone line, especially in a multi-pair cable? If it were made to Cat5e standards, perhaps, but the existing cable infrastructure isn't. Also as lines are never particularly well balanced, the spectrum pollution into the airwaves is just going to get worse.

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Russia launches non-terrifying satellite that focuses Sun's solar rays onto Earth

John Sager

Re: Tracking info freely available

Or use Gpredict on Linux. The object is catalogued as 2017-042F. I just looked at predictions on Gpredict. It looks like it won't be high in the sky in SE England until around midnight BST, so it may already be in eclipse by that time. Check it out looking NE at about 23:45 tonight.

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Openreach asks UK what it thinks about 10 million 'full fibre' connections

John Sager

Not here methinks

I have, finally, just got on to FTTC, which took ages and rural broadband money to get the cabinet locally, then another several months to get moved off an EO line onto that cabinet, then a bit of intervention from my ISP to get Openreach's data in some semblance of accuracy before the order went through. Sadly, some more distant EO lines in our area will have to wait another 2 years, but then they get FTTP, apparently. I sincerely doubt they'll upgrade those of us where FTTC is available.

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China pollutes ocean with bloody big rocket

John Sager

Re: All my sympathy..

The Chinese are probably slightly more civilised than that now unless it was a really egregious & stupid mistake by someone. Now the NorKs probably have the more brutal approach, which may explain why their technical endeavours don't progress too fast.

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Not that scary or that hard: Two decades of VLANS

John Sager

I've implemented several VLANs on my home network to segregate guest WiFi, security cameras, etc. The Netgear switches I use are cheap & very capable.

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IoT coverage for 95% of UK by 2019? We can't even do 4G, Sigfox

John Sager

Re: Mixing IoT with cellular networks

Privacy usually isn't an issue with such applications as they usually monitor things like pipe pressures or weather clock are still running

Speak for yourself. The pressure in my pipes is my own affair. And monitoring IoT traffic from premises will eventually tell you quite a lot about the behaviour of the occupants if it's in clear.

Being tech-savvy will hopefully help me avoid the most egregious horrors of the IoT world but I pity the poor buggers who can't evaluate this stuff themselves.

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TalkTalk customers complain of being unable to load Amazon website

John Sager

Re: normally

Yup, AAISP are a top ISP and unlike XKCD it's not a dream. They helped me with 2 problems that were/would have been call-centre hell with BT.

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F-Secure's Mikko Hypponen on IoT: If it uses electricity, it will go online

John Sager

Lots of tinfoil-hattery going on here

Much of this assumes that these devices can communicate to their parent 'cloud' as if by magic. The Amazon Whispernet idea doesn't really pass the economics sniff test for a lot of them. A Kindle is quite pricey, certainly compared with a toaster, and the Whispernet only worked in the US - needed to talk via AT&T. The most obvious route is via Bluetooth or wi-fi, or perhaps even z-wave or zigbee to the home router, where this stuff should be properly policed. Home routers need to be better than they are in many ways - both security and QoS, for example, but this won't happen as long as they're still based on cheap & nasty MIPS-based SoCs. Fortunately SoC-land is getting much better in this respect so we might hope to see better products in the next few years. Customer push would help, as would reviews from hell for the stinkers. However, sadly I can see wings evolving on pigs first:(

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