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* Posts by Wade Burchette

782 posts • joined 5 Apr 2007

Page:

Flying to Mars will be so rad, dude: Year-long trip may dump 60% lifetime dose of radiation on you

Wade Burchette

Radiation

Whenever the topic of radiation comes up, I like to refer to this chart:

http://imgs.xkcd.com/blag/radiation.png

It helps puts things into perspective and shows that radiation at low levels is not bad for you. But some people think that all radiation is immediately bad for you. This does not mean we cannot take steps to mitigate extra radiation on a trip to Mars. The chart is just meant to put things in perspective.

7
0

Microsoft: Like the Borg, we want to absorb all the world's biz computers

Wade Burchette

Re: Testing

@jarfil

"I don't see why Microsoft wouldn't be able to do the same."

Um ... have you been on the moon the past 3 years? Have you seen all the articles about how a Windows 10 update breaks something? If Microsoft does not properly test their updates to Windows 10, what makes you think they will do a better job here? But you are right, there is no reason Microsoft wouldn't be able to do the same. And that is the problem: they are able but not willing.

14
3

You know all those movies you bought from Apple? Um, well, think different: You didn't

Wade Burchette

Paying customer v. Pirate

If you are paying customer:

(a) If you have bought a disc, you insert the disc. Then wait for a studio logo promo to finish. Which then goes to a movie trailer that you have to press a button to bypass. If you are lucky, there isn't another movie trailer or two. But only if you are lucky. Then you get to a menu which takes at least 15 seconds before you can do anything. Finally after selecting to play the movie, you get an unskippable anti-piracy warning. Followed by an unskippable screen as to why this movie was rated the way it was. Followed by an unskippable legal disclaimer about the opinions of the commentary not being the opinions of the studio. And then finally the movie starts.

(b) If you bought a digital copy, you have to sign in to an account. Which then verifies that you can use and download the movie you bought, while making sure you didn't download too many times. At least it lets you stream, provided that the movie studio still has a contract with Apple, Amazon, etc. Which is not guaranteed, so your money may go bye-bye at the whim of a movie studio. And every time you stream or play a downloaded copy, the video has to check in to make sure you are authorized to play that video. An authorization that can be revoke by Apple, Amazon, etc or the movie studio as it suits then.

But if you are a pirate:

(a) You insert your disc, USB drive, or similar, push play and enjoy.

(b) You load the Plex app on your smart TV, Roku, TiVo, etc, find your video file, and enjoy.

33
0

Apple in XS new sensation: Latest iPhone carries XS-sive price tag

Wade Burchette

No seperate headphone jack?

Then no thank you.

8
0

Microsoft: You don't want to use Edge? Are you sure? Really sure?

Wade Burchette

Dear Microsoft

If your product was superior, people would be knocking down your doors to use it. If Edge and Windows 10 was really good, you wouldn't have to resort to dirty tricks to get people to use it. The simple fact that you must resort to underhanded tactics means your product is garbage, it does not mean we are ignorant.

Dear Microsoft, if you are reading this and listening -- and based on much you listened to feedback in Windows 10 beta I know you are not -- I will tell you what is wrong with Edge. First, the UI is confusing and stupid. The simple fact is it could solve world peace but if the UI is so terrible that it is difficult to use, like the UI in Edge is, then nothing else matters. Second, I shouldn't have to use the Microsoft store to install add-ons. (I, of course, know why that is true. The purpose of Windows 10 is to make money off me after day 1 and you thus want me to get used to using the Windows store so I will buy stuff through it.) Third, updates should never ever without exception require a restart. The browser and the OS should be separate.

I will be happy to use Edge without being pushed if, and only if, you make a product worth using. As it is now, you made a product worth running away from.

9
2

I wish I could quit you, but cookies find a way: How to sidestep browser tracking protections

Wade Burchette

Re: Multiple layers

I use uBlock and NoScript. For any tracking cookie that breaks through those defenses, I go to my router and make that domain point to 0.0.0.0. Despite being blocked at the router, somehow I still get a doubleclick.net cookie. I have yet to figure out that out.

5
0

Nokia scores a $3.5bn deal to inflict 5G on T-Mobile customers

Wade Burchette

Re: Stop 5G

It is even worse here in the US of A. There are spots where I cannot get 1G coverage. And I'm not talking about mountainous terrain. There are places I travel that are flat, rural areas where I have no coverage at all. My mobile phone company has an app where you can report dead spots. I use that app to report such dead spots, and I even told them through it that I much rather have full telephone coverage everywhere than LTE data somewhere.

0
0

How hack on 10,000 WordPress sites was used to launch an epic malvertising campaign

Wade Burchette

There is a simple solution

"The ads often contained malicious JavaScript."

There is a simple solution to malvertising: ABSOLUTELY NO JAVASCRIPT, JAVA, FLASH, or SIMILAR IN ANY AD EVER, NO EXCEPTION! Advertisements used to work just fine without javascript, java, or Flash. What changed?

But this will never happen. Their greed trumps my security (and privacy) every day of the week, and twice on Sunday.

7
0

You want to know which is the best smartphone this season? Tbh, it's tricky to tell 'em apart

Wade Burchette

Re: My wishlist

I would like to add one thing to your wishlist: A minimum of 4 years of security updates and enhancements.

I shouldn't have to look into Lineage OS (the successor to Cyanogenmod) to get new security updates after 18 months. I don't like getting a new phone because that means I have to spend a lot of time transferring stuff and getting things the way I like it back. I want to keep using my phone for at least 3 years, probably longer. It is not the money, it is the time involved with a new phone.

17
0

Shock Land Rover Discovery: Sellers could meddle with connected cars if not unbound

Wade Burchette

Re: Good reason not to buy

"So what happens when (not if) ALL card are connected...by law?"

I would like to see how a connected car can work without an antenna and its fuse removed.

5
0

Skype Classic headed for the chopping block on September 1

Wade Burchette

Re: People still use Skype?

It is the same old story: big company buys smaller company, big company gets rid of the people who made the smaller company successful, big company then wonders why people abandon the smaller company's product.

37
0

It walks, it talks, it falls over a bit. Windows 10 is three years old

Wade Burchette

Reasons why Windows 7 is far superior

In Windows 7, you have a proper and logical start menu whose goal is to make it easy to do things and not to push apps through an app store where Microsoft profits.

In Windows 7, you can choose which updates to download, when to download them, and when to install them.

Windows 7 is pretty; Windows 10 has the dog-butt ugly flat look.

Windows 10 is slowly replacing the control panel of Windows 8, 7, Vista. But as it does, what was once 1 step is now 5 steps.

Windows 7 never tries to trick you into giving Microsoft your email to log in.

Windows 7 has a full backup program.

Windows 10 took away the free games and replaced them with games with ads. Why? The games were stable, all you had to do was keep them and do nothing else.

The Windows 10 email app is pure garbage. Unfortunately, Microsoft no longer lets you download the old pretty good Windows live mail program. So you email program choices are garbage, Thunderbird, or something that costs money.

I do not want the app store icon put back on the taskbar after every update. I do not want my telemetry and privacy settings undone after every update. I do not want to use the illogical and confusing Edge browser so stop bugging me about it; I don't care how much faster it is, if it is difficult to use that is all irrelevant. Windows 7 has none of those annoyances.

I have concluded that the purpose of Windows 10 is to make money off you after day 1. I don't care how much better it is in other areas, when it is annoying and difficult to use, all that other stuff is irrelevant. A program or OS should focus first on making my life easier; but Windows 10 cares not about that. It only cares about making Microsoft money after the first day.

38
3

Did you know? The word 'Taiwan' would crash iOS thanks to a buggy filter for the Chinese govt

Wade Burchette

Re: Denying reality for the sweet, sweet cash

"The reality is corporations are amoral entities with only one purpose for existence."

Apple is a publicly traded corporation. Like all publicly traded corporations, the shareholders only care about profits. They don't want to hear "we lost billions because we made an honorable decision". If shareholders heard those words, they will force out the CEO and bring in someone who will make billions, all so their stock price will go up. This is the nature of the beast, and it is both good and bad.

3
1

HP Ink's UK profits tumble nearly 85% – of course Brexit to blame

Wade Burchette

Re: I advise people not to touch HP printers

3. The reliability is absolute garbage. If you make it 6 months without having some issue with the newer ink printer or 12 with the current lasers, you either didn't print much or you one of the lucky few.

0
0

A volt out of the blue: Phone batteries reveal what you typed and read

Wade Burchette

Re: If someone is able to open my phone

You may not be the target.

Imagine that the CIA, Kremlin, MI6 or any other clandestine organization was wanting to spy on an individual. They could have a "friend" deliver them a mobile phone with this battery spying tech on it. Wait for them to be on a cellular network and not WiFi and then upload the data through untraceable routes. There are other delivery vectors to. Study a person enough to know where they go and where they would buy and service phones. Then arrange for an "accident" so that the phone is damaged and while it is being repaired, plant the spying battery. Or, keep a special stock of modified phones and when the target has to replace his after the "accident" ensure that he buys the modified phone.

2
3

Apple takes $9m kick down under after bricking iPhones

Wade Burchette

Re: OoooH That will teach them

A better punishment is to make the Tim Cook pay $9 million. If we hold the CEO financially responsible for malfeasance then junk like this would die overnight. Making the business pay is just a tax write-off. The people responsible or the people who approve of bad decisions are not affected at all and so they have no motivation for doing the right thing. Touch their wallet and suddenly they will straighten up and fly right.

3
0

In defence of online ads: The 'net ain't free and you ain't paying

Wade Burchette

Re: happy for adverts if....

I have some sensible rules for ads before I consider them acceptable. These rules are sensible because they were the standard when the internet went from luxury to necessity. If they worked once, they can work again.

(1) Absolutely no tracking in any way, shape, or form, no exception. Just because you attempt to make it sound beneficial 'by showing ads to my interest' does not make it acceptable. (2) Absolutely no pop-up window, pop-under window, or obscures part or all of a web page, no exception. (3) Absolutely no ad that attempt to determine my location, no exception. i.e. No ad that says '[city name] man discovers shocking secret'. (4) Absolutely no ad that requires javascript, java, flash, or any other plug-in, no exception. Incidentally, obey this rule would kill malvertising immediately. (5) Absolutely no autoplay videos except and only except when I click on a clear link to a video. This rule applies to more than ads.

My rules are not a burden because websites used to be quite profitable following my rules. But greed took over and advertisers went too far. And instead of realizing they are the problem, they try to guilt us into obeying their perverted point of view. That won't work for me. And whenever I find a website that tries to guilt me, I make it a point to explain that I am not a mooch but I am someone who cares deeply about my privacy and security.

58
2

Nadella tells worried GitHub devs: Judge us by our actions

Wade Burchette

FYI: Qualcomm hasn't given up on Arm-based Windows 10 slabtops

Wade Burchette

Windows on ARM will never work unless I can run my programs (and not just apps) from 10 years ago on it. I have programs from over 10 years ago that I still use quite often. I cannot be the only one. Legacy compatibility is more important than people realize.

4
1

Is Microsoft about to git-merge with GitHub? Rumors suggest: Yes

Wade Burchette

Re: Disney probably is more of an IT company than AOL

The only company I think would be worse for Github than Microsoft would be Disney. These are the same greedy bastards who keep bribing ... er "lobbying" elected officials to increase copyright's length. The Big Mouse has become thoroughly evil.

30
1
Wade Burchette

It is the same old story ...

Big company buys smaller company. Big company replaces all the employees who made smaller company with their own personnel. The products of smaller company quickly become garbage because the big company's personnel have no personal investment in the smaller company's products and ideas and so do not truly appreciate its value.

29
0

Sysadmin's PC-scrub script gave machines a virus, not a wash

Wade Burchette

"We used to have McAfee on our Uni NT4 machines, it used to slow the PCs down so much that most people just disabled it."

So, just like modern McAfee then. It is nice to see that McAfee hasn't abandoned their glorious time-honored tradition of slowing computers down to a crawl.

22
0

Within Arm's reach: Chip brains that'll make your 'smart' TV a bit smarter

Wade Burchette

Re: How will it be used?

See Minority Report to know exactly how it will be used.

4
0

US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

Wade Burchette

Re: 100 Years Of Hell

It is not a Repub/Democrat thing. The mistake people make is they really believe that the other party is corrupt to the core while their own favorite party is not. Example: Bill Clinton, Democrat, signed the DMCA law which made it illegal for me to break encryption even if I want to make a personal copy of my legally purchased item. All political parties today answer to their corporate overlords, just in different ways. The only way to fix it is to ask the people who are bribed by corporations to ban those very same bribes. That ain't going to happen.

12
0

US senators ask FTC to investigate Google's Location imbroglio

Wade Burchette

Google location services

Google Maps is the worst violator. Every time you start it up, it checks to make sure you have full location tracking. If you switch to GPS only, then it will nag you every time. EVERY time. And it is worded to make you believe that it is all-or-nothing. I would switch, but in my testing I find Google Maps is the best for directions on rural routes, like I have to take. I find Waze (also owned by Google and which also nags you about location services) is best for long distance and city drives.

At one time, Google even gimped Maps unless you used full location tracking. Two years ago (with my old LG G4 that died one day for no good reason) I was driving along a rural highway. GPS only location, phone on a windshield mount. Every few miles there was a message "searching for signal". An update to Maps came out soon after that and magically under the same scenario, there was no "searching for signal" issue.

1
0

FCC sets a record breaking $120m fine for rude robocalls

Wade Burchette

Re: First step the fixing robocalls

Have fun putting people who are robocalling from India with a VoIP number in jail.

The first step is to force the phone companies to actually do something about the problem. They have the ability to stop this, or at least greatly reduce it. But they are too lazy (and cheap) to do anything substantial. Some let you use the service nomorobo.com, but that is not bulletproof because illegal robocallers can just change their numbers daily and even use an active number belonging to a real person. I have had people call me because a robocaller used my number. Stopping robocalls isn't going to increase the phone companies' revenue so they will not do anything about it unless forced.

4
1
Wade Burchette

Re: Could it be?

"He wasn't fined for robocalling, he was nailed mainly for spoofing the caller ID."

And having a record message. In the US, all telemarketering calls must have a live person on the other end; recorded messages are always illegal. It is still perfectly legal, unfortunately, for politicians and wanna-be politicians to robocall you to the living end. So long as they do it between certain hours.

5
0

You say Halo and I say goodbye: Microsoft has a word with unauthorised mod devs

Wade Burchette

Chinese web giant finds Windows zero-day, stays schtum on specifics

Wade Burchette

Re: Edge has had a pretty bad

"Edge is just IE12 web render engine with a new UI frame."

Makes sense. Why do updates to it require a restart? (And why do add-ons require the Microsoft Store? Don't answer that last one, I know why.) Why does a browser have to be intertwined so tight with the OS?

And, of course, since Edge is essentially IE with a new UI and since this is new Microsoft, the UI is absolute garbage, just like Windows 8 and 10's UI is absolute garbage. Ugly, ribbon everywhere when it should be nowhere, what was once 1 step is now 5, confusing. I don't care if Edge can load pages 5 times as fast as any other browser, if the UI is a confusing stupid nightmare then I won't ever be using it. Microsoft has forgotten that designs should be easy to use and logical.

5
0

Windows Admin Center: Vulture gets claws on browser-based server admin

Wade Burchette

Bad bad idea

Several years ago, I installed Exchange 2013 on a test server. This version of Exchange only has a web console. On a new install of Server 2012 R2, I added the Essentials role. I then followed the install instructions from Microsoft to the letter. Exchange installed without issue, but nowhere did Microsoft tell me or anyone that the Essentials role was incompatible with Exchange.

So installed Server 2012 R2 fresh and tried again, again following Microsoft's instructions to the letter. Exchange installed and this time the web console actually came up. But it only told me "something went wrong". The Exchange powershell program didn't work either.

So now the third time. But this time I bought a book, which included steps Microsoft did not. Fresh install of Server 2012 R2 again, followed the book's instructions to the letter, and SUCCESS! Finally, everything worked. So I set up several users and tested everything I needed at the time. 2 months later I go back to the web console ... "something went wrong". I did nothing on the test server except install Windows updates. Nothing else. Literally, nothing else. The Exchange powershell still worked, so I could manage users that way and everything else still worked. (A year and a half later, everything for this Exchange stopped working: calendar, email, powershell, everything. And this despite me not doing a thing.)

The point is, this is Microsoft. A web admin console will never be released in a working state. The first few times you use it, it may work. But can you guarantee it won't stop working even though you did nothing to affect it? I have a QNap NAS. That web admin console just works. Microsoft has some brilliant programmers who are hamstrung by idiot managers chasing fads. Idiot managers do not care about something working, they care about a new shiny. A new admin console is shiny, once it works for their limited testing, it will be a low priority to make sure it stays working for everyone because the programmers who designed it will be moved to a new shiny. As my experience with Exchange 2013 shows, this is a very bad idea all around.

12
3

India completes its GPS alternative, for the second time

Wade Burchette
Trollface

"Given that the Indian Mars mission was cheaper than the film 'The Martian' I think you might protest too much."

Of course it cost less. Their government saved money by outsourcing all the tech support to India!

6
0

Police chief wants citizens to bring 'net oligarchs to heel

Wade Burchette

Re: UK Laws are the problem

"UK Laws are the problem, where if you lose then you may well find that YOU are having to pay the other sides legal fees as well as your own. In the home of 'sue first (or fire, whichever is appropriate) and ask questions later' this does not apply."

The solution is not an either-or. The loser having to pay the fine hurts the poor who cannot afford a loss to expensive lawyers. But in the American system, the rich can keep the lawsuit going almost indefinitely to bankrupt someone knowing they likely will not have to pay any fines. This is tactic that has been used with great success to silence opposition: You are rich and well-funded, but someone says something that you do not like. So you sue for libel and you and your expensive lawyers do whatever you can to drag out the lawsuit just so the person you are suing will not have any money left. The longer you can keep it from actually going to trial, the better. The purpose is not to win, but to make the other side lose (which may or may not also include silencing them).

The solution is a middle-of-the-road approach.

6
0

My PC makes ‘negative energy waves’, said user, then demanded fix

Wade Burchette

Reminds me of a story I read about

This has been a long time ago and I wished I saved the link. Anyway, as the story goes AT&T put up a new mobile phone tower in a neighborhood. As soon as it was erected, the neighbors started to complain about headaches. They complained so much and so often that the local news became involved. Turns out, the tower didn't even have electricity yet so it wasn't operational. It goes to show you the power of the mind.

But I do have a link. Many people have moved to Green Bank, West Virginia (and the surrounding area) because they are "allergic" to cell phones and WiFi. They are not, of course. It is all psychosomatic. Furthermore, the Green Bank radio telescope was placed where it was at because it meant to study radio waves from space -- the mountains block all terrestrial radio waves and none are allowed in the area. How can your mind distinguish between a radio wave from earth and from space? It can't, of course.

I do know people who sensitive to the noise these devices emit. But everyone I know like that doesn't get headaches from the devices, just that the low hissing noise that it makes bothers them and so absent any background noise their mind just focuses on that hiss. But that is different, that is sensitive hearing not allergic reaction.

14
0

An easy-breezy attitude to sharing personal data is the only thing keeping the app economy alive

Wade Burchette

Re: Better alternative

"I remain unconvinced by the idea that regulation will save us."

I have learned through the years that any fix by politicians only makes the problem worse. First, they don't know anything about the problems they need to fix and they won't let someone who is qualified to write the laws. Second, to get a law passed requires so much pork and other unrelated garbage just to get the majority of the corrupt politicians to agree. Third, today if a Democrat proposes the fix than the Republicans will blindly oppose it no matter what and vice-versa. The hyper-partisan politics of today disgust me.

7
1

As Zuck apologizes again... Facebook admits 'most' of its 2bn+ users may have had public profiles slurped by bots

Wade Burchette

Re: Mega-Problem

"If you're not even a FB user, how do you opt out? Will Washington pick up on this vicious cycle... And how about managing info held by Data-Brokers? Congress has done zuk-all about Equifux!"

A politician's job is to get elected or re-elected; our wants and needs are a distant third. Elections are not cheap, so a politician needs financial help to get elected/re-elected. And the only ones with big enough wallets to help are large corporations. But they don't give money out of the goodness of their heart; they expect something in return. Nothing will ever be done by Congress no matter which party is charge unless the outcry is so great that it will affect their chances of being elected/re-elected. You don't bite the hands that feed you. The only way to fix this problem is to ask Congress to voluntarily cut out a large source of their income. You may get one or two to agree, but never half.

7
1

2001 set the standard for the next 50 years of hard (and some soft) sci-fi

Wade Burchette

The music

What I remember most about 2001 is the music. It has some of the most iconic music ever written. Who doesn't know the 'dum-dum-dum-dum' drum sequence from this movie? This movie predates me by 10 years, I still don't understand the opening or the ending, but the music is permanently stuck in my head.

I would like to think that this move inspired other iconic scores, like in Star Wars and Indiana Jones.

2
0

Intel outside: Apple 'prepping' non-Chipzilla Macs by 2020 (stop us if you're having deja vu)

Wade Burchette

If anyone can do it, Apple can

Microsoft couldn't pull off such a feat. Only Apple could. Part of the reason is because Microsoft cannot go all-in on another CPU architecture. They do not have a devoted legion of followers like Apple does. But Apple can; they do not need to transition because many of their users will buy whatever they put out. Not only that, Apple's culture will mean it will be close to right before they even try. Microsoft's culture is now "we will fix it later, for now let us figure out how to make money out of people".

But there are many questions. Rumors are that Apple was the reason why their is an AMD GPU on an Intel CPU. Not only that, Intel learned the hard way that GPU is a different beast than CPU. What about the GPU on an x86-less iMac? Will it still be AMD? Which architecture will Apple go with? Will it be ARM? Or something from the ground-up? Will they license x86 instruction set for emulation? If so, will it be from AMD or Intel? So many questions.

5
2

Fleeing Facebook app users realise what they agreed to in apps years ago – total slurpage

Wade Burchette

Most people do not care

People take to the streets to protest the NSA and many other government agencies slurping up all their personal information while at the same time handing all that same information over to Facebook, Twitter, et al. People would never allow the police to place a microphone in their home but will pay Amazon and Google to do the same thing. The fact is the majority of people do not care. They will be more than happy to give all their personal information to an entity that wants to know everything about them so long as they provided something for free. Facebook, Twitter, Windows 10, and such may not cost money; that does not mean it is free.

Well, I do care. And when people ask me why I do not use Facebook or Instagram or Snapchat or anything like that, I always ask them "Why would someone like me not be on that? What do I know that you don't?"

44
0

Windows 10 to force you to use Edge, even if it isn't default browser

Wade Burchette

Re: Edge is the most-secure browser

Security through obscurity is not much security at all. So few people use Edge because the UI is confusing and stupid. It just makes more sense for hackers to go after a browser that people use, a logical one with a proper UI like Chrome or Firefox. The advantage of those two browsers is that updates do not require a full restart, and add-ons do not require you to use the Microsoft store.

22
1

YouTube plan to use Wikipedia against crackpots hits snag

Wade Burchette

Re: Correcting Wikipedia

"This was in (relatively) early days of wikipedia, it may have improved now."

Nope. If anything, it worse than ever before.

7
2

OK, deep breath, relax... Let's have a sober look at these 'ere annoying AMD chip security flaws

Wade Burchette

Something is not right

I say a comment somewhere which proved the people from "CTS" were using a green screen for their promotional video. They easily found stock photos of the backgrounds used in the video.

https://i.imgur.com/OkWlIxA.jpg

Regardless, something is not right when you give a company 24 hours to fix a security hole. And the AMD flaws website (what was it again?) was registered in late February, so they at least knew for over 24 hours. And something is not right when the WHOIS records for your websites are registered using Domains by Proxy. Why would would a serious company go to such trouble to conceal their identity? Everything about this feels wrong.

73
1

Microsoft says 'majority' of Windows 10 use will be 'streamlined S mode'

Wade Burchette

There is a difference between iPad and Windows

The iPad started off locked down and started off fresh. There are no apps 20 years old that you would need to put on it. Windows, on the other hand, started out open and there are programs 20 years old that people still need to use. The same reason why Windows on ARM will never succeed is the same reason why Windows S will never succeed: People use Windows because they want to and can use programs released a long time ago.

15
0

Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?

Wade Burchette

Agreed. People use Windows because their programs from 20 years ago still work. It is the legacy compatibility. Windows on ARM takes that away. The whole purpose of it, like Windows 8 and 10, is to pad Microsoft's wallet and not what the customer wants. With Win on Arm you are limited to the Windows Store which conveniently gives Microsoft a cut of all sales. That Microsoft wants it to succeed, because now you will have to buy new apps from them. Windows on ARM will never succeed unless I can still install programs released 20 years ago and 1 year ago.

12
1

We already give up our privacy to use phones, why not with cars too?

Wade Burchette

Connected car

At no time and in no way should a vehicle ever be connected to the internet. Now, the radio may have some connection to the internet, but it needs to be completely isolated from the rest of the vehicle. In other words, no physical connection to the rest of the vehicle except for the 12V power. If I can unlock my doors with a smartphone, than so can a hacker.

Vehicle to Vehicle communication is okay, provided it is short range and the information sent to each vehicle must obey a standard with all non-standard communications discarded. The information sent must be well-defined and it cannot send commands to other vehicles, just information.

And if I eventually have to buy a car that is connected to the internet, then I would like to see it try working the antenna pulled out. Or with the fuse pulled out.

4
0

World+dog ignores Rubin's Wonderdroid

Wade Burchette

Re: Funny that

It was also a Sprint exclusive, a company that has perhaps the absolute worst customer service and has a horrible network. My dad had Sprint. He called customer service to ask for a copy of his bill. The correct response to such a question would be "Sure. Could you confirm that your address is ..." The response he got was "Why?" Needless to say, he wasn't a customer for long after that.

4
1

A tiny Ohio village turned itself into a $3m speed-cam trap. Now it has to pay back the fines

Wade Burchette
Joke

Re: "raise property taxes slightly"

"Also I noticed that poorer people (any skin shade) are housed in trailer parks or cheap wooden houses OUTSIDE the town or city limits. I was told it was so they would have no vote in local councils."

Actually, it is to keep tornadoes away from city centers. Rednecks and tornadoes love trailer parks, and if the trailer park is away from the city, then the tornado will naturally gravitate toward that and not the city, thus saving the precious Wal-Mart.

58
1

No Windows 10, no Office 2019, says Microsoft

Wade Burchette

Re: No Windows 10, no Office 2019

The last time I installed Office 2016 for someone (1 month ago), I used the license key and it made me create an Office account before it would activate.

6
1
Wade Burchette

No Windows 10, no Office 2019

I know Microsoft meant this to be a bad thing, but actually it is a blessing. Office peaked in 2003. Since then each version hasn't been as good. But it is like a roller coaster: it goes down a lot, then up a little but not as high where it started, then down a lot, then up a little but not as high as when it started, then down a lot, and repeat.

Office 2003 was great. Then 2007 introduced that accursed ribbon that Microsoft puts everywhere when it should be nowhere. 2010 was better than 2007 because you could customize that accursed ribbon. 2013 was much because the MENUS WHERE ALL CAPITAL LETTERS MAKING THEM HARD ON THE EYES, and Microsoft was full-on stupid (still is) with the dog-butt ugly UI. 2016 was better because it returned proper capitalization to menus, but now it requires your email address to even use it. I expect 2019 version to be absolute garbage. I still have a valid license for 2003 version, and I ain't giving it up.

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Tall, slim models are coming to take over dumpy SSD territory

Wade Burchette

Re: Height Correction

I wonder why such arbitrary lengths? 325.35 and not 325? Why the extra 0.35? Or the other direction, why not 325.5? 38.6, why not 38.5?

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Biggest Washington DC lobbyist is now a tech giant (yes, it's Google)

Wade Burchette

Re: Lobbying is the proof

It has been said we have the best government money can buy. Hillary Clinton spent $1,200,000,000 on the last election and the Donald half that. Where did that money come from? Whoever gave it to them, I can promise you it wasn't because they liked them because I have a hard time finding two more unlikable people than Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. It was for political favors. Get ready for "Google presents 'The State of the Union' with President Trump". "This Democratic party response to President Trump is brought to you by AT&T". "My fellow Americans. After the recent California earthquake it is important that we rebuild our country together. And while you are rebuilding, don't forget your Gatorade, it is a thirst quencher."

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