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* Posts by Wade Burchette

766 posts • joined 5 Apr 2007

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In defence of online ads: The 'net ain't free and you ain't paying

Wade Burchette
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Re: happy for adverts if....

I have some sensible rules for ads before I consider them acceptable. These rules are sensible because they were the standard when the internet went from luxury to necessity. If they worked once, they can work again.

(1) Absolutely no tracking in any way, shape, or form, no exception. Just because you attempt to make it sound beneficial 'by showing ads to my interest' does not make it acceptable. (2) Absolutely no pop-up window, pop-under window, or obscures part or all of a web page, no exception. (3) Absolutely no ad that attempt to determine my location, no exception. i.e. No ad that says '[city name] man discovers shocking secret'. (4) Absolutely no ad that requires javascript, java, flash, or any other plug-in, no exception. Incidentally, obey this rule would kill malvertising immediately. (5) Absolutely no autoplay videos except and only except when I click on a clear link to a video. This rule applies to more than ads.

My rules are not a burden because websites used to be quite profitable following my rules. But greed took over and advertisers went too far. And instead of realizing they are the problem, they try to guilt us into obeying their perverted point of view. That won't work for me. And whenever I find a website that tries to guilt me, I make it a point to explain that I am not a mooch but I am someone who cares deeply about my privacy and security.

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Nadella tells worried GitHub devs: Judge us by our actions

Wade Burchette
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FYI: Qualcomm hasn't given up on Arm-based Windows 10 slabtops

Wade Burchette
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Windows on ARM will never work unless I can run my programs (and not just apps) from 10 years ago on it. I have programs from over 10 years ago that I still use quite often. I cannot be the only one. Legacy compatibility is more important than people realize.

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Is Microsoft about to git-merge with GitHub? Rumors suggest: Yes

Wade Burchette
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Re: Disney probably is more of an IT company than AOL

The only company I think would be worse for Github than Microsoft would be Disney. These are the same greedy bastards who keep bribing ... er "lobbying" elected officials to increase copyright's length. The Big Mouse has become thoroughly evil.

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Wade Burchette
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It is the same old story ...

Big company buys smaller company. Big company replaces all the employees who made smaller company with their own personnel. The products of smaller company quickly become garbage because the big company's personnel have no personal investment in the smaller company's products and ideas and so do not truly appreciate its value.

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Sysadmin's PC-scrub script gave machines a virus, not a wash

Wade Burchette
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"We used to have McAfee on our Uni NT4 machines, it used to slow the PCs down so much that most people just disabled it."

So, just like modern McAfee then. It is nice to see that McAfee hasn't abandoned their glorious time-honored tradition of slowing computers down to a crawl.

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Within Arm's reach: Chip brains that'll make your 'smart' TV a bit smarter

Wade Burchette
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Re: How will it be used?

See Minority Report to know exactly how it will be used.

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US Congress mulls expanding copyright yet again – to 144 years

Wade Burchette
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Re: 100 Years Of Hell

It is not a Repub/Democrat thing. The mistake people make is they really believe that the other party is corrupt to the core while their own favorite party is not. Example: Bill Clinton, Democrat, signed the DMCA law which made it illegal for me to break encryption even if I want to make a personal copy of my legally purchased item. All political parties today answer to their corporate overlords, just in different ways. The only way to fix it is to ask the people who are bribed by corporations to ban those very same bribes. That ain't going to happen.

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US senators ask FTC to investigate Google's Location imbroglio

Wade Burchette
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Google location services

Google Maps is the worst violator. Every time you start it up, it checks to make sure you have full location tracking. If you switch to GPS only, then it will nag you every time. EVERY time. And it is worded to make you believe that it is all-or-nothing. I would switch, but in my testing I find Google Maps is the best for directions on rural routes, like I have to take. I find Waze (also owned by Google and which also nags you about location services) is best for long distance and city drives.

At one time, Google even gimped Maps unless you used full location tracking. Two years ago (with my old LG G4 that died one day for no good reason) I was driving along a rural highway. GPS only location, phone on a windshield mount. Every few miles there was a message "searching for signal". An update to Maps came out soon after that and magically under the same scenario, there was no "searching for signal" issue.

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FCC sets a record breaking $120m fine for rude robocalls

Wade Burchette
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Re: First step the fixing robocalls

Have fun putting people who are robocalling from India with a VoIP number in jail.

The first step is to force the phone companies to actually do something about the problem. They have the ability to stop this, or at least greatly reduce it. But they are too lazy (and cheap) to do anything substantial. Some let you use the service nomorobo.com, but that is not bulletproof because illegal robocallers can just change their numbers daily and even use an active number belonging to a real person. I have had people call me because a robocaller used my number. Stopping robocalls isn't going to increase the phone companies' revenue so they will not do anything about it unless forced.

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Wade Burchette
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Re: Could it be?

"He wasn't fined for robocalling, he was nailed mainly for spoofing the caller ID."

And having a record message. In the US, all telemarketering calls must have a live person on the other end; recorded messages are always illegal. It is still perfectly legal, unfortunately, for politicians and wanna-be politicians to robocall you to the living end. So long as they do it between certain hours.

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You say Halo and I say goodbye: Microsoft has a word with unauthorised mod devs

Wade Burchette
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Chinese web giant finds Windows zero-day, stays schtum on specifics

Wade Burchette
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Re: Edge has had a pretty bad

"Edge is just IE12 web render engine with a new UI frame."

Makes sense. Why do updates to it require a restart? (And why do add-ons require the Microsoft Store? Don't answer that last one, I know why.) Why does a browser have to be intertwined so tight with the OS?

And, of course, since Edge is essentially IE with a new UI and since this is new Microsoft, the UI is absolute garbage, just like Windows 8 and 10's UI is absolute garbage. Ugly, ribbon everywhere when it should be nowhere, what was once 1 step is now 5, confusing. I don't care if Edge can load pages 5 times as fast as any other browser, if the UI is a confusing stupid nightmare then I won't ever be using it. Microsoft has forgotten that designs should be easy to use and logical.

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Windows Admin Center: Vulture gets claws on browser-based server admin

Wade Burchette
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Bad bad idea

Several years ago, I installed Exchange 2013 on a test server. This version of Exchange only has a web console. On a new install of Server 2012 R2, I added the Essentials role. I then followed the install instructions from Microsoft to the letter. Exchange installed without issue, but nowhere did Microsoft tell me or anyone that the Essentials role was incompatible with Exchange.

So installed Server 2012 R2 fresh and tried again, again following Microsoft's instructions to the letter. Exchange installed and this time the web console actually came up. But it only told me "something went wrong". The Exchange powershell program didn't work either.

So now the third time. But this time I bought a book, which included steps Microsoft did not. Fresh install of Server 2012 R2 again, followed the book's instructions to the letter, and SUCCESS! Finally, everything worked. So I set up several users and tested everything I needed at the time. 2 months later I go back to the web console ... "something went wrong". I did nothing on the test server except install Windows updates. Nothing else. Literally, nothing else. The Exchange powershell still worked, so I could manage users that way and everything else still worked. (A year and a half later, everything for this Exchange stopped working: calendar, email, powershell, everything. And this despite me not doing a thing.)

The point is, this is Microsoft. A web admin console will never be released in a working state. The first few times you use it, it may work. But can you guarantee it won't stop working even though you did nothing to affect it? I have a QNap NAS. That web admin console just works. Microsoft has some brilliant programmers who are hamstrung by idiot managers chasing fads. Idiot managers do not care about something working, they care about a new shiny. A new admin console is shiny, once it works for their limited testing, it will be a low priority to make sure it stays working for everyone because the programmers who designed it will be moved to a new shiny. As my experience with Exchange 2013 shows, this is a very bad idea all around.

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India completes its GPS alternative, for the second time

Wade Burchette
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Trollface

"Given that the Indian Mars mission was cheaper than the film 'The Martian' I think you might protest too much."

Of course it cost less. Their government saved money by outsourcing all the tech support to India!

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Police chief wants citizens to bring 'net oligarchs to heel

Wade Burchette
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Re: UK Laws are the problem

"UK Laws are the problem, where if you lose then you may well find that YOU are having to pay the other sides legal fees as well as your own. In the home of 'sue first (or fire, whichever is appropriate) and ask questions later' this does not apply."

The solution is not an either-or. The loser having to pay the fine hurts the poor who cannot afford a loss to expensive lawyers. But in the American system, the rich can keep the lawsuit going almost indefinitely to bankrupt someone knowing they likely will not have to pay any fines. This is tactic that has been used with great success to silence opposition: You are rich and well-funded, but someone says something that you do not like. So you sue for libel and you and your expensive lawyers do whatever you can to drag out the lawsuit just so the person you are suing will not have any money left. The longer you can keep it from actually going to trial, the better. The purpose is not to win, but to make the other side lose (which may or may not also include silencing them).

The solution is a middle-of-the-road approach.

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My PC makes ‘negative energy waves’, said user, then demanded fix

Wade Burchette
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Reminds me of a story I read about

This has been a long time ago and I wished I saved the link. Anyway, as the story goes AT&T put up a new mobile phone tower in a neighborhood. As soon as it was erected, the neighbors started to complain about headaches. They complained so much and so often that the local news became involved. Turns out, the tower didn't even have electricity yet so it wasn't operational. It goes to show you the power of the mind.

But I do have a link. Many people have moved to Green Bank, West Virginia (and the surrounding area) because they are "allergic" to cell phones and WiFi. They are not, of course. It is all psychosomatic. Furthermore, the Green Bank radio telescope was placed where it was at because it meant to study radio waves from space -- the mountains block all terrestrial radio waves and none are allowed in the area. How can your mind distinguish between a radio wave from earth and from space? It can't, of course.

I do know people who sensitive to the noise these devices emit. But everyone I know like that doesn't get headaches from the devices, just that the low hissing noise that it makes bothers them and so absent any background noise their mind just focuses on that hiss. But that is different, that is sensitive hearing not allergic reaction.

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An easy-breezy attitude to sharing personal data is the only thing keeping the app economy alive

Wade Burchette
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Re: Better alternative

"I remain unconvinced by the idea that regulation will save us."

I have learned through the years that any fix by politicians only makes the problem worse. First, they don't know anything about the problems they need to fix and they won't let someone who is qualified to write the laws. Second, to get a law passed requires so much pork and other unrelated garbage just to get the majority of the corrupt politicians to agree. Third, today if a Democrat proposes the fix than the Republicans will blindly oppose it no matter what and vice-versa. The hyper-partisan politics of today disgust me.

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As Zuck apologizes again... Facebook admits 'most' of its 2bn+ users may have had public profiles slurped by bots

Wade Burchette
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Re: Mega-Problem

"If you're not even a FB user, how do you opt out? Will Washington pick up on this vicious cycle... And how about managing info held by Data-Brokers? Congress has done zuk-all about Equifux!"

A politician's job is to get elected or re-elected; our wants and needs are a distant third. Elections are not cheap, so a politician needs financial help to get elected/re-elected. And the only ones with big enough wallets to help are large corporations. But they don't give money out of the goodness of their heart; they expect something in return. Nothing will ever be done by Congress no matter which party is charge unless the outcry is so great that it will affect their chances of being elected/re-elected. You don't bite the hands that feed you. The only way to fix this problem is to ask Congress to voluntarily cut out a large source of their income. You may get one or two to agree, but never half.

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2001 set the standard for the next 50 years of hard (and some soft) sci-fi

Wade Burchette
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The music

What I remember most about 2001 is the music. It has some of the most iconic music ever written. Who doesn't know the 'dum-dum-dum-dum' drum sequence from this movie? This movie predates me by 10 years, I still don't understand the opening or the ending, but the music is permanently stuck in my head.

I would like to think that this move inspired other iconic scores, like in Star Wars and Indiana Jones.

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Intel outside: Apple 'prepping' non-Chipzilla Macs by 2020 (stop us if you're having deja vu)

Wade Burchette
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If anyone can do it, Apple can

Microsoft couldn't pull off such a feat. Only Apple could. Part of the reason is because Microsoft cannot go all-in on another CPU architecture. They do not have a devoted legion of followers like Apple does. But Apple can; they do not need to transition because many of their users will buy whatever they put out. Not only that, Apple's culture will mean it will be close to right before they even try. Microsoft's culture is now "we will fix it later, for now let us figure out how to make money out of people".

But there are many questions. Rumors are that Apple was the reason why their is an AMD GPU on an Intel CPU. Not only that, Intel learned the hard way that GPU is a different beast than CPU. What about the GPU on an x86-less iMac? Will it still be AMD? Which architecture will Apple go with? Will it be ARM? Or something from the ground-up? Will they license x86 instruction set for emulation? If so, will it be from AMD or Intel? So many questions.

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Fleeing Facebook app users realise what they agreed to in apps years ago – total slurpage

Wade Burchette
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Most people do not care

People take to the streets to protest the NSA and many other government agencies slurping up all their personal information while at the same time handing all that same information over to Facebook, Twitter, et al. People would never allow the police to place a microphone in their home but will pay Amazon and Google to do the same thing. The fact is the majority of people do not care. They will be more than happy to give all their personal information to an entity that wants to know everything about them so long as they provided something for free. Facebook, Twitter, Windows 10, and such may not cost money; that does not mean it is free.

Well, I do care. And when people ask me why I do not use Facebook or Instagram or Snapchat or anything like that, I always ask them "Why would someone like me not be on that? What do I know that you don't?"

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Windows 10 to force you to use Edge, even if it isn't default browser

Wade Burchette
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Re: Edge is the most-secure browser

Security through obscurity is not much security at all. So few people use Edge because the UI is confusing and stupid. It just makes more sense for hackers to go after a browser that people use, a logical one with a proper UI like Chrome or Firefox. The advantage of those two browsers is that updates do not require a full restart, and add-ons do not require you to use the Microsoft store.

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YouTube plan to use Wikipedia against crackpots hits snag

Wade Burchette
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Re: Correcting Wikipedia

"This was in (relatively) early days of wikipedia, it may have improved now."

Nope. If anything, it worse than ever before.

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OK, deep breath, relax... Let's have a sober look at these 'ere annoying AMD chip security flaws

Wade Burchette
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Something is not right

I say a comment somewhere which proved the people from "CTS" were using a green screen for their promotional video. They easily found stock photos of the backgrounds used in the video.

https://i.imgur.com/OkWlIxA.jpg

Regardless, something is not right when you give a company 24 hours to fix a security hole. And the AMD flaws website (what was it again?) was registered in late February, so they at least knew for over 24 hours. And something is not right when the WHOIS records for your websites are registered using Domains by Proxy. Why would would a serious company go to such trouble to conceal their identity? Everything about this feels wrong.

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Microsoft says 'majority' of Windows 10 use will be 'streamlined S mode'

Wade Burchette
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There is a difference between iPad and Windows

The iPad started off locked down and started off fresh. There are no apps 20 years old that you would need to put on it. Windows, on the other hand, started out open and there are programs 20 years old that people still need to use. The same reason why Windows on ARM will never succeed is the same reason why Windows S will never succeed: People use Windows because they want to and can use programs released a long time ago.

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Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?

Wade Burchette
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Agreed. People use Windows because their programs from 20 years ago still work. It is the legacy compatibility. Windows on ARM takes that away. The whole purpose of it, like Windows 8 and 10, is to pad Microsoft's wallet and not what the customer wants. With Win on Arm you are limited to the Windows Store which conveniently gives Microsoft a cut of all sales. That Microsoft wants it to succeed, because now you will have to buy new apps from them. Windows on ARM will never succeed unless I can still install programs released 20 years ago and 1 year ago.

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We already give up our privacy to use phones, why not with cars too?

Wade Burchette
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Connected car

At no time and in no way should a vehicle ever be connected to the internet. Now, the radio may have some connection to the internet, but it needs to be completely isolated from the rest of the vehicle. In other words, no physical connection to the rest of the vehicle except for the 12V power. If I can unlock my doors with a smartphone, than so can a hacker.

Vehicle to Vehicle communication is okay, provided it is short range and the information sent to each vehicle must obey a standard with all non-standard communications discarded. The information sent must be well-defined and it cannot send commands to other vehicles, just information.

And if I eventually have to buy a car that is connected to the internet, then I would like to see it try working the antenna pulled out. Or with the fuse pulled out.

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World+dog ignores Rubin's Wonderdroid

Wade Burchette
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Re: Funny that

It was also a Sprint exclusive, a company that has perhaps the absolute worst customer service and has a horrible network. My dad had Sprint. He called customer service to ask for a copy of his bill. The correct response to such a question would be "Sure. Could you confirm that your address is ..." The response he got was "Why?" Needless to say, he wasn't a customer for long after that.

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A tiny Ohio village turned itself into a $3m speed-cam trap. Now it has to pay back the fines

Wade Burchette
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Joke

Re: "raise property taxes slightly"

"Also I noticed that poorer people (any skin shade) are housed in trailer parks or cheap wooden houses OUTSIDE the town or city limits. I was told it was so they would have no vote in local councils."

Actually, it is to keep tornadoes away from city centers. Rednecks and tornadoes love trailer parks, and if the trailer park is away from the city, then the tornado will naturally gravitate toward that and not the city, thus saving the precious Wal-Mart.

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No Windows 10, no Office 2019, says Microsoft

Wade Burchette
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Re: No Windows 10, no Office 2019

The last time I installed Office 2016 for someone (1 month ago), I used the license key and it made me create an Office account before it would activate.

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Wade Burchette
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No Windows 10, no Office 2019

I know Microsoft meant this to be a bad thing, but actually it is a blessing. Office peaked in 2003. Since then each version hasn't been as good. But it is like a roller coaster: it goes down a lot, then up a little but not as high where it started, then down a lot, then up a little but not as high as when it started, then down a lot, and repeat.

Office 2003 was great. Then 2007 introduced that accursed ribbon that Microsoft puts everywhere when it should be nowhere. 2010 was better than 2007 because you could customize that accursed ribbon. 2013 was much because the MENUS WHERE ALL CAPITAL LETTERS MAKING THEM HARD ON THE EYES, and Microsoft was full-on stupid (still is) with the dog-butt ugly UI. 2016 was better because it returned proper capitalization to menus, but now it requires your email address to even use it. I expect 2019 version to be absolute garbage. I still have a valid license for 2003 version, and I ain't giving it up.

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Tall, slim models are coming to take over dumpy SSD territory

Wade Burchette
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Re: Height Correction

I wonder why such arbitrary lengths? 325.35 and not 325? Why the extra 0.35? Or the other direction, why not 325.5? 38.6, why not 38.5?

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Biggest Washington DC lobbyist is now a tech giant (yes, it's Google)

Wade Burchette
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Re: Lobbying is the proof

It has been said we have the best government money can buy. Hillary Clinton spent $1,200,000,000 on the last election and the Donald half that. Where did that money come from? Whoever gave it to them, I can promise you it wasn't because they liked them because I have a hard time finding two more unlikable people than Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. It was for political favors. Get ready for "Google presents 'The State of the Union' with President Trump". "This Democratic party response to President Trump is brought to you by AT&T". "My fellow Americans. After the recent California earthquake it is important that we rebuild our country together. And while you are rebuilding, don't forget your Gatorade, it is a thirst quencher."

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Microsoft whips out tool so you can measure Windows 10's data-slurping creepiness

Wade Burchette
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Re: 'they still won't switch the slurp off either.'

Windows 10 still won't have a proper and logical start menu, Aero, pre-boot F8, or a proper backup program. Those are the reasons why I'm sticking with Windows 7 to the bitter end, because I block all slurp at the router level.

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Meltdown/Spectre week three: World still knee-deep in something nasty

Wade Burchette
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Re: Intel "shouldn't be selling CPUs?"

Um ... Have you seen the benchmarks for Ryzen and Eypc? The only area where Intel has a clear advantage anymore is gaming, on everything else Ryzen goes toe-to-toe with Core i-whatever. And in servers, Eypc is actually was better dollar-for-dollar than anything Intel has to offer before these patches. You can buy 32 core Eypc processors for much much less than a 24 core Xeon. AMD is competitive again. The issue is perception and Intel's marketing. Intel helps fund commercials for companies which promote their product. This is a standard practice, because I have a friend in the HVAC business who has ads paid for by Carrier corporation for his business because he sells a lot of their units. AMD doesn't have the cash to overcome perception and marketing just yet.

Another thing, it takes about 2 years from design to production for each new CPU. Assuming Intel learned about this in July of 2017 and started right away fixing it, that would put them at July 2019 before they have a fixed CPU. And that is pretending they also knew about Spectre at the time too. Pretending AMD learned about Spectre recently, that would put them in January 2020 before they have a patched CPU too.

Intel does lie. What they have been telling people is that AMD is affected too, they have just not told them that AMD is not affected as much as Intel is.

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Security hole in AMD CPUs' hidden secure processor code revealed ahead of patches

Wade Burchette
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Re: So for Intel is always bad but the sweet AMD is fine? PLEASE!

Are you having nice weather in Santa Clara today?

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Honda pores over in-car navigation software with Alibaba – report

Wade Burchette
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Re: Give me a car with

I bought a car with navigation. This was in 2004. There have been no more updates since 2013. Because of this, I now use the GPS of my phone. It is always up to date, I don't have to pay for those updates, and it has traffic. I've now decided that I will not buy a car with GPS built-in no exception. You are not going to fool me twice. I might consider a head unit with GPS built in. If the updates stop for that, then I can rip it out and put a new head unit in; can't do that with a built-in GPS. There is only two features I want in my radio: Bluetooth and iPod compatibility. (The old iPods which had plenty of storage space for my lossless CD rips. You know, devices so good they had to go.)

I already know the car manufacturer's response: but a new car. Sorry, but my vehicle is paid for and works well. I have spent very little on repairs and maintenance, and most of that was normal wear and tear. No major mechanical problems at all. Why should I replace? Just keep updating your navigation data!

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Google Chrome ad-blocking to begin in February – but what is it going to block?

Wade Burchette
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Re: Not acceptable

In addition to tracking, I also noticed that javascript within an ad is not considered unacceptable. That javascript definitely helps with the tracking. But is also means that malvertising will still exist. Two days ago, I was helping someone on their computer and every time we went to yahoo.com, his browser was redirected to a scam "Microsoft alert!" page. This happened every time, and each scam page was a different domain.

This whole situation just seems like a distraction. Tell people you are concerned with only acceptable ads, make the definition of acceptable purposefully weak, and then tell everyone you care so don't use an ad-blocker. This is an ad-slinger trying to trick you into letting them make more money off you by pretending they care.

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Container-flinger pushes Win 10 transformer for legacy apps

Wade Burchette
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Re: It would have been nice...

I think this referring to making Windows 7 programs run on non-x86 systems or in systems where you do not have permission to install programs but do have permission to use an app store. The article is not clear, but I think it is the latter.

And it a program, not an app. Yes, technically an application and a program are the same thing. But before Microsoft went "mobile first (and customer last)" they were called programs. Apple and Google used the word apps. And, of course, apps are bought from an app store where conveniently Apple and Google make money, a lot of money. Microsoft being the great copiers that they are decided they too wanted to make money this way and so started to call programs "apps". I believe one day Microsoft will ban any program not installed through their app store "for your protection", but in reality so that Microsoft can make a percentage profit off every sale. Now, when I think of a program today, I think of software that does not require an app store to use. I have been resisting calling everything apps because I don't want Microsoft to succeed in forcing everything to go through their app store, and thus succeed in controlling what I can and cannot do with my purchase.

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FREE zero-day for every reader: AT&T's DirecTV kit has a root hole – and no one wants to patch it

Wade Burchette
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Linksys is now owned by Belkin

So there is your problem right there. Everything Belkin is pure garbage. The garbage in my trash can becomes even less valuable when I throw away something from Belkin.

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Tech giants at war: Google pulls plug on YouTube in Amazon kit

Wade Burchette
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Love the Hendrix reference

That is all.

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French activists storm Paris Apple Store over EU tax dispute

Wade Burchette
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Re: Theft or not

"Of course, that's impossible, tax law in the EU is a mismash of compromise and ambiguity because there isn't a snowball's chance in hell of all EU members agreeing to a common, centrally-managed, tax code or business structure."

And if the EU members did agree to a common tax code, then Apple and many other business their regional headquarters to an European country not in the EU. Even when the Brexit happens, the EU cannot boycott the UK without severe consequences. So Apple could just easily move the offices to Northern Ireland in such a situation.

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The sun rose, you woke up, and Qualcomm sued Apple three times

Wade Burchette
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Re: Mutually assured destruction

The only winner will be the lawyers.

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Ad-filtering fiend Eyeo: Morning has broken, like the first morning

Wade Burchette
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Simple rules

I have yet to see advertisers obey my simple rules for ads, rules that were once implemented when the internet went from luxury to necessity. If they worked once, they can work again.

(1) Absolutely no tracking of any kind for any reason, no exception. (2) Absolutely no javascript or something similar in an ad, no exception. (3) Absolutely no pop-up or pop-under ads, no exception. (4) Absolutely no ads that require Flash or Java or any other plug-in, no exception. (5) Absolutely no autoplay video ads EXCEPT only when I click on a clear link to a video. (6) Absolutely no ad that attempts to determine my location, no exception.

Follow my rules, which were successful once, and my adblocker will be turned off. Websites that complain about my adblocker are asking me to respect them while they are unwilling to respect me. Don't ask me to do something you are unwilling to do. Lead by example, and follow my simple rules that do work.

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Surprise: Android apps are riddled with trackers

Wade Burchette
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RE: Whats the proposed solution?

My tablet is a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 and Samsung has long since stopped supporting it. So I installed Cyanogenmod and later Lineage OS on it when Cyanogenmod died. Both have extra privacy built in. In the settings, you can override the privacy settings of any app, including Google's. That is your best choice, to see if your device supports Lineage OS. If that isn't available, you can check to see if you can root your device and manually uninstall any bloat apps you don't want and install a privacy app with root access. I did something like that with my Galaxy S3, but I forgot which app I used.

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Back to the Fuchsia: The next 10 years of Android

Wade Burchette
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18 months

18 months of guaranteed updates is at least 30 months too short. That is not even two years. Moving to a new phone takes a lot of time. As such, I want to hold on to my phone for at least 3 years, maybe 4. The one thing I would like to see on Android is to bypass the carrier for all updates. The second thing I would like to see is to allow us to uninstall any bloatware; only block apps that required for the phone to work. For example, I want to uninstall Chrome, a bunch of Samsung junk, and a lot of carrier junk. As it stands now, I can only disable some of that.

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Tesla launches electric truck it guarantees won't break for a million miles

Wade Burchette
Silver badge

Re: Interesting

The safest speed is slightly above the posted speed limit. A maximum speed of 60 MPH is not safe on a 70, 75, 80 MPH highway. Driving slow makes people behind you impatient and angry and thus you will do things you might not usually do in your rush to pass. These vehicles need to be able to drive highway speeds.

Other than that, I like this. If enough recharging stations are available, then the 30 minute wait for trucks isn't a big deal like it is for passenger vehicles. Truckers need 30 minute breaks to stretch the legs and to help prevent drowsiness.

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Amazon Key door-entry flaw: No easy fix to stop rogue couriers burgling your place unseen

Wade Burchette
Silver badge

What if ...

What if I am an Amazon approved courier. And what if I have a friend who is a thief. I deliver the package but conveniently leave the door slightly ajar so that it does not lock. Some time later, my friend comes by with gloves and a mask on and robs the place while I continue to deliver packages. My face will be on another camera at another location so you know I wasn't there. And how can you prove that I made an honest mistake?

Or what if I have a friend and we work in tandem. My friend finds the cable and phone lines on the side of the house. We time it out so that I deliver the package and begin to walk out the door. But my friend disconnects the cable and phone lines so that the internet dies, whether it is DSL or cable. Then we rob the place. As we leave, we break a window from the outside so that it looks like a neighborhood robbery and reconnect the internet. How can you prove it wasn't just a random outage or glitch in the equipment?

Trusting people to be honest is about as smart as trusting Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, et al with your privacy. Yet millions upon millions of people are naive and do so. Letting people in your house to deliver a package is a bad bad idea. Far better to leave it an approved drop center where you can pick it up.

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Your next laptop will feature 'CMF' technology

Wade Burchette
Silver badge

Re: Translation :

Exactly. I care not about how it looks, I care about how easy it is to repair and how good the parts are on the inside. I shouldn't have to remove a keyboard to remove a hard drive. I shouldn't have to take out 10 screws to remove the battery. I shouldn't have a hinge that breaks after 2 years of use of my laptop. And I shouldn't have to buy proprietary parts to repair a desktop. I'm looking at you, HP, on that one. Why do you have a proprietary power supply?

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