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* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

4152 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

Ecuador says 'yes' to Assange 'freedom' deal, but Julian says 'nyet'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Assange is a political prisoner, in the United Kingdom, end of

The US will silence him?

Hmm maybe the Democrats...

Remember Assange knows who leaked the docs to him.

If he says Seth Rich... all heck breaks loose

Adam Schiff will be instructed by the Clintons to bury this.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

Re: Yes, but you've omitted the most important bit...

They don't let you take cats to prison, however there are programs where the cons are used to train service dogs.

The truth, Assange will not get the death penalty. (Assuming he was assisting Manning during the actual theft.

The other truth... he'll be asked about the DNC theft and the Clinton's don't want him talking.

He may not make it to trial alive.

Cue the private security black ops going to take him out... and its not going to be Trump's dong.

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Intel eggheads put bits in a spin to try to revive Moore's law

Ian Michael Gumby
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Coat

Re: Amazing stuff

Dude! You had to go political.

I'll skip your dig at Trump. He's a big boy and I'm sure if your rated, he'd tweet about you. :-P

But lets take a look at Brexit.

It was explained to me by a Brit who lives in both the US and London that people got fed up with some non-UK citizen sitting in Brussels (I think???) telling everyone what they can and cannot do.

Hmmm. Over 240 years ago, a group of colonists got fed up paying taxes and being told what they can and cannot do by some guy sitting on the other side of the pond.

On the positive... you got a chance to vote yourself out of a bad deal.

All I can say is " Karma Bee-itches! "

Mine is the jacket with the asbestos liner with enough space for a class 4 (plate) body armor.

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SEAL up your data just like Microsoft: Redmond open-sources 'simple' homomorphic encryption blueprints

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Chinese walls.

I agree but there are better ways to handle this problem that are going to be much more efficient.

And even if the data is encrypted, you can break your Chinese wall.

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Marriott's Starwood hotels mega-hack: Half a BILLION guests' deets exposed over 4 years

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Craigie Re: Card numbers

Actually there is a product you can get for online purchases.

The other thing that there is a company that tokenizes the CC details so that companies like Marriot doesn't store the CC # and stuff.

There's more, but the real problem is that we have the Mongol horde of programmers who really don't know what they are doing behind the scenes. (Or you could use Vandals too ... )

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Sorry, we haven't ACLU what happened in sealed 'Facebook decryption' case, but let's find out

Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

@Mike Re: Perhaps?

So... you have a couple of things...

Yes the Feds do have access to the encrypted messages. There's a couple of ways that they can do this... And no, I don't know which way the do it...

Also FB would have to have a copy of the encrypted message. After all, they have to be able to transport and deliver the message.

What FB claims is that they can't decrypt it.

Note: After it became clear that Zuck and Company were considering selling access to user's data, it is not a far stretch to believe that they also have access to the keys. This way they can better target the user for ads.

Sort of like Google saying 'no human reads your gmail emails... (But their machine processing does. )

This is why I suspect FB doesn' t want to admit that it is feasible.

Of course it could be that they don't know the keys and that they are local to your keychain, but who knows and who cares? Why have a FB account?

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Euro consumer groups: We think Android tracking is illegal

Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

Gee!

And I have friends who say I'm a dolt for buying and sticking with an Apple iPhone.

Yeah, Apple makes their money on the kit, not selling ads or marketing.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

>Comparing Google to Obama is weird

This is Andrew - he seems to have a hard-on against both.

And rightly so.

Both did 'evil' while claiming to 'do no evil'.

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LG: Fsck everything, we're doing 16 lenses in smartphones (probably)

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@hmv

Dual card slots doesn't necessarily solve the problem. The medium can be mishandled.

You could always use wi-fi to back up the shots in subjective real time. As to ruining shots... yeah,

it could have been processing, it could have been the film and/or film cartridges itself. (Depending on the camera and film. ) With 35mm if you have an older reusable case, light can get in. On 120mm rolls this too could be a problem. If the film wasn't inserted properly...that too could cause errors. (Think about loading a roll under fire.) Plates are another story and handling of them could pose an issue even before the shot.

My dad had a "pocket" camera that he took with him. Of course that was in Dec '44 just in time to help wrap up the battle of the bulge and then some. (14th Armor) The irony... he captured images of people during a time that he wanted to forget. (remembering them, brought back memories of how some of them died..)

But back to the point.

Back in the '30s there were some incredible shots taken with a pocket 35mm camera. A Leica I think .

In focus with a good depth of field. (A skating waiter??? IIRC)

It was well framed and told a story.

Some of the best boxing photos were taken with 4x5s and a flash.

When I was growing up in the 70's in one of the classes on composition, we had a guest speaker who was a professional sports photographer. One thing he said was that getting a good shot meant being in the right place at the right time. That meant planning. He only shot 6-12 photos during a game. Ansel Adams also took a lot of time setting up and waiting for the right shot.

Which goes to another point. One can argue that today's smart phones are ruining photography. Rather than take your time, frame the subject and create a good shot, people just point and click taking multiple shots hoping something works out.

Its a give and take world.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@DougS Re: I think you missed the point

Not exactly...

Yes, I agree with you that most who use their camera phone would do much better if they actually took a photography course on composition.

Of course with higher pixel count, you can do a better job of cropping and post work that lets you salvage an ok print.

And a camera (DSLR or mirrorless) will do a better job than a phone even if the phone has a higher pixel count.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Fuzzy not exactly...

There is only so much you can pack in to 35mm of film.

Back in the 80's Kodak came up with a B&W film that had extremely small grains and gave one of the sharpest images available.

But if you wanted truly good images, you needed to go to a larger format. 120mm for example. Or plates.

Don't get me wrong. I grew up using a Nikon F. and beyond. (All Nikon)

I haven't done any black and white work in years, but I bet I can still unload canister and put it in the can for processing in under 2 minutes. either in a bag or in a darkroom.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

Re: Small room, large AI.

Well...

I think of this in terms similar to a Multiple Mirror Telescope. (MMT)

But that's just me. ;-)

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Oracle sued by app sales rep: I made tens of millions for Larry, then fired for being neither young nor male – claim

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @AC

For sales people its a job.

Oracle ranks around IBM... its a steady paycheck until you find a better place to be.

Oracle like IBM has to re-invent itself. It was primarily Oracle's high price for Exadata that caused a lot of companies to come up with a big data strategy. I mean for the cost of Oracle's licenses alone you could kit out a Hadoop cluster and break even after 16-18 months.

Those big ticket deals are dwindling. And your quota is based on what the territory did the year prior.

In a shrinking market... not that good.

And yeah, I know the sales side of the biz

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Lurker ...

I know many of those minions.

Oracle has many women in their sales force.

The key metric is the base salary of the woman and those of her underlings.

Assume that they are all on the same sales incentive plan.

Now you take a look at the cost per revenue generated by the sales rep.

If the woman had a base that was double that of her younger counter part and she didn't bring in twice the revenue, then she would cost more than the younger person. It would be simple math.

So you can take a look at the cost of revenue by sales rep to see who's more efficient. It could be that the younger worker, even though he brought in less revenue was still a cheaper option.

That's the straight bean counter argument.

That said... the allegations of harassment is another issue. Again it could be ageism or sexism, or neither.

Sales critters tend to be pack animals. That is... if you don't belong to their pack, they will cut you out. So it could be not so much a 'good ol boys network' but something close. (Women too can be part of the pack.)

I was once part of a team of top performers at Big Blue.

After I left, one of my friends was cut. Not because of his age... (they were all older seasoned vets.). But he happened to have two quarters where he was the low man in the group. Wrong place at the wrong time. I had left a couple years earlier because even though I was pulling out the best numbers in the territory, my quota exceeded what the region could produce. Its another way to force someone out. Unrealistic quotas for the territory forcing you to kill yourself for a target you could never hit.

I wish her luck, but its always going to be difficult to prove sexism or ageism because the deck is stacked against you. The best thing you can do is to be an independent consultant. You make more for taking on slightly more risk. But you get to call your own shots.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC

I would suspect Ageism over Sexism here.

But seriously who would want to work for Oracle?

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Hortonworks faces sueball over Cloudera merger

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Violates SEC rules

I don't think that's a fair assessment.

I've chatted w the senior execs at Horton, Cloudera and MapR.

Horton had an interesting 'go to market' strategy and tried to compete on price and selling services. There's a couple of flaw's in Rob's plan. At first they gained market share by undercutting Cloudera. But there were gaps in what was being offered and they got hammered.

It was and is pretty easy to convert customers from HDP to Cloudera and Vice versa. Of the three big vendors, MapR, to this date, still has the fewest number of defections. What this suggests is that people who chose MapR, made a conscious decision based on the product's merit and not cheapest license cost.

Even Cloudera isn't out of the woods. They got a huge lift by Intel a few years back, before the IPO. Still they too have issues in terms of profitability.

There's a flaw in the Open Source model. In order to succeed, you need to have a buyer big enough and willing to pony up the cash.

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A 5G day may come when the courage of cable and DSL fails ... but it is not this day

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Mage Re: 5G application

Try living in a densely populated city where during rush hour you have tons of vehicles using wi-fi. When you consider the future of making each of them a 'hot spot' more data.

So in dense populated areas 5G can help.

W.R.T rural settings... I'd either need a line of sight to a Cell tower or I'd have to set up a 100 ft. tall mast for line of sight to the local telco (~20-30 miles away) and then put in expensive equipment on both ends. 100mb/s symmetrical links would be nice for an IoT based ag outfit.

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Hands up who isn't p!*$ed off about Amazon's new HQ in New York and Virginia?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Corporate welfare is not "liberal"

Foxcon isn't necessarily a bad deal.

Foxcon wanted IL but IL is a mess. So they went over the border.

The only real issue is Lake Michigan water supply.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Contract void?

The discount is based on the number of jobs they actually bring in.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Well yeah, duh

Not necessarily.

Its a question of who ponied up a ton of tax incentives.

Financial markets... NYC/NJ, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, etc .... So there's no need to be in NY for that.

Government? If VA is so important, what did a certain 'No Such Agency' open up a data center in Utah?

The funny thing... you're not going to find a single plot in most cities that can house 50K people or cities that can absorb the influx. I said most, but in Chicago, you could. There's one plot down the road from me. It would have been the best location because of location of transportation where you can live 20 miles away and still have an easy commute. (Metra) then private bus or walk to campus.

The only thing that needs to be in VA are lobbyists.

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Alexa, cough up those always-on Echo audio recordings, says double-murder trial judge

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Sounds about right

The issue that you and many miss...

When a judge gives a court order, Amazon can't refuse. They can fight a subpoena, but not a court order.

Failure to respond means contempt of court which Amazon doesn't want to do. (No one wants to do)

But from the article:

However, Amazon finally handed over the recordings after Bates gave permission. The recordings didn't provide anything useful however and may even have helped Bates' case that there was several reasonable explanations for what may have happened. The charges against him were dropped in November 2017.

The common thought is that Alexa doesn't record until the command word <Alexa> is said.

So its important to know what was in the recordings. Was it a command/question to Alexa, or did it contain background noise?

Meaning the recordings would indicate just how much information Amazon collects from you, assuming you own an Alexa.

That's what we need to learn...

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iPhone XR, for when £1,000 is just too much for a smartmobe

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: In Android land

in Android land... you have to ask how much data is being sent back to Google in an effort to track you so that they can spam you better with ads.

While Apple still does a bit of spying on you... the price difference covers the bit more privacy.

It looks like you'll end up with an ipad mini , blue tooth head sets and watches for devices to replace that simple phone.

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Cisco swings the axe on permanent staff – hundreds laid off worldwide this week

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Re: Open roles unfulfilled

By the time you get the notice, its too late.

Yes you will be blocked from applying for those 'open roles' which actually are no longer open and the position is frozen until you and your team are gone from the rolls.

Your managers know about the layoff long before you do and if they wanted to keep you, they would have told you to apply for a different role or would have had the other manager call you and then tell you that the manager called him out of courtesy and that you should take the job...

IBM and other big corporations do this.

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Supreme Court raises eyebrows at Google's cozy $8.5m legal deal

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ST Re: The Bret thing

Dude, quit trying to be a lawyer.

Kavanaugh was never caught in a lie or lying.

The so called perjury trap is that you have two witnesses who say two different things and therefore one must be lying so you have a possible case for a perjury charge. If only you could prove that what was said was a lie.

We know that Kavanaugh didn't lie because of the questions being asked. If the answer is subjective ... e.g. did you drink a lot? (To some one beer is a lot. To others downing a 6 pack while at a party is not.)

You don't have a lie.

There's more to this and if you really want to get down to it... we can investigate the lawyers and the accusers and probably find that it was all politically motivated and they lied.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Flame

@El Reg Your ANTIFA t-shirt is showing...

When the author writes:

Newly seated Justice Brett Kavanaugh – who has been credibly accused of sexual assault and lied repeatedly during his confirmation hearing – was also critical of the arrangement. He repeatedly called it "strange", suggested there were other better options and warned that it had the "appearance of favoritism and collusion."

You know that there is unnecessary bias in the story that really has no place in Journalism.

Kavanaugh is a Supreme Court Justice.

That's all you had to say.

Instead you push out unnecessary rhetoric which actually is being shown to be completely false.

Creepy Porn Lawyer and his client are being referred to the DoJ for possible charges.

Ford's lawyers are also being investigated.

While I would expect this BS from CNN, I would hope that a more respected technical news site, even if web only, would hold their reporters to higher standards. And even then, we're still talking about grading on a curve.

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Official: IBM to gobble Red Hat for $34bn – yes, the enterprise Linux biz

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Butter Ball ... Re: Redhat employees - get out now

Not exactly true.

IBM will offer some key employees, back loaded retention packages.

IBM will not touch Red Hat for a couple of years and may keep Red Hat a separate company as a wholly owned subsidiary indefinitely.

(Yes I escaped from the borg after my gold plated handcuffs came off.)

Google created Alphabet as their holding company which helped create 'glass walls' between divisions which also helped reduce the threat of Government intervention and calling Google a monopoly ...

So there is a precedence also considering that Red Hat has its own strong brand ... don't want to weaken it.

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Amazon is at this point a money-printing cloud machine with a grocery store in the parking lot

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Wrong reason to worry...

Actually AWS can lock you in.

If you don't understand how... its already to late. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@diodesign ... Re: Indeed

There's nothing shocking here.

Its called taking your money (profits) and running. Its the end of the year.

So if you bought earlier this year or so... (longer to qualify for Capital gains and not ordinary income) you would be smart to move out of tech.

There is also a bit of a question mark due to Trump's tariff talk and also the 2018 midterm elections.

So no need to panic ...

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It only took Oz govt transformation bods 6 months and $700k to report that blockchain ain't worth the effort

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: In all fairness

The Australian government isn't exactly the brightest example of forward looking, progressive thinking people.

Is that because the sheep have revolted and are now buggering unsuspecting male farmers rather than the other way around? So the smart Aussie is always looking over his shoulder?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Or it could be used to track a path of a physical thing in the supply chain (where individual suppliers cannot be trusted). It would be also rather inefficient and very laggy. Oh, and the whole "proof-of-work" is a total non-starter, unless you are into speculation with "instruments" which they are not.

Uhm no... not really.

Take farm goods. Are you going to place a sticker on every watermelon and then try to track it?

If you said yes, then you have no clue about farming or watermelon growers. Then consider the fact that you may track the carton used, but that doesn't mean you couldn't have cross contamination along the way. There's more to this.. but blockchain doesn't help.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

@paulf

"Bonus points that it actually debunked the latest buzz-word fad, and consigned it to the circular file."

Sure, but does the solution that you debunked use AI? Maybe that's why it failed. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC ... Re: But...

Its not a ponzi scheme, its someone trying to re-invent the wheel while not really understanding the technology. There are two components, the actual blockchain, and then the distributed ledger.

There is a niche where blockchain can make sense. but most of the examples touting blockchain are outside of the niche. Maybe this is one reason why IBM's stock is way down?

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SQLite creator crucified after code of conduct warns devs to love God, and not kill, commit adultery, steal, curse...

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Not the first piece of absurd preaching to come from the SQLite team

Actually, if you read the last line... it could explain why he chose this as the CoC:

"nor sleep with their colleagues' spouses."

That said, anyone who claims threads to be evil doesn't know how to use and manage threads.

It separates the men from the posers.

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London flatmate (Julian Assange) sues landlord (government of Ecuador) in human rights spat

Ian Michael Gumby
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@DougS ... Re: I really hope he gets the boot

I've been saying the same thing for years now...

If the US wants him... they will tag him in Australia. That's his last stop and they will pull his Passport.

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Apple to dump Intel CPUs from Macs for Arm – yup, the rumor that just won't die is back

Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC...Re: Stop Press!

Apple OSX is derived from Mach (micro kernel) that run NeXT-Step.

In terms of developer platform. I'd take a mac over a linux box but would still run the code on a cluster of linux boxes. There are a lot of things that the Mac gets right.

With respect to ARM vs Intel... The Arm chips could make sense if you're running something like a macbook air where all you need is enough power to run a web browser and some other stuff.

Where Intel comes in is when you want to run a lot of things at the same time or need a bit of CPU/GPU horse power and memory that you can't get via an ARM chip.

So for Macbook Pros, still need the intel chip.

That said... Intel needs the competition to continue to improve their chips.

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Leaked memo: No internet until you clean your bathroom, Ecuador told Julian Assange

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Saurman Re: @James O'Shea

There were 3 charges and 2 of them had their statutes of limitations run out.

The third charge still exists.

The Swedes could still want him, but I don't think its a high priority for them these days.

Assange may be a twat, but he's not stupid. If he can flee and can get out of the country (e.g. dye his hair brown and get on the chunnel to France using an Ecuadorian passport...) He won't say anything until he's well outside of UK's jurisdiction.

He'd then risk an extradition request for jumping bail, however I seriously doubt that they would do it or even a country attempt to honor it.

But no, he won't get out of the embassy without getting nabbed.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Flame

@SVV Re: Please, someone set up a GoFundMe

Huh?

Seriously?

You'd think the Embassy could provide those already.

Here I was about to up vote you because I thought you were going to do it to save the cat.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@James O'Shea

Not quite.

At this point, its not clear that Sweden will still want him. There's just a single charge and if put on trial, memories would have faded so Sweden may take a pass.

This doesn't stop the UK for enforcing the jumping bail. And they will do that since he's cost them a pretty penny in terms of overtime.

He 'walks out' or is dumped out, he will face UK music, then back to Australia. Then its up to Jeff Sessions to see if the US wants him or not.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@0laf Bzzzt!

First, had been arrested in Sweden before fleeing jurisdiction. He would have been sent back to Australia, long before any extradition request would have been sent. So bollocks to that.

Second, even if he had gone back to Sweden from the UK, again the UK could have nixed any extradition such that he would still have gone back to Australia when it was over.

That said, Australia would have handed him over 'toot sweet' [sic] Meaning that he was already arrested for hacking US systems while a kid so he has a record in Australia and the complaint would have been a second offense against the US. Not to mention the US and Australia are on good terms.

So if the US wanted him... they would get him via the Australian Government.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@RGE_Master ...

Actually, had he not fled, he would have been arrested, faced the charges and would have been tossed out of the country most likely not serving any jail time except for any time he would have spent while charged awaiting trial.

That's how cocked up this thing really is.

He's trying to play the role of a martyr yet had he stayed and faced the music, he would have been labeled a typical Aussie sexual predator / lout. End of story.

He would have been sent packing back to Australia and that would have been it.

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Decoding the Chinese Super Micro super spy-chip super-scandal: What do we know – and who is telling the truth?

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC Re: 'None of the actors can be taken at face value...

Your personal take of a false flag by the US is laughable and not even worthy of a B movie (direct to hulu) or something like that.

Look, Trump's beef w China and tariffs are more than just trade. He wants to apply pressure on NK.

At the same time... you don't even think about China's activities surrounding their man made island which they now have put military forces on and are claiming ownership over some oil fields that are supposed to be owned by Viet Nam (IIRC).[Note: I could be wrong about the other countries involved... going from memory]

I'd say that Bloomberg's reporting seems to be accurate consider ancillary factors going on.

Do you really bork a bunch of hardware over a firmware upgrade that has malware associated with it? Or do you just upgrade to a fixed release? Or go back to a prior release?

There's more, and what's interesting is which motherboards... blades.

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Sun billionaire Khosla discovers life's a beach after US Supreme Court refuses to hear him out

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

@ yank .. Re: Easements

I believe this falls under an easement appurtenant (That's the correct spelling)

Had to deal with an issue on this topic with my condo association.

IANAL, just spend too much time dealing with them...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @ Throatwarbler Mangrove Sauce for the goose...

I think in the court of public opinion, Khosla is a prick.

But to your point. I'd check the property lines. Usually you own up to the curb and the sidewalk crosses over the city's easement. You are responsible to keep it clean. If you live in an area where it snows... and you don't.... you can be hit with fines from the city, but more importantly if someone gets hurt... you will be sued and could lose. (Homeowners insurance usually covers this, YMMV)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Jake ... Re: @ Throatwarbler Mangrove Sauce for the goose...

How much did it cost your friend to get the case tossed? ;-)

Yeah, that's the thing.

Each time someone does something stupid... its going to cost your friend.

If your friend was as rich as Khosla he would be sued more times than not.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Mark Re: @ Throatwarbler Mangrove Sauce for the goose...

I think many missed what I was saying and focused on the legal liability...

The point was that Khosla's lawsuit dealt with easements and this is where he will lose.

(And has consistently lost. The beach (below tide) which is public property is 'land locked' (yeah I know about the water...) and thus an easement apprutenant ?sp? is required. (Meaning that you john doe, has the right to cross his land to get to the public beach because there is no other way to get there. )

His only legal objection deals with potential legal liability.

To your point, yes you can put up all the signs in the world, yet one slip and fall, you can bet your bottom dollar that a lawyer will suddenly appear and sue Khosla. Even if its frivolous, there's a cost.

While the city should annex the path via eminent domain, Khosla demanded too much money.

Here the city would have to sue Khosla to get the land at a more reasonable price. Khosla is the type of guy to push it where he's going to spend more on legal costs than the land is actually worth, just to be a bully. (His ego needs the win.)

Like I said, the issue is complicated.

In general, for all property owners, there can be some legal liability when you have easements for the public on your land. But for the most part. in general, most land owners aren't dicks.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@ Throatwarbler Mangrove Re: Sauce for the goose...

Not exactly.

Its a bit more complicated than that.

Yes you are correct about the 1976 law. However... here's the rub. He owns the surrounding land and its a bay. Going from memory, there's an out cropping on either side so he owns all of the shore such that there is no way to get to the mean tide line without crossing over his property. Its not like they could walk along the tide line and enter the bay.

That law isn't being challenged or in question.

Now going from memory, the lawsuit deals with easements. And while his expensive lawyers can try to be creative, they have an uphill battle trying to argue against the fact that there is an easement even though there was no actual easement recorded.

He lost and now has lost his appeals.

But here's the thing.

One has to ask about his liability for anyone who crosses on the easement and trips and falls. Can he be sued?

Thats an issue to be figured out...

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Holy macaroni! After months of number-crunching, behold the strongest material in the universe: Nuclear pasta

Ian Michael Gumby
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Joke

Re: Talk to Larry Niven...

Yes. Were he to enter in to the US illegally, I'd call him an illegal alien.

Extraterrestrial ? Yes to that too.

IIRC other species could become Pak due to the bacteria found in the root. I'll have to re-read Ringworld Engineers some time when I get the chance. FFS I think its been over 15 years since I read that.

BTW, Larry Niven is on LinkedIn. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Talk to Larry Niven...

They were aliens.

Read all of his stories regarding the Protector and the Pak.

Aliens also meaning extraterrestrial as well as a different species.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Alien

Talk to Larry Niven...

Can you say Ringworld? Ringworld Engineers?

I get that while Larry Niven’s stories had discussed this material, these guys actually simulated it. BTW, good luck in trying to mine it... ;-)

But I have to ask... the simulation is based on the material as it is within a Neutron Star, or assuming that they could actually manufacture or mine it... would it react the same outside of the effects of a Neutron Star? Would it lose its liquidity?

Alien because of the Pak Protector reference.

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Google goes bilingual, Facebook fleshes out translation and TensorFlow is dope

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: Google Assistant is bilingual

Written or oral?

Right now if you have good Thai to English and English to Tamil, or Welsh, You can translate. You don't need to go direct, but to an intermediate universal language.

But to your point. You need to take it in context.

Where you have trouble is understanding idioms or slang expressions that are based on cultural contexts.

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