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* Posts by Ian Michael Gumby

3928 posts • joined 11 Apr 2006

The e-waste warrior, 28,000 copied Windows restore discs, and a fight to stay out of jail

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: @pip25 ... Oh, come on

Did you not read the next sentence?

This was probably done to avoid the expense of a long trial.

Yest M$ will sue you in to submission.

How many people have a spare 25-30K (USD) lying around to make a frivolous lawsuit go away?

That's just for starters.

If he went to court and was found guilty of copyright infringement, he could end up owing $$$$$$$$$$$$

Remember those cases where a woman pirated a bunch of music a few years back? (Maybe a decade ago? )

The legal system is what it is. Like I said in my post, I've seen bad judges, lousy lawyers where I ended up having to write $$$ to get the issue resolved. Heck, I'm still involved in a case where I'm going to lose money even if I win and I have little recourse to recoup those losses because it will cost me more than its worse and its a gamble.

Its not corruption. Its the system.

BTW, a neat trick... Lawyers will say whatever they want, even if its a lie. They'll merely say that they misspoke. Its only when its under oath that they won't lie if they suspect that they'll get caught.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Someone Re: Counterfeit packaging

His defense argued in the appeal that the license was real.

Imagine if you bought in bulk a purfume. Call it brand X.

You then got a bunch of empty brand C perfume bottles, cleaned them up and then refilled them with brand X perfume you bought in bulk.

Its the real product, in the real package only you recycled it.

Did you break the law?

The perfume is real. The product is in a real albeit recycled bottle / box. Or missing the box, and you sell it at a discount to the stuff in the factory box at a retail store. So what laws did you break?

And the sentencing does fit. There's a lot of leeway on what the judge can do here.

Welcome to the US legal system.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: "counterfeit goods"?

The argument is that regardless of the fact that he just restored the existing license on the PC with a clean new install, is he a licensed MS distributor?

So does he have the legal right to refurbish and sell a clean system with MS on it?

That's their argument... and his defense in the appeal is that he didn't counterfeit the license key but used a software tool to fix the existing machine and the legitimate software that was already there. Or so the argument goes.

Its not lunacy. Welcome to the US legal system.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@pip25 ... Re: Oh, come on

Wow.

The defense raises an interesting argument. I mean really compelling.

With respect to your comment, the judges are regular people and understand the law but will often make stupid decisions. (I know from first hand experience.) There is nothing magical and mystical about a judge.

In addition, its also who makes the more compelling argument in court. Keep in mind the guy pleaded guilty to copyright infringement. This was probably done to avoid the expense of a long trial.

At the same time... the appellate judge may still say no, depending on the argument raised by the prosecution, and then it would have to then be appealed at the state supreme court to hear these arguments.

Common sense is still common sense. To be fair, look around you. How many people do you see who make mistakes and ignore common sense?

I hope this guy gets off. But I'm sure there's more to the case than the compelling argument.

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Hot NAND: Samsung wheels out 30TB SSD monster

Ian Michael Gumby
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@Baldrickk Re: nate1981

You have a laptop that can fit a 2.5" disk?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Adam 52

What are you trying to do?

If I want to set up a fast data response.... that would be 3 x 2TB NVMe.

On a single node that's 6TB of raw fast disk.

Then you have 5 open SATA slots. You can put slower larger HDDS, or SSDs (4TB) which would be slower. I would rather use SSDs because 5x4 = 20TB raw space which is enough. You can get 8TB HDDs which is currently the sweet spot. Larger HDDs exist like 10 or 12 TB but you pay a premium. The other issue is the amount of heat and energy used by the HDDs.

So when you're limited by the number of M.2 slots, you will end up paying a premium for the higher density. Note, I would end up using 2 of the SATA SSDs mirrored for the OS and not boot from NVMe. While that may seem counter intuitive... my pcs run Linux and run 24x7x365.

Keep in mind... 2010 Hadoop clusters had 1 or 2 U boxes w 4 Hot Swap 3.5" SATA / SAS . 2 CPUs w 8 cores or 16 threads. (Xeon E5s) Drives were 2 or 4 TB depending on your budget.

Now you have a single CPU w 18 cores == 36 virtual cores. which would mean 4-5 older servers.

When you consider that... it puts things in perspective.

And yes, I'm not running a PC game on these machines. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Facepalm

@Kain preacher ... Re: Where to buy? No price!

Uhm really?

Your link is to a 4TB drive.

Not the 15TB or anything close to that.

I can get 4TB drives and 2TB M.2 drives.

Man, I have to ask... how many here play with PBs of data?

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Backup

Geez, I love how these 'experts' who don't work with data at scale talk about taking snapshots and backups.

News flash... Hadoop has been around for 10 years now. You don't take backups of hadoop clusters. you take snapshots and xfer the data to another cluster. The cluster's resiliency and backup to another cluster is it. What, you're going to back up to tape? Really? As someone with half a shred of thought points that its not the incremental backup that takes time.. but the restoring of the data.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

I don't know why I was down voted. LUKs is a OS feature. And yes, it takes CPU cycles. Hardware encryption would be different and I agree its not there. But its possible to add and based on the anticipated price point... not that expensive.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

SSD Pricing...

The smallest footprint is the M.2 NVMe cards which currently max out at 2TB and cost as much as most PCs. (Microcenter's in house specials)

Those cards are about $1250 apiece (give or take).

The new motherboards have 3 M.2 slots so you can put 3TB raw of fast storage, then 5 or so SATA III drives.

This would allow for tiered storage on a pc using an i9 chip w 12-14 cores. Going higher would be a waste because your PC is limited to 128GB of memory. Now you have a machine that if properly configured would cost about 12K but would be able to act as a server with enough horse power to do some serious work. Unlike servers that are 1U and 2U in height for racks, I can put these in custom cases and water cool them for quiet running. (Silent running means low TDP chips <= 65Watts ) [Add in a large 120mm or larger case fan running w a lower RPM, ~20-27db noise range to keep the air moving for memory and SSDs]

Note: This may sound expensive, but when you consider the horsepower today versus building out a cluster of lower powered servers with the same power... its a wash. Less noise, heat and power.

There's a lot you can do with a small cluster of these machines.. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Mushroom

Where to buy? Re: No price!

Try buying anything > 4TB SSD drives.

They may exist but they aren't hitting distributors and open markets. Looks like its OEM sales directly to big vendors only. (IBM, HPE, etc... ) The largest SSD/NVMe drive on the market for business or consumer purchase is 4TB.

The flame isn't for you or anyone here, but for Samsung and others talking about products yet not available to anyone outside of the major players.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Backup

The short answer... you don't. You look at distributed file systems where the data is replicated across the cluster and then replicated to a back up cluster.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@AC

Luks would be for encryption at rest and can be applied to any drive. Were they to do anything about encryption, it would mean adding some hardware to do the encryption of the disk within the disk.

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Hyperoptic's overkill 10Gbps fibre trial 'more than a clever PR stunt'

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Well you need individual fibres anyhow...

Huh?

Few people care about >1 GBit downstream, the bottleneck usually is the upstream.

Sorry but that is BS. Most residential users want faster downstream because they are cutting the cord and are streaming video. So in a family of 4, most likely you have 4 people in 4 rooms streaming video and/or music.

In terms of upstream... it depends on what you're doing. But those people are fewer...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@AC Re: @DougS Fiber backhaul to cell tower

No, I didn't forget that.

The cost of laying the fiber for the cell tower is cost prohibitive when you compare it against a point to point connection via microwave connections.

I thought that was obvious.

In terms of even pulling fiber in the city... we had an issue where we rent space for a cell tower on our condo building. They wanted to add fiber but rather than use the existing conduit owned by Ameritech, they wanted to go through a different wall and then run the fiber in the open in our garage space. I was able to nix it, and they went back and did a deal with Ameritech to use their conduit.

I personally would love to have fiber to my unit. I could easily pull fiber to each room. While I don't even own a 4K TV I would love to have a high bandwidth throughout the house and in my SOHO lab. The only problem is that most of my older machines don't have 10GbE so it would be a short term waste.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@DougS Re: Fiber backhaul to cell tower

Actually if you can't get fiber to the house then you most likely won't see fiber to the tower. That's pretty much a given. (Hint, you have to run the fiber and that's the expensive part. So you can run multiple fibers for the same price offering both telco and consumer fiber.)

In much of the rural US you will see cell towers with microwave point to point antennas to handle the communication from the cell to carrier.

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IBM's chief diversity officer knows too much and must be stopped!

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Korev Re: Future employer

Yup. Even if the clause is enforceable, its rarely ever used.

The issue is that for some companies they are introducing you to their customer. Its written in to many contracts as an 'anti-poaching' clause.

The reason companies loathe to enforce it...

1) You're worth X, the relationship of customer is worth Y*X where Y is > 1.

2) Its a punitive measure. Meaning they spend $$$ to stop you from working at said client where they will never collect enough in damages to make it worth their while.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @Arthur the cat ... This isn't that unusual in the U.S.

If you don't sign the new agreement, you're gone.

So you had to make the choice of staying or leaving... its easier to stay and then plan your exit than deal with a sudden exit.

As to the lawsuit.

That was predictable. Because you worked for them and are now creating a competing product? Its a given you'll get sued. The lawsuit had merit and a given. You should have anticipated it. That's not to say that you would not be successful, you were, but that the lawsuit was predictable. (Yes, it sucks, welcome to America where lawyers can be found under any rock... )

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Easy solution for IBM -

You do realize that they already did it, right.

When IBM has you sign a separate employee agreement, its usually tied to additional compensation which is what makes the contract binding. So if she got a promotion... and they hand her this contract... that's enough.

Now she could have gone to a lot of different companies except those specifically listed. No lawsuit no gardening period.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Arthur the cat ... Re: This isn't that unusual in the U.S.

Sigh.

You should have signed it.

There are a couple of clauses you need to pay attention to... the one where if a clause is deemed unenforceable, only that paragraph is voided and the rest of the contract is still valid.

Second if that paragraph is unenforceable, and they attempt to sue... especially in the UK, you are going to be made whole. (Loser pays) Also IBM and other companies attempt to use the paragraph to intimidate you. Meaning if you left, and went to work for a competitor or another company they deemed a competitor or customer... they will have their lawyers send you a harassing letter.

You can then tell them to pound sand and ignore it.

Like I said in a response to an earlier post... the regular IBM contract's non-compete is overly broad. You have a right to work in your field. If you had to sign a separate contract ... with consideration paid to you... and that clause wasn't overly broad... they can and will sue you.

Now... in your case... specifically to your case... you claimed to be working on a piece of software that your old company was working on. They could sue you for IP theft if your new work was based on anything taken from the old company. (e.g. notes, docs or code) You're a direct competitor.

Again YMMV and your lawsuit was not an issue of a non-compete clause.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: This isn't that unusual in the U.S.

While the non-compete is common, however how enforceable the clause is... depends on a lot of things.

First the wording... does it present you from your right to work?

Second the length of term of the non-compete.

Your Jimmy Johns example is bunk. Not that I doubt the clause is in there.. but that it would be held enforceable.

(Yes, I did work for the borg. I did have to sign a second contract where the clause was enforceable. And yes, I talked with a lawyer who is familiar with IBM and gave me the straight dope. )

I've seen and signed many other contracts with non-competes. Bottom line, if the non-compete is enforceable, and you sign it... you should honor it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Neil Barnes Re: Just a little question

It depends... did she already start work at Microsoft or not? If not, then she's not getting paid.

If she already started to work for Microsoft... they may still be paying her while this works itself out in court.

However... here's the rub.

If you're a rank and file employee, there's a clause in your contract that basically prohibits you from working for anyone who's a customer of IBM. This clause is overly broad and isn't enforceable since you have a right to work and earn a living.

Some employees are asked to sign a different contract. (Usually when you come in from an acquisition and they hand you a retention package, you get that contract.) Here, they have a paragraph that prohibits only a couple of companies that are considered competitors. This paragraph is legal and binding. * The major difference is that you have the ability to go work for more than those companies. For me... I was prohibited from working for Oracle or Microsoft. Others could be different.

There are other cases between companies and they ended up settling out of court. The kicker is that most clauses are 6 months and by the time that you end up getting in to trial, the non-compete is up.

*There could be an issue with the term of non-compete. For me, it was 6 months. Here, it looks like a year. The courts may determine that the period is too long and that would invalidate the clause. YMMV depending on the lawyers and judge.

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Six things I learned from using the iPad Pro for Real Work™

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Baldrick Re: blast away

Its a bit unfair to assume the comparison against a desktop where you have the ability to handle the TDP by tossing a honking radiator on top of it with a large fan to push air to cool it. So no duh! He's comparing the iPad to a laptop.

Even here... iPad lacks fan so its still not a fair comparison.

One app / feature that the author missed... Duet.

I can use my iPad Pro 12.9" as a second monitor for my MacBook Pro while traveling.

In terms of work... I tend to use the iPad as my library with over 50 work related texts, or for downloading and watching movies while on a flight and I don't want to do any reading. Or emails when I can't take the laptop out. Also as a second terminal if I need to do a remote login. (Need to have the case with the keyboard for that to work. )

I do agree that the gestures and multi tasking is a bit bizarre. They changed it from a simple swipe then scrolling to find the second App, to something that doesn't seem to want to work. Lets hope they get it right. (Hint: add an on/off switch in the System Preferences for the app to select it to be in the list for second pane and got back to the original way )

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Yes, Assange, we'll still nick you for skipping bail, rules court

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Scorochoi!! Re: Schrödinger's Embassy

No need.

He's slowly killing himself by staying in the embassy. Its a self imposed prison.

The embassy can at any time tell him to leave.

So he goes to jail in the UK. He gets set out of the country. I don't see the UK letting him go to Ecuador. He's been a total prat and has given the UK a black eye. Note: Its possible a liberal judge who doesn't like Trump will let him go to Ecuador.

And of course... unless they are transporting him like a prisoner... (most likely not) Unless there's a direct flight from the UK to Australia, he'll most likely have to get off the plane. There, he can get off and switch to a different plane on a flight to Ecuador. Even here, he may face some challenges, but still its possible to do it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Troll Feeder Re: Schrödinger's Embassy

At this time, the US has made no indication that they want Assange.

If he walks out... he will be taken in to custody by the UK and will have to deal with jumping bail.

That's it.

When he does his time, pays his fine... its up to the UK to determine what to do with him.

They will most likely toss him from the UK and put him on a plane to Australia.

If they are nice... they may let him get on a plane to Ecuador. (Most likely not)

So he goes to Australia.

Here... the Australians can take his passport away. Now that he has an Ecuadorian passport, he might be able to leave before the US decides that they want him. The Australian Government is more than likely willing to send him to the US considering his conviction while a teen for hacking US government systems.

That's most likely where he'll get nabbed.

The bottom line... he's not going to be staying there much longer.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Sparty ... Re: "arguably wrong"

This actually wasn't a waste of money.

Its really more of a sign that Assange is getting tossed of the couch in the embassy.

It was a long shot and worth the gamble. If he won... he walks out, boards a flight to Ecuador.

If he loses... he has to figure out his next move.

He had to know it was a long shot.

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Assange fails to make skipped bail arrest warrant vanish

Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: @AC ... @Jimmy Page He needs to show that he had reasonable cause to jump bail

I don't know if there's a size limit on a diplomatic pouch. ;-)

So stuff him in to one...

I don't know how well it would fly, but you get the idea.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Thumb Up

@Winky Re: Ian Michael Gumby A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Touche!

And it gets to the heart of the matter.

Had to upvote you for that.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Kain ... Re: @Scorchio! A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

I think that was implied. The point was that the UK could say get out and leave never to come back. Or they could say... you came to us on an Aussie passport, so back to Australia you go.

Most likely they'll send him back to Australia who has to take him...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Black Helicopters

Re: I assume...

yeah. He's still there.

Mk1? In the US that could either be a US Optics / Leupold / Nightforce scope sitting on a nice .308 tactical rifle, or something similar. :-)

Not that they'll shoot. Just watching and waiting...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Trollface

@AC ... Re: @Jimmy Page He needs to show that he had reasonable cause to jump bail

When I was in the UK (London) I walked by the area, not really knowing that was where he was hiding. I saw a bobby standing around... just thought it was normal since that was Embassy row.

They can sneak him out into an embassy car, so it can't be searched. But what then? Put him in a burlap sack marked as a diplomatic pouch? The watch him get loaded on a diplomatic jet and flown away?

I mean its possible, but I really can't see that happening.

What I could see happening is the staff packing his bags, putting him in a car, tricking him in to believing its an embassy car, then dropping a dime on his arse as he's on his way to London City airport.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@Scorchio! Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Long time no see. :-)

There are two things.

If Assange surrenders for jumping bail, it gives Sweden time to see if they still want him. Assuming that they don't, then the UK will toss him back to Australia. Technically they can send him anywhere but because he's been a tool and cost the UK $$$$$ in police hours... They'll most likely toss him back to Australia.

What happens next is going to be interesting.

1) Will Australia let him out?

Australia can take his Aussie passport away.

2) Will they allow him to leave using his Ecuador passport?

If he does, could the Aussies bar him from returning? He's no longer traveling on an Aussie passport ...

3) Does the US really want him?

So far nothing has popped up, but that doesn't matter.

If the US wants him... they'll nail him in Australia when he lands. No chance to clear customs and jump a flight to Ecuador ...

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@macjules Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

If memory serves, two of the charges have past their statute of limitations. If only Sweden allowed to be charged in abstentia... then all would be right in the world.

The third charge had a longer statute of limitations so he could theoretically be on the hook for that. However as time goes on... the victims will want to put this behind them if they haven't already and move on.

So the likelihood of Sweden grabbing him? Less and Less each day. Assange knows this. His bet is that if he can get the UK to drop the jumping bail charges, he can scurry out of the Embassy to Ecuador before anyone is the wiser and laugh at everyone. If he goes to the UK for jumping bail... it gives time for the Swedes to consider their options.

The US won't touch him in the UK. They will wait until he's back in Australia. You can bet the UK won't let him choose where he goes when he gets the boot. He's going back to mama.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Ugh

The UK has had to expend serious money to post a guard on the embassy in case he tries to flee yet again.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Jimmy Page Re: He needs to show that he had reasonable cause to jump bail

Did he?

Sure. He wanted to avoid going to Sweden to face Rape Charges. If found guilty... he'd pretty much have been banned from most of Europe. (That and for being a prat)

But that's not enough to get the bail jumping tossed.

Note: He went to court 3 times to get the EAW rejected. He lost 0-3.

He then jumped bail.

Now he's going to face time in the UK prison system and then sent packing to Australia.

Note: While he has an Ecuadorian passport, he entered the UK as a Aussie so that's where he's going to be sent packing. (BTW, that's where his dear old mum resides and she plead to the Brits to allow her son to come home...)

The best thing for Assange is to get the Ecuadorian Staff to help sneak him out and on to a private flight out of the country. But most likely someone would snitch and he'd be caught. (No longer an Ecuadorian issue...) ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Big Brother

@ Ben ... Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Just a nit... being a grammar Nazi... the word is regardless not irregardless. ;-)

But I digress.

If the US wants him, they will nail him in Australia and not in the UK. The Aussies will gladly hand him over without the red tape.

Assange will then be forced to talk about what he knows about the DNC hack and who his source really was in exchange for a lighter sentence over his alleged involvement in the Manning hack. (Why did you think he was afraid of the US in the first place? ) [See Manning's Article 32 hearing transcripts. ]

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Ian Michael Gumby
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@amanfrom Mars Re: A Flagrant Rotten Denial of Justice and a Blot in the UKGBNI Landscape

Still not taking your meds? ;-)

The law is that if someone posts bond, you do a runner, you're guilty of jumping bail and they forfeit the bail money.

You get caught, you're going straight to jail and do your time for jumping bail, regardless if everything else pans out.

Assange created his own mess. Now he has to live with it.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

@Remeses

Great, as long as you can pay for their services and the endless supply of condoms...

Yeah the argument is flawed.

The underlying argument is "how would you like this to go away and the tosser to leave and to never be allowed to come back in to the country?"

Assange is destined to lose. He out hid the charges against him in Sweden, but I don't know if there's a statute for jumping bail.

He could just turn himself in and actually get better accommodations. Note: It would be a down grade except that he'll now have access to an outside yard and free medical benefits.

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US broadband is scarce, slow and expensive. 'Great!' says the FCC

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: 25 up, 3 down

Sounds like you're using AT&T. :-(

Look, lets put this in perspective.

Back in 1994, if you wanted internet connection, you needed at a minimum a 56KB leased line which would cost you roughly $400 a month. (one class C subnet network) If you had a T1, the minimum cost would be $1,000.00 USD per month (Both on a 24 month minimum contract)

Moving forward a decade... that 56KB moved up to a T1 for the same price.

Moving forward another decade, you can get 'broadband speed', 5 static IPs , for less that that $400.00

The point is that you can get faster internet today for relatively less than you would have had to pay 20+ years ago.

Is the US lagging? for sure.

Comcast has been telling me that they've upgraded the service that I am contracted to use. Ok great.

(BTW, I'm Comcast Biz because I need static IPs and 24/7 'support'. )

If I were in a rural area... I would be SOL because my farm is too far out for cable and modem speed would be too crappy. I'd have to erect a 75ft to 100 ft antenna and set up a point to point connection to the local telco in town. Not cheap, and I'd have to see how to get it subsidized from the local telco which collects rural broadband fund taxes from everyone.

So its a mixed bag.

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Hortonworks accuses ex-sales bod of stealing customers for new job

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Meh

Happens all the time.

Reps switch companies and of course take their rolodex and personal relationships with them. A good sales rep for Hortonworks will crush Snowflake. It all depends on how they sold HWX / hadoop in the first place.

Hortonworks is crying over the fact that they didn't have a strong enough relationship w customers.

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Julian Assange to UK court: Put an end to my unwarranted Ecuadorean couch-surf

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Oh do fuck off.

Assanage?

Here's his future...

He's going to be leaving the Embassy one way or another. We know its getting close because his lawyer is crying about the jumping bail charge. He already has an Ecuadorian passport and the thing is that he'll argue that he shouldn't be sent back to Australia but to Ecuador.

The UK will most likely deal with him and send him back to Australia because that was the passport he used while entering the country. That's what scares Assange the most. He's still an Aussie citizen. If the US wants him... that's where he's most vulnerable if the US wants him.

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: The guy is a wanker...

Bzzt.

Assange is a friggin drama queen.

Publishing the leak is somewhat protected. There's a SCOTUS case that offers some protection.

That's not what's worrying him.

He jumped bail and he's going to end up either being tossed out or have to go to a hospital and then get arrested and sent back to Australia.

The truth... many countries will close their boarders to him over his antics.

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Sili-spurned Valley! No way, San Jose! Amazon snubs SF Bay Area in search for HQ2 city

Ian Michael Gumby
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Boffin

Re: Labor is the key.

Taxes?

When you consider cost of living and cost of talent... not much different than Seattle. Even our local brew has improved. (Including distilled beverages)

Taxes can go down if you get rid of Madigan

What you're missing is transportation. As to high tech talent... You can get OSU grads to come to Chicago... but how many Big10 grads, or Univ of Chicago grads want to go to Cowlumbus?

(Free clue, I had a cowbell that I picked up at a Clippers game... ;-)

There's more I can say, but Chicago is a much better option when you consider transportation and logistics. (When you fly in to Cowlumbus... its not going to be a direct flight. Chicago... it usually is. ;-)

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Ian Michael Gumby
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Re: Get rid of Madigan and fix the pension issue, and we'll be back to normal.

Crime?

If you take away the gang banging its not that bad. More riff raff all over downtown Seattle than in Chicago.

In Chicago, there are a couple of neighborhoods you avoid. If Amazon comes in... you'll see river west, river north, and wicker park boom and beyond. Already River North has a lot of construction of housing going on... its getting to the point where its faster to walk or take the EL and then walk to get around in some areas. (Or ride a bike, but I usually travel less than 3 miles so walking is better)

The only rash of crimes are the increase of car jackings. But that's getting under control.

Oh and if you want, you can live in the burbs then take Metra. I have a lot of friends who do this.

Madigan is worse than the crime issue. Besides at least now we have CCW permits.

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Sloppy Reporting...

Just to add... in El Reg's defense... several other major news organizations also didn't comment on Chicago.

(That could be a good thing.)

Bezos is a Blue man and will probably pick a blue state. California, Illinois, NY are the bluest state.

Toronto is out... think about all of the border crossings when you have to visit the office. The border agents will constantly harass you about why you're going to Toronto and try to see if you're doing any sales business there. (Which means tax revenue...)

Atlanta? Traffic sucks. Talent? Meh, there's some.

Chicago has Google, Groupon, and others. (Boeing, United, Allstate, McDonalds, Miller Brewing, ... )

Get rid of Madigan and fix the pension issue, and we'll be back to normal.

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: I'll take a Punt

Austin?

Traffic sucks.

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Indy!

Sorry mate.

Chicago.

What do you do in Downtown Indy after 5?

Its like most cities in the midwest. All of the 'burbs look the same and the city shuts down after 5.

Indy, Cleveland, Columbus, Cincy... all the same.

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge
Flame

Sloppy Reporting...

Got to flame El Reg.

Sorry guys but you talk about 19 of the 20 cities leaving out Chicago.

In terms of cities... Chicago has a lot going for it. I know where four of the potential sites are and I live very close to one of them (Walking distance to most of them, albeit not a walk I would want to take in the frozen cold or heavy rain. )

In terms of commuting to work... You can live anywhere in Chicagoland (Chicago and surrounding suburbs, including Indiana) get to downtown via car, rail (Metra), or the EL. Or bike even. You have high tech companies as well as several tech incubators in the city. And O'Hare is a major airport w Midway for some flights too. So transportation isn't an issue.

The only 'red flag' is Illinois' state government. Get rid of Mike Madigan and his daughter, and you will see the necessary changes flow thru the State's government.

If you can stomach real seasons, its not that bad. We don't fold when it snows and we don't have threats of Hurricanes. (Or earthquakes.)

Its not just the local schools, but Chicago draws on talent from across the Midwest.

Cowlumbus isn't bad, but not the same as Chicago. Indy? Meh.

So why didn't El Reg mention Chicago? Only one reference on the page and its in the list.

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Who's using 2FA? Sweet FA. Less than 10% of Gmail users enable two-factor authentication

Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

Re: SMS 2FA shouldn't even count as "security"

I have to call BS on the AC posts.

2FA may use SMS txts. BTW you can set your phone to not show texts on your lock screen....

But you can download DUO or Google's tool for setting up 2FA Then you have to only have your phone handy with you.

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Ian Michael Gumby
Silver badge

@AC Re: Not Surprised

There are few good reasons not to use 2FA (and I can't think of any outside of, possibly, some for users with disabilities)

huh?

If you are disabled and can use a computer, then you can use a phone app to do the 2FA key.

But yeah, I'm one of the 10% who does it on my active gmail accounts.

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