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* Posts by Paul Crawford

3647 posts • joined 15 Mar 2007

Good news: AI could solve the pension crisis – by triggering a nuclear apocalypse by 2040

Paul Crawford
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Holy Quarrel

Like the Philip K Dick story?

https://philipkdickreview.wordpress.com/2014/06/17/holy-quarrel/

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Astroboffins discover the stink of eggy farts wafting from Uranus

Paul Crawford
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Where the Sun don't shine

...on Gemini filters the sunlight reflected above the clouds in Uranus’ atmosphere into spectral lines...

Well done to those boffins for finding that, contrary to common public opinion, the Sun does shine on Uranus.

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Bungling cops try to use dead chap's fingers to unlock his smartmobe

Paul Crawford
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Re: Animation

Well its a poor necromancer who blames the corpse...

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Tech bribes: What's the WORST one you've ever been offered?

Paul Crawford
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Re: Probably...

You hope its a taste of things to come?

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Nominet drains mug of tea, leans back, calmly explains how to make Whois GDPR-compliant

Paul Crawford
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Re: I would agree with only LEAs having full access

On the other hand whether paid-access-for-others stands up might depend on whether the domain owners opt in?

INAL but I think it should not - after all the right to privacy is not something to be sold without consent. LEA are a different matter, some would say they should get a warrant, others might feel that whois data is not so personal as to need that for a general look-up. Getting other data like IP addresses of those making contact, etc, is another matter.

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OK, this time it's for real: The last available IPv4 address block has gone

Paul Crawford
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Re: BT

Did BT also update all of their supplied modems, etc, to work with IPv6?

Genuine question, as I'm on VM and last time I looked (admittedly a year or two ago) my cable modem with IPv4 only.

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Machines learned to assemble IKEA’s semi-disposable furniture

Paul Crawford
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Re: @Ledswinger

I think there's only certain tools that qualify for "real man" status

Yes, and that type of tool is made by Abingdon King Dick

http://www.kingdicktools.co.uk/index.asp

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Paul Crawford
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Re: Not the real world

Real men have tool boxes!

Some even keep tools in them.

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Size does matter, chaps: Oversized todgers an evolutionary handicap

Paul Crawford
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Trollface

And in.

And out.

And in.

...

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Guess who's still most moaned about UK ISP... Rhymes with BorkBork

Paul Crawford
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Re: I miss Demon Internet

You mean before they were bought our and ruined?

Like practically every other decent small ISP?

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US government weighs in on GDPR-Whois debacle, orders ICANN to go probe GoDaddy

Paul Crawford
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To be honest, why should the rest of the world comply with a law Europe has developed. Why should the US, Asia anyone else?

Maybe because they want to do business with companies and people in the EU?

Otherwise they are free to do as their local laws demand, but just not to deal with EU customers.

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More than 87m Facebook profiles farmed, says second ex-Cambridge Analytica witness

Paul Crawford
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Very true - simply nullifying a vote on the basis that some dodgy dealings allegedly* took place is a very risky idea and sounds a lot like certain tin-pot dictators do when general/presidential elections are held.

However, using such dodgy dealings as a reason for holding a 2nd democratic vote once people have seen more, and making sure that any illegal actions are prevented, that is another matter altogether.

[*] as we have not had a court trial yet, etc.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: "because, as upper class Brits, they did not want to front up the deal"

Try the phrase "getting your hands dirty"

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India completes its GPS alternative, for the second time

Paul Crawford
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I suspect it is much less about guiding neuks to terminal global warming and much more about mitigating the major economic costs of the loss of precision navigation and timing. Few folk realise how much we take for granted would go TITSUP in the event of prolonged GPS outage (like mobile phone networks and digital TV, etc, and the services that rely upon them) to other things that do have fall-back options but less efficient/safe (like ship navigation and air traffic control).

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'Well intentioned lawmakers could stifle IoT innovation', warns bug bounty pioneer

Paul Crawford
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Re: Easiest solution

For the legion of commentards on El Reg, yes. But then all of the rest of the population they will still buy "oh shiny thing!" and we still suffer from the botnets and friends & family pestering us to sort out the shit storm they have brought upon the digital world.

So really you have to make the manufacturers somehow responsible with enough clout that they act.

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Paul Crawford
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Make the supplier / importer responsible for the consequences of bugs that remain unpatched after, say, 1 month and for 5 years after end of sale. I'm sure it would focus minds on security and patching systems beautifully.

As for stifling innovation, at what point is collateral damage sufficient to stop marketing muppets from adding ill-thought out and supported features? Financial pain is probably the only incentive. Or jail time.

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UK rocket-botherers rattle SABRE, snaffle big bucks

Paul Crawford
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Re: Satellites

The main "punishment" the UK will get is a result of stupid politicians and those who voted from them. You don't need to punish someone who is beating themselves so effectively.

But otherwise you probably are right in terms of future job losses, just not in terms of the real reason.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: jw@resthaven.org.uk

Also you have used less fuel in the initial stage with maximum launch mass and highest air resistance. I suspect that leads to a huge increase in payload/cost ratio.

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What most people think it looks like when you change router's admin password, apparently

Paul Crawford
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Re: "why would you use your own?"

Dozens of reasons: your own control of firmware, no back-doors, ability to set up different wifi networks for guest and own use, custom firewall rules, maybe running a VPN end point in it, etc, etc.

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Fear the Reaper: Man hospitalised after eating red hot chilli pepper

Paul Crawford
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Gimp

"You eat one, suffer a bit, recover and 10min later your brain is telling you to eat some more."

Sounds a bit like visiting a dominatrix =>

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UK.gov expected to quit controversial harvesting of schoolchildren's nationality data

Paul Crawford
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Re: Rotated children

Just ask them - the hips don't lie

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VMs: Imperfect answers to imperfect problems, but they're all we have

Paul Crawford
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Hardware Obsolecence

Another very good reason for VM use is to get round the lack of drivers for ancient OS to match modern hardware. In many cases you can get "immortal" hardware as the VM sees little if any changes to the machine upon which it runs.

Of course one would not want to use an out of date OS, but in the real world you may well have some very expensive / difficult to replace software that works just fine on wk2 for example, but would be way too much cost/trouble to replace and run on a current OS.

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Azure needs extra security controls before it's fit for government use, says Australia

Paul Crawford
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Re: "additional configuration and security controls"

I wondered if this has anything to do with the odious CLOUD act and the Aussies wanting to be damn sure Uncle Sam can't extract data without them knowing.

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They're back! 'Feds only' encryption backdoors prepped in US by Dems

Paul Crawford
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Re: The ultimate vapour-ware

And a little salt

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Paul Crawford
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So at what point will legislation force all public servants and politicians to use the "magical" proposed system and only the proposed system?

After all if it is secure and never going to be abused then they have nothing to worry about and surely will be delighted.

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There's security – then there's barbed wire-laced pains in the arse

Paul Crawford
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Re: Conflicting Advice

OK so lets say you force your users to change passwords every 30 days, and even more assume this does not lead to piss-poor practice in terms of post-it notes, easy-to-guess choices or IT support getting lax in terms of vetting those requesting a reminder/renewal: Now you have an average time from breach to password change of 15 days.

Do you really think that any competent bad guys won't have totally screwed your systems in under 15 days? Not put in shadow accounts and/or key-logging software? Not used network access to compromise all those unpatched* devices you don't/can't have AV on like printers, IoT crap, etc?

So how much more useful is this compared to password changes one per year or only on employee changes or suspected breaches?

[*] when did you last get an update for any of your printers with built-in web servers?

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Apple, if you want to win in education, look at what sucks about iPads

Paul Crawford
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Re: Walled Kindergarten

The name is Bond, Basildon Bond.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: @AC

"People also moan when kids show no interest in STEM subjects"

I doubt that arsing about with animated emojiis is going to make anyone interested in STEM.

Taking said expensive iPads apart, now that might get some interest...

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Politicos whining about folks' data rights ought to start closer to home

Paul Crawford
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Re: It's just data warehousing all over again

For some reason I read that as "whore housing"

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Why you shouldn't trust a stranger's VPN: Plenty leak your IP addresses

Paul Crawford
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Re: IPv6

You really should be checking your config, etc. Sadly IPv6 leaks are all too common: many VPNs simply disable v6 as a quick solution to that issue.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: WebRTC

The usual VPN check sites such as https://ipleak.net/ already report on WebRTC activity.

But as you say, who really uses it?

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Brit Lords start peer-to-peer wrangling over regulating the internet

Paul Crawford
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Re: Oh no ...

And how is that different from the house of commons?

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Please no Basic Instinct flashing, HPE legal eagles warn staffers

Paul Crawford
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Coat

Ah yes, my kilt worn* the traditional way.

Thanks, mine is the Prince Charlie jacket =>

[*] of course when a Scotsman is asked what is worn beneath his kilt the correct answer is "Nothing, its all in perfect working order".

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Uber self-driving car death riddle: Was LIDAR blind spot to blame?

Paul Crawford
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The question being asked as fsck-all to do with why she chose to cross there, or it being night time. The key point is the car totally failed to see her and make any attempt to stop.

Uber execs should be facing jail time for this: they have shown the sort of negligence in design and system testing that lead to a death. Having some low-paid meatbag sit there with the hope of taking over in the event of a fault is something already ridiculed in tech circles such as El Reg, and yet that seems to be their approach to checking the sensor system could detect all reasonable risks.

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Did the FBI engineer its iPhone encryption court showdown with Apple to force a precedent? Yes and no, say DoJ auditors

Paul Crawford
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Joke

Re: useful idiots in politics

Come now! All good politicians know that π=22/7

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Fed up with Facebook data slurping? Firefox has a cunning plan

Paul Crawford
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Re: While Facebook Container may help a bit, it has limitations.

No, this is still very important because some people actually do different things on facebook compared to the rest of the web they access.

Yes, I know that is a strange idea that there are people who won't spunk their entire life and thoughts on the modern idiot-box replacement, but it is apparently true. By locking out cookie / "like button" tracking they are making a good start.

Next think they should be addressing is browser fingerprinting. Just how much information is really needed to make a usable web site interaction? My guess is very little compared to what is currently offered, so they should stop reporting non-generic stuff like installed fonts, plugins, display size, etc. While some info might be useful, having only a dozen or so browser permutations from Firefox would be a major step forward in terms of privacy and a useful selling point over Google/MS offerings.

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Fatal driverless crash: Radar-maker says Uber disabled safety systems

Paul Crawford
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Re: The Shape of Things to Come...

"So you want to make a life-saving technology too expensive to use?"

I think we have just seen it doing quite the opposite.

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Paul Crawford
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Re: The Shape of Things to Come...

"why do you think autonomous vehicles would be any different?"

Because those behind it should be facing jail time for injury or death unless they can show the highest standards for safety-critical code. You know, like the aviation industry does.

What, that will make it too expensive to get rid of human taxi drivers?

Sadly we have reached the point where software suppliers/licensor/whatever need to be held to account for a shitty job. Just now they can fob off all sorts of liability under the EULA, but cars are different - they actually do kill people when it goes wrong as we are sadly now discussing.

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What the @#$%&!? Microsoft bans nudity, swearing in Skype, emails, Office 365 docs

Paul Crawford
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Re: What that tells us about Skype?

That was my thought - how do they know or verify if you have been using foul language on Skype?

Doh, of course just take a look at the voice-to-text slurp logs...

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Parents blame brats' slipping school grades on crap internet speeds

Paul Crawford
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Trollface

@LucreLout

You are obviously new to this site:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/06/27/slab_fondling_becomes_xrated/

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Manchester Arena attack: National Mutual Aid Telephony system failed

Paul Crawford
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Re: Holy **** you can't make this stuff up.

You could post them to NI to deal with Brexit there?

You won't have time to make a splendid cup of tea before the resignation letter is on your desk...

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Astro-boffins find new type of super-fast supernova

Paul Crawford
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Re: "absolutely phenomenal"

I think the term you were looking for was "astronomical":

https://what-if.xkcd.com/73/

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UK smut overlord declares age checks should protect users' privates

Paul Crawford
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Re: @Johndoe132

It depends on your goals, budget and technical skills.

One advantage of most VPN providers is they in effect run NAT so your traffic shares an IP address with many other users, providing ether (A) plausible deniability, or (B) a noise-like signature for any advert tracking.

As for "no logging" then sure you don't log if you don't want to. But are Amazon are not tracking traffic to your rented instance?

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Paul Crawford
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Re: Time to install a decent VPN

There are many VPN choices but not many that are good. As a general rule you need to:

(A) expect to pay real money, probably £3 - 10 per month for a usable service as otherwise they can't provide the bandwidth, servers, etc, without whoring you Facebook/Google style.

(B) always use a VPN provider in another country, that way your own gov has to make a real effort to get any data (e.g. a competent court order in that country).

(C) do your homework and check the T&C for logging and if you plan on using bit-torrent, etc.

There are some advertorial sites like www.bestvpn.com which are useful, but remember they are tending to push the sponsors. Also some guidance like: https://torrentfreak.com/vpn-services-keep-anonymous-2018/ as another list to consider.

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Galileo, Galileo, Galileo, off you go: Snout of UK space forcibly removed from EU satellite trough

Paul Crawford
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ESA and Galileo are very different even though it is the same basic industry:

All of the countries that pay in to ESA get a moderately equal share of that back via contracts and staff employment, and generally all projects are open to all members to bid. Provided the UK does not do anything even more stupid like stopping this, we still get to bid.

Galileo was driven by EU political goals to be independent of the USA/Russia/China (a later comer) in the area of precision navigation and timing. AFIK there is requirements from the very start of the project that for any work on Galileo (certainly anything to do with the security system) to be an EU national. The UK was part of the process that originally created this. Shortly we will not be EU nationals.

Remind me again why is anyone surprised at this news?

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Uber's disturbing fatal self-driving car crash, a new common sense challenge for AI, and Facebook's evil algorithms

Paul Crawford
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Re: LiDAR doesn't work in the dark? WTF?

The other WTF you missed was that even when the pedestrian came in to camera view the car did not brake even though an AI system should have a reaction time an order of magnitude faster than a human, and should out-brake most humans by knowing full well what is the lock-limit of the wheels (i.e. reaching anti-lock point),

Also as others have pointed out the car was clearly driving beyond its sensor range, again that is something humans do, but is actually against the highway code. Drive to your visible range stopping-distance we are instructed.

So who is going to fall for this: The software engineer(s) who developed the sensor/stopping code? Those who did a safety analysis? The executives up top?

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BOFH: Give me a lever long enough and a fool, I mean a fulcrum and ....

Paul Crawford
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Re: I like the new boss

Depend on whether this new boss is a danger to the IT crew or to other boss' sections.

Could get quite interesting (in the Chinese curse sense) to be in a pincer movement by a top executive and some world-savvy IT "specialists".

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El Reg deep dive: Everything you need to know about UK.gov's pr0n block

Paul Crawford
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Re: given unrealistic expectations of the act

Pizza, is that with anchovies? Or extra cream?

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Paul Crawford
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Re: Cybergumble

I know (in a non-biblical sense) someone who deserves a medal in ineptness for being unable to find pornography on the net.

Turned out his web browser window was too small and all the search results were further down the page and he did not know to scroll.

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We need to talk, Brit Parliamentary committee tells Mark Zuckerberg

Paul Crawford
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Just block Facebook and prosecute anyone doing business with them in the UK.

Sure, you wont get Zuck in jail, but the spooking of investors and the damage to the brand would be priceless...

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