nav search
Data Center Software Security DevOps Business Personal Tech Science Emergent Tech Bootnotes BOFH

back to article
MPs slam HMRC's 'deeply worrying' lack of post-Brexit customs system

Silver badge

Re: "what happens..native UK farming industry if..reduce import tariffs to 0?" " ...

That's why the EU cannot work, there will never be agreement on the serious issues.

And is that really a bad thing? Do you really want the EU to 'work' as per say the US?

Remember Margaret Thatcher joined the EU, not because she believed in it, but to ensure the UK had a voice at the table where decisions over its (and the Single Market - which M.Thatcher did believe in) future and thus protect UK interests.

At some stage with the "EU not working" someone with influence in the EU will decide that current arrangements can no longer stand and propose a new model - just as M.Thatcher did back in the 80's with the EEC and proposed the Single Market which addressed many of the trade failings of the EEC, the question is, post-Brexit, how will UK interests be protected?

Once you step outside the confines of the Nigel Farage/UKIP 'little Englander' box, it becomes obvious, the best way to leave the EU (in its current form) and protect UK interests is to remain! :) However, that doesn't mean necessarily accepting the current EU, warts and all. I suspect that T.May and her monkeys are beginning to realise this simple fact and are now heading towards a no deal Brexit as an act of throwing their toys out of the pram...

2
1
Anonymous Coward

Re: "what happens..native UK farming industry if..reduce import tariffs to 0?" " ...

Remember Margaret Thatcher joined the EU

No, John Major did, when he signed up to Maastricht, despite all the opinion polls showing that people didn't want him to.

At some stage with the "EU not working" someone with influence in the EU will decide that current arrangements can no longer stand and propose a new model

And the EU politcians will reply, as they always have, with their mantra of "EU not working, then we need more Europe to fix it". The idea of staying in and making it change worked for a co-operative community, but it has never, and will never, work for a political union that is run for and by the politicians. It would, of course, have been better to change it from within, but 25 years of trying has shown that anyone who tried to rock the boat was simpy ignored. It's what Cameron tried to do, and failed completely. The EU leaders don't accept that it's failing, and so won't listen to any attempt to fix it. It'll take a real disaster to make them see that, and I for one would rather not be in the EU when that happens.

now heading towards a no deal Brexit as an act of throwing their toys out of the pram

EU politicians have long been used to determining everything that happens in the EU, by right. That can be seen in the way they're trying to run both sides of the Brexit negotiations, they simply assume that they can tell the UK how to negotiate, and we'll do what we're told. The only way to make them sit up and pay attention would seem to be the likelihood of a "no deal Brexit". Like any negotiation, if the person you're negotiating with doesn't seriously believe you're ready to walk away they will never make concessions. It's also a curious feature of negotiating with French business people (like Barnier) that only when you lose your temper and shout at them do they actually seem to think "Oh, you're really serious about that". I've seen that in several business meetings. They seem to need a display of passion, and if the UK Brexit negotiators have been doing the classic British icily polite style of diplomacy it could well be misunderstood as a lack of determination or preparation.

I'm beginning to think that the best thing that could happen to make progress would be a handbagging, just have someone on the UK team blow up and state that either the EU gets its act together and starts negotiating on trade or we'll walk away witn no deal, and have the whole delegation just walk out of the room & get on a plane.

1
1
Silver badge

Re: "what happens..native UK farming industry if..reduce import tariffs to 0?" " ...

>No, John Major did, when he signed up to Maastricht

Whilst you are legally correct, he was really only finishing off what Thatcher had started. [Aside: Although it is debatable whether Thatcher would have signed up to the version Major signed.] But agree the Maastricht Treaty was the start of our current mess with respect to the EU.

> It's also a curious feature of negotiating with French business people

Yes, I've always found it useful to get a Dutch person to front the negotiations with the French, they go so much better (ie. they agree to do more of what I want) than when the Brit's and French try and do it directly face-to-face.

>I'm beginning to think that the best thing that could happen to make progress would be a handbagging

Trouble is that Thatcher was probably the last UK politician who knew how to use a handbag, both on the Europeans and on her Cabinet...

1
0
Silver badge
Meh

Food crisis

I cannot help feeling that it might be a really good idea to buy in a year's supply of cans in time for Brexit day.

That will cost maybe one or two thousand pounds, and if the Brexiteers are right then I'll get to eat the food over time anyway. But if, God forbid, all those economists are right and we don't enter this new golden age that the Brexiteers have promised, but instead see our economy collapse to Venezuelan standards, then at least I won't starve before I can get out of the country.

16
4
Thumb Up

Re: Food crisis

I'm thinking along the same lines. Also, I live on the top floor of an Edinburgh tenement, and I might start growing food on the roof.

6
0
Silver badge
Holmes

Re: Food crisis

Pragmatic- The more that leave, the more food left for those who do not...

2
0
Silver badge

Re: Food crisis

And unlike Venezuela we do not even have large oil reserves remaining (just the last dregs of ours) to aid recovery at some point (not that Venezuela seem to be making good use of it but at least they have a bit of natural resource potential to exploit).

7
0
Silver badge

Re: Food crisis

@ tiggity

"And unlike Venezuela"

On that note does Corbyn still think Venezuela is a socialist success?

2
4

Because as everyone knows, the way to successfully implement a major IT overhaul is to rush it through as fast as possible because politicians haven't been able to get their shit together

18
0
Silver badge

It's almost like those morons in charge who campaigned to leave thought that Article 50 contained a complete & comprehensive guide on leaving the EU...

11
3
Silver badge

those morons in charge who campaigned to leave thought that Article 50 contained a complete & comprehensive guide

I'm more surprised by the morons who seem to think that Leavers expected everything to be just perfect the day after we leave. Of course it won't be.

Brexit will take years of hard work to undo the damage and establish a decent result, especially if the remainers just sit back saying "Told you so" instead of doing something constructive. At least those of us who never wanted to join the EU in the first place did our best to make it work, untill we could get out.

Nothing worthwhile is ever easy, and sometimes you have to get out of your comfort zone to get some real improvements. Personally I think it will be worth it. We'll see.

1
16
ZSn

'At least those of us who never wanted to join the EU in the first place did our best to make it work, until we could get out.'

No you didn't - all we heard was how bad the EU was and lies like they banned bendy bananas, while pushing for a referendum. We don't want to work to dig you out of the hole that you made. Suck it up - you won after all.

15
1
Silver badge

@ ZSn

"all we heard was how bad the EU was"

Probably because it is

"and lies like they banned bendy bananas"

Thats a cute interpretation on the fact that the EU have made a criminal offence over the shape of a banana. One that will result in a fine and possibly 6 month jail.

"while pushing for a referendum"

A democratic vote we had never had about our membership of the EU. And once we got the democratic (if highly rigged by remain) vote it gave the 'wrong' answer and now remain want democracy scrapped.

"We don't want to work to dig you out of the hole that you made"

You do realise that this country is only as good as the people make it. So if your not willing to participate it is your country you are refusing to help. Surely thats cutting ones nose?

"Suck it up - you won after all."

Is that the taste of sour grapes?

1
12
Anonymous Coward

Re: @ ZSn

>Thats a cute interpretation on the fact that the EU have made a criminal offence over the shape of a banana. One that will result in a fine and possibly 6 month jail.

The shape of a banana does not and cannot result in a criminal offence. The laws (of which there have been two) are relating to the labeling applied to the bananas for sale. It is an offence to categorize a banana incorrectly as class 1 when it is excessively bendy and should be class 2.

13
0

Re: @ ZSn

@AC don't bother - i've already explained in depth to codejunky the EU directive in question and how it reflelcted our own mislabling of goods act and the penalties associated with it - but he doesn't want to know or care so keeps of dragging up the bendy banana misrepresentation like all good brexiteers.

13
1
ZSn

Re: @ ZSn

'Thats a cute interpretation on the fact that the EU have made a criminal offence over the shape of a banana. One that will result in a fine and possibly 6 month jail.'

Link to the relevant law please - not the Daily Heil.

'A democratic vote we had never had about our membership of the EU. And once we got the democratic (if highly rigged by remain) vote it gave the 'wrong' answer and now remain want democracy scrapped.'

And the xenophobic lies peddled by Goveno etc are not rigged - 350 million anyone?

How about another referendum then, or is democracy only correct when it gives the 'correct' answer, and then we can't change our mind afterwards?

'You do realise that this country is only as good as the people make it. So if your not willing to participate it is your country you are refusing to help. Surely thats cutting ones nose?'

If the country allows xenophobia and racism to grow like this then frankly it needs to get Brexit good and hard.

6
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: @ ZSn

I haven't worked out if Codejunky is a genuine member of the Brexit Taliban, a WUM, or an AI attempting to pass the Turing Test by posing as one of the lower thinking members of society.

8
1
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

@AC

"It is an offence to categorize a banana incorrectly as class 1 when it is excessively bendy and should be class 2."

Thank you for posting that. I hope you find it as funny as I do that the EU is concerned about bananas. Between that and dictating which fruits are correct to label the product jam (didnt one of these stupid laws effectively label a carrot a fruit as well?) I dont think they can get any funnier.

1
10

Re: @ ZSn

@codejunky

You mean like how we extensivly catagorise what everything is during trade negotiations to ensure everyone is working from a common understanding and framework?

Yes the UK had catgories for bananas before the EU directive.

I'm sure you will be looking forward to your chlorine washed chicken being described as farm fresh organic food?

I presume in your world caveat emptor is the only way to go?

9
0

Re: @ ZSn

having had discussions at length i'd go with the first option - though taliban is unwarented - I'd class him as a beliver in Laissez-faire and screw the proles

7
1
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

@ ZSn

"Link to the relevant law please - not the Daily Heil."

Sod that go talk to the 2 remainers above who are trying to defend this law. Apparently its about the label on the bendy banana not the bendy banana being labelled. Makes you wonder how the world spins without a law for it.

"And the xenophobic lies peddled by Goveno etc are not rigged - 350 million anyone?"

No thats not rigging that is lying. I dont defend his lying so feel free to tear into him. However the gov campaigning for a particular outcome (also the opposite outcome as the PM stated he would be backing, not that the gov should have campaigned) is rigging. Using tax payer money to do so is also rigging. Refusing to accept the possibility of an alternative (nobody but the gov had the power to negotiate with the EU for leave) is rigging. And of course the direct threat the chancellor made to the population with a budget that was designed to sink an economy and had no practical purpose beyond that. Thats rigging.

"How about another referendum then, or is democracy only correct when it gives the 'correct' answer, and then we can't change our mind afterwards?"

Sure. Why not. Of course after would be after we have left, had time to implement it, and by the argument of remain it will take years to sort this out so after that too. And if you can elect a party willing to sell the country to the EU which will require accepting the Euro and none of the opt outs then sure. If the EU is still around at that time

"If the country allows xenophobia and racism to grow like this then frankly it needs to get Brexit good and hard."

You are right. What the EU does to those poor countries is horrible, locking them out of trade. And the remainers comments about needing to be in the EU or be subjects of the horrible US or China does seem very anti-foreigner and fearing the world.

I know thats not what you ment but if you wish to suggest leavers are racist then it is just as valid to do the same to remainers.

0
9

Re: @ ZSn

Sod that go talk to the 2 remainers above who are trying to defend this law. Apparently its about the label on the bendy banana not the bendy banana being labelled. Makes you wonder how the world spins without a law for it.

Please just stop - we had the same fsking law in the UK before the EU directive - how many more times?

8
0
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

@ Alt C

"You mean like how we extensivly catagorise what everything is during trade negotiations to ensure everyone is working from a common understanding and framework?"

Oh how the world was in chaos and fell apart until.... the EU finally applied a law to bendy bananas. It wasnt a criminal issue before but the EU fixed the world as it put pen to paper and made me laugh as it dictated the shape of a banana. And now we all sing and dance now the worlds problems have finally been solved after all these years of previously not having a criminal law against the bent banana.

"Yes the UK had catgories for bananas before the EU directive."

Surely you are picking up on this by now. Catagory != criminal law. Criminal law != category.

"I'm sure you will be looking forward to your chlorine washed chicken being described as farm fresh organic food?"

Isnt that the one the EU food standards passed as perfectly fine? And the US? And I dont know of the UK food standards having a problem with it (I am sure every remoaner would have screamed about it if so). So if a good chunk of the developed world food standards agencies think its ok I could listen to the experts or I could listen to.... dont you guys like experts? Or is it only when they tell you what you want to hear? I lay bets you consume things far worse than chlorine washed chicken.

"I presume in your world caveat emptor is the only way to go?"

I presume by that you are declaring your rejection of food standards agencies. The very agencies who approve this food and you consider that caveat emptor. Go on please do explain.

0
10
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

@ Alt C

"Please just stop - we had the same fsking law in the UK before the EU directive - how many more times?"

We had a criminal law in the UK before the EU criminalised it? We criminalised the shape of a banana before the EU criminalised the shape of a banana?

1
8

Re: @ ZSn

Surely you are picking up on this by now. Catagory != criminal law. Criminal law != category.

let me explain

it was an offence to mis-catagorise bananas and sell them. In the UK selling class B bananas as class A was an offence exactly the same as it is under the EU directive.

I never said anything about not agreeing with food standards please read again.

"I'm sure you will be looking forward to your chlorine washed chicken being described as farm fresh organic food?"

the key words there are 'being described as' - i.e. passing one product off as another - its what these regulations you find so funny stop happening.

I'll ignore rest of the rant as the usual tangental argument brexiteers indulge in.

10
1
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

"I hope you find it as funny as I do that the EU is concerned about bananas."

Mate, I don't know where you get your idea that all bureaucracy comes from the EU. In the fields I'm familiar with (health and safety, and planning permission) the UK's rules are much more restrictive and detailed than here in NL, while not being anymore effective. E.g. the planning permission I got here in The Hague for a construction project in a conservation area is much shorter and less prescriptive than the planning permission for a little house on a bit of wasteland in Sussex (e.g. that includes requirements for the garden design and type of plants). And it's not just government, industry has form too: the UK CSCS construction site safety passport system is much more convoluted than the VCA system used in NL (and also BE and GER I think) while providing no more safety. (And yes, I've got both the CSCS and VCA cards.) The only upside I can see to Brexit is that when the powers that be can no longer blame stuff on Brussels, folk might realise that rather a lot of red tape (some of it useful, some of it not) is entirely homegrown. And as far as produce description (= consumer protection) legislation is concerned, the UK used to have that in the past too, and hopefully will still have it in future.

6
0

Re: @ ZSn

I'm totally sick and tired of all of the anti EU rubbish that is spoken..

Try http://blogs.ec.europa.eu/ECintheUK/euromyths-a-z-index/ for info on "bendy bananas".

Brexit - We are truly fu&ked !

5
1
Silver badge

all we heard was how bad the EU was and lies like they banned bendy bananas,

If that's all you heard you have very selective hearing.

The old common market (whose banana policies were replaced by the EU, FYI) worked pretty well. It solved a real post-war need. The EU brought in an unwanted and unecessary political dimension, purely to satisfy the vanity of politicians. Even the French barely agreed to join, we wouldn't have had we been asked (which is why John Major didn't ask).

Since the EU was created we've seen a drop in growth, a monetary system stumbling from crisis to crisis, and a massive Europe-wide increase in support for extremist and populist parties from people who see mainstream politics as offering no alternatives. If it goes on like that it will implode, messily.

Leaving is a drastic solution, it's a great pity that it became necessary and it will be painful, but at least we'll have a chance of a better future.

We don't want to work to dig you out of the hole that you made.

Fine, we'll do the digging for you, and maybe your kids will appreciate it. In the meantime it would be good if you at least wouldn't throw the dirt back in.

1
5
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

@ Alt C

"it was an offence to mis-catagorise bananas and sell them. In the UK selling class B bananas as class A was an offence exactly the same as it is under the EU directive."

I direct you and the others above including ZSn who didnt believe it was true-

https://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2016/05/12/to-properly-explain-the-eus-bendy-bananas-rules-yes-theyre-real/#74db7ce96fc9

To make it clear this started with a lack of belief that this law existed and now having to tell you about the law your defending.

"I never said anything about not agreeing with food standards please read again."

So what is your argument about the chicken? Or do you assume it wont be labelled as such because the EU wont be singing you to bed every night?

"the key words there are 'being described as' - i.e. passing one product off as another - its what these regulations you find so funny stop happening."

No no no you have already said and I requote- "it was an offence to mis-catagorise bananas and sell them. In the UK selling class B bananas as class A was an offence exactly the same as it is under the EU directive." which I assume you meant mis-selling regulations which surely apply further than bananas since its the EU who criminalised bendy bananas and we thought they were nuts for it.

"I'll ignore rest of the rant as the usual tangental argument brexiteers indulge in."

You do usually I am used to it. I do find yours entertaining though.

@ H in The Hague

"Mate, I don't know where you get your idea that all bureaucracy comes from the EU."

Mate I dont know where you get your idea that I think that.

"The only upside I can see to Brexit is that when the powers that be can no longer blame stuff on Brussels, folk might realise that rather a lot of red tape (some of it useful, some of it not) is entirely homegrown."

I actually hope this does cause a cut in our red tape. An amount from the EU, an amount of bad implementation of EU ideas and plenty home grown.

"And as far as produce description (= consumer protection) legislation is concerned, the UK used to have that in the past too, and hopefully will still have it in future."

Tell Alt C that. He seems to think it is all going.

1
2
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

"A democratic vote we had never had about our membership of the EU."

Apart from this one, you mean?

5
2
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

@ Christoph

"Apart from this one, you mean?"

Exactly, the EU didnt exist then, that was a vote for something different. Thanks for making my point but it wasnt necessary, this ground has been covered many times.

1
5
Silver badge

Re: @ ZSn

Apart from this one, you mean?

That was a vote to remain in the European Economic Community (EEC), otherwise known as the Common Market. The political entity called the EU wasn't created until almost 20 years after that, and there was no UK vote to join it. Only one to remain in it, which resulted in a choice of "leave".

1
6
Gold badge
Unhappy

"Brexit will take years of hard work to undo the damage "

of Brexit

FTFY.

"Personally I think it will be worth it. We'll see."

And if not you're retired on a good pension already, so who cares, eh?

1
2
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Re: "Brexit will take years of hard work to undo the damage "

"Personally I think it will be worth it. We'll see."

And if not you're retired on a good pension already, so who cares, eh?

Nope, I'm still working, and plan to return to the UK when I do l retire, so I care very much.

1
0
Gold badge
Unhappy

"Nope, I'm still working, and plan to return to the UK when I do l retire, "

How interesting. Were you abroad when you voted?

I found it very telling that the Scottish Independence Referendum let almost anyone living in Scotland vote.

Because those people would mostly likely have to live with the consequences of their decision.

But you don't live in the UK. For you "Britain" is actually more a place inside your head, whose climate you don't experience and whose taxes (it appears) you don't pay.

I've often wondered how many UK elections have been decided by absentee "subjects" whose actual knowledge of the country is decades out of date.

0
2
Silver badge

Re: "Nope, I'm still working, and plan to return to the UK when I do l retire, "

But you don't live in the UK. For you "Britain" is actually more a place inside your head, whose climate you don't experience and whose taxes (it appears) you don't pay.

You really shouldn't make assumptions on things you know nothing about. I spend part of each year in the UK with my family and pay UK taxes on my UK income. I've spent more than half my life there so am very familiar with the climate.

I've often wondered how many UK elections have been decided by absentee "subjects" whose actual knowledge of the country is decades out of date.

Not as many as have been decided by people who have lived there all their life and still don't have a clue about the world beyond their own town, let alone lived in other countries to really understand how the world works.

4
0
Silver badge
Unhappy

What a disaster

But after the bigly trade deal with Trump all the sub-standard USA food products will just fly through customs with no problems. We are screwed.

12
2
Anonymous Coward

A week after the Brexit vote I was round at a friends who had voted leave (I voted stay), watching tv and when the news came on after a few seconds he said he was sick of this Brexit thing and switched over, which left me with two thoughts - "I dunno what you're complaining about, you voted for this shit", and "it's not going away no matter how many times you change channels"

25
1
Silver badge

Vote now?

he said he was sick of this Brexit thing and switched over,

I know a few people with that attitude. Despite their talk, they never bothered to go out and vote.

I know too many who professed wanting to stay in the EU, none of them bothered to vote either.

10
0
Silver badge

@AC

"he said he was sick of this Brexit thing and switched over"

Is that not a valid reaction? So far we have voted leave and had almost every day some moaning twit complain we should remain (either here or from the EU). There is always some doom sayer who will predict fire and brimstone, I assume some are the same who shout about god on street corners considering the fanaticism. Nearly 20 yrs to finally get the vote and the day after the result we hear of many ways to ignore the people, ditch democracy and declare anyone voting leave as idiots.

And we havnt even left yet.

0
17
Silver badge

Re: @AC

What you see as moaning and doom-saying others see as practical problems which desperately need to be solved.

A year ago I wouldn't have said 'desperately'. After watching this debacle unfold it now strikes me as perhaps too mild an adverb.

13
0
Silver badge

Re: @AC

@ Rich 11

"A year ago I wouldn't have said 'desperately'. After watching this debacle unfold it now strikes me as perhaps too mild an adverb."

The doom saying is not practical problems, its idiots trying to look incompetent or bone-headed to stop us from leaving.

0
13
Silver badge

Re: @AC

@codejunky

There is always some doom sayer who will predict fire and brimstone

But when the doom sayer is standing on top of Vesuvius, with the ground rumbling, shaking and making odd noises, and farts of sulphurous gas filling the air, is it not possible that doom is really very, very likely to be coming?

11
1
Silver badge

Re: @AC

@ Pen-y-gors

"But when the doom sayer is standing on top of Vesuvius, with the ground rumbling, shaking and making odd noises, and farts of sulphurous gas filling the air, is it not possible that doom is really very, very likely to be coming?"

Hell yeah. But in this case they are shouting it in the UK after they let out a little fart. Very different.

0
8
Anonymous Coward

@codejunky

His changing channels was not because of watching the complainers, but the news basically saying over and over in many different ways for days on end "Brexit is happening, but nobody in the leave campaign even thought about making plans if they won and they don't know what to do now." Well, apart from that Nigel "bin juice" Farage who had obviously planned to quit no matter which way the vote went.

6
0

Re: @AC

@codejunky - i'll take a leap here and guess you voted condervative - in which case its your bone headed idiots who can't seem to negotiate or get it into their heads - we left the club the EU owes us no favours. its David and his crew that are being incompetent with their rainbows and unicorn wish list.

10
0
Silver badge

Re: @codejunky

@AC

"His changing channels was not because of watching the complainers, but the news basically saying over and over in many different ways for days on end "Brexit is happening, but nobody in the leave campaign even thought about making plans if they won"

So as I said. watching complainers who keep trying to get in the way of brexit.

"Farage who had obviously planned to quit no matter which way the vote went"

He didnt. He pissed off the EU by turning up as an elected MEP and bursting their bubble. It was funny to watch. Junkers face was a picture when he asked the dumb question of why Farage was there now that we had voted leave. I hoped the collective noise of remainers would rise up and say 'we aint left yet'.

0
8
Silver badge

Re: @AC

@ Alt C

"i'll take a leap here and guess you voted condervative"

Good leap but no. I dont hold a grudge for you trying.

"can't seem to negotiate or get it into their heads - we left the club the EU owes us no favours"

You know what I absolutely agree. Seriously, I am not impressed with the governments faffing over this. If the EU doesnt want to negotiate we cannot force them to unless we conquer them (obv not going to happen) and by the same right we owe the EU nothing unless they wish to conquer us (again not going to happen). This is where both sides are free to negotiate or not as they deem fit, and the EU has made 3 non-negotiable demands that we reject, so no negotiation, nobody owes anybody anything. Unfortunately some muppets (PM included) keep going over to try and make a negotiation happen.

"David and his crew that are being incompetent with their rainbows and unicorn wish list."

Not sure about that. I havnt followed him particularly but our side of the negotiations seem to have been pretty friendly considering the EU negotiator isnt allowed to negotiate. Hell our side even proposed some solutions to EU problems (the Irish border for example and the bill the EU wants).

I lay the blame on those in gov who reject brexit and seek to undermine it. Even Clegg and Corbyn have been accused of trying to make agreements to remain which is not only fanciful but also undermines the actual working parts of the government trying to make brexit happen.

0
7
Gold badge
Unhappy

"apart from..Nigel.. Farage.. obviously planned to quit no matter which way the vote went."

Well there you go then.

Planning sorted. *

*Actually I think they believed the Brexit fairy would wave her magic wand and it would all magically sort itself out.

Well how would you explain doing f**k all planning, other than positing the existence of a magical supernatural being with vast powers to sort out such a colossal s**tstorm ?

6
1
Anonymous Coward

Re: @codejunky

"So as I said. watching complainers who keep trying to get in the way of brexit."

I don't see how people airing their views on the mess the leavers have created is "trying to get in the way of brexit."

"He pissed off the EU by turning up as an elected MEP and bursting their bubble. It was funny to watch."

Yes, hilarious. So much so I was in danger of splitting my sides, which could've been life threatening if it weren't for that extra £350m/week the NHS are now getting.

6
0

Page:

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

The Register - Independent news and views for the tech community. Part of Situation Publishing