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Butcher breaks out of own freezer using black pudding

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Re: This is a serious problem.

They shouldn't freeze - I've had experience in a few walk-in freezers of various sizes.

If you are to get it to freeze you need excessive liquid present that can then freeze in the button - if that happens it's because of poor maintenance or spillages.

The buttons work fine in the standard humidity of the freezers

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TRT
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Re: This is a serious problem.

I suspect he let frost build up around the control which physically prevented the mechanism from moving. It would be near the door of course, and thus subject to frequent bursts of warmer, moist air. Melt, refreeze, repeat for years on end.

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Re: This is a serious problem.

Probably they shouldn't freeze if used properly. But for safety critical systems they shouldn't freeze. Full stop. The design should still work even if you chuck a bucket of water over them.

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Re: This is a serious problem.

I suspect he let frost build up around the control which physically prevented the mechanism from moving. It would be near the door of course, and thus subject to frequent bursts of warmer, moist air. Melt, refreeze, repeat for years on end.

Could have been made worse by not shutting the door fully each time he was in...keeping it only slightly ajar wouldn't hurt the temperature inside too much, but would allow moist air from outside to settle around the control

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Re: This is a serious problem.

The walk-in I used once had a huge iron mushroom protruding 6 inches from the inside face of the door as the door latch. I felt safe.

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Re: This is a serious problem.

If the seal on the outside of the mechanism is faulty, and the outside air is quite humid, hoar frost can build up to the point of the inner release sticking. This shouldn't happen with modern doors, but I've seen it in more elderly examples (1960s and earlier), as often found "out the back" of small, family run butchers. As noted, a good (ecky) thump will shift it.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: This is a serious problem.

You have that the wrong way round, they don't need to replace the button but supply black pudding to all the fridge owners. Problem solved.

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Re: This is a serious problem.

So you are saying there could be contributory negligence? Maybe not an open and shut case then?

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Re: This is a serious problem.

"life-threatening design flaw which should have the manufacturer fitting replacement buttons to every freezer in the field, at their own expense, before the freezer owners start a class action suit."

Probably cheaper pudding some of that black stuff in each free-zer. Everyone happy. Job done.

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Re: This is a serious problem.

I suppose a small heating element wound into the button would do the trick.

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pudding jokes aside for a minute..

he's on thin ice here. I can't devon fathom the consequences

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Those of you who think that black pudding is purely british ...

... should probably not order a Sundae in Korea.

That said, whenever I harvest a hog or sheep I make a fair copy of the Stornoway variant, and another version that would feel quite at home in Bury ... although I would probably horrify the locals in those places because I've been experimenting with cooking them in my smokehouse, instead of the more traditional boiling. The results are quite tasty. I'm also working on fully cured and dried versions, in the tradition of Lap Cheong. So far, the results are promising.

Sausage is gawd/ess's gift to those of us who like playing with our food.

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Ecky thump?

Lancastrian... I had to Goggle it on the Online.

Uncyc entry

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Re: Ecky thump?

Now you are making me feel old. I remember the Goodies episode it came from. You could tell the rank of an Ecky Thump practitioner by the size of his flat cap. The grand master was a wizened little guy with a hat almost as broad as he was tall.

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Re: Ecky thump?

Goodies, goody goody yum yum

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Re: Ecky thump?

See also: "The Goodies" Series 5 - "Kung Fu Kapers" (1975)

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Re: Ecky thump?

This Yank was in Yorkshire when KFK was first aired. About halfway through, the meter ran out of shillings ... My cousin, visiting for six months, still refers to that evening as the one where she fully realized she wasn't in California anymore.

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Re: Ecky thump?

almost as broad as he was tall.

Almost as broad as 'e were tall.

FTFY.

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Re: Ecky thump?

@ed can you not get any comment from Bill Oddie?

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JLV
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Trollface

I knew there was a reason why I am not vegan*

* one of many reasons anyway.

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Let's hope that the button manufacturer...

...has been supplying the White House and North Korea.

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Coat

Re: Let's hope that the button manufacturer...

But that just means there'll be a slight delay before nuclear armageddon, while the President sits in the Oval Office, furiously beating his sausage.

Your idea is close, but no cigar.

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Pint

Re: Let's hope that the button manufacturer...

"no cigar"

Ouch.

Beer :-)

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Wonder how this combat pudding would fare against dwarf bread?

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Strangely enough ...

... unlike dwarf bread, black pudding isn't fiction, no matter how much the heathens of the world wish it were.

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Re: Strangely enough ...

I've a local baker who I swear makes dwarf bread. I can't get the breadknife through the crust.

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Re: Strangely enough ...

Try hardtack then.... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardtack

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Anonymous Coward

I was unger the impression that he ate 1.5kg of the black pudding, there by producing enough gas to blow the door open

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Go

"Black pudding saved my life, without a doubt."

And now he's the spokesman for the British Black Pudding Association.

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Paris Hilton

Shake yer bum!

I can't beleeeeeive it! No one has linked to the ultimate destination for this story's theme tune.

Viruses and bugs get web sites and logos, but none of them get a theme tune.

Standards are falling ever faster around here. Sad!

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Lips and aholes

Meat derivatives from each end of the animal can prove useful it seems.

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Re: Lips and aholes

The only animal parts in black pudding is blood.

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Re: Lips and aholes

"The only animal parts in black pudding is blood."
Wrong! You won't find much pig fat in blood. Or intestine (sausage casing).

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Gluten sensitivity

As jake pointed out early in this thread, coeliac disease is a nasty thing to have and is fortunately rare. Not rare is digestive upset following consumption of food containing gluten; typically bread. Gluten is a protein responsible for giving bread dough elasticity and trapping the bubbles of "carbon pollution" that give leavened breads their texture.

The period of allowing the yeast to do its work in the dough is called proving. Modern breads use accelerants to reduce proving to its shortest possible duration, two hours or less. Traditional bread makers like Mrs Git allow bread dough to prove for 24 hours. A friend in the USA who makes award-winning pizzas proves his dough for 48 hours. The longer proving improves the digestibility of the baked product.

I suspect that many who think they are sensitive to gluten are reacting to crappy modern bread.

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Re: Gluten sensitivity

Indeed. The late Mrs Cynic used to make sourdough bread, where all the yeast in it was whatever happened to be floating by ("wild" yeast) and consequently both proving and rising were unusually slow (around a week in total), and it is normal to put a bit of this batch's dough into the mix of the next batch. It tastes sour because of relatively elevated levels of metabolic acids from the yeast.

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Re: Gluten sensitivity

If you think modern (or Chorleywood) process produces bad bread, look at some of the adulterants the mid-Victorians put into the bread:

Chalk (for whitening)

Alum (again for whitening) - some said this caused ricketts as it could prevent the digestive system from pulling nutrients from other foods consumed

Arsenic - by accident made it's way into some loaves. The baker claims he was adding Alum but mixed up the containers

Millers routinely put "rotten" or sour flour into the mix to sell off gone-off stocks with no one noticing

Bone meal (whitening again)

Whatever the brewers had adulterated the yeast with - beer brewing created yeast, which the bakers purchased as there was no such thing as dried yeast at that time. Brewers adulterated beer too, and that made it's way into the yeast.

Potatoes

Plaster of Paris

Sawdust

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Re: Gluten sensitivity

"It tastes sour because of relatively elevated levels of metabolic acids from the yeast."

Sourdough sometimes tastes sour because of the activity of one variety or another of lactobacillus, which has a symbiotic relationship with the yeast. I say "sometimes" because different strains of yeast & lactobacillus produce different flavo(u)rs in the finished product.

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Re: Gluten sensitivity

"Chorleywood"

Derogatively known to us kids in Yorkshire as "plaggy bread". About the only thing it was good for was catching carp and eels.

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Re: Gluten sensitivity

"About the only thing it was good for was catching carp and eels."
I find it sticks to the roof of my mouth, a rather strange place to go fishing for carp and eels I would have thought ;-)

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Fridge light mystery solved.

So now we know: the light doesn't go out when the door is shut.

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Re: Fridge light mystery solved.

The light switch is next to the door in walk-in fridges, just like in most unrefrigerated rooms. In fact, many (mine included) have a switch on the inside, and on the outside ... with an indicator light on the outside to show if the interior light is on or off without opening the door.

Strangely enough, walk-in fridges are designed with (temporary) human occupation in mind. Imagine that!

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Wot !!! No haggis ??

I can't believe a butcher would not have a good sturdy haggis in the freezer.

One blow with that, and he'd have knocked the door off it's hinges

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On the other hand, if felt troubled with the freezing temperatures and pain associated with outer extremities freezing solid, he should consider himself lucky that that wouldn't have been troubling him much longer if he just lay down on the floor and waited an hour or so.

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Interesting, a specific gluten free black pudding option.

I keep meaning to try a vegetarian black pudding on the same plate as a regular black pudding to see how they compare and how many people I can drive insane by the simple act. I wonder if GF is also exotic enough to add to the list...

I mean hey, more black pudding.

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FAIL

Poor Caption Picture

Gawd help the butcher if he'd had to use the black pudding in the caption picture.

The one he used (a frozen one) was straight, so he had no problem aiming at the release button.

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