nav search
Data Center Software Security Transformation DevOps Business Personal Tech Science Emergent Tech Bootnotes BOFH

back to article
Seagate launches non-flying disk drive for drones

No mention of battery life, unless it's not battery powered in which case it's a non starter. I have both a WD Passport Wireless (slow SD) and a Pro (much faster SD reader) and I'm happy with both for this job. And the Pro also runs Plex natively without any hackery required.

1
0

Not self powered

Unfortunately it is not self powered. It is similar to any other portable hard drives. The only difference is the integrated micro SD reader. At least this review http://www.firstquadcopter.com/reviews/seagate-dji-fly-drive-review/ says that is pretty fast. It features about 130MB/s read/write speed.

0
0
Silver badge

Would be much easier to just slap in a wireless chip into the drone so you can just clone it to your laptop or even phone, and then you can just carry a wireless-connected drive of your choice rather than partner up with a terrible drive manufacturer.

As it says, 250 flights of an hour each. You aren't going to do all that without being near a computer at some point.

Years ago I bought a Wifi SD card, which has 32Gb of storage and also shares it over a Wifi network of your choice when it's full (e.g. to a phone or to a real network). Amazing technology for something that just works like an SD card to the recording device. I bought it for astrophotography, so I didn't have to touch the camera mounted to the telescope in order to access the images, but I'm sure they could come up with something sensible, much cheaper than a £200 drive, that basically only does what an £80 drive and a USB adaptor does.

And I can get a Samsung 256 GB EVO Plus MicroSDXC for £133. You're not telling me I'd need more than that. That's "only" 50 flights of 4K video by their same estimations.

5
1
TRT
Silver badge

I bought it for astrophotography, so I didn't have to touch the camera...

Exactly this.

2
0
Anonymous Coward

The wireless chip in the drone wouldn't be able to stream ~500MB/s data though. The real-time feed that drones send to the controllers is nowhere near as high quality as that captured to the on-board storage, predominantly for bandwidth reasons - it's why they have onboard storage. Plus the occasional dropped frame is fine from a controller perspective, not from a recorded footage perspective.

Although I'm not sure how this product is specialised to drones - there have been similar devices to this targeted at photographers for years.

3
0
Silver badge

> Although I'm not sure how this product is specialised to drones - there have been similar devices to this targeted at photographers for years

Look at the picture - it's branded dji. That alone is probably the whole point, as it allows dji to sell them along side their drones.

4
0
Silver badge

As it says, 250 flights of an hour each. You aren't going to do all that without being near a computer at some point.

Or as it actually says; 250 flights of less than 15 minutes, equating to 60 hours.

0
0

" two months of complimentary access to Adobe Premiere Pro CC "

Then it's $20 or $50 per month after (depending on what you subscribe to). No thanks.

3
1
Silver badge
Joke

Where's my flying NAS?

Hey, Seagate, where's my flying NAS? If the Navy can launch the USS Akron (ZRS-4), then we can have real storage in the clouds! So where is it? A disk on the ground is exactly that, and we need fully cloudy storage.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Battery life killer for drone.

Unless this is an SSD, a spinning drive would consume WAY too much juice to be useful for flying. Battery life is only about 15-20 minutes already with a drone, adding weight and features shortens it even more. High end drones like the Inspire 2, technically already have drives like this, but at least are NVMe already and designed for hot swap and plug directly into an adapter for the PC.

0
0

POST COMMENT House rules

Not a member of The Register? Create a new account here.

  • Enter your comment

  • Add an icon

The Register - Independent news and views for the tech community. Part of Situation Publishing