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Facebook and Google show how the world really will be blanketed in 5G

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Oh gooddy. Even easier for Google to track you

Terragraph will make heavy use of WiGig, the Wi-Fi-like network for 60 GHz spectrum, and the nodes, which can be mounted on lamp posts or buildings, will use low cost chips and components, said Facebook.

Now they can track you and send you targetted adverts even more than before.

Because the cells are so small then Zuck, google and their mates will soon be able to track your every step even inside your home.

And we want this because?

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Anonymous Coward

Open Source in the infrastructure?

The largest problem with Open Source in some of these infrastructure networks is that those contribute or wish to contribute may lack the skills required.

Many in the Open Source Community do not work with RTOS systems and think that just because you can have Linux OSs that are fast enough that they could replace the RTOS systems behind the networks.

I'm sure I'm going to get down voted, but consider this... You don't go to your internist when you need a cardiologist to put a stent in. The point is that when working with RTOS systems you have to think a tad differently and a bit more precise in terms of what you want to accomplish.

Unlike other systems, if you don't get it right the first time it will be an order of magnitude more difficult to correct issues.

I have worked in telephony and controlled systems and I work with open source tools today with over 30 years in the software industry as a professional, I can tell you that today's coders lack the skills required to develop these systems.

Going through Coursera courses or Code Monkey programs will not be enough in terms of training.

You need a strong core engineering background to hopefully do things right.

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Re: Open Source in the infrastructure?

I suspect this will ultimately be a different type of open source, because what the writer has missed are the shed loads of patents owned by various parties around 4/5g technologies and software methods. So whilst the hardware designs and code may be 'open source', to use them for commercial purposes will most probably only be open to those who have made the necessary IP licensing arrangements...

I find support for this view because the facebook Open Cellular project pages gives very little away about the project and it's use of third-party IP.

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Coat

What was that ?

"Many people might not realize that running their own cellular networks is not only possible but also doesn't require substantial technical expertise."

It requires next to no technical expertise to install a Wi-Fi access point : just switch it on. On the other hand, considering the level of complexity simplicity of passwords revealed in reports of user id hacking, the technical expertise to understand how to secure it is beyond a lot of people.

Now you want Joe Schmoe from the deepest parts of Africa to go install an open cellular network node ? Are you working for the NSA ? Because they're gonna be listening in as soon as that thing boots.

And the best case scenario is that they are the only ones listening.

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"especially as more unlicensed and shared spectrum comes into play"

Dream on!

The mobile operators have demonstrated that spectrum has value, plus given the problems the regulators are having in freeing up further spectrum for 3/4G usage, I see no grounds for a meaningful increase in unlicensed spectrum.

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Meh

Low orbit Satelites?

Do Stratelites orbit significantly lower than satelites? Enquiring minds etc etc.... PP

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Re: Low orbit Satelites?

Stratelites don't orbit, they float. In order to float there must be atmosphere, meaning they are WAY closer than satellites.

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Hackers in the cellular system

If they use fully open source hardware and software, what stops some guy from buying the required hardware off Amazon or eBay, loading up the software, then spoofing a real AT&T or Verizon tower?

I doubt there is a lot of security in that phone -> tower connection, because the telcos didn't expect that someday some random guy could set up his own. If it was truly secure Stingray devices wouldn't be possible...

Bad enough that you have to worry if the public wifi access point you're connecting to is the real thing or one a hacker set up. At least you can control that by being careful what wifi access points you connect to. Soon you might have to worry about the same thing when your phone connects to an "AT&T" tower. Thanks, Facebook!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Hackers in the cellular system

Close, but no cigar. While being able to intrude into these "OpenConnect" devices (nice one cuum-Smuckerberg, I caught that one) is a bonus for the bad guys, the mission all along is to collect your private data from your always-connected smartphone. These devices will probably have, at the very least IP trangulation so that they are able to pin-point your location whenever you are online. Perhaps Facestalk isn't quite happy that not everyone cares to have a surveillance account, so they are trying to make sure that if you don't live in a cave, then they will make a profit off of your existence nonetheless. Call it the introduction to a brave new world of barely legal identity theft, what's worse is nobody gives a flying fukk about their privacy, that is until it matters (we don't like your personal views therefore, your job is on the line bubba!). Heck that's why the worthless whatsapp (back in 2014, not sure if still worthless now) was purchased for $19bn, because not everyone volunteers their phone numbers plus all other intimate details of our lives to Facestalk. Pretty soon, Facestalk will know who and when you boned... Yep, we trust him with even our private activities, dumb fukks.

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