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Police use of illegally held biometrics broke the law, says commish

Anonymous Coward

I wonder.....

..... if anything will come of this crime I've just reported to Crimestoppers-uk.org

They've given me a reference number so I can log back in for updates.

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Holmes

Re: I wonder.....

..... if anything will come of this crime I've just reported to Crimestoppers-uk.org

Your name will be added to the list of known troublemakers and you will be ceaselessly harassed?

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2 wrongs, Squares and Circles

Its great they've matched current crimes against old data, but by law they should have destroyed that data!!

2 wrongs don't make a right

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Black Helicopters

In a parallel, there are rules where if the spooks have illegally collected data which proves a suspect did not commit a crime they are being investigated for the spooks are required to informally brief the police that they are "barking up the wrong tree".

Tinfoil hats on...

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Goes without saying …

“Police use of illegally held biometrics broke the law”

Things done illegally often break the law. Funny that …

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Police have been ignoring laws

Full stop.

As far as many (from Parliament and the ACPO downwards) are concerned, laws are for the Little People, to keep the plebs in line, but it's perfectly acceptable for those who have the power to ignore them or interpret them creatively "for the greater good".

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Re: Police have been ignoring laws

but it's perfectly acceptable for those who have the power to ignore them or interpret them creatively "for the greater good".

Well, naturally, because they can all be trusted not to abuse power in any way. After all, if they couldn't be trusted they would never have been elected or nominated to such lofty positions of responsibility, would they?

One of the disadvantages of having gone without a revolution or civil war in this country for so many centuries is that the result of what happens to abusers of power has been forgotten. Or they just think that it will never, never happen to them.

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Police guidelines, break the law now, obey later or retrospectively change the law later, who's going to tell us off, a toothless Commissioner, LOL !

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Windows

"lack of clarity"

The law is quite clear, the only lack of clarity is in oversight and whether the perps are actually caught & punished. The typical disciplinary procedure appears to be tip the perp off by suggesting they resign before formal procedures are started and join a different force.

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I'd be interested to see who's collar got felt

Who'd be to one to get left out to dry (if at all) the plod who added the crims records, the it bod who figured out a way to get round the automated controls or the SHB who ordered the it bod to make it happen because the plods couldn't do their jobs (quickly enough)?

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Anonymous Coward

Define

Illegally held biometric data ?

Is there a time limit or the fact that you were found innocent of a crime after being arrested and giving a sample ?

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Story Time

Here in New Zealand we have a thing called "Private Prosecution". This means if a crime may have been committed anyone can begin criminal proceedings.

We have seen at least one high profile case where the Attorney General declined to proceed against a former Mayor who had been accused of breaking election funding laws. (not in the public interest apparently).

It turned out there was a case to answer after all, and the AG came on board eventually after a private citizen began proceedings.

Of course the multi-millionaire former mayor appealed (after being convicted) and magically turned up some witnesses who backed his side of the story, but the whole thing did kill his credibility, (hopefully).

The point is that if the UK have similar laws, it would be easy to find out if your details are being held, who is in charge and file criminal charges.

It might at least give the powers that be a chance to think.

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Wait for the headline...

"In a tragic accident at the Home Office the Biometrics Commissioner fell down two flights of stairs and broke his neck. The Commissioner was to attend a meeting with the Home Secretary and representatives of the NPCC and was ascending the stairs to a conference room with the Police representatives when he appears to have slipped and fallen some considerable distance, including across two landings. None of the Police Officers present reported seeing what actually happened to cause him to lose his footing."

"I am deeply distressed by what has happened" smiled the Home Secretary, adding that "as a mark of respect for the deceased his last report would be shelved indefinitely".

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Unhappy

Naughty boys and girls

Now go to bed!

Wait! Best have your supper first.

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