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Want longer battery life? Avoid the New York Times and The Grauniad

Ads? Flash? JavaScript animations?

Let's face it, it's not going to be the text, is it?

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Re: Ads? Flash? JavaScript animations?

Network connections being kept open to serve ads and track users mean that the phone's radios have to be kept on.

Still, it's a novel approach to website performance.

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Re: Ads? Flash? JavaScript animations?

Phone?

The article says 2013 Retina Macbook Pro. Wouldn't fancy holding that up to my ear.

A retina laptop screen (2560x1600) will have a lot of pixels to animate. It would be interesting to see if the same ratios between power consumption of website renderings applied to a bog-standard 1388x768 laptop and across different browsers.

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and the same tests done with

things such as Adblock+ , Flashblock and NoScript enabled give?

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(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: and the same tests done with

Lower readings?

(PS: The guy has Flash blocked by default.)

C.

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Re: and the same tests done with

would be great to see this as a little browser add-on, how power hungry is this website. scored 1-100

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Re: and the same tests done with

"would be great to see this as a little browser add-on, how power hungry is this website. scored 1-100"

It would be a good idea, but it may be difficult to get accurate readings unless the OS actually makes power consumption figures available to developers. I know OSX (recent versions) tracks this, but I don't know if the readings are made available to developers through an API. I don't know if Windows or Linux even track this, let alone make it available to developers. The browser would also need to enable access to this information but would also need to track what it is doing in each tab. For instance, looking purely at the power usage by each process (which is what the OS would see), you would not get accurate power usage information for a largely text based site if you had a browser window or tab open in the background showing a flash movie.

Don't get me wrong. This info may already be available via the browsers. If it isn't, it should be.

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Re: and the same tests done with

Not specifically web sites, but Visual Studio has tools that can profile power usage by an app. This is really for apps that you're going to submit to the store, so I guess they're expecting to be installed on Phones/Tablets where this would matter.

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Re: and the same tests done with

Disable js/css/all plugins and you're good to roll. It'll look like shit and be unusable but hey.. Battery right?

On this theme amazon.co.uk blows my 2KW desktop PSU every time I use it ;)

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Re: and the same tests done with

I can't dupe the results now, but when I first put this laptop online last month, the fan kicked in to high speed on the Grauniad site, with ABP and NoScript running. The script(s) that run the Reuters slide shows are another good fan test.

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Re: and the same tests done with

Pretty much all OSs have power monitoring abilities. But they're all dependent on the hardware having sensors to gather the information reported. This hardware is quite common on laptops, but pretty much nonexistent on desktop machines.

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Megaphone

Re: and the same tests done with

Follow-up: Looks like it's guardianapps.co.uk that, when unblocked, runs up the CPU temp. You need that script running to display comments.

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Anonymous Coward

thought there was a change to the guardian's site recently - when browsing it while listening to podcasts on a MS Lumia the guardian site causes podcasts to quit. Guessing their site is optimised for iPhones given their target audience (and popularity of all things apple)

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Coat

Try this page

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/the-old-suburban-office-park-is-the-new-american-ghost-town/2015/07/20/b8e7653a-1f6e-11e5-bf41-c23f5d3face1_story.html

It has a number of 7000 pixel wide photos in the page with some javascript stuff resizing the images to suit resolution/dpi of page. Eats around 800Mb on Firefox which then crashes on Linux, spanners MSIE and Chrome on the Atom based 2Gb RAM Windows 7 client I use at work - system becomes unresponsive and hard drive is on all the time. According to comments on another forum, it spanners Android based phones as well. I resorted to links in a terminal to actually read the 1000 words!

PS: lots of moderation happening are we being spammed?

Coat icon: off out in the rain for the lutz

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Re: Try this page

My guess is that some ppl have decided to comment on the publicity on this site.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Try this page

Wow! Firefox went up to 750MB once I turned off NoScript. Oddly enough, IE didn't seem concerned and its use of memory didn't go up much.

I saw the vanished comments and I think someone was being snarky about the author for no obvious reason.

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Re: Try this page

FF on Linux is happy with this site and it "only" uses 200M, but then I'm running Adblock Plus and Ghostery.

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Re: Try this page

FF on Win 8.1 loaded this page but consumed over 2GB of memory in the process of loading it. When the page completed loading FF memory consumption dropped to 770MB (still a lot but FF is memory hog).

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Outside, trying to get in

Using Firefox; if you use the Request Policy plugin and NoScript (of course) then you can see a list of third party content that the page is trying to pull in as well as the third party scripts.

As an example, reading an article in The Independent newspaper website right now, it tries to pull in third party content from 25 other sites and 25 scripts from those sites. I block them all and can still read the articles.

Sometimes you get a blank space in an article and that can be filled by allowing some obvious content delivery network site, if you really want to. Then of course, allowing just one third party content site gives you an entire new set of third party scripts trying to get in as well as a new set of third party content trying to get in. It's a surreal jungle out there.

I've got to the point where, if i'm keen to see stuff, I give temporary permission for all third party content but close the tab if it needs third party scripts to work.

As someone earlier mentioned, I've had sites crash my browser under Linux and they will never be visited again.

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Re: Outside, trying to get in

yup, I will temporarily allow scripts till I find the one needed to display content. then allow it permanently, but it is amazing to see how many scripts are trying to concurrently run and what little need they have for it either !!

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Re: Outside, trying to get in

Addendum/Correction

Now I remember: Certain sites didn't just crash my browser, they caused an instant system shutdown. This was running Linux Mint 13 with MATE on and old laptop. Does anyone know how that can even happen?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Outside, trying to get in

Read an article about overuse of 3rd party trackers recently - Politico.com topped the chart by loading 112.

112!

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Re: Outside, trying to get in

@frank ly

Never actually had a *shutdown* on Linux other than thermal runaway when I had a problem with acpi and fan control on Ubuntu 5.10 or something. Might be worth checking the temperature as the computer tries to load the page?

Trying to load my death-test page (linked above) results in Firefox thinking about it for a bit then deciding to quit. With noscript you can actually load the page but the memory use is very high (1Gb RAM in the netbook).

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Re: Outside, trying to get in

Until fairly recently I would use RequestPolicy and hand craft policies to get rid of social networks, 'elsewhere on the web', and so on like an idiot but now when there are sites which bring in 70 (according to the ad blocker's icon) off-site scripts and hang waiting if one of them goes down which is a fairly regular occurance if there are 70, it's ad blockers all the way.

And how this set up not be subverted? Last year El Reg was peddling WhatsApp for PCs which was a scam but they probably had no idea that that was what they were pushing.

If they put a "please please disable your ad blocker" message which I now have on by default to navigate the treacherous waters that are the Internet I might relent if they're not loading a tonne of off-site stuff.

They brought it upon themselves.

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Re: Outside, trying to get in

"Addendum/Correction

Now I remember: Certain sites didn't just crash my browser, they caused an instant system shutdown. This was running Linux Mint 13 with MATE on and old laptop. Does anyone know how that can even happen"

Back in the day I saw web sites and code that crashed routers and modems, anything is possible through bad coding and / or evil genius.

I am the same as a lot of you, out went the black list and in with the whitelist. the web is turning into a shitty ad infested cess pit.

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Boffin

Re: Outside, trying to get in - Linux crashes

I suspect that the browser builds don't honour the processor type flags in the build configuration.

I get a lot of kernel panics on an old Eee PC I think because the diddy Celeron it runs on doesn't support the latest processor instructions.

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And the Reg?

So how does the Register itself stack up power consumption wise?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: And the Reg?

El Reg is has a zero carbon footprint. It is powered by the hot air of its readership.

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Re: And the Reg?

"El Reg is has a zero carbon footprint. It is powered by the hot air of its readership."

And also powered by the gasses emitted from bull shit, hyperbole and many a vented spleen.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: And the Reg?

Towards the bottom (bad) end of the list, I suspect - so many ads, some of them animated or trying to pop up in front of the text. Goes through phases depending on who's advertising at the time - seem to remember HP ads were awful a few months ago. Actually had a few genuine popup ads on the Reg a couple of days ago too - closed my browser and went to get my news elsewhere!

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Re: And the Reg?

El-Reg was the reason I got ABP, I dont mind adverts, just keep them responsible. It was when they started filling the entire background and you couldnt click on the sides to scroll down, that was when I got irritated enough to do something.

Considering It's El-Reg they should think about offering a Ad-free version.

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Boffin

Re: And the Reg?

>you couldnt click on the sides to scroll down

Now this is the sort of thing that really gets my goat. Anything that interferes with the conventional and most basic methods of navigating around the page (arrow keys, mousewheel/touchpad scrolling, tabbing -- I've even had Home/End/PgUp/PgDn fucked with on occasion) is bad enough when the site's *own* webmonkeys do it, but when piped-in ads are responsible my contempt-o-meter crosses the red line. You come away with the feeling that they aren't all that bothered whether you actually, I dunno, *read* what's on the page or anything wacky like that.

From a dev POV I won't even use jQuery if the efficiency gained doesn't justify the bloat added. Dear ghod, I'm glad they made it modular - if it was monolithic I think I'd never use it.

For those hankering for an FF addon that profiles power usage, it's worth looking at YSlow (dependent on Firebug, which has a couple of its own profiling widgets to boot) as the reasons for a page loading slowly are oftentimes not entirely unrelated to the reasons for your computer shitting its lungs out of its ear in the process.

(However it should be noted that those addons themselves, when activated, do exacerbate such problems a bit in their own right.)

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MJI
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I watch task manager

And see FF utilisation creep up.

Anything over 1 oe 2 percent is dodgy.

Seen 30% since they got multi core support.

Start blocking and that drops.

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Mushroom

I blame the current obsession with Single Page Web Applications, JQuery and image bombardment - all in the name of fancy design and efficiency. In reality, you have an irritating design that doesn't work on any platform, continuous loading from multiple JQuery scripts and a flat battery as the device goes mental trying to render it all. The amount of on the fly loads and calculations and ad pingbacks is just ridiculous. Kickstarter is another culprit and just kills the battery on my tablet.

NoScript, Ad-Block and binning all browser plugins (especially fucking flash) is pretty much mandatory these days

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Joke

"Kickstarter is another culprit and just kills the battery on my tablet."

That's not actually the website killing the battery - it's a protection mechanism built into your tablet to power it down before you've had time find your credit card and blow a wad of money on some improbable project.

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I sympathise with batteries over NYT

A lot of people die a little inside when exposed to the NYT.

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Coat

A relevant blog post

"I feel like someone just set up the entire vendor hall from an awful tech conference in my living room."

http://blog.lmorchard.com/2015/07/22/the-verge-web-sucks/

Link via another well known technical forum - the one with orange.

The blog post author's use of web developer tools in Firefox coupled with the lightbeam extension have given me an idea for Maths teaching next year...

The coat: quitting while I'm ahead, thanks all.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: A relevant blog post

@keithpeter

Thanks for the linky, an excellent read.

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Graun Groan

The Grauniad site occasionaly moans at me for blocking ads.

But, as with things like Facebook,, the only way to make these sites sensible is to block ads.

Doesn't like Ghostery, either.

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Re: Graun Groan

The worst site that I go on is the independent, the Grauniad is OK although it gets jolly batey about ad blockers.

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Re: Graun Groan

Being an unreconstructed Opera 12 user, I take advantage of the built-in content blocker. The Graun site doesn't seem to know about that, or at least doesn't complain about it. But the latest redesign is a clusterfeck of the highest order in Opera on my 1024*600 netbook. You can't scroll to the bottom of the page without it spontaneously scrolling back up again, and it insists on stealing valuable screen height with worthless non-scrolling banners top and bottom. At least, that's how it used to be, until I tried turning off Javascript as an experiment. I left it switched off. The usability is improved by several orders of magnitude.

-A.

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@Bloakey1 Re: Graun Groan

Frivolous upvote for using an adjective I've not read outside the pages of Tank Girl.

Are you from Worthing too?

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Ghostery

No-one's (edit: one person has while reading the thread) mentioned Ghostery yet. Blocks these things without you having to spend 5 minutes on every page making decisions about what you want to enable. It blocks DataPoint Media, DoubleClick and Google Analytics on this page.

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Re: Ghostery

Ghostery is very useful, but their business model may surprise you.

http://venturebeat.com/2012/07/31/ghostery-a-web-tracking-blocker-that-actually-helps-the-ad-industry/

It's always a playoff between something being free and you being the something.

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Re: Ghostery

@Roq D. Kasba

Thanks for the link, but having read it, I'm in need of some kind person to explain it to me. It seems to me that it's saying that ad-promoters WANT to be blocked by Ghostery. And are paying Ghostery's creators to tell them that their ads are being blocked. Shurely shome mishtake? I must be misunderstanding summat somewhere.. - aren't I?

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