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What does a flashmob of 1,024 robots look like? Just like this

All very good but...

... did anyone else look at the bots and immediately think they resemble Minions off Despicable Me?

Edit: just a bit of yellow and they'd be perfect.

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Re: All very good but...

Ha! I was thinking the same thing!

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Happy

I thought it was just chimps that could push pianos around.

Colin

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It loooks like their "life" rules are:

If I am surrounded, stay where I am

else if I'm not being illuminated, make a small random movement

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I don't think it's random, they follow the edge of the shape round to the right place.

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Why 2^N ?

I would think that a fibonacci sequence would work better with creating a more complex super-bot.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Why 2^N ?

Because 1024 allows you to name them killobots?

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Just a personal feeling

The video of the moving kilobots gives me the same itchy feelings as looking at an anthill.

1024 must be above some critical number.

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Re: Just a personal feeling

I agree about the itchy feeling, then I looked at how long in real time these images took to make.

I'm not currently worried about a swarm of robots that can form a shape in little under 12 hours!

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Pint

Now

Make them a bit bigger and balance a beer on top.

Automated bar staff!

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Re: Now

Just so long as it doesn't take 12 hours to deliver my beer!

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Re: Now

"Just so long as it doesn't take 12 hours to deliver my beer!"

It depends of where you're seated. If you are right in the middle, good luck for you.

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Re: Now

"Automated bar staff!"

Or a mega McDonald.

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so whats gained by doing this in hardware rather than software?

I can see whats lost - money, time, energy, hardware and space.

advances in rigid leg shuffling technology maybe

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While you are essentially correct in that these could have been modelled in software, and doubtless the initial basic programming was, it is only through creating the physical devices and letting them roam that all of the foibles, annoyances and damn stupid gotchas really come out. This real learning is then fed back into the software model which can be refined and then (typically) pushed out to the physical devices for the next tests. Upgrading the software on a few devices is usually annoying, 1k of them very much so.

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I suspect that these have already had numerous iterations in software before making it to a physical prototype. As for updating them, I would also suspect that they have a common wireless interface to blitz the entire lot at once. This is in a confined, controlled area. Security would not be as prevalent as usability at this point. Of course that just makes it easier for the nefarious megalomaniac to take control of his robot army.

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Even with a common wireless interface, successfully updating all of them and verifying that the updates have all been applied to each of them isn't going to be a fun task. Having worked with mass update devices (admittedly the last production devices was a rather badly designed IR update process, the next gen were wireless or wired), there are always some devices that just fail to update and identifying and tracking down these devices makes for a tedious day.

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...verifying that the updates have all been applied to each of them isn't going to be a fun task...

Maybe use their coloured LEDs to indicate the software version: for example if you have 1021 green bots and 3 red bots, it's easy to tell which didn't get the upgrade.

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"Upgrading the software on a few devices is usually annoying, 1k of them very much so."

Maybe, multicasting would speed up updates by 1000X.

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Coat

@2460 ---

Shhhhhhhhh. No one is supposed to know what I'm up to .....

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Killabots

I shall call zem kilobots [strokes cat], make zem move slowly and tell zem zey are to do with 1024.

Bwaaah haaa hah haaaa....

Really sorry folks, someone had to do it.

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Alert

Obligatory skynet allusion

"when we invent a machine capable of creating a machine smarter than itself, we have already lost the war" - does a swarm smater than the individual count? If the algorythm works with nanobots we can create the T-1000 prototype :)

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Replicators!

Someone call SG1 quickly and we can kill them at v0.1

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Anonymous Coward

Re. bots

Those motors are used in a lot of older phones, Samsung mainly.

The disk ones are nice as they are somewhat robust and controllable, as well as no external moving parts to snag or break.

A good source is phone repair shops as the screen ribbon cable with attached motor is usually replaced as a unit, also old phones from charity shops sometimes have them.

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If they're internet connected someone can hack them and program them to attack.

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This post has been deleted by its author

Pint

I think you ought to know...

....I'm feeling very depressed.

I wonder what sort of real people personalities (TM) would be appropriate for the botling hordes? Perhaps suitable neuro-patterns could be harvested from London commuters, or Glasto-goers..?

Beer, partly because it's Friday, but mostly because

a: if all goes according to plan, things like this will be doing my housework in a few years time;

b: if the plan goes horribly awry and the botlings take over, I'll need a feckin' beer.

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Any other long-time Mac users here reminded of...

The "Life" cellular-automata simulation screensaver that used to run on the old 680x0 Macs?

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